Date   

descendants of Gussie and Peter MEYER #general

Shari Kantrow
 

Dear JewishGenners,
I am always amazed at what a helpful and caring
community and forum this is, and how many questions
are answered, and how many puzzles are solved here
weekly.
Perhaps the descendants of Gussie and Peter MEYER
are reading this. They had nine children altogether:
five children who died as teens or sometime in their
childhood, and four grown children: Celia, abt 1887,
Abe abt. 1882, Joseph 1895 and my grandfather Samuel,
1893. They all died fairly young, but some of them
went on to have children of their own.
1.Joseph married Ella and had Gussie Rose, Leah
and Celia (named afther his deceased sister). Celia
had 4 daughters
2.Abraham married Florence(?) and had Irene(?)
and Clifford(?)
3.Celia (1887) may have married, but she died
prior to about 1935-40.

I would love to correspond with anyone who is
related, or who may know these people. Many thanks
again for all you do.
Warmest regards,
Shari Kantrow
Bloomfield, NJ

researching:
MEYER, KAFKA, KUPFER, SCHAFF -Russian/Poland>NY
BLITZER,KARPET,JACOBSON,LANDSMAN, BLITZMAN,BLAZER
PLATZMAN, REYITTS (REIZ)Kamenets-Podolskiy, Podolia > NY
SCHWARTZ,HABERMAN,DICKMAN,SHAPIRO- Bukaczowce>NY
SCHNEIDER, MILBAUER, MEYER - Austria


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen descendants of Gussie and Peter MEYER #general

Shari Kantrow
 

Dear JewishGenners,
I am always amazed at what a helpful and caring
community and forum this is, and how many questions
are answered, and how many puzzles are solved here
weekly.
Perhaps the descendants of Gussie and Peter MEYER
are reading this. They had nine children altogether:
five children who died as teens or sometime in their
childhood, and four grown children: Celia, abt 1887,
Abe abt. 1882, Joseph 1895 and my grandfather Samuel,
1893. They all died fairly young, but some of them
went on to have children of their own.
1.Joseph married Ella and had Gussie Rose, Leah
and Celia (named afther his deceased sister). Celia
had 4 daughters
2.Abraham married Florence(?) and had Irene(?)
and Clifford(?)
3.Celia (1887) may have married, but she died
prior to about 1935-40.

I would love to correspond with anyone who is
related, or who may know these people. Many thanks
again for all you do.
Warmest regards,
Shari Kantrow
Bloomfield, NJ

researching:
MEYER, KAFKA, KUPFER, SCHAFF -Russian/Poland>NY
BLITZER,KARPET,JACOBSON,LANDSMAN, BLITZMAN,BLAZER
PLATZMAN, REYITTS (REIZ)Kamenets-Podolskiy, Podolia > NY
SCHWARTZ,HABERMAN,DICKMAN,SHAPIRO- Bukaczowce>NY
SCHNEIDER, MILBAUER, MEYER - Austria


More on Australian Connections #general

am <madele@...>
 

More on Australian Connections.

From: Adele Meren < madele@rabbit.com.au >

As I've had lots of request for help [ and I'm happy to help you ], I
thought I'd save you all some time with the following short cuts:
If you go to the the Australian Jewish News [AJN] web site at
< www.ajn.com.au > and click on their 'web links' column on the left,
then select 'local,' it will lead you to pretty much all of the Jewish
links around Australia.
Remember, if you see a phone number, you'll need to check out the area
code that you should dial before the actual number, as we have 6 large
states and 2 territories [like a state, including our federal capital],
each with a unique phone area code. Here they are for you all:

Victoria and Tasmania [including Melbourne and Hobart] 3, New South
Wales and the ACT [including Sydney and Canberra] 2, Queensland
[including Brisbane] 7, South Australia, Western Australia and the
Northern Territory [including Adelaide, Perth and Darwin] 8.

So, if dialling Melbourne for example, you'd dial 61 [Australia] then 3
[Victoria/Melbourne], then the actual phone number.

Hope this helps.

Adele Meren,
Melbourne, Australia.

Searching for: KOWAL [Plock and Warsaw, Poland] and WEINBERGER [Pilzno
and Cracow, Poland].


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More on Australian Connections #general

am <madele@...>
 

More on Australian Connections.

From: Adele Meren < madele@rabbit.com.au >

As I've had lots of request for help [ and I'm happy to help you ], I
thought I'd save you all some time with the following short cuts:
If you go to the the Australian Jewish News [AJN] web site at
< www.ajn.com.au > and click on their 'web links' column on the left,
then select 'local,' it will lead you to pretty much all of the Jewish
links around Australia.
Remember, if you see a phone number, you'll need to check out the area
code that you should dial before the actual number, as we have 6 large
states and 2 territories [like a state, including our federal capital],
each with a unique phone area code. Here they are for you all:

Victoria and Tasmania [including Melbourne and Hobart] 3, New South
Wales and the ACT [including Sydney and Canberra] 2, Queensland
[including Brisbane] 7, South Australia, Western Australia and the
Northern Territory [including Adelaide, Perth and Darwin] 8.

So, if dialling Melbourne for example, you'd dial 61 [Australia] then 3
[Victoria/Melbourne], then the actual phone number.

Hope this helps.

Adele Meren,
Melbourne, Australia.

Searching for: KOWAL [Plock and Warsaw, Poland] and WEINBERGER [Pilzno
and Cracow, Poland].


Re: Surname origins #general

Jeff Hecht <jeff.hecht@...>
 

from my efforts to track down relationships among HECHTs, I've
concluded there were multiple origins in German-speaking regions. This
makes sense if surnames were adopted circa 1800, since distinct groups
existed in several places (mine are >from Kempen, Posen, and I've heard
of others >from around Warsaw, and in Austria) by the late 19th century.
I suspect this is true for other surnames as well.

In the case of HECHT, there were German Lutheran HECHTs as well as Jews,
although it's possible the "Germans" were assimilated early.

On the other hand, on the WASP side of my family, one surname (TRAVER)
was a variant on TREBER used by a single pair of immigrant brothers >from
Germany on their arrival in North America in 1710, and that exact
spelling appears not to have been duplicated elsewhere. However, the
surname TRAVERS had a separate origin.

-- Jeff Hecht, Newton, Massachusetts

Sally Bruckheimer wrote:
[clipped]

Bottom line is that your family might be related to the rest, but you need
to follow your family back >from what you know and learn more about the
specific family in the town in which they lived. If there were others of
the surname somewhere else, they may end up related to yours if you get back
far enough, but you won't know until you get there.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Surname origins #general

Jeff Hecht <jeff.hecht@...>
 

from my efforts to track down relationships among HECHTs, I've
concluded there were multiple origins in German-speaking regions. This
makes sense if surnames were adopted circa 1800, since distinct groups
existed in several places (mine are >from Kempen, Posen, and I've heard
of others >from around Warsaw, and in Austria) by the late 19th century.
I suspect this is true for other surnames as well.

In the case of HECHT, there were German Lutheran HECHTs as well as Jews,
although it's possible the "Germans" were assimilated early.

On the other hand, on the WASP side of my family, one surname (TRAVER)
was a variant on TREBER used by a single pair of immigrant brothers >from
Germany on their arrival in North America in 1710, and that exact
spelling appears not to have been duplicated elsewhere. However, the
surname TRAVERS had a separate origin.

-- Jeff Hecht, Newton, Massachusetts

Sally Bruckheimer wrote:
[clipped]

Bottom line is that your family might be related to the rest, but you need
to follow your family back >from what you know and learn more about the
specific family in the town in which they lived. If there were others of
the surname somewhere else, they may end up related to yours if you get back
far enough, but you won't know until you get there.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


answers regarding GAISIN & Jojna #ukraine

dayna reader <zoeys_mom@...>
 

as of this evening i have received over 35 answers to
my questions regarding the town of GAISIN and the male
name jojna.

i want to thank each and every member of the ukraine
sig who responded to my inquiry. each note seemed to
have a new bit of useful information.

i had a very interesting break-thru because of the
help of the nice folks here who concurred that the
name JOJNA would be YONAH in yiddish. i wanted to
share this with all of you, as it is very interesting.

for years, there has been on our family tree a mystery
man named YONAH (no known surname). he was purported
to be the 2nd husband of my gg-grandma (the one who's
name i found on the ship manifest). i'm not sure who
originally put him on the family tree, but no one knew
anything about him. i recently contacted my 91 year
old cousin who is the nephew of this gg-grandma. he
knew her personally and is certain she only had 2
husbands, as was another uncle.

as the responses poured into my inbox >from the
wonderful ukrainain sig-ers, and each one mentioned
the name YONAH, i realized that the mysterious YONAH
on our tree was actually my gg-grandma's *son*, not
her 2nd husband. mystery solved.

thanks again to all the wonderful people who helped.

dayna chalif
san francisco, USA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine answers regarding GAISIN & Jojna #ukraine

dayna reader <zoeys_mom@...>
 

as of this evening i have received over 35 answers to
my questions regarding the town of GAISIN and the male
name jojna.

i want to thank each and every member of the ukraine
sig who responded to my inquiry. each note seemed to
have a new bit of useful information.

i had a very interesting break-thru because of the
help of the nice folks here who concurred that the
name JOJNA would be YONAH in yiddish. i wanted to
share this with all of you, as it is very interesting.

for years, there has been on our family tree a mystery
man named YONAH (no known surname). he was purported
to be the 2nd husband of my gg-grandma (the one who's
name i found on the ship manifest). i'm not sure who
originally put him on the family tree, but no one knew
anything about him. i recently contacted my 91 year
old cousin who is the nephew of this gg-grandma. he
knew her personally and is certain she only had 2
husbands, as was another uncle.

as the responses poured into my inbox >from the
wonderful ukrainain sig-ers, and each one mentioned
the name YONAH, i realized that the mysterious YONAH
on our tree was actually my gg-grandma's *son*, not
her 2nd husband. mystery solved.

thanks again to all the wonderful people who helped.

dayna chalif
san francisco, USA


Re: ViewMate: Philadelphia Ship's Manifest - Verified #general

Eric Benshetler <Penn77@...>
 

Martin-

My guess is that the "verified" stamp was used when issuing a
Certificate of Arrival as part of the naturalization process. Usually
manifests have only handwritten numbers and a date, although you'll
notice that a date stamp was used on some of the other entries on the
manifest page. For more information, see

http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/occ/

---- Eric Benshetler
(in suburban Philadelphia)

On 25 May 2005 22:18:48 -0700, martin@insytecorp.com (nitram) wrote:

Does anyone know what the stamped words verifed along with a date mean on a ship's
manifest. I have my wife's gf and ggf posted on viewmate at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6152

See lines 5 through 8.

Martin Kleiner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: ViewMate: Philadelphia Ship's Manifest - Verified #general

Eric Benshetler <Penn77@...>
 

Martin-

My guess is that the "verified" stamp was used when issuing a
Certificate of Arrival as part of the naturalization process. Usually
manifests have only handwritten numbers and a date, although you'll
notice that a date stamp was used on some of the other entries on the
manifest page. For more information, see

http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/occ/

---- Eric Benshetler
(in suburban Philadelphia)

On 25 May 2005 22:18:48 -0700, martin@insytecorp.com (nitram) wrote:

Does anyone know what the stamped words verifed along with a date mean on a ship's
manifest. I have my wife's gf and ggf posted on viewmate at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6152

See lines 5 through 8.

Martin Kleiner


Discussion continues: Madison Avenue, NYC, c. 1902 #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

Sally BRUCKHEIMER and Shellie WIENER both question where I got my
information that 102nd Street and Madison Avenue in Manhattan would not have
been an affluent area in 1902. By private email, I replied that my information
was personal and anecdotal.

My father's family, like so many Eastern European Jewish immigrant families
in New York City, first settled on the Lower East Side. Shortly afterwards,
before my father's birth, they relocated to Brownsville, in Brooklyn, another
classic neighborhood for the Eastern European Jewish immigrants.
Eventually, they moved to the southeast section of what was called Harlem, at
99th Street. This neighborhood today is known as "Spanish Harlem" in
acknowledgment of the large Hispanic population living there. The center of
Harlem, both north and west, was considered to be a much nicer place.

According to my father's reports to me, the people living in southeast
Harlem at that time, then composed almost exclusively of immigrants Jews and
Italians, still were terribly poor. Were they richer than their family members
remaining on the Lower East Side? Maybe, but the difference probably was
marginal and relative.

I do know that there is a section called (I think) "Mount Morris Park" that
is at Fifth Avenue around 125th Street. At the beginning of the 20th
Century, this was a fine area. Since Madison Avenue is only one street east of
Fifth Avenue, it is possible that these two avenues were nicer then than the
avenues just a few blocks further east.

The German area, as I always I understood it, is "Yorkville." The
unofficial borders of Yorkville would be 86th Street to 96th Street on the
Upper East Side. At 96th Street, even today, Spanish Harlem probably would be
considered to begin.

Sometimes, these internal boundaries are invisible but well-understood by
the residents, and the difference of only a few blocks actually indicates an
entirely different neighborhood. Park Avenue at 96th Street, where the train
tracks to Grand Central go underground, is officially part of the Upper East
Side. Two blocks away, at 98th Street, it's problematic whether that part of
Park Avenue really is the Upper East Side, or whether it's the southeastern
edge of Harlem; ditto at 98th and Third Avenue, also a two block difference
north and east.

The homes of the rich German Jews clustered on the north end of the Upper
East Side, but I think that most of them did not go above 96th Street, though
there may have been some mansions directly on Central Park that were built
higher than 96th Street. The Jewish Museum at 92nd Street, a former Warburg
mansion, is an example.

As I said, to my knowledge, the southeast section of Harlem, the section now
called Spanish Harlem, was not a rich area in 1902.

Judy SEGAL
New York City


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Discussion continues: Madison Avenue, NYC, c. 1902 #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

Sally BRUCKHEIMER and Shellie WIENER both question where I got my
information that 102nd Street and Madison Avenue in Manhattan would not have
been an affluent area in 1902. By private email, I replied that my information
was personal and anecdotal.

My father's family, like so many Eastern European Jewish immigrant families
in New York City, first settled on the Lower East Side. Shortly afterwards,
before my father's birth, they relocated to Brownsville, in Brooklyn, another
classic neighborhood for the Eastern European Jewish immigrants.
Eventually, they moved to the southeast section of what was called Harlem, at
99th Street. This neighborhood today is known as "Spanish Harlem" in
acknowledgment of the large Hispanic population living there. The center of
Harlem, both north and west, was considered to be a much nicer place.

According to my father's reports to me, the people living in southeast
Harlem at that time, then composed almost exclusively of immigrants Jews and
Italians, still were terribly poor. Were they richer than their family members
remaining on the Lower East Side? Maybe, but the difference probably was
marginal and relative.

I do know that there is a section called (I think) "Mount Morris Park" that
is at Fifth Avenue around 125th Street. At the beginning of the 20th
Century, this was a fine area. Since Madison Avenue is only one street east of
Fifth Avenue, it is possible that these two avenues were nicer then than the
avenues just a few blocks further east.

The German area, as I always I understood it, is "Yorkville." The
unofficial borders of Yorkville would be 86th Street to 96th Street on the
Upper East Side. At 96th Street, even today, Spanish Harlem probably would be
considered to begin.

Sometimes, these internal boundaries are invisible but well-understood by
the residents, and the difference of only a few blocks actually indicates an
entirely different neighborhood. Park Avenue at 96th Street, where the train
tracks to Grand Central go underground, is officially part of the Upper East
Side. Two blocks away, at 98th Street, it's problematic whether that part of
Park Avenue really is the Upper East Side, or whether it's the southeastern
edge of Harlem; ditto at 98th and Third Avenue, also a two block difference
north and east.

The homes of the rich German Jews clustered on the north end of the Upper
East Side, but I think that most of them did not go above 96th Street, though
there may have been some mansions directly on Central Park that were built
higher than 96th Street. The Jewish Museum at 92nd Street, a former Warburg
mansion, is an example.

As I said, to my knowledge, the southeast section of Harlem, the section now
called Spanish Harlem, was not a rich area in 1902.

Judy SEGAL
New York City


1942 - Coming to America #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

Does anyone know for certain (no guesses), if aliens >from Poland and Germany
would have been able to come to America in 1942 on a permanent basis?

Thanks,
Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1942 - Coming to America #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

Does anyone know for certain (no guesses), if aliens >from Poland and Germany
would have been able to come to America in 1942 on a permanent basis?

Thanks,
Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Re: Wilner family of Warsaw #general

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Ann Rabinowitz wrote:

"I am posting this for a friend who is looking for the siblings of Alexander
WILNER who was born in Warsaw in 1918 and came to the U.S. after WWII."

You can find some WILNERs in the 1938/1939 Warsaw Telphone Directory,
available on the Library of Congress' website, using the search engine at
www.kalter.org/search.php.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Wilner family of Warsaw #general

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Ann Rabinowitz wrote:

"I am posting this for a friend who is looking for the siblings of Alexander
WILNER who was born in Warsaw in 1918 and came to the U.S. after WWII."

You can find some WILNERs in the 1938/1939 Warsaw Telphone Directory,
available on the Library of Congress' website, using the search engine at
www.kalter.org/search.php.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


The Name Jojna #ukraine

Lancy
 

Jojna is the Yiddish vernacular of the Hebrew name Yonah, the name of the
prophet. In English, Jonas.

Lancy Spalter
Kfar Tavor, Israel

----- Original Message -----


also, the ship manifest said they left behind in
russia a son, whose first name was JOJNA. i have
searched the jewishgen given names database and get no
hits on this name. does anyone else have male family
members >from russia with this or a similar first
name?if so, what was the hebrew/yiddish equivalent?
also what were they called if they immigreated to
america?

please respond privately.

thanks,
dayna chalif
san francisco, USA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine The Name Jojna #ukraine

Lancy
 

Jojna is the Yiddish vernacular of the Hebrew name Yonah, the name of the
prophet. In English, Jonas.

Lancy Spalter
Kfar Tavor, Israel

----- Original Message -----


also, the ship manifest said they left behind in
russia a son, whose first name was JOJNA. i have
searched the jewishgen given names database and get no
hits on this name. does anyone else have male family
members >from russia with this or a similar first
name?if so, what was the hebrew/yiddish equivalent?
also what were they called if they immigreated to
america?

please respond privately.

thanks,
dayna chalif
san francisco, USA


"Former Residence" #ukraine

Steve Franklin <cryptozoomorphic@...>
 

I realise the reader asked for a private response, but there is an issue here I
have noticed for a while now. These are the entries found in ships manifests and
other places that speak of "most recent" or "former" places of residence. I have
not studied this enough to have a complete theory on the subject, but my general
impression is that it was not clear to the respondent just exactly what the
correct answer might be.

Consider: These are folks who may have spent weeks, even months on occasion, at
the port >from which they sailed, waiting for papers, waiting for someone to get
over an illness, waiting for money promised by relatives. They also may have
spent time at an intermediate residence in another country or province closer to
the western and northern European ports >from which they sailed, at the home of
distant or closer relatives who volunteered or were persuaded to help them on
their journeys. They may also have moved to larger cities, as did my grandfather
to Ekaterinoslav, prior to, or in preparation for, their long journey to America
or other foreign country.

There was also confusion in their minds as to whether they needed to, or should,
specify the name of their tiny shtetl or the larger town nearby that would be
better known to the wider world. It was also very common to specify the name of
a district (or the city after which the district was named) rather than the
actual city >from which or near which they lived. They would even sometimes
specify the province (gubernya) >from which they came. My mother insisted her
family came >from "Kovno" despite the fact that they came >from a different town
in Kaunas Gubernya.

So it is critical to keep in mind that none of these responses to questions or
questionnaires is chiseled in stone. They are simply the best answers your
ancestors could think of, or the ones they thought they were expected to give,
and did not necessarily reflect the facts on the ground, so to speak.

Steve FRANKLIN (FRENKEL), SHEVCHINSKY or SCHAFF, SOSNOVSKY, WOLF: Dnieper River
towns
http://www.lordbalto.com/
|
| i recently found the ship manifest for the journey to
| america of my gg-grandmother, her husband and 2
| children. the manifest says they came >from the town of
| GAISIN in "Pod. gub." Russia. the 1930 census says
| they came >from "Podolsk." i have also been told by
| other family members they were >from the
| kamenets-podolsk region of russia. i looked in the
| shetl seeker and found a few possibilities for this
| town, but so far i'm unable to find a town called
| GAISIN in the kamenetz-podolsk area. can anyone help
| me with this?
|
| also, the ship manifest said they left behind in
| russia a son, whose first name was JOJNA...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine "Former Residence" #ukraine

Steve Franklin <cryptozoomorphic@...>
 

I realise the reader asked for a private response, but there is an issue here I
have noticed for a while now. These are the entries found in ships manifests and
other places that speak of "most recent" or "former" places of residence. I have
not studied this enough to have a complete theory on the subject, but my general
impression is that it was not clear to the respondent just exactly what the
correct answer might be.

Consider: These are folks who may have spent weeks, even months on occasion, at
the port >from which they sailed, waiting for papers, waiting for someone to get
over an illness, waiting for money promised by relatives. They also may have
spent time at an intermediate residence in another country or province closer to
the western and northern European ports >from which they sailed, at the home of
distant or closer relatives who volunteered or were persuaded to help them on
their journeys. They may also have moved to larger cities, as did my grandfather
to Ekaterinoslav, prior to, or in preparation for, their long journey to America
or other foreign country.

There was also confusion in their minds as to whether they needed to, or should,
specify the name of their tiny shtetl or the larger town nearby that would be
better known to the wider world. It was also very common to specify the name of
a district (or the city after which the district was named) rather than the
actual city >from which or near which they lived. They would even sometimes
specify the province (gubernya) >from which they came. My mother insisted her
family came >from "Kovno" despite the fact that they came >from a different town
in Kaunas Gubernya.

So it is critical to keep in mind that none of these responses to questions or
questionnaires is chiseled in stone. They are simply the best answers your
ancestors could think of, or the ones they thought they were expected to give,
and did not necessarily reflect the facts on the ground, so to speak.

Steve FRANKLIN (FRENKEL), SHEVCHINSKY or SCHAFF, SOSNOVSKY, WOLF: Dnieper River
towns
http://www.lordbalto.com/
|
| i recently found the ship manifest for the journey to
| america of my gg-grandmother, her husband and 2
| children. the manifest says they came >from the town of
| GAISIN in "Pod. gub." Russia. the 1930 census says
| they came >from "Podolsk." i have also been told by
| other family members they were >from the
| kamenets-podolsk region of russia. i looked in the
| shetl seeker and found a few possibilities for this
| town, but so far i'm unable to find a town called
| GAISIN in the kamenetz-podolsk area. can anyone help
| me with this?
|
| also, the ship manifest said they left behind in
| russia a son, whose first name was JOJNA...