Date   

Re: The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this Forum #general

Larry Tauber <ltauber@...>
 

Common courtesy of course dictates a thank you, and Dave Schwartz's
efforts went above and beyond. Unfortunately, it seems to me that part
of the nature of communicating by e-mail is that it tends to
de-personalize communications. (I noticed this a lot at a former
workplace where e-mail instructions were never accompanied by a please
or thank you). I am grateful to all members of the group who have
participated either by sharing with the group as a whole or responding
to individual requests.

And if there is anyone who in the group who I have failed to thank -
THANK YOU.

Larry Tauber
New York

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Schwartz [mailto:superdayv@yahoo.com]
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2005 8:02 AM
To: Romania SIG
Subject: [rom-sig] The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the
Usefulness of this Forum


Romania SIG #Romania RE: The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this Forum #romania

Larry Tauber <ltauber@...>
 

Common courtesy of course dictates a thank you, and Dave Schwartz's
efforts went above and beyond. Unfortunately, it seems to me that part
of the nature of communicating by e-mail is that it tends to
de-personalize communications. (I noticed this a lot at a former
workplace where e-mail instructions were never accompanied by a please
or thank you). I am grateful to all members of the group who have
participated either by sharing with the group as a whole or responding
to individual requests.

And if there is anyone who in the group who I have failed to thank -
THANK YOU.

Larry Tauber
New York

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Schwartz [mailto:superdayv@yahoo.com]
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2005 8:02 AM
To: Romania SIG
Subject: [rom-sig] The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the
Usefulness of this Forum


Blumenberg in Ukraine #ukraine

Leslie Weinberg <lbw50@...>
 

I am searching some Blumenberg family who may have gone to the
Ukraine >from Poland in the late 1930s. Two girls, named Rachela and
Zofia, born 1923 and 1925, may have gone there first, and were then
joined by their brother Mozes, who left Israel for Russia in 1945.
Does anyone have any information on these people? Leslie Weinberg
--
To err is human, to forgive canine.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: You will have better luck if you enter the names
you are searching into the JewishGen Family Finder -
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Blumenberg in Ukraine #ukraine

Leslie Weinberg <lbw50@...>
 

I am searching some Blumenberg family who may have gone to the
Ukraine >from Poland in the late 1930s. Two girls, named Rachela and
Zofia, born 1923 and 1925, may have gone there first, and were then
joined by their brother Mozes, who left Israel for Russia in 1945.
Does anyone have any information on these people? Leslie Weinberg
--
To err is human, to forgive canine.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: You will have better luck if you enter the names
you are searching into the JewishGen Family Finder -
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/


Re: The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefu lness of this Forum #romania

gedalia54@juno.com <gedalia54@...>
 

I don't doubt what Dave says is true. It seems, though, that lack of
courtesy is not unique to JewishGen or ROM-SIG; but prevalent thru
society today, as life continues to speed up more and more all the time,
and people are more rushed, as one reason. Lack of courtesy bothers me,
too; but I think there may be more than one reason when this happens.

I took time on JewishGen to respond to someone a few weeks ago; never
heard back >from her and thought, like Dave, how rude. But then, out of
the blue, this woman replied about 3-4 wks later, explaining she had
been sick with a bad cold.

I just joined the ROM-SIG list last wk, really just for a very focused
question in my gen. search, since my family is not >from Romania. To my
surprise, I was literally flooded with responses to my inquiry. I
still have not been able to respond to everyone personally; and for
this I apologize -- but my lack of response is not out of lack of
courtesy, in this case, but just lack of time (since, again, I got
a whole lot of responses).

I don't think lack of courtesy is going to disappear any too soon.
Was it Voltaire that said, "Common sense is an uncommon thing"? He
might have also said, as well: "Common courtesy is an uncommon thing..."

But, also, why not focus on the good experiences as well? Because
for every discourteous person, there's one or two who are courteous.
And, in fact, this has ONLY been my experience in the short time I've
been on this list. I have actual Romanian researchers replying to my
inquiry, and taking some time to look into my question before responding
to me -- which blows me away!

Really, I can only answer for myself, and say that I need to respond
more quickly to other ROM-SIG members, even when I have other things
that seem more pressing than that. I appreciate Dave's comment and
guess it cannot be repeated too much...that a little 'southern hospitality'
goes a long way.

Charles Millman
JGFF researcher #3411
Plymouth Meeting
gedalia54@juno.com
18 May 2005

* * *


-- Dave Schwartz <superdayv@yahoo.com> wrote:

Over the years, I have >from time to time answered
requests for information on this forum. In all but
one instance, I never heard back >from the party…not
even a simple thank you.

For example, recently there was a request for help in
finding a cemetery in Pittsburgh. As a one-time
resident of Pittsburgh, I knew something about the
cemetery in question. The name had changed and was
therefore hidden >from the searcher. It took me a
while, but I finally found the cemetery and emailed
the person with instruction on how to find it…and
heard nothing back. This has not been a single
incident but rather the rule than the exception. I
wonder how many others have had this experience and
like me have vowed never to respond again?

Dave Schwartz
Wimberley, Texas


MODERATOR NOTE: The subject of common courtesy and politeness
has been brought up all too often on JewishGen. So this is a
only another reminder that when you are responded to in any way,
even if your question is not answered as you would wish, someone
has taken the time, and made the effort to help. They deserve a
polite response! Or in time those responses will stop, and you may
be the loser!


Romania SIG #Romania Re: The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefu lness of this Forum #romania

gedalia54@juno.com <gedalia54@...>
 

I don't doubt what Dave says is true. It seems, though, that lack of
courtesy is not unique to JewishGen or ROM-SIG; but prevalent thru
society today, as life continues to speed up more and more all the time,
and people are more rushed, as one reason. Lack of courtesy bothers me,
too; but I think there may be more than one reason when this happens.

I took time on JewishGen to respond to someone a few weeks ago; never
heard back >from her and thought, like Dave, how rude. But then, out of
the blue, this woman replied about 3-4 wks later, explaining she had
been sick with a bad cold.

I just joined the ROM-SIG list last wk, really just for a very focused
question in my gen. search, since my family is not >from Romania. To my
surprise, I was literally flooded with responses to my inquiry. I
still have not been able to respond to everyone personally; and for
this I apologize -- but my lack of response is not out of lack of
courtesy, in this case, but just lack of time (since, again, I got
a whole lot of responses).

I don't think lack of courtesy is going to disappear any too soon.
Was it Voltaire that said, "Common sense is an uncommon thing"? He
might have also said, as well: "Common courtesy is an uncommon thing..."

But, also, why not focus on the good experiences as well? Because
for every discourteous person, there's one or two who are courteous.
And, in fact, this has ONLY been my experience in the short time I've
been on this list. I have actual Romanian researchers replying to my
inquiry, and taking some time to look into my question before responding
to me -- which blows me away!

Really, I can only answer for myself, and say that I need to respond
more quickly to other ROM-SIG members, even when I have other things
that seem more pressing than that. I appreciate Dave's comment and
guess it cannot be repeated too much...that a little 'southern hospitality'
goes a long way.

Charles Millman
JGFF researcher #3411
Plymouth Meeting
gedalia54@juno.com
18 May 2005

* * *


-- Dave Schwartz <superdayv@yahoo.com> wrote:

Over the years, I have >from time to time answered
requests for information on this forum. In all but
one instance, I never heard back >from the party…not
even a simple thank you.

For example, recently there was a request for help in
finding a cemetery in Pittsburgh. As a one-time
resident of Pittsburgh, I knew something about the
cemetery in question. The name had changed and was
therefore hidden >from the searcher. It took me a
while, but I finally found the cemetery and emailed
the person with instruction on how to find it…and
heard nothing back. This has not been a single
incident but rather the rule than the exception. I
wonder how many others have had this experience and
like me have vowed never to respond again?

Dave Schwartz
Wimberley, Texas


MODERATOR NOTE: The subject of common courtesy and politeness
has been brought up all too often on JewishGen. So this is a
only another reminder that when you are responded to in any way,
even if your question is not answered as you would wish, someone
has taken the time, and made the effort to help. They deserve a
polite response! Or in time those responses will stop, and you may
be the loser!


Re: Mynoyow, Ukraine #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Peter Zavon wrote comments on my previous posting on the same subject.

And there is another trick - Austrian map coordinates are referring to
Ferro latitude. Ferro is the Greek island,
Ferro is NOT a Greek Island. It is in the Canary Islands, 17° 39' 46"
west
of the Greenwich Meridian. The Canaries are part of Spain. Ferro is also
called El Hierro
Of course, Peter is correct. Ferro (known as Hierro in Spanish) is part of
Canaries.
Chap by name Hipparchus has established an astronomical observations point
on this island in the ancient times, and I have assumed, without proper
checking, that this was the island in Aegian Sea. Silly indeed, since Ferro
longitude is indicative of the island location _west_ of Greenwich.

Thank you, Peter for your correction.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Re:Mynoyow, Ukraine #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Peter Zavon wrote comments on my previous posting on the same subject.

And there is another trick - Austrian map coordinates are referring to
Ferro latitude. Ferro is the Greek island,
Ferro is NOT a Greek Island. It is in the Canary Islands, 17° 39' 46"
west
of the Greenwich Meridian. The Canaries are part of Spain. Ferro is also
called El Hierro
Of course, Peter is correct. Ferro (known as Hierro in Spanish) is part of
Canaries.
Chap by name Hipparchus has established an astronomical observations point
on this island in the ancient times, and I have assumed, without proper
checking, that this was the island in Aegian Sea. Silly indeed, since Ferro
longitude is indicative of the island location _west_ of Greenwich.

Thank you, Peter for your correction.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


JCR: US Immigration records before 1892 #unitedkingdom

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Jill and others,

Yes, there are records available prior to 1892. I feel I should first
explain the pivotal date of 1892. The Ellis Island Foundation, in
collaboration with the Mormon Church, indexed the passenger arrivals
to the Port of New York for the period 1892 - 1924, as this was felt
to be the period of time that would be of most interest to
genealogists.

The National Archives of the United States has always maintained ship
lists, indexes to passengers and passenger manifests going much
further back in time, in fact to the 1700s (offhand). Many of these
have been microfilmed by the LDS and available through their Family
History Centers.

Recently, an American commercial online genealogy company made
available a searchable index to passengers arriving at New York from
1851 to 1891. The names (if found) are linked to scanned manifest
pages so that one can read the whole entry.

I don't know if it is policy not to mention commercial sites here,
but if not, I am not doing so. I suggest that Jill contact me off
list for further information.

Hoping this is of use,

Jeremy G Frankel
ex-London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: As requested before this thread is no longer pertinent to the
JCR-UK discussion group and further discussion should be taken off list.


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JCR: US Immigration records before 1892 #unitedkingdom

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Jill and others,

Yes, there are records available prior to 1892. I feel I should first
explain the pivotal date of 1892. The Ellis Island Foundation, in
collaboration with the Mormon Church, indexed the passenger arrivals
to the Port of New York for the period 1892 - 1924, as this was felt
to be the period of time that would be of most interest to
genealogists.

The National Archives of the United States has always maintained ship
lists, indexes to passengers and passenger manifests going much
further back in time, in fact to the 1700s (offhand). Many of these
have been microfilmed by the LDS and available through their Family
History Centers.

Recently, an American commercial online genealogy company made
available a searchable index to passengers arriving at New York from
1851 to 1891. The names (if found) are linked to scanned manifest
pages so that one can read the whole entry.

I don't know if it is policy not to mention commercial sites here,
but if not, I am not doing so. I suggest that Jill contact me off
list for further information.

Hoping this is of use,

Jeremy G Frankel
ex-London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: As requested before this thread is no longer pertinent to the
JCR-UK discussion group and further discussion should be taken off list.


The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this Forum #romania

Dave Schwartz <superdayv@...>
 

Over the years, I have >from time to time answered
requests for information on this forum. In all but
one instance, I never heard back >from the party…not
even a simple thank you.

For example, recently there was a request for help in
finding a cemetery in Pittsburgh. As a one-time
resident of Pittsburgh, I knew something about the
cemetery in question. The name had changed and was
therefore hidden >from the searcher. It took me a
while, but I finally found the cemetery and emailed
the person with instruction on how to find it…and
heard nothing back. This has not been a single
incident but rather the rule than the exception. I
wonder how many others have had this experience and
like me have vowed never to respond again?

Dave Schwartz
Wimberley, Texas


MODERATOR NOTE: The subject of common courtesy and politeness
has been brought up all too often on JewishGen. So this is a
only another reminder that when you are responded to in any way,
even if your question is not answered as you would wish, someone
has taken the time, and made the effort to help. They deserve a
polite response! Or in time those responses will stop, and you may
be the loser!


Romania SIG #Romania The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this Forum #romania

Dave Schwartz <superdayv@...>
 

Over the years, I have >from time to time answered
requests for information on this forum. In all but
one instance, I never heard back >from the party…not
even a simple thank you.

For example, recently there was a request for help in
finding a cemetery in Pittsburgh. As a one-time
resident of Pittsburgh, I knew something about the
cemetery in question. The name had changed and was
therefore hidden >from the searcher. It took me a
while, but I finally found the cemetery and emailed
the person with instruction on how to find it…and
heard nothing back. This has not been a single
incident but rather the rule than the exception. I
wonder how many others have had this experience and
like me have vowed never to respond again?

Dave Schwartz
Wimberley, Texas


MODERATOR NOTE: The subject of common courtesy and politeness
has been brought up all too often on JewishGen. So this is a
only another reminder that when you are responded to in any way,
even if your question is not answered as you would wish, someone
has taken the time, and made the effort to help. They deserve a
polite response! Or in time those responses will stop, and you may
be the loser!


Yale J. Reisner to Speak to JGS of Greater Miami, Inc. #general

Barbara Musikar
 

The JGS of Greater Miami, Inc. and the JGS of Palm Beach County, Florida are proud
to present a lecture by Yale J. Reisner. Mr. Reisner is the director of the Ronald
S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project at the Jewish Historical Institute of
Warsaw, Poland.

When: Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 7 PM

Where: Aventura Turnberry Jewish Center - 20400 NE 30th Ave. Aventura, FL

Topic: A Most Extraordinary Situation - Genealogical Adventures in Poland

Cost: JGS Miami, Inc. and JGS Palm Beach County members $5.00
Non-members $10.00

For more information contact JGS Miami at 305-868-9226 or e-mail
bar945@hotmail.com

Barbara Musikar
President JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
VP Programming
Surfside, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yale J. Reisner to Speak to JGS of Greater Miami, Inc. #general

Barbara Musikar
 

The JGS of Greater Miami, Inc. and the JGS of Palm Beach County, Florida are proud
to present a lecture by Yale J. Reisner. Mr. Reisner is the director of the Ronald
S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project at the Jewish Historical Institute of
Warsaw, Poland.

When: Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 7 PM

Where: Aventura Turnberry Jewish Center - 20400 NE 30th Ave. Aventura, FL

Topic: A Most Extraordinary Situation - Genealogical Adventures in Poland

Cost: JGS Miami, Inc. and JGS Palm Beach County members $5.00
Non-members $10.00

For more information contact JGS Miami at 305-868-9226 or e-mail
bar945@hotmail.com

Barbara Musikar
President JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
VP Programming
Surfside, FL


info about cemetaries #poland

daphnabrafman <boazber@...>
 

Has anyone been to the Tomaszow Lubelski and Bilgoraj cemeteries recently? I
need some information. Please contact me.

Daphna Brafman
boazber@bezeqint.net

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland info about cemetaries #poland

daphnabrafman <boazber@...>
 

Has anyone been to the Tomaszow Lubelski and Bilgoraj cemeteries recently? I
need some information. Please contact me.

Daphna Brafman
boazber@bezeqint.net

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Warsaw Ghetto Death Card #poland

Vangheluwe Daniel <vangheluwe.smietan@...>
 

I am searching informations about the family SMIETAN, wich was living
Nowolipki 31m28 before the war. I dont have news of their since 1939.

I am just discovering on JRI Poland the death card of Paulina Zarecka, who
was living precisely Nowolipki 31m28 in 1941 (before dying in July) It is
interessant for me to know the story of the appartement.

I ask the following: Is there a way to look up directly on the excel file
of the Warsaw Ghetto Death Card if other people had died who precisely were
living at Nowolipki 31/28?

Many thanks to advance

Daniel VANGHELUWE
France


Re: Military records in the Austro-Hungarian Empire #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

On 14th May, Tom Weiss asked about the location of the
military records of Eastern Galicia.

I fear that they no longer exist and the following
information may be of general interest to members of
this group.

Before WW1, all military records of the Habsburg
Empire were stored at the vast Kriegsarchiv, Vienna.
Following the defeat of Austria, the records of
Habsburg citizens, born and resident outside Austria
itself, were sent mainly to Prague and Tyrnau.

Access to the records at the Kriegsarchiv was once
free - indeed I obtained them for my great-uncle
Siegfried KERNER and learnt >from them that he was
short-sighted and a keen cyclist and skier! As he died
in the holocaust, and I never knew him, this and other
titbits were valuable information for me.

Entry to the Staatsarchiv, Nottendorfergasse, {in
which the Kriegsarchiv is now based} was also once
free. There is now a daily fee [ca 7 Euros], but one
can get reduced rates for longer periods. There is now
also a search fee for records and this has to be paid
even if no records are found. This was not the case
when I asked for the records of Ernst KERNER,
Siegfried's brother, in late 2003. They could not find
any, but I did not incur a charge for the abortive
search.

I was quoted 80 Euros for another search last year -
which seemed rather steep if no records were
available. Someone else was quoted ca 40 Euros. I
expect the search charges are based on an estimate of
the time spent in the search. You now will get a quote
when you ask for records.

I was told, at that time, that the major destination
of records >from military personnel who were not
"zustandig" [resident] in Austria itself were Prague
and Tyrnau {Trnava} and that probably most of the
latter had been cleared out in a spring clean!

This is confirmed here in paragraph b [in German]:

http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/AUT/karchiv.html

The archives repatriated to Prague seem to have fared
better. No mention is made of Galicia - which is, I
fear, bad news.

Vienna still holds the records of all citizens of the
country of Austria itself, citizens and the records of
higher ranks, gallantry awards and special mentions
etc for those soldiers coming >from the wider Habsburg
empire. The ordinary soldiers' [Privates] records from
the wider Empire were all repatriated after WW1.

There may still be records of all war casualties,
located in Vienna. This has to be confirmed.

Where the Galician records went, I do not know, but a
search of the Special Interest Group {SIG} message
archives with the terms "galicia war records" provided
a very useful posting on 23 Mar 2004 >from Brian J
Lenius to the Galicia Group entitled: Military
service/Kolomea.

There are references to articles in this posting which
should provide leads, including two by Dr. Christoph
Tepperberg, the Director of the Kriegsarchiv.

http://www.eegsociety.org/back.html

1. "The Personnel Records of the Austrian War
Archives (Kriegsarchiv)" in East European Genealogist.
(East European Genealogical Society, Winnnipeg,
Canada, Vol.5 No.4, Summer 1997, pp.18-19)

2. "The Austrian War Archives in Vienna (Kriegsarchiv
Wien) and its Records Pertaining to Personnel" in East
European Genealogist. (East European Genealogical
Society, Winnnipeg, Canada, Vol.8 No.4, Summer 2000,
pp.9-24)

and then there is a rather pessimistic letter to the
Galicia Group, dated 20 Feb 2003, >from Edward
Goldstein: Subject: Austro-Hungarian Army
1914-1918.This includes the sentence: "none of the
records >from Galicia seem to have survived".

All this does not sound too optimistic, however if you
are prepared to fork out the search fee, you may find
something in Vienna! The file I got for Gt-Uncle
Siegfried was unbelievably large and detailed; no
wonder the Tyrnau archives threw them out. They
probably had no space to store them all.

Unfortunately, we can now look on these lost records
as further casualties of that terrible WW1, which was
meant to be "the war to end all wars".

Celia Male [UK]


JRI Poland #Poland Warsaw Ghetto Death Card #poland

Vangheluwe Daniel <vangheluwe.smietan@...>
 

I am searching informations about the family SMIETAN, wich was living
Nowolipki 31m28 before the war. I dont have news of their since 1939.

I am just discovering on JRI Poland the death card of Paulina Zarecka, who
was living precisely Nowolipki 31m28 in 1941 (before dying in July) It is
interessant for me to know the story of the appartement.

I ask the following: Is there a way to look up directly on the excel file
of the Warsaw Ghetto Death Card if other people had died who precisely were
living at Nowolipki 31/28?

Many thanks to advance

Daniel VANGHELUWE
France


JRI Poland #Poland re:Military records in the Austro-Hungarian Empire #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

On 14th May, Tom Weiss asked about the location of the
military records of Eastern Galicia.

I fear that they no longer exist and the following
information may be of general interest to members of
this group.

Before WW1, all military records of the Habsburg
Empire were stored at the vast Kriegsarchiv, Vienna.
Following the defeat of Austria, the records of
Habsburg citizens, born and resident outside Austria
itself, were sent mainly to Prague and Tyrnau.

Access to the records at the Kriegsarchiv was once
free - indeed I obtained them for my great-uncle
Siegfried KERNER and learnt >from them that he was
short-sighted and a keen cyclist and skier! As he died
in the holocaust, and I never knew him, this and other
titbits were valuable information for me.

Entry to the Staatsarchiv, Nottendorfergasse, {in
which the Kriegsarchiv is now based} was also once
free. There is now a daily fee [ca 7 Euros], but one
can get reduced rates for longer periods. There is now
also a search fee for records and this has to be paid
even if no records are found. This was not the case
when I asked for the records of Ernst KERNER,
Siegfried's brother, in late 2003. They could not find
any, but I did not incur a charge for the abortive
search.

I was quoted 80 Euros for another search last year -
which seemed rather steep if no records were
available. Someone else was quoted ca 40 Euros. I
expect the search charges are based on an estimate of
the time spent in the search. You now will get a quote
when you ask for records.

I was told, at that time, that the major destination
of records >from military personnel who were not
"zustandig" [resident] in Austria itself were Prague
and Tyrnau {Trnava} and that probably most of the
latter had been cleared out in a spring clean!

This is confirmed here in paragraph b [in German]:

http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/AUT/karchiv.html

The archives repatriated to Prague seem to have fared
better. No mention is made of Galicia - which is, I
fear, bad news.

Vienna still holds the records of all citizens of the
country of Austria itself, citizens and the records of
higher ranks, gallantry awards and special mentions
etc for those soldiers coming >from the wider Habsburg
empire. The ordinary soldiers' [Privates] records from
the wider Empire were all repatriated after WW1.

There may still be records of all war casualties,
located in Vienna. This has to be confirmed.

Where the Galician records went, I do not know, but a
search of the Special Interest Group {SIG} message
archives with the terms "galicia war records" provided
a very useful posting on 23 Mar 2004 >from Brian J
Lenius to the Galicia Group entitled: Military
service/Kolomea.

There are references to articles in this posting which
should provide leads, including two by Dr. Christoph
Tepperberg, the Director of the Kriegsarchiv.

http://www.eegsociety.org/back.html

1. "The Personnel Records of the Austrian War
Archives (Kriegsarchiv)" in East European Genealogist.
(East European Genealogical Society, Winnnipeg,
Canada, Vol.5 No.4, Summer 1997, pp.18-19)

2. "The Austrian War Archives in Vienna (Kriegsarchiv
Wien) and its Records Pertaining to Personnel" in East
European Genealogist. (East European Genealogical
Society, Winnnipeg, Canada, Vol.8 No.4, Summer 2000,
pp.9-24)

and then there is a rather pessimistic letter to the
Galicia Group, dated 20 Feb 2003, >from Edward
Goldstein: Subject: Austro-Hungarian Army
1914-1918.This includes the sentence: "none of the
records >from Galicia seem to have survived".

All this does not sound too optimistic, however if you
are prepared to fork out the search fee, you may find
something in Vienna! The file I got for Gt-Uncle
Siegfried was unbelievably large and detailed; no
wonder the Tyrnau archives threw them out. They
probably had no space to store them all.

Unfortunately, we can now look on these lost records
as further casualties of that terrible WW1, which was
meant to be "the war to end all wars".

Celia Male [UK]