Date   

The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this Forum #general

drgoldin90@...
 

Hello All

I am most dismayed by the comments posted today. It has always been my
impression, as well as my personal experience with fellow genners on this
discussion group that people are more than happy to assist in every way and I have
often seen public thank yous and notes of appreciation. We all know how great
it feels to get "unstuck" and learn something new about our ancestors. I
sincerely hope the lack of appreciation is rare and that if you are (one of the
few) who are guilty of not thanking someone who has helped that you will
rectify this right away.

Marge Goldin
Dix Hills, NY

Researching:
AUSTRIAN (Radom, Poland); MEISELMAN (Korolovke, Galicia); BREGMAN (Slutsk,
Belarus); BREAKSTONE (Minsk, Belarus); FISHER (Kutno, Poland and London
England); ELBERT (Budapest and Sobotiste, Hungary); GOLDIN (Dvin, Belarus);
PRESSNER (Galicia)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this Forum #general

drgoldin90@...
 

Hello All

I am most dismayed by the comments posted today. It has always been my
impression, as well as my personal experience with fellow genners on this
discussion group that people are more than happy to assist in every way and I have
often seen public thank yous and notes of appreciation. We all know how great
it feels to get "unstuck" and learn something new about our ancestors. I
sincerely hope the lack of appreciation is rare and that if you are (one of the
few) who are guilty of not thanking someone who has helped that you will
rectify this right away.

Marge Goldin
Dix Hills, NY

Researching:
AUSTRIAN (Radom, Poland); MEISELMAN (Korolovke, Galicia); BREGMAN (Slutsk,
Belarus); BREAKSTONE (Minsk, Belarus); FISHER (Kutno, Poland and London
England); ELBERT (Budapest and Sobotiste, Hungary); GOLDIN (Dvin, Belarus);
PRESSNER (Galicia)


Re: R' David "Karliner" FRIEDMAN #rabbinic

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

On 2005.05.19, Shlomo Katz <SKATZ@ebglaw.com> wrote:

I have a vague recollection that someone on the list was interested
in a picture of R' David "Karliner" FRIEDMAN. A recently published
biography of R' Baruch Ber Leibowitz entitled "Harav Hadomeh
Lemalach" has such a picture on page 198.
If someone is indeed interested in this picture, the author of the
recently published "Harav Hadomeh Lemalach" is a neighbor of mine.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem

[Moderator's Note: Please respond privately.]


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: R' David "Karliner" FRIEDMAN #rabbinic

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

On 2005.05.19, Shlomo Katz <SKATZ@ebglaw.com> wrote:

I have a vague recollection that someone on the list was interested
in a picture of R' David "Karliner" FRIEDMAN. A recently published
biography of R' Baruch Ber Leibowitz entitled "Harav Hadomeh
Lemalach" has such a picture on page 198.
If someone is indeed interested in this picture, the author of the
recently published "Harav Hadomeh Lemalach" is a neighbor of mine.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem

[Moderator's Note: Please respond privately.]


Double dates on Vital Records written in Russian #general

R Gerber <beccamd@...>
 

I just wanted to know if there is a way to let everyone know why there are
two dates listed on some Vital Records, perhaps in a FAQ on JewishGen
somewhere. I have been translating Russian records for people on ViewMate,
and I often get asked why there are two dates.

The reason is because of the switch >from the Julian to Gregorian calendars.

The Gregorian Calendar was adopted immediately upon the promulgation of Pope
Gregory's decree in the Catholic countries of Italy, Spain, Portugal and
Poland, and shortly thereafter in France and Luxembourg. During the next
year or two most Catholic regions of Germany, Belgium, Switzerland and the
Netherlands came on board. Hungary followed in 1587. The rest of the
Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland made the change during 1699 to
1701. By the time the British were ready to go along with the rest of
Europe, the old calendar had drifted off by one more day, requiring a
correction of eleven days, rather than ten. The Gregorian Calendar was
adopted in Britain (and in the British colonies) in 1752, with (Wednesday)
September 2, 1752, being followed immediately by (Thursday) September 14, 1752.
In many countries the Julian Calendar was used by the general population
long after the official introduction of the Gregorian Calendar. Thus events
were recorded in the 16th to 18th Centuries with various dates, depending on
which calendar was used.

To complicate matters further New Year's Day, the first day of the new year,
was celebrated in different countries, and sometimes by different groups of
people within the same country, on either January 1, March 1, March 25 or
December 25. January 1 seems to have been the usual date but there was no
standard observed. With the introduction of the Gregorian Calendar in
Britain and the colonies New Year's Day was generally observed on January 1.
Previously in the colonies it was common for March 24 of one year to be
followed by March 25 of the next year. This explains why, with the
calendrical reform and the shift of New Year's Day >from March 25 back to
January 1, the year of George Washington's birth changed >from 1731 to 1732.
In the Julian Calendar his birthdate is 1731-02-11 but in the Gregorian
Calendar it is 1732-02-22.

Sweden adopted the Gregorian Calendar in 1753, Japan in 1873, Egypt in 1875,
Eastern Europe during 1912 to 1919 and Turkey in 1927. Following the
Bolshevik Revolution in Russia it was decreed that thirteen days would be
omitted >from the calendar, the day following January 31, 1918, O.S. becoming
February 14, 1918, N.S. (Further information can be found in The Perpetual
Calendar -- http://www.norbyhus.dk/calendar.html.)

In 1923 the Eastern Orthodox Churches adopted a modified form of the
Gregorian Calendar in an attempt to render the calendar more accurate (see
below). October 1, 1923, in the Julian Calendar became October 14, 1923, in
the Eastern Orthodox calendar.

-credit to various websites on the switch >from Julian to Gregorian calendar
system

-Rebecca Gerber

Glenview, IL
USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Double dates on Vital Records written in Russian #general

R Gerber <beccamd@...>
 

I just wanted to know if there is a way to let everyone know why there are
two dates listed on some Vital Records, perhaps in a FAQ on JewishGen
somewhere. I have been translating Russian records for people on ViewMate,
and I often get asked why there are two dates.

The reason is because of the switch >from the Julian to Gregorian calendars.

The Gregorian Calendar was adopted immediately upon the promulgation of Pope
Gregory's decree in the Catholic countries of Italy, Spain, Portugal and
Poland, and shortly thereafter in France and Luxembourg. During the next
year or two most Catholic regions of Germany, Belgium, Switzerland and the
Netherlands came on board. Hungary followed in 1587. The rest of the
Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland made the change during 1699 to
1701. By the time the British were ready to go along with the rest of
Europe, the old calendar had drifted off by one more day, requiring a
correction of eleven days, rather than ten. The Gregorian Calendar was
adopted in Britain (and in the British colonies) in 1752, with (Wednesday)
September 2, 1752, being followed immediately by (Thursday) September 14, 1752.
In many countries the Julian Calendar was used by the general population
long after the official introduction of the Gregorian Calendar. Thus events
were recorded in the 16th to 18th Centuries with various dates, depending on
which calendar was used.

To complicate matters further New Year's Day, the first day of the new year,
was celebrated in different countries, and sometimes by different groups of
people within the same country, on either January 1, March 1, March 25 or
December 25. January 1 seems to have been the usual date but there was no
standard observed. With the introduction of the Gregorian Calendar in
Britain and the colonies New Year's Day was generally observed on January 1.
Previously in the colonies it was common for March 24 of one year to be
followed by March 25 of the next year. This explains why, with the
calendrical reform and the shift of New Year's Day >from March 25 back to
January 1, the year of George Washington's birth changed >from 1731 to 1732.
In the Julian Calendar his birthdate is 1731-02-11 but in the Gregorian
Calendar it is 1732-02-22.

Sweden adopted the Gregorian Calendar in 1753, Japan in 1873, Egypt in 1875,
Eastern Europe during 1912 to 1919 and Turkey in 1927. Following the
Bolshevik Revolution in Russia it was decreed that thirteen days would be
omitted >from the calendar, the day following January 31, 1918, O.S. becoming
February 14, 1918, N.S. (Further information can be found in The Perpetual
Calendar -- http://www.norbyhus.dk/calendar.html.)

In 1923 the Eastern Orthodox Churches adopted a modified form of the
Gregorian Calendar in an attempt to render the calendar more accurate (see
below). October 1, 1923, in the Julian Calendar became October 14, 1923, in
the Eastern Orthodox calendar.

-credit to various websites on the switch >from Julian to Gregorian calendar
system

-Rebecca Gerber

Glenview, IL
USA


The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Dear Dave,
I'm sorry to hear that your experiences have been
so disappointing, especially since my own have been
just the opposite.

Over the years, I've helped a lot of people, mostly
by replying privately, and have always heard back
from them with gratitude.
Unfortunately, it's that small minority with poor manners
who spoil things for those who have good ones. I hope
you are not too discouraged to try again and that your
future experiences are positive.

Best of luck,
Merle Kastner
Montreal, Canada
merlek@videotron.ca
Researching:
KASTNER & OSTFELD, Radauti, Bukovina;
NATHANSON & MENDELSSOHN, Piatra Neamt, Negulesti, Falticeni, Romania;
DENENBERG/DYNABURSKI & GARBARSKI/GOLDBERG, Sejny, Suwalki gubernia, Poland,
New York, NY;
KUSSNER, Bendery, Bessarabia/Moldova, Philadelphia, PA;
MILLER/SZCZUCZYNSKI, Lida, Vilnius, Lithuania/Belarus, Philadelphia, PA.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Dear Dave,
I'm sorry to hear that your experiences have been
so disappointing, especially since my own have been
just the opposite.

Over the years, I've helped a lot of people, mostly
by replying privately, and have always heard back
from them with gratitude.
Unfortunately, it's that small minority with poor manners
who spoil things for those who have good ones. I hope
you are not too discouraged to try again and that your
future experiences are positive.

Best of luck,
Merle Kastner
Montreal, Canada
merlek@videotron.ca
Researching:
KASTNER & OSTFELD, Radauti, Bukovina;
NATHANSON & MENDELSSOHN, Piatra Neamt, Negulesti, Falticeni, Romania;
DENENBERG/DYNABURSKI & GARBARSKI/GOLDBERG, Sejny, Suwalki gubernia, Poland,
New York, NY;
KUSSNER, Bendery, Bessarabia/Moldova, Philadelphia, PA;
MILLER/SZCZUCZYNSKI, Lida, Vilnius, Lithuania/Belarus, Philadelphia, PA.


Re: Designation of unmarried partners #unitedkingdom

Naomi Fellerman <nfellerman@...>
 

I want to thank everyone for their comments on this subject, I feel
personally that it is important to record relationships that are
marriages in all but name even if there are no children involved. The
partners do effectively become part of each others families, and imagine
future generations looking at photos asking "Who's that with Aunt/Uncle
....?" and no-one knowing even if they had spent 20 or more years
together. I will be looking at changing the software I use to one that
allows me to add "partners".

Regards to all

Naomi Fellerman


Common courtesy #general

David Kravitz
 

"Over the years, I have >from time to time answered requests for information
on this forum. In all but one instance, I never heard back >from the
party...not even a simple thank you. "

I have respomded to a great many JewishGenners over the last fifteen years
and, rarely these days, post on the JewishGen site unless my email is of
general interest. >from time to time I also offer my article on researching
in the UK and this brings dozens of requests. In virtually every case I
receive a thank you. My correspondence has led to developing friendships
across the oceans and I had the pleasure and privilege of meeting two
regular contributers in New York and San Francisco in March.

I think the complainant is unlucky or has a problem with his email provider.

David Kravitz
Netanya, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Designation of unmarried partners #general

Naomi Fellerman <nfellerman@...>
 

I want to thank everyone for their comments on this subject, I feel
personally that it is important to record relationships that are
marriages in all but name even if there are no children involved. The
partners do effectively become part of each others families, and imagine
future generations looking at photos asking "Who's that with Aunt/Uncle
....?" and no-one knowing even if they had spent 20 or more years
together. I will be looking at changing the software I use to one that
allows me to add "partners".

Regards to all

Naomi Fellerman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Common courtesy #general

David Kravitz
 

"Over the years, I have >from time to time answered requests for information
on this forum. In all but one instance, I never heard back >from the
party...not even a simple thank you. "

I have respomded to a great many JewishGenners over the last fifteen years
and, rarely these days, post on the JewishGen site unless my email is of
general interest. >from time to time I also offer my article on researching
in the UK and this brings dozens of requests. In virtually every case I
receive a thank you. My correspondence has led to developing friendships
across the oceans and I had the pleasure and privilege of meeting two
regular contributers in New York and San Francisco in March.

I think the complainant is unlucky or has a problem with his email provider.

David Kravitz
Netanya, Israel


Henia HOLZMAN #general

bogm@wp.pl <bogm@...>
 

I am looking for Henia HOLZMAN, born about 1928 in Warsaw (?), Poland.
She lived until 1954 in Dzierzoniow (near Wroclaw), Poland and mooved
then to Israel. She had two daughters: Niusia (married Henryk
Binder)and Mirka.
Any information would be greatly appreciated.
Bogumila Misztal


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Henia HOLZMAN #general

bogm@wp.pl <bogm@...>
 

I am looking for Henia HOLZMAN, born about 1928 in Warsaw (?), Poland.
She lived until 1954 in Dzierzoniow (near Wroclaw), Poland and mooved
then to Israel. She had two daughters: Niusia (married Henryk
Binder)and Mirka.
Any information would be greatly appreciated.
Bogumila Misztal


Ellis Island - Ship's Manifest #general

Shirley Collier <shirley.collier@...>
 

One of my mother's cousins remained behind in London at the age of two and
a half with my grandfather when her mother emigrated to America. She joined
the family later at the age of nine, travelling on the ship "Cameronia" out
of Glasgow on the 20th June 1921, the final destination being Wilkes Barre,
PA. Above her name on the manifest is what looks like YL99153 London
1/10/32 (handwritten). Please can anyone explain what this might mean?

Thanks.

Shirley Collier
East of London UK

Researching:
BERMAN/BEARMAN - Piesk,Lublin/Warsaw/Philadelphia/London
HARRIS - Sieradz/Hull/London
ROZAINSKY/WAPNASH - Rozan/Czestochowa/New York/London
TILLES/TRINKENREICH - Tarnow/Krakow/Newcastle/London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ellis Island - Ship's Manifest #general

Shirley Collier <shirley.collier@...>
 

One of my mother's cousins remained behind in London at the age of two and
a half with my grandfather when her mother emigrated to America. She joined
the family later at the age of nine, travelling on the ship "Cameronia" out
of Glasgow on the 20th June 1921, the final destination being Wilkes Barre,
PA. Above her name on the manifest is what looks like YL99153 London
1/10/32 (handwritten). Please can anyone explain what this might mean?

Thanks.

Shirley Collier
East of London UK

Researching:
BERMAN/BEARMAN - Piesk,Lublin/Warsaw/Philadelphia/London
HARRIS - Sieradz/Hull/London
ROZAINSKY/WAPNASH - Rozan/Czestochowa/New York/London
TILLES/TRINKENREICH - Tarnow/Krakow/Newcastle/London


Re: Hunter College Medals #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Barbara Mannlein wrote:

<<In 1892, Julia DAVIS, my husband's grandmother, was presented with the
"Prof. Von Swarthout Medal" . In 1895, she was awarded the "Libbie Van
Arsdale Memorial Prize." Both medals were given by what was then known as
the Thomas Hunter Normal School (now Hunter College) in New York City Julia
graduated >from the Normal School in 1898. My mother-in-law ,who passes her
mother's medals on, was not sure for what they were given. She thought that
the Van Arsdale was given for accomplishments in music.>>

A quick search on the ProQuest New York Times Historical database yielded
many articles about this school, founded in 1870, and these
awards--including two in which Barbara's husband's grandmother, Julia Davis,
was mentioned by name.

The article dated February 12, l983 headlined: "Young Women Who Have
Finished Normal College Work" and listed Julia as a "Freshman Normal" who
had obtained a 95 percent average.

And in an article dated June 21, 1895 with the headline:

"Prepared Now to Teach - Young Women Who Have Finished Normal College Work -
Over Three Hundred Graduate," towards the bottom of the left column it
reads:

"The Prizes in the academic department were: The Libbie Van Arsdale Prize
for Progress in Music to Julia Davis." It then goes on to list a mulitude
of prizes in Latin, German, French, etc., including monetary awards and
several gold watches!

This is just another oppotunity to remind everyone of the rich resource
scanned and digitized newspapers are for the genealogist. The Normal School
graduated hundreds of young Jewish women over so many years, that it's
likely that many more JewishGenners grandmothers and great-grandmothers'
names appear in articles concerning this school and others, as the names of
graduates were routinely listed in The New York TImes. One charming
headline read: "Want to be Schoolmarms."

As for:

<<I wrote to Hunter College and never even received any answer.>>

I've had great success getting copies of my grandfather's college
transcripts >from both Cooper Union (1912-15) and Brooklyn Polytechnical
Institute (1918-1919). In the case of Cooper Union I visited the
registrar's office in person and was given a form to fill out for a
transcript request, and for Brooklyn Polytech I phoned their registrar's
office, learned that they access these old archives off-site, was told the
fee and information required, and two weeks after mailing in the request I
had my grandfather's entire file. This included not only his grades for
attending night school there, but a high school record for the one year
1911-1912 he spent at Stuyvesant High School (something I was not aware of),
and letters and telegrams >from the W.P.A in 1938 requesting the Polytech
write to confirm that he had graduated >from their institution before they
would appoint him to a job. His transcripts listed several home and business
addresses that were also helpful in furthering my research.

So, yes...it is definitely worth trying to obtain these educational records.
Call Hunter College again, and ask to speak to the office that issues
transcripts or has knowledge of where old records are kept. If records >from
the 1890s don't exist, they will tell you, and if these records do exist,
inquire about the fee to get copies and the procedure you need to follow.
Getting to the right person, by phone, is essential. Don't give up!

You should also continue searching through the New York Times database,
using such keywords as: "Julia Davis," "Normal School," along with the names
of the medals she received, and you are sure to turn up much more
information about her. Remember that most public libraries offer access to
these databases free of charge on site, or through remote access with a
card, as do universities. Consult your local branches for details.

Good luck!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Hunter College Medals #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Barbara Mannlein wrote:

<<In 1892, Julia DAVIS, my husband's grandmother, was presented with the
"Prof. Von Swarthout Medal" . In 1895, she was awarded the "Libbie Van
Arsdale Memorial Prize." Both medals were given by what was then known as
the Thomas Hunter Normal School (now Hunter College) in New York City Julia
graduated >from the Normal School in 1898. My mother-in-law ,who passes her
mother's medals on, was not sure for what they were given. She thought that
the Van Arsdale was given for accomplishments in music.>>

A quick search on the ProQuest New York Times Historical database yielded
many articles about this school, founded in 1870, and these
awards--including two in which Barbara's husband's grandmother, Julia Davis,
was mentioned by name.

The article dated February 12, l983 headlined: "Young Women Who Have
Finished Normal College Work" and listed Julia as a "Freshman Normal" who
had obtained a 95 percent average.

And in an article dated June 21, 1895 with the headline:

"Prepared Now to Teach - Young Women Who Have Finished Normal College Work -
Over Three Hundred Graduate," towards the bottom of the left column it
reads:

"The Prizes in the academic department were: The Libbie Van Arsdale Prize
for Progress in Music to Julia Davis." It then goes on to list a mulitude
of prizes in Latin, German, French, etc., including monetary awards and
several gold watches!

This is just another oppotunity to remind everyone of the rich resource
scanned and digitized newspapers are for the genealogist. The Normal School
graduated hundreds of young Jewish women over so many years, that it's
likely that many more JewishGenners grandmothers and great-grandmothers'
names appear in articles concerning this school and others, as the names of
graduates were routinely listed in The New York TImes. One charming
headline read: "Want to be Schoolmarms."

As for:

<<I wrote to Hunter College and never even received any answer.>>

I've had great success getting copies of my grandfather's college
transcripts >from both Cooper Union (1912-15) and Brooklyn Polytechnical
Institute (1918-1919). In the case of Cooper Union I visited the
registrar's office in person and was given a form to fill out for a
transcript request, and for Brooklyn Polytech I phoned their registrar's
office, learned that they access these old archives off-site, was told the
fee and information required, and two weeks after mailing in the request I
had my grandfather's entire file. This included not only his grades for
attending night school there, but a high school record for the one year
1911-1912 he spent at Stuyvesant High School (something I was not aware of),
and letters and telegrams >from the W.P.A in 1938 requesting the Polytech
write to confirm that he had graduated >from their institution before they
would appoint him to a job. His transcripts listed several home and business
addresses that were also helpful in furthering my research.

So, yes...it is definitely worth trying to obtain these educational records.
Call Hunter College again, and ask to speak to the office that issues
transcripts or has knowledge of where old records are kept. If records >from
the 1890s don't exist, they will tell you, and if these records do exist,
inquire about the fee to get copies and the procedure you need to follow.
Getting to the right person, by phone, is essential. Don't give up!

You should also continue searching through the New York Times database,
using such keywords as: "Julia Davis," "Normal School," along with the names
of the medals she received, and you are sure to turn up much more
information about her. Remember that most public libraries offer access to
these databases free of charge on site, or through remote access with a
card, as do universities. Consult your local branches for details.

Good luck!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Re: The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this Forum #general

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

Sadly, it happens to too many of us. Recently a genner asked me about
Gelfand and Katz saying she had those two names in her tree....so I
sent what I had....never a reply, never yes we have a connection, no
we don't, absolutely nothing. I sent her another email checking to
see if she had received the information...no answer to that either.

Will her lack of response stop me >from responding to others? Not at all.
Hope springs eternal and maybe one day someone to whom I send family info
will respond with a positive connection. Same applies to providing how-to
info or finding something for somebody. Do unto others...equals random
acts of genealogical kindness.

Requesting a read receipt is not always returned as there is the ability
to refuse to send one.

Happily, I can say that most other genners are courteous and thankful for
whatever help I've been able to provide. Not only that, but it has ended
up with some new email friends whom I hope to meet in Las Vegas as well as
other email friends throughout the world.

Regards,
Joanie
Joan Parker, Immediate Past President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@intergate.com
Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN, BERGER-Plock, Poland/Russia and Brooklyn, NY;
PINKUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, Litovsk; Grodno, Russia maybe Odessa, Ukraine,
Bronx and Brooklyn, NY;
GELFAND, YEHUDIS, KATZ-Minsk, Bronx, NY, Miami and Miami Beach, FL.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness of this Forum #general

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

Sadly, it happens to too many of us. Recently a genner asked me about
Gelfand and Katz saying she had those two names in her tree....so I
sent what I had....never a reply, never yes we have a connection, no
we don't, absolutely nothing. I sent her another email checking to
see if she had received the information...no answer to that either.

Will her lack of response stop me >from responding to others? Not at all.
Hope springs eternal and maybe one day someone to whom I send family info
will respond with a positive connection. Same applies to providing how-to
info or finding something for somebody. Do unto others...equals random
acts of genealogical kindness.

Requesting a read receipt is not always returned as there is the ability
to refuse to send one.

Happily, I can say that most other genners are courteous and thankful for
whatever help I've been able to provide. Not only that, but it has ended
up with some new email friends whom I hope to meet in Las Vegas as well as
other email friends throughout the world.

Regards,
Joanie
Joan Parker, Immediate Past President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@intergate.com
Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN, BERGER-Plock, Poland/Russia and Brooklyn, NY;
PINKUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, Litovsk; Grodno, Russia maybe Odessa, Ukraine,
Bronx and Brooklyn, NY;
GELFAND, YEHUDIS, KATZ-Minsk, Bronx, NY, Miami and Miami Beach, FL.