Date   

Re: Las Vegas Conference registration #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The following is posted on behalf of the Las Vegas Conference committee:

Dear all,

If you have not yet registered for the 25th annual conference being
held in Las Vegas during July 10-15th, there are only 14 days left to
register online (as of Saturday June 11, 2005)

The conference program is available online at the following page:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/lv2005/program.htm >.

In the Resource Room, there will be special databases, translators and
Guests available only during the conference.

One of the "perks" of registering online before June 15th is you
can be assured that up to 6 of the surnames you are looking for will
be included in the Family Finder, distributed to all conference
attendees.

If you register after June 15th, we will include your names on a
separate sheet to be distributed during the conference.

Shelly Weiner
LV2005 web g-ddess / LV2005 Resource Room Coordinator
Conference website:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/LV2005/home.htm >


Romania SIG #Romania RE: Las Vegas Conference registration #romania

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The following is posted on behalf of the Las Vegas Conference committee:

Dear all,

If you have not yet registered for the 25th annual conference being
held in Las Vegas during July 10-15th, there are only 14 days left to
register online (as of Saturday June 11, 2005)

The conference program is available online at the following page:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/lv2005/program.htm >.

In the Resource Room, there will be special databases, translators and
Guests available only during the conference.

One of the "perks" of registering online before June 15th is you
can be assured that up to 6 of the surnames you are looking for will
be included in the Family Finder, distributed to all conference
attendees.

If you register after June 15th, we will include your names on a
separate sheet to be distributed during the conference.

Shelly Weiner
LV2005 web g-ddess / LV2005 Resource Room Coordinator
Conference website:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/LV2005/home.htm >


Re: Las Vegas Conference registration #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The following is posted on behalf of the Las Vegas Conference committee:

Dear all,

If you have not yet registered for the 25th annual conference being
held in Las Vegas during July 10-15th, there are only 14 days left to
register online (as of Saturday June 11, 2005)

The conference program is available online at the following page:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/lv2005/program.htm >.

In the Resource Room, there will be special databases, translators and
Guests available only during the conference.

One of the "perks" of registering online before June 15th is you
can be assured that up to 6 of the surnames you are looking for will
be included in the Family Finder, distributed to all conference
attendees.

If you register after June 15th, we will include your names on a
separate sheet to be distributed during the conference.

Shelly Weiner
LV2005 web g-ddess / LV2005 Resource Room Coordinator
Conference website:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/LV2005/home.htm >


French SIG #France RE: Las Vegas Conference registration #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The following is posted on behalf of the Las Vegas Conference committee:

Dear all,

If you have not yet registered for the 25th annual conference being
held in Las Vegas during July 10-15th, there are only 14 days left to
register online (as of Saturday June 11, 2005)

The conference program is available online at the following page:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/lv2005/program.htm >.

In the Resource Room, there will be special databases, translators and
Guests available only during the conference.

One of the "perks" of registering online before June 15th is you
can be assured that up to 6 of the surnames you are looking for will
be included in the Family Finder, distributed to all conference
attendees.

If you register after June 15th, we will include your names on a
separate sheet to be distributed during the conference.

Shelly Weiner
LV2005 web g-ddess / LV2005 Resource Room Coordinator
Conference website:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/LV2005/home.htm >


Need info on Kalvarija & Liubavas FHL records or others #general

Sal & Ellen Barbieri <elsal@...>
 

Has anyone checked FHL films: Evangelical Reform Church records of Kalvarija
1844-1894 to see if they contain any Jewish records?

I need records >from Lubow - Lubowo which is present day Liubavas, Lithuania
5422-2303. Family came to NYC 1869-72, so need earlier yrs.
Thank you,
Ellen Barbieri - Researcher #8682
San Diego, CA
elsal@cox.net

Researching: KAPLAN, GOLDBERG, KANOWICZ/COHN, KRAMARSKY/GRAMARSKY,
ZYMAN/SIMON - SUWALKI, LUBOW, NYC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need info on Kalvarija & Liubavas FHL records or others #general

Sal & Ellen Barbieri <elsal@...>
 

Has anyone checked FHL films: Evangelical Reform Church records of Kalvarija
1844-1894 to see if they contain any Jewish records?

I need records >from Lubow - Lubowo which is present day Liubavas, Lithuania
5422-2303. Family came to NYC 1869-72, so need earlier yrs.
Thank you,
Ellen Barbieri - Researcher #8682
San Diego, CA
elsal@cox.net

Researching: KAPLAN, GOLDBERG, KANOWICZ/COHN, KRAMARSKY/GRAMARSKY,
ZYMAN/SIMON - SUWALKI, LUBOW, NYC


ARTICLE - JTA more on Ashkenazi intelligence and genetics #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear genners,

A JTA article gives more information on the topic and more
comments >from researchers and interested personalities.

http://www.jta.org/page_view_story.asp?intarticleid=15509&intcategoryid=5

(remember to copy and paste the entire URL into your browser)

While the study proposes that occupations "allowed" to Jews
during medieval times account for improved genetic mental
agility, those quoted in this updated story note that at the same
time the Christian majority were selecting against an
intelligence gene due to celibacy of priests and monks,
preventing the most learned >from reproducing, Jews, on the other
hand, with historical devotion to learning, believed that the
best marriage partners were intellectually advanced students.
Jews who were economically better off had more children who lived
longer and who tended to marry others in the same "class."
Combined with very low intermarriage until contemporary times,
this tended to concentrate both good (e.g. intelligence) and bad
(e.g. genetic disease) genes.

There is some interesting information on a Gaucher's clinic at
Shaare Zedek Hospital (Jerusalem) whose patients are in high-IQ
professions.

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
President, JFRA Israel
schelly@allrelative.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ARTICLE - JTA more on Ashkenazi intelligence and genetics #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear genners,

A JTA article gives more information on the topic and more
comments >from researchers and interested personalities.

http://www.jta.org/page_view_story.asp?intarticleid=15509&intcategoryid=5

(remember to copy and paste the entire URL into your browser)

While the study proposes that occupations "allowed" to Jews
during medieval times account for improved genetic mental
agility, those quoted in this updated story note that at the same
time the Christian majority were selecting against an
intelligence gene due to celibacy of priests and monks,
preventing the most learned >from reproducing, Jews, on the other
hand, with historical devotion to learning, believed that the
best marriage partners were intellectually advanced students.
Jews who were economically better off had more children who lived
longer and who tended to marry others in the same "class."
Combined with very low intermarriage until contemporary times,
this tended to concentrate both good (e.g. intelligence) and bad
(e.g. genetic disease) genes.

There is some interesting information on a Gaucher's clinic at
Shaare Zedek Hospital (Jerusalem) whose patients are in high-IQ
professions.

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
President, JFRA Israel
schelly@allrelative.net


re Were they from Poland or Russia? #general

Alice Josephs
 

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@earthlink.net> writes on Fri, 03 Jun 2005
03:27:51 -0700

<<Last time I was in Poland I had a very interesting conversation with
very well educated, very nice, English speaking Polish guy who expressed
to me his belief that much of the "anti-Jewish" feeling in Poland stem
from the "fact" that Jews had a different attitude and feeling toward
Russians. Another guy in Eastern Poland who was ethnic Belorussian
Orthodox insisted that members of his Belorussian Orthodox minority in
Eastern Poland had a much better attitude toward Jews and had a much
better relationship with Jews before the war than Polish Catholics
did.>>

Well, as far as I can tell - I don't pretend to be an expert and have
only relatively recently started researching the Polish (Russian
Polish) side of my family - such a discussion is a small part of the
complex, and often in the past, tortured jigsaw which makes up the
relations between - shall I call it Poles and Jews? Or non-Jewish Poles
and Jewish Poles?

This question of vocabulary is part of irresolvable questions through
the ages. Whether the questions of whether Jews were or were not
"Polish" or for that matter natives of other central and Eastern
European countries should have been posed at all is of course another
matter. But Poland has always been made up of what was defined as
"minorities" - Jews being among them, non Jewish Belorussians another
and Ukrainians another and so on. There has always of course been the
influence of the Catholic church for better or for worse and then
Communism.

I recently lent a book called The River Remembers by S L Shneiderman ,
a Yiddish journalist born in Poland ( ISBN 0-8180-0821-0), to a
university graduate Polish Catholic who grew up during the Communist
era. When she returned it to me, she told me she had made lots of notes
from it and said she had no idea the Jewish population had played such
an active part in Polish mainstream life. The Communist party in
Poland, as far as I can tell, had always tried to suppress the role of
religion and, along with some opponent Polish nationalist groups, also
suppressed the nuanced history of the Jews in Poland. Economic peaks
and troughs and political jockeying all played their part in attitudes
towards "the Jews" (who of course varied and vary as much as any other
group of people including non Jewish Poles).

I don't know of course whether her reaction is "representative". But
her received imagery had probably mostly been through the media and
perhaps lacking the depth and nuances which are needed when talking
about any group of people. It is true, as far as I have found out,
that many Jews found the ideals of Communism very attractive but others
were not interested and embraced the ideals of Polish independence
until they were ejected >from the nationalist cause.

>from what I can tell, Romantic Polish literature played no small part
in Polish nationalism and many Jews were influenced in their early
education by this as much as anyone else in Poland. Canadian Morris
Macarz who has written a biography Staying Ahead (ISBN 0-8158-0522-5)
writes that in his home town of Pultusk before Polish independence
Jews had lived relatively peacefully for centuries but after
independence, after the First World War, the Jewish population was
buffeted by a boycott movement and anti-Semitism - in no small part due
I suppose to the economic circumstances of the time.

Small wonder that many turned to Communism and, being a cross section
of the human race, some Jewish Poles and Jewish Russians found
themselves put in a position of power, and may not have acted in an
ethical way whether because of a bad convergeance of circumstances or
because of their own personalities or a mixture of both. Yet in the
Stalinist era the Jews found themselves still a target, although it is
a matter of debate whether many of those murdered and imprisoned were
targetted for being Jewish or just because so many of them were in
positions of authority in the USSR and therefore prime targets for
purges in the political infighting or a mixture of both.

I have recently heard that in Hollywood there has arisen a difficult
situation regarding a monument to fallen Soviet soldiers. What I have
heard is that former Soviet mostly Jewish army veterans in Los Angeles
wanted to put up the monument - a slab of red granite with lines >from
a Russian poet rather than a representation of soldiers and videos of
soldiers relating their experiences - but this immediately raised the
hackles of many Polish Catholic Americans who saw this not in terms of
the liberation of the camps but a vindication of how the former USSR
was allowed to take over Poland after the German National Socialist
invasion.

A symbol can mean different things to different people. This has to be
put alongside the present day politics in Poland itself and how Poland
is still redefining and negotiating how it deals with the states at the
heart of the former Soviet Union. I don't know whether the Hollywood
situation has now been resolved and I hope I have accurately defined
the situation. These are problems not to be carelessly written or
talked about.

This is only a small part of what I have learnt and I hope interpret in
a realistic way since tentatively treading the tangled path of Polish
Jewish genealogy and I am sure I have much else to learn, not least as
more and more literature is published by Polish Jews >from families who
have never left Poland.

Alice Josephs UK
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genealice/ Jewish Pultusk
website : http://J-Pultusk.tripod.com
JABLUSZKO ROZENBERG Ciechanow DON GOLDMACHER GURMAN Pultusk, Poland.
STERN (STARR) Heppenheim HERZ Kochendorf MARKUS Otterstadt, Hainchen,
Roedelheim GRUEN GRUENEWALD Roedelheim HOCHSCHILD Gross Rohrheim
MAYERFELD Biebesheim, Germany.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re Were they from Poland or Russia? #general

Alice Josephs
 

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@earthlink.net> writes on Fri, 03 Jun 2005
03:27:51 -0700

<<Last time I was in Poland I had a very interesting conversation with
very well educated, very nice, English speaking Polish guy who expressed
to me his belief that much of the "anti-Jewish" feeling in Poland stem
from the "fact" that Jews had a different attitude and feeling toward
Russians. Another guy in Eastern Poland who was ethnic Belorussian
Orthodox insisted that members of his Belorussian Orthodox minority in
Eastern Poland had a much better attitude toward Jews and had a much
better relationship with Jews before the war than Polish Catholics
did.>>

Well, as far as I can tell - I don't pretend to be an expert and have
only relatively recently started researching the Polish (Russian
Polish) side of my family - such a discussion is a small part of the
complex, and often in the past, tortured jigsaw which makes up the
relations between - shall I call it Poles and Jews? Or non-Jewish Poles
and Jewish Poles?

This question of vocabulary is part of irresolvable questions through
the ages. Whether the questions of whether Jews were or were not
"Polish" or for that matter natives of other central and Eastern
European countries should have been posed at all is of course another
matter. But Poland has always been made up of what was defined as
"minorities" - Jews being among them, non Jewish Belorussians another
and Ukrainians another and so on. There has always of course been the
influence of the Catholic church for better or for worse and then
Communism.

I recently lent a book called The River Remembers by S L Shneiderman ,
a Yiddish journalist born in Poland ( ISBN 0-8180-0821-0), to a
university graduate Polish Catholic who grew up during the Communist
era. When she returned it to me, she told me she had made lots of notes
from it and said she had no idea the Jewish population had played such
an active part in Polish mainstream life. The Communist party in
Poland, as far as I can tell, had always tried to suppress the role of
religion and, along with some opponent Polish nationalist groups, also
suppressed the nuanced history of the Jews in Poland. Economic peaks
and troughs and political jockeying all played their part in attitudes
towards "the Jews" (who of course varied and vary as much as any other
group of people including non Jewish Poles).

I don't know of course whether her reaction is "representative". But
her received imagery had probably mostly been through the media and
perhaps lacking the depth and nuances which are needed when talking
about any group of people. It is true, as far as I have found out,
that many Jews found the ideals of Communism very attractive but others
were not interested and embraced the ideals of Polish independence
until they were ejected >from the nationalist cause.

>from what I can tell, Romantic Polish literature played no small part
in Polish nationalism and many Jews were influenced in their early
education by this as much as anyone else in Poland. Canadian Morris
Macarz who has written a biography Staying Ahead (ISBN 0-8158-0522-5)
writes that in his home town of Pultusk before Polish independence
Jews had lived relatively peacefully for centuries but after
independence, after the First World War, the Jewish population was
buffeted by a boycott movement and anti-Semitism - in no small part due
I suppose to the economic circumstances of the time.

Small wonder that many turned to Communism and, being a cross section
of the human race, some Jewish Poles and Jewish Russians found
themselves put in a position of power, and may not have acted in an
ethical way whether because of a bad convergeance of circumstances or
because of their own personalities or a mixture of both. Yet in the
Stalinist era the Jews found themselves still a target, although it is
a matter of debate whether many of those murdered and imprisoned were
targetted for being Jewish or just because so many of them were in
positions of authority in the USSR and therefore prime targets for
purges in the political infighting or a mixture of both.

I have recently heard that in Hollywood there has arisen a difficult
situation regarding a monument to fallen Soviet soldiers. What I have
heard is that former Soviet mostly Jewish army veterans in Los Angeles
wanted to put up the monument - a slab of red granite with lines >from
a Russian poet rather than a representation of soldiers and videos of
soldiers relating their experiences - but this immediately raised the
hackles of many Polish Catholic Americans who saw this not in terms of
the liberation of the camps but a vindication of how the former USSR
was allowed to take over Poland after the German National Socialist
invasion.

A symbol can mean different things to different people. This has to be
put alongside the present day politics in Poland itself and how Poland
is still redefining and negotiating how it deals with the states at the
heart of the former Soviet Union. I don't know whether the Hollywood
situation has now been resolved and I hope I have accurately defined
the situation. These are problems not to be carelessly written or
talked about.

This is only a small part of what I have learnt and I hope interpret in
a realistic way since tentatively treading the tangled path of Polish
Jewish genealogy and I am sure I have much else to learn, not least as
more and more literature is published by Polish Jews >from families who
have never left Poland.

Alice Josephs UK
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genealice/ Jewish Pultusk
website : http://J-Pultusk.tripod.com
JABLUSZKO ROZENBERG Ciechanow DON GOLDMACHER GURMAN Pultusk, Poland.
STERN (STARR) Heppenheim HERZ Kochendorf MARKUS Otterstadt, Hainchen,
Roedelheim GRUEN GRUENEWALD Roedelheim HOCHSCHILD Gross Rohrheim
MAYERFELD Biebesheim, Germany.


Mt. Zion Cemetery, Los Angeles, CA #general

Seg420@...
 

On the death certificate of my husband's great grandfather, it states he was
buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery, Los Angeles, CA, on Nov 24, 1929.

On the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry, which has the information
on those buried in Mt. Zion, I don't find him. On the death certificate,
his name is Hyman Cohen. The family names him Chaim Kagan. I've looked for
both and used the D-M Soundex, searched by death year, and still don't find him.

Thinking to contact the cemetery, I find an address, but not a phone number,
which makes me wonder if the cemetery is still in operation and/or if its
records are being housed and administered by another cemetery now (as this
happens in the Chicago area).

Does anyone know about this cemetery in Los Angeles? I'd like to find these
cemtery records so that I can see if he is really buried there, and if so,
where within the cemetery?

Thank you,
Susi Godfrey


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mt. Zion Cemetery, Los Angeles, CA #general

Seg420@...
 

On the death certificate of my husband's great grandfather, it states he was
buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery, Los Angeles, CA, on Nov 24, 1929.

On the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry, which has the information
on those buried in Mt. Zion, I don't find him. On the death certificate,
his name is Hyman Cohen. The family names him Chaim Kagan. I've looked for
both and used the D-M Soundex, searched by death year, and still don't find him.

Thinking to contact the cemetery, I find an address, but not a phone number,
which makes me wonder if the cemetery is still in operation and/or if its
records are being housed and administered by another cemetery now (as this
happens in the Chicago area).

Does anyone know about this cemetery in Los Angeles? I'd like to find these
cemtery records so that I can see if he is really buried there, and if so,
where within the cemetery?

Thank you,
Susi Godfrey


German historian Monica Kingreen to speak at NYC museum -12 Jun (Sun) #germany

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Monica Kingreen, the German historian, scholar, and Obermayer German Jewish
History Award winner, will give the dedicatory address on Sunday, June 12,
at a ceremony marking the donation of 200-year-old German Torah ornaments to
the Judaica Museum in Riverdale, New York.

The rare silver tas (Torah breastplate) and rimmonim (finials) were made in
Fuerth in the late 18th century by the master silversmith Johann Jakob
Runnecke, also known as "Meister Rimmonim." They were used by the Jewish
community of Meerholz, a small town 20 miles east of Frankfurt, until it
disbanded in the late 1930s. The ornaments, which had been donated to the
Meerholz synagogue by a member of the Stern family, were then returned to my
father's first cousin Leo Stern.

The silver was nearly confiscated in Frankfurt during Kristallnacht, after
Leo and family hurriedly left Germany without their belongings. Later, my
father packed the contents of their apartment, including the Torah
ornaments, and arranged for their shipment to America. The Sterns settled in
Glens Falls, New York, and have had the silver in their home there for over
50 years.

Leo's son Walter, born in Meerholz in 1914, will be a guest of honor at the
ceremony. He and my father (Carl Stern, 1907-1963) were raised on the same
street in Meerholz. The town was home to five generations of Sterns,
beginning with Loeb Mayer Stern (1786-1842), who settled there in about 1805.

Monica Kingreen, who is associated with the Fritz Bauer Institute in
Frankfurt, has studied and written about numerous German Jewish communities,
including Windecken, Heldenbergen and Ostheim. She will speak at the event
on the Jewish community of Meerholz and the history of these objects.

The museum's director, Karen Franklin, is head of the Family Research
Program at the Leo Baeck Institute, former president of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies, and a member of the GerSIG
Coordinating Committee.

The event will take place >from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. Sunday at the Judaica
Museum, which is located in the RiverWalk building of the Hebrew Home for
the Aged, 5961 Palisade Avenue, Riverdale. Directions are at
www.hebrewhome.org/directions.asp .

You are very welcome to join us at this very special event, which fittingly
will be held on Erev Shavuot -- the festival that celebrates the receiving
of the Torah. Light refreshments will be served.

Renee Stern Steinig Dix Hills, New York, USA rsteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us


German SIG #Germany German historian Monica Kingreen to speak at NYC museum -12 Jun (Sun) #germany

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Monica Kingreen, the German historian, scholar, and Obermayer German Jewish
History Award winner, will give the dedicatory address on Sunday, June 12,
at a ceremony marking the donation of 200-year-old German Torah ornaments to
the Judaica Museum in Riverdale, New York.

The rare silver tas (Torah breastplate) and rimmonim (finials) were made in
Fuerth in the late 18th century by the master silversmith Johann Jakob
Runnecke, also known as "Meister Rimmonim." They were used by the Jewish
community of Meerholz, a small town 20 miles east of Frankfurt, until it
disbanded in the late 1930s. The ornaments, which had been donated to the
Meerholz synagogue by a member of the Stern family, were then returned to my
father's first cousin Leo Stern.

The silver was nearly confiscated in Frankfurt during Kristallnacht, after
Leo and family hurriedly left Germany without their belongings. Later, my
father packed the contents of their apartment, including the Torah
ornaments, and arranged for their shipment to America. The Sterns settled in
Glens Falls, New York, and have had the silver in their home there for over
50 years.

Leo's son Walter, born in Meerholz in 1914, will be a guest of honor at the
ceremony. He and my father (Carl Stern, 1907-1963) were raised on the same
street in Meerholz. The town was home to five generations of Sterns,
beginning with Loeb Mayer Stern (1786-1842), who settled there in about 1805.

Monica Kingreen, who is associated with the Fritz Bauer Institute in
Frankfurt, has studied and written about numerous German Jewish communities,
including Windecken, Heldenbergen and Ostheim. She will speak at the event
on the Jewish community of Meerholz and the history of these objects.

The museum's director, Karen Franklin, is head of the Family Research
Program at the Leo Baeck Institute, former president of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies, and a member of the GerSIG
Coordinating Committee.

The event will take place >from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. Sunday at the Judaica
Museum, which is located in the RiverWalk building of the Hebrew Home for
the Aged, 5961 Palisade Avenue, Riverdale. Directions are at
www.hebrewhome.org/directions.asp .

You are very welcome to join us at this very special event, which fittingly
will be held on Erev Shavuot -- the festival that celebrates the receiving
of the Torah. Light refreshments will be served.

Renee Stern Steinig Dix Hills, New York, USA rsteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us


Re: Rabbi POSNER/POZNER in Warsaw in 19th century #rabbinic

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

On 2005.06.09, Shaul Berger <shaul@bergerworld.net> wrote:

I am hitting a wall trying to find information about Leib POSNER,
born in Warsaw by middle of 19th century and died around 1928. He
married Chaya and they had more than 7 children born >from 1880-1897.

Leib's brother (or some other close relative) was a famous rabbi in
Warsaw. I hope that someone can point me to a starting point [...]
Dear Shaul,

You can find both POSNERs and POZNERs in the 1938/1939 Warsaw
Telephone Directory by using my search engine at
< www.kalter.org/search.php >. All relevant entries will be listed,
if you use the Daitch-Mokotoff search method.

Good luck,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic RE: Rabbi POSNER/POZNER in Warsaw in 19th century #rabbinic

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

On 2005.06.09, Shaul Berger <shaul@bergerworld.net> wrote:

I am hitting a wall trying to find information about Leib POSNER,
born in Warsaw by middle of 19th century and died around 1928. He
married Chaya and they had more than 7 children born >from 1880-1897.

Leib's brother (or some other close relative) was a famous rabbi in
Warsaw. I hope that someone can point me to a starting point [...]
Dear Shaul,

You can find both POSNERs and POZNERs in the 1938/1939 Warsaw
Telephone Directory by using my search engine at
< www.kalter.org/search.php >. All relevant entries will be listed,
if you use the Daitch-Mokotoff search method.

Good luck,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


SCHECHTER in Philadelphia in 1920 #general

DebWE308@...
 

H Genners,
I am searching for: Abraham and Fanny SCHECHTER who lived in Philadelphia in
1920. They had at that time 2 children: Harry and Robert. At the time of the
1920 census, Harry was 2.5 years old, and Robert was several months old. If
anyone knows the family, please contact me or ask them to contact me.

Debbie Wang Etzion


Re: Which Ostrah for my ROSENBAUMs? #rabbinic

Mr L Reich <lreich@...>
 

On 2005.06.02, Yoni ben-ari <yrcdi@netvision.net.il> asked:

In my family's handwritten yichus page it is written that my
ggggrandfather, Israel ROSENBAUM lived in Ostrah and was a talmid
(follower) of Reb' Yehoshua Heschel of Apta.
[...]
Can anyone suggest, >from the above information which Ostrah he was
from as I've seen several Ostrah's referred to [...]
It's odds on that the "Ostrah" referrred to is Ostrog (Ostraha) in
Ukraine: 50 20 N, 26 31E.

This was one of the great kehillos of Eastern Europe: the home town
of the Mahrsho. A number of distinguished followers of the Baal Shem
Tov lived there. These include:

a) R' Yaakov Yosef (ben R' Yehuda Leib) (1738-1791) known as R' Yevi

b ) The former's grandson, R' Yevi the 2nd, d. 1849

c) R' Yitzchok Eizik Hacohen (author of Zichron Kehuna, Lviv 1863),
son of R' Yoel, Rav in Stanislow, son of R' Yitzchok Eizik (the
1st), son of R' Betzalel of Ostrah, son of R' Naftali Katz, Rav in
Ostrah and Franfurt on Main. He died at the age of 53 in 1787.

When the community was destroyed by the Nazis, despite many years of
decline, there were still 27 shuls and shtieblech.

Leslie Reich
Source: Megilas Poilin Jerusalem-Tel Aviv 1966


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SCHECHTER in Philadelphia in 1920 #general

DebWE308@...
 

H Genners,
I am searching for: Abraham and Fanny SCHECHTER who lived in Philadelphia in
1920. They had at that time 2 children: Harry and Robert. At the time of the
1920 census, Harry was 2.5 years old, and Robert was several months old. If
anyone knows the family, please contact me or ask them to contact me.

Debbie Wang Etzion


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Which Ostrah for my ROSENBAUMs? #rabbinic

Mr L Reich <lreich@...>
 

On 2005.06.02, Yoni ben-ari <yrcdi@netvision.net.il> asked:

In my family's handwritten yichus page it is written that my
ggggrandfather, Israel ROSENBAUM lived in Ostrah and was a talmid
(follower) of Reb' Yehoshua Heschel of Apta.
[...]
Can anyone suggest, >from the above information which Ostrah he was
from as I've seen several Ostrah's referred to [...]
It's odds on that the "Ostrah" referrred to is Ostrog (Ostraha) in
Ukraine: 50 20 N, 26 31E.

This was one of the great kehillos of Eastern Europe: the home town
of the Mahrsho. A number of distinguished followers of the Baal Shem
Tov lived there. These include:

a) R' Yaakov Yosef (ben R' Yehuda Leib) (1738-1791) known as R' Yevi

b ) The former's grandson, R' Yevi the 2nd, d. 1849

c) R' Yitzchok Eizik Hacohen (author of Zichron Kehuna, Lviv 1863),
son of R' Yoel, Rav in Stanislow, son of R' Yitzchok Eizik (the
1st), son of R' Betzalel of Ostrah, son of R' Naftali Katz, Rav in
Ostrah and Franfurt on Main. He died at the age of 53 in 1787.

When the community was destroyed by the Nazis, despite many years of
decline, there were still 27 shuls and shtieblech.

Leslie Reich
Source: Megilas Poilin Jerusalem-Tel Aviv 1966