Date   

Seeking Babette GOETZ - Bensheim #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

Dear GerSigger

I'm searching for Babette GOETZ born January 2nd, 1844 in Bensheim-
Bergstrasse Hessia and married to Wilhelm MAINZER of
Heppenheim/Bergstrasse 12-31-1838 - 12-29-1922

I'm looking for the names and the dates of the parents of Babette GOETZ

Very best >from Hansmartin Unger in Switzerland @BOXE


German SIG #Germany Seeking Babette GOETZ - Bensheim #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

Dear GerSigger

I'm searching for Babette GOETZ born January 2nd, 1844 in Bensheim-
Bergstrasse Hessia and married to Wilhelm MAINZER of
Heppenheim/Bergstrasse 12-31-1838 - 12-29-1922

I'm looking for the names and the dates of the parents of Babette GOETZ

Very best >from Hansmartin Unger in Switzerland @BOXE


Re: Posen Documents on line - Thank you! #germany

Ury Link
 

Dear Mr Lustig

I have read you letter today about the Posen documents.
and I wanted to thank you very very much for the link to this documents.

My father was born in Posen and also my Grandmother and her family.

It took me time to find how the system is working, but after not more
then 1 hour I found what I wanted to find.

I learned when my Grandfather came to Posen, where the lived,
the birth documents about the Grand-grand parents and more.

Today in the evening I will try to find more information that I missed before.

Without you "Link" I it was not happened. Thanks again and best regards,

Ury Link, Amsterdam Holland uryl@...


German SIG #Germany Re: Posen Documents on line - Thank you! #germany

Ury Link
 

Dear Mr Lustig

I have read you letter today about the Posen documents.
and I wanted to thank you very very much for the link to this documents.

My father was born in Posen and also my Grandmother and her family.

It took me time to find how the system is working, but after not more
then 1 hour I found what I wanted to find.

I learned when my Grandfather came to Posen, where the lived,
the birth documents about the Grand-grand parents and more.

Today in the evening I will try to find more information that I missed before.

Without you "Link" I it was not happened. Thanks again and best regards,

Ury Link, Amsterdam Holland uryl@...


Clarification of German Name from 1854 #germany

Michael Rubin
 

I'm looking for your collective perspective on a name >from 1854.
This name came >from a marriage registration in Hartford Connecticut
USA and belonged to a Jewish woman who was either >from Bavaria or
was the daughter of former Bavarians.

The name is "Rechina Roster." The first name is almost certainly Regina
(based on other sources of information), but the last name puzzles me.
This doesn't sound like a German name and I suspect that it was
corrupted/changed in the registration process.

I'd be interested in your perspectives on what the last name actually
should be based on its German (Jewish) origins. Thanks,

Michael Rubin, Newton, Mass. USA rubinmichaels@...


German SIG #Germany Clarification of German Name from 1854 #germany

Michael Rubin
 

I'm looking for your collective perspective on a name >from 1854.
This name came >from a marriage registration in Hartford Connecticut
USA and belonged to a Jewish woman who was either >from Bavaria or
was the daughter of former Bavarians.

The name is "Rechina Roster." The first name is almost certainly Regina
(based on other sources of information), but the last name puzzles me.
This doesn't sound like a German name and I suspect that it was
corrupted/changed in the registration process.

I'd be interested in your perspectives on what the last name actually
should be based on its German (Jewish) origins. Thanks,

Michael Rubin, Newton, Mass. USA rubinmichaels@...


Memorial Plaque Project Update - Launches With 30,000 Records #subcarpathia

Nolan Altman
 

Memorial Plaque Project Launches With 30,000 Records. Please help us grow!

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2013 initial year report for the Memorial
Plaque Project database. The MPP database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/ The MPP database includes the
data >from plaques and Yizkor lists >from synagogue and other organizations.
Many of these sources include patronymic information.

In its initial year, the database includes close to 30,000 records >from the
US, Israel and British Columbia. These records come >from 46 different
synagogues and other institutions.

We believe that the MPP is a good example of how users of JewishGen's
databases can "give back". If you are a member of a synagogue or other
organization with memorial plaques or Yizkor lists, please consider helping
us to grow this database. You can find more information on submitting data
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm If you have
additional questions, please contact me directly.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

-Boston Area, Massachusetts. Thanks to David Rosen, who is coordinating
submissions >from the JGS of Greater Boston in time for the summer IAJGS
Conference. David's team of volunteers have been working at this project
for over 6 months and are credited with submitting 16,000 records >from 30
institutions.
-Bialystoker Center, NY. Thanks to Mark Halpern for coordinating the
submission of 4,000 records >from the Bialystoker Center in Manhattan.
-White Plains, NY. Thanks to Alan Steinfeld for coordinating the submission
of 2,250 records >from Congregation Kol Ami.
-Albany, NY. Thanks to Professor Barry Trachtenberg and the students of his
"American Jewish Experience" class at the University at Albany, State
University of New York, for photographing, indexing and submitting 2,100
records >from B'Nai Shalom Reform Congregation and Temple Israel in Albany,
NY.
-Oakdale, NY. Thanks to Karen Smollins for coordinating the submission of
1,550 records >from the B'nai Israel Reform Temple in Oakdale, NY.
-Huntington, NY. Thanks to Sandy Masnick for coordinating the submission of
750 records >from Temple Beth El in Huntington, NY.
-Bronx, NY. Thanks to Roberta Solit for photographing and indexing 650
records >from Temple Emanuel of Parkchester in the Bronx.

Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all your
submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information for
this update.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@...
JewishGen Acting VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
July 2013


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Memorial Plaque Project Update - Launches With 30,000 Records #subcarpathia

Nolan Altman
 

Memorial Plaque Project Launches With 30,000 Records. Please help us grow!

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2013 initial year report for the Memorial
Plaque Project database. The MPP database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/ The MPP database includes the
data >from plaques and Yizkor lists >from synagogue and other organizations.
Many of these sources include patronymic information.

In its initial year, the database includes close to 30,000 records >from the
US, Israel and British Columbia. These records come >from 46 different
synagogues and other institutions.

We believe that the MPP is a good example of how users of JewishGen's
databases can "give back". If you are a member of a synagogue or other
organization with memorial plaques or Yizkor lists, please consider helping
us to grow this database. You can find more information on submitting data
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm If you have
additional questions, please contact me directly.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

-Boston Area, Massachusetts. Thanks to David Rosen, who is coordinating
submissions >from the JGS of Greater Boston in time for the summer IAJGS
Conference. David's team of volunteers have been working at this project
for over 6 months and are credited with submitting 16,000 records >from 30
institutions.
-Bialystoker Center, NY. Thanks to Mark Halpern for coordinating the
submission of 4,000 records >from the Bialystoker Center in Manhattan.
-White Plains, NY. Thanks to Alan Steinfeld for coordinating the submission
of 2,250 records >from Congregation Kol Ami.
-Albany, NY. Thanks to Professor Barry Trachtenberg and the students of his
"American Jewish Experience" class at the University at Albany, State
University of New York, for photographing, indexing and submitting 2,100
records >from B'Nai Shalom Reform Congregation and Temple Israel in Albany,
NY.
-Oakdale, NY. Thanks to Karen Smollins for coordinating the submission of
1,550 records >from the B'nai Israel Reform Temple in Oakdale, NY.
-Huntington, NY. Thanks to Sandy Masnick for coordinating the submission of
750 records >from Temple Beth El in Huntington, NY.
-Bronx, NY. Thanks to Roberta Solit for photographing and indexing 650
records >from Temple Emanuel of Parkchester in the Bronx.

Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all your
submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information for
this update.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@...
JewishGen Acting VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
July 2013


JOWBR Update - JOWBR Breaks Through 2 Million Records! #subcarpathia

Nolan Altman
 

JOWBR Breaks Through the 2 Million Record Mark!

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2013 pre-Conference update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR database
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a
new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the first two
explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 75,000 new records and 21,000 new photos.
The database is adding 220 new cemeteries along with updates or additions to
an additional 330 cemeteries. This update brings JOWBR's holdings to 2.03
million records >from almost 4,050 cemeteries / cemetery sections
representing 81 countries!

Once again, donors for this update include a mix of individuals, Jewish
genealogical societies, historical societies and museums. We appreciate all
our donor's submissions and the transliteration work done by a faithful
group of JewishGen volunteers.

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to find
and gain permission to add many of the records >from under-represented
countries. In addition, without our volunteer transliterators, led by
Gilberto Jugend, we would not be able to add the information >from some very
difficult to read photos.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

-Germany. We are adding close to 140 new German cemeteries (20,000 records).
Significant contributions came from:
Dieter Peters submitted approximately 130 cemeteries with 11,000
records >from his collection. Additional cemetery records will be added in
future updates.
Gerold Helmts of the Jüdische Gemeinde, Hamburg, submitted 2 Hamburg
cemeteries with 4,300 records.
Gil Hüttenmeister submitted 4 cemeteries comprising 2,750 records.
Professor Dr. Manfred Brusten submitted 3 Wuppertal cemeteries of
1,600 records.
-Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing submissions >from Netanya,
Petach Tikvah and Savyon. This update includes 12,700 records and close to
1,000 photos.
-New Haven, Connecticut. Thanks to Rabbi Eliezer Greer, Research Director
of The New Haven Jewish Cemetery Association, for supplementing and
adjusting records we originally had >from Rabbi Ed Cohen. Rabbi Eliezer's
group is responsible for an additional 4,200 records.
-Norfolk & Portsmouth, Virginia. Our appreciation to Donna Bluemink for
coordinating the submission of approximately 3,600 records >from 3 cemeteries
in Norfolk and for 3 cemeteries in Portsmouth, Virginia originally compiled
by Samuel Werth.
-Bender, Moldova. Thanks to Yefim Kogan for adding 3,300 additional records
and photos for this cemetery in the Bessarabian region of Moldova.
-Czech Republic. We are adding close to 3,100 records >from 11 different
cemeteries thanks to Achab Haidler >from the Chewra organization in the Czech
Republic.
-Bahia Blanca, Argentina. Thanks to Claudia Nasberg Director (Gerente) of
the Asociación Israelita de Bahía Blanca for submitting source documents
that include 2,250 records.
-Slovakia. We are adding 6 cemeteries, 1,900 records and 300 photos thanks
to submission by Shaul Berger and Ludmila Pártosová.
-Israeli Kibbutzim. Our thanks to the Israel Genealogy Research Group for
submitting 1,700 records >from 6 Kibbutzim.
-South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Meddin Hellman for coordinating
the submission of 1,700 photos >from 4 South Carolinian cemeteries.
-Waterbury, Connecticut. Thanks to Ruben Poupko for submitting 1,650
records and photos for 8 Waterbury cemeteries. Some additional sections
will be added in future updates.
-Bern-Wankdorf, Switzerland. Thanks to Rubina Lerch of the Sekretariat of
the Jüdische Gemeinde Bern (JGB) for submitting 1,650 records >from this
Swiss cemetery.
-Passaic Junction Cemetery, Saddle Brook, NJ. Thanks to Mark Pollack who
has completed indexing this cemetery with the final 1,500 records.
-US Veteran Burials. We are adding 1,500 records that update our collection
of veteran burials in Federal and State veteran cemeteries around the
country.
-Guanabacoa, Cuba. Our thanks to Daniel Kazez for submitting 1,400 records
from this Cuban cemetery.
-Ontario, Canada. Thanks to Allen Halberstadt, coordinator of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Canada, Toronto's Cemetery Project, for updating 240
cemetery sections resulting in 1,400 additional records >from various
cemeteries.
-Slubice, Poland. Thanks to Katja Wolgast for submitting 1,200 records from
Slubice, formerly known in German as Dammvorstadt, which was the historic
site of the Jewish Cemetery of Frankfurt (Oder).
-Randolph, Massachusetts. Thanks to Deborah Hatch for submitting 1,000
records and photos for 4 sections of the Lindwood Memorial Park in Randolph.
-Peabody, Massachusetts. Thanks to Mitch Hollander an Alan Gordon for
submitting 1,000 records and 900 photos >from the Temple Beth El Cemetery.
-Soroca, Moldova. Thanks to Brock Bierman for submitting 900 records and
photos >from the old cemetery in Moldova.
Woburn, Massachusetts. Thanks to Marjorie Duby for submitting 800 photos
from the Beth Joseph 3 Cemetery section in Woburn, Mass.
Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all your
submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information for
this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to make
additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery section
individually or consider a group project for your local Society, temple or
other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR database and
make it possible for researchers and family members to find answers they
otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations you may be
affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would
consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@...
JewishGen Acting VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
July 2013

MODERATOR NOTE: Sub-Carpathia is represented, although not mentioned.


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia JOWBR Update - JOWBR Breaks Through 2 Million Records! #subcarpathia

Nolan Altman
 

JOWBR Breaks Through the 2 Million Record Mark!

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2013 pre-Conference update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR database
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a
new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the first two
explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 75,000 new records and 21,000 new photos.
The database is adding 220 new cemeteries along with updates or additions to
an additional 330 cemeteries. This update brings JOWBR's holdings to 2.03
million records >from almost 4,050 cemeteries / cemetery sections
representing 81 countries!

Once again, donors for this update include a mix of individuals, Jewish
genealogical societies, historical societies and museums. We appreciate all
our donor's submissions and the transliteration work done by a faithful
group of JewishGen volunteers.

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to find
and gain permission to add many of the records >from under-represented
countries. In addition, without our volunteer transliterators, led by
Gilberto Jugend, we would not be able to add the information >from some very
difficult to read photos.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

-Germany. We are adding close to 140 new German cemeteries (20,000 records).
Significant contributions came from:
Dieter Peters submitted approximately 130 cemeteries with 11,000
records >from his collection. Additional cemetery records will be added in
future updates.
Gerold Helmts of the Jüdische Gemeinde, Hamburg, submitted 2 Hamburg
cemeteries with 4,300 records.
Gil Hüttenmeister submitted 4 cemeteries comprising 2,750 records.
Professor Dr. Manfred Brusten submitted 3 Wuppertal cemeteries of
1,600 records.
-Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing submissions >from Netanya,
Petach Tikvah and Savyon. This update includes 12,700 records and close to
1,000 photos.
-New Haven, Connecticut. Thanks to Rabbi Eliezer Greer, Research Director
of The New Haven Jewish Cemetery Association, for supplementing and
adjusting records we originally had >from Rabbi Ed Cohen. Rabbi Eliezer's
group is responsible for an additional 4,200 records.
-Norfolk & Portsmouth, Virginia. Our appreciation to Donna Bluemink for
coordinating the submission of approximately 3,600 records >from 3 cemeteries
in Norfolk and for 3 cemeteries in Portsmouth, Virginia originally compiled
by Samuel Werth.
-Bender, Moldova. Thanks to Yefim Kogan for adding 3,300 additional records
and photos for this cemetery in the Bessarabian region of Moldova.
-Czech Republic. We are adding close to 3,100 records >from 11 different
cemeteries thanks to Achab Haidler >from the Chewra organization in the Czech
Republic.
-Bahia Blanca, Argentina. Thanks to Claudia Nasberg Director (Gerente) of
the Asociación Israelita de Bahía Blanca for submitting source documents
that include 2,250 records.
-Slovakia. We are adding 6 cemeteries, 1,900 records and 300 photos thanks
to submission by Shaul Berger and Ludmila Pártosová.
-Israeli Kibbutzim. Our thanks to the Israel Genealogy Research Group for
submitting 1,700 records >from 6 Kibbutzim.
-South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Meddin Hellman for coordinating
the submission of 1,700 photos >from 4 South Carolinian cemeteries.
-Waterbury, Connecticut. Thanks to Ruben Poupko for submitting 1,650
records and photos for 8 Waterbury cemeteries. Some additional sections
will be added in future updates.
-Bern-Wankdorf, Switzerland. Thanks to Rubina Lerch of the Sekretariat of
the Jüdische Gemeinde Bern (JGB) for submitting 1,650 records >from this
Swiss cemetery.
-Passaic Junction Cemetery, Saddle Brook, NJ. Thanks to Mark Pollack who
has completed indexing this cemetery with the final 1,500 records.
-US Veteran Burials. We are adding 1,500 records that update our collection
of veteran burials in Federal and State veteran cemeteries around the
country.
-Guanabacoa, Cuba. Our thanks to Daniel Kazez for submitting 1,400 records
from this Cuban cemetery.
-Ontario, Canada. Thanks to Allen Halberstadt, coordinator of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Canada, Toronto's Cemetery Project, for updating 240
cemetery sections resulting in 1,400 additional records >from various
cemeteries.
-Slubice, Poland. Thanks to Katja Wolgast for submitting 1,200 records from
Slubice, formerly known in German as Dammvorstadt, which was the historic
site of the Jewish Cemetery of Frankfurt (Oder).
-Randolph, Massachusetts. Thanks to Deborah Hatch for submitting 1,000
records and photos for 4 sections of the Lindwood Memorial Park in Randolph.
-Peabody, Massachusetts. Thanks to Mitch Hollander an Alan Gordon for
submitting 1,000 records and 900 photos >from the Temple Beth El Cemetery.
-Soroca, Moldova. Thanks to Brock Bierman for submitting 900 records and
photos >from the old cemetery in Moldova.
Woburn, Massachusetts. Thanks to Marjorie Duby for submitting 800 photos
from the Beth Joseph 3 Cemetery section in Woburn, Mass.
Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all your
submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information for
this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to make
additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery section
individually or consider a group project for your local Society, temple or
other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR database and
make it possible for researchers and family members to find answers they
otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations you may be
affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would
consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@...
JewishGen Acting VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
July 2013

MODERATOR NOTE: Sub-Carpathia is represented, although not mentioned.


Re: how to interpret results #dna

Itzhak Epstein
 

Milton,

To begin with, why do you think that you are related to these
Kochs? What do your Y-DNA tests indicate?

>from the little that you write, it looks like all three of you are
Ashkenazi Jews.

We Ashkenazim are endogamous and we share much of the same genetic
cocktail. Therefore, total centimorgans are not so useful for
us. Largest segment are more helpful.

To get an idea of how meaningful these totals are, I analyzed the FF
data fo a cousin on which results I am now working. She had about
1980 matches with total strangers which I divided into ten
deciles. Below are the deciles and the total centimorgan ranges in
each of them.

107 - 157 ( 50 )
97 - 107 ( 10 )
90 - 97 ( 7 )
84 - 90 ( 6 )
78 - 84 ( 6 )
73 - 78 ( 5 )
66 - 73 ( 7 )
56 - 66 ( 10 )
43 - 56 ( 13 )
20 - 43 ( 23 )

As for a town in common, think regionally. Our ancestors often moved
within regions and some locations indicate the likelihood of
migration (think Odessa). When you identify a likely relative,
identify the regions and ask about migrations.

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY
<mailto:iegen@...>

At 11:42 AM 7/25/2013, Milton wrote:
I have done a FamilyFinder with FTDNA, along with two other people
whose families are also KOCH >from Jagielnica. We have not yet been
able to connect our families with a common ancestor.
The data reveals that one of them has 65+ cMorgans in common with
me, and the other has 87+.
In addition, when reviewing other "possible relatives", I noticed
that several people have over 150 cM in common with me. However,
there do not seem to be any names or towns in common with me in this
group of people.
How do I interpret the results of the two other KOCH families? Does
the data truly suggest a relationship, even as far back as several
generations?


DNA Research #DNA Re: how to interpret results #dna

Itzhak Epstein
 

Milton,

To begin with, why do you think that you are related to these
Kochs? What do your Y-DNA tests indicate?

>from the little that you write, it looks like all three of you are
Ashkenazi Jews.

We Ashkenazim are endogamous and we share much of the same genetic
cocktail. Therefore, total centimorgans are not so useful for
us. Largest segment are more helpful.

To get an idea of how meaningful these totals are, I analyzed the FF
data fo a cousin on which results I am now working. She had about
1980 matches with total strangers which I divided into ten
deciles. Below are the deciles and the total centimorgan ranges in
each of them.

107 - 157 ( 50 )
97 - 107 ( 10 )
90 - 97 ( 7 )
84 - 90 ( 6 )
78 - 84 ( 6 )
73 - 78 ( 5 )
66 - 73 ( 7 )
56 - 66 ( 10 )
43 - 56 ( 13 )
20 - 43 ( 23 )

As for a town in common, think regionally. Our ancestors often moved
within regions and some locations indicate the likelihood of
migration (think Odessa). When you identify a likely relative,
identify the regions and ask about migrations.

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY
<mailto:iegen@...>

At 11:42 AM 7/25/2013, Milton wrote:
I have done a FamilyFinder with FTDNA, along with two other people
whose families are also KOCH >from Jagielnica. We have not yet been
able to connect our families with a common ancestor.
The data reveals that one of them has 65+ cMorgans in common with
me, and the other has 87+.
In addition, when reviewing other "possible relatives", I noticed
that several people have over 150 cM in common with me. However,
there do not seem to be any names or towns in common with me in this
group of people.
How do I interpret the results of the two other KOCH families? Does
the data truly suggest a relationship, even as far back as several
generations?


Do you recognize any of these names? #general

nk
 

All,

I have found names of family members in on-line family trees managed by
individuals whom I have never heard of.

Do you know any of these managers and have their contact information?

1) Divon Mordechai Lan lists my paternal ggrandparents (Zelbovitch) on his tree.

2) Benjamin Murkoff (perhaps >from England?) lists my paternal grandparents
(Zelbovitch) in his tree.

3) Chen Katz who lives in Rishon l'Zion, Israel, grand-daughter of Feiga
(Zelbovich) and Reuven Ioneson.

Thank you so much for your time.


Michele Zell Kanter
Skokie, IL

Researching:

ZELBOVITCH, ZILBER - Ponidel, Lithuania
KORB, LEVIN - Skopishok, Lithuania
KARLIK, LAVINTMAN - Kitay Gorod, Ukraine
GREENBERG - Kamenny Brod, Ukraine

MODERATOR NOTE: Private responses only.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Do you recognize any of these names? #general

nk
 

All,

I have found names of family members in on-line family trees managed by
individuals whom I have never heard of.

Do you know any of these managers and have their contact information?

1) Divon Mordechai Lan lists my paternal ggrandparents (Zelbovitch) on his tree.

2) Benjamin Murkoff (perhaps >from England?) lists my paternal grandparents
(Zelbovitch) in his tree.

3) Chen Katz who lives in Rishon l'Zion, Israel, grand-daughter of Feiga
(Zelbovich) and Reuven Ioneson.

Thank you so much for your time.


Michele Zell Kanter
Skokie, IL

Researching:

ZELBOVITCH, ZILBER - Ponidel, Lithuania
KORB, LEVIN - Skopishok, Lithuania
KARLIK, LAVINTMAN - Kitay Gorod, Ukraine
GREENBERG - Kamenny Brod, Ukraine

MODERATOR NOTE: Private responses only.


A new website for Vilnius Internal Passport Records #general

Howard Margol
 

A new shutterfly web site for Vilnius Internal Passport records is now available.
To date, 9,080 records have been translated.
https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com/

During Lithuania independence, 1919-1940, everyone in Vilnius had to apply for an
internal passport. Also during that time, Vilnius was part of Poland and not
Lithuania. Some of those who received an internal passport were born in Vilnius.
However, a large percentage were born elsewhere, including a large number >from
Belarus and parts of Poland.

If you go to the site, you will see a small sample of surnames that appear in
those records. You will notice where they were born, including Belarus and Poland.
Most of the site is available at no charge. To see the translated Vilnius I.P.
records, special arrangements have to be made.

An additional 35,000 Vilnius I.P. records remain to be translated.

The site also includes an index of 97,000 I.P. records for other places in
Lithuania that have been translated. For those interested in records for a
particular district, you can contact the district coordinator at
http://www.litvaksig.org/districtresearch and/or
http://www.litvaksig.org/specialprojects

Howard Margol
Founder - Coordinator - Lithuania Internal Passport Project
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A new website for Vilnius Internal Passport Records #general

Howard Margol
 

A new shutterfly web site for Vilnius Internal Passport records is now available.
To date, 9,080 records have been translated.
https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com/

During Lithuania independence, 1919-1940, everyone in Vilnius had to apply for an
internal passport. Also during that time, Vilnius was part of Poland and not
Lithuania. Some of those who received an internal passport were born in Vilnius.
However, a large percentage were born elsewhere, including a large number >from
Belarus and parts of Poland.

If you go to the site, you will see a small sample of surnames that appear in
those records. You will notice where they were born, including Belarus and Poland.
Most of the site is available at no charge. To see the translated Vilnius I.P.
records, special arrangements have to be made.

An additional 35,000 Vilnius I.P. records remain to be translated.

The site also includes an index of 97,000 I.P. records for other places in
Lithuania that have been translated. For those interested in records for a
particular district, you can contact the district coordinator at
http://www.litvaksig.org/districtresearch and/or
http://www.litvaksig.org/specialprojects

Howard Margol
Founder - Coordinator - Lithuania Internal Passport Project
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Re: Usefulness of DNA testing in genealogy, and FTDNA vs. 23-and-me #dna

Marsha Epstein <marsha.epstein@...>
 

Both Y DNA tests and autosomal tests can be useful in genealogy. I
just helped a member of the Epstein Surname Group at Family Tree DNA
find his 1/2 brother. He never knew his father, just that his father
was Jewish. His mother was unmarried. He took the YDNA results which
confirmed he matched only with Jewish men >from Eastern Europe, but no
close matches. Then he took the autosomal test and found a 2nd cousin.
I wrote the 2nd cousin asking if she had any relatives in or >from St.
Louis, where this man was born. She DID, and it turned out to be our
member's 1/2 brother. The relationship was confirmed with YDNA
testing. So he has now gotten together with his biological father's
family as a result of DNA testing.

This demonstrates another benefit of Family Tree DNA over 23-and-me:
we have volunteer administrators who are skilled in DNA testing and
genealogy who can help, as I did with this member. It demonstrates the
benefit of joining an existing group, especially one that has lots of
members. I've learned so much >from the administrators of the groups
I'm in.

Marsha Epstein
Los Angeles
Co-Administrator of the Epstein Surname DNA Group at Family Tree DNA


DNA Research #DNA Re: Usefulness of DNA testing in genealogy, and FTDNA vs. 23-and-me #dna

Marsha Epstein <marsha.epstein@...>
 

Both Y DNA tests and autosomal tests can be useful in genealogy. I
just helped a member of the Epstein Surname Group at Family Tree DNA
find his 1/2 brother. He never knew his father, just that his father
was Jewish. His mother was unmarried. He took the YDNA results which
confirmed he matched only with Jewish men >from Eastern Europe, but no
close matches. Then he took the autosomal test and found a 2nd cousin.
I wrote the 2nd cousin asking if she had any relatives in or >from St.
Louis, where this man was born. She DID, and it turned out to be our
member's 1/2 brother. The relationship was confirmed with YDNA
testing. So he has now gotten together with his biological father's
family as a result of DNA testing.

This demonstrates another benefit of Family Tree DNA over 23-and-me:
we have volunteer administrators who are skilled in DNA testing and
genealogy who can help, as I did with this member. It demonstrates the
benefit of joining an existing group, especially one that has lots of
members. I've learned so much >from the administrators of the groups
I'm in.

Marsha Epstein
Los Angeles
Co-Administrator of the Epstein Surname DNA Group at Family Tree DNA


Lida District Birds-of-a-Feather meeting August 7 in Boston #belarus

Jrbaston
 

If your family came >from the towns of Eisiskes (now in Lithuania),
Belitsy,
Lida, Novy Dwor, Orlya, Ostrynia, Radun, Rozhanka, Scucin, Vasilishki,
Voronovo and Zhaludok (all now in Belarus), as well as surrounding
villages,
then please join us at the Lida District Birds of a Feather (BOF) meeting,
Wednesday, August 7, >from 3:30-4:45 p.m., in the Cabot Room, on the
4th Floor of the Park Plaza Hotel in Boston.

The BOF meeting is part of the International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy taking place in Boston >from August 4-9.

The meeting will discuss new Lida District projects and resources,
review the many existing Internet resources for Lida District researchers,
and offer the opportunity for networking between researchers.

Data for Lida District towns is handled by LitvakSIG (for records in the
Lithuanian State Historical Archive-Vilnius) and also by BelarusSIG (for
records mostly in the Grodno Archive). And there are a number of other
resources available for Lida District research.

Hope to see you on August 7,

Judy Baston, Coordinator
Lida District Birds of a Feather
JRBaston@...


Ukraine SIG Activities at IAJGS Conference, Boston #ukraine

rondoctor@...
 

Dear Ukraine SIG Friends,

As most of you know the 2013 Annual Conference of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies is in Boston at the
Park Plaza Hotel >from 4-9 August.
Ukraine SIG is sponsoring several sessions and events at the Conference
and there are many presentations dealing with Ukraine.

I have corresponded with many of you over the past two years and will be
delighted to meet you in person. I hope you will join us at as many of these
events as possible.

*Ukraine SIG Special Events*
=============================

*Ukraine SIG Table at SHARE SIG/BOF Fair*
Sunday, 4 August, 1:30 pm -5:00 pm, Imperial Ballroom, Mezzanine

Visit us at the Ukraine SIG table at the SHARE Fair. Stop by to say
hello. We’ll try to respond to any questions you have.

*Ukraine SIG Annual Meeting*
Wednesday, 7 August, 9:45 am – 11:00 am, Plaza Ballroom, Mezzanine

Ron Doctor, Janette Silverman and selected Ukraine SIG volunteers
will discuss the SIG’s accomplishments during the past year and will offer a
preview of where we are headed in the next year. We’ll talk about new data
acquisitions and translations and what it means for your research. We’ll set
aside time for an open question and answer period and will conclude the
Annual Meeting with formal transfer of the Coordinator position >from Ron
to Janette.

*Ukraine SIG Town Leaders, Project Leaders, and KehilaLinks Owners,
1^st Annual Meeting*
Wednesday, 7 August, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm, Plaza Ballroom, Mezzanine

If you are a Ukraine SIG Town Leader, Project Leader or KehilaLinks
Owner, please try to attend this meeting. If you are not yet one of our
volunteers but would like more information you are welcome to attend and
participate. We will discuss new resources, projects and fundraising
activities, and will offer suggestions for getting started.

*Ukraine SIG Luncheon, Yochai Ben Ghedalia*
Common Interest - New Modes of Cooperation Between an Archive and a SIG
Cost for the luncheon and presentation is $42. Attendance is limited.
To register, go to http://www.iajgs2013.org/meals.cfm
Thursday, 8 August, 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm, Arlington Room, Mezzanine

Yochai Ben Ghedalia, Director of the Central Archives for the
History of the Jewish People (CAHJP, at Hebrew University in Jerusalem)
will give the SIG's annual luncheon presentation. In the past year Ukraine
SIG and other JewishGen groups have entered into agreements with the
Central Archives. These agreements involve acquisition of documents and
other new materials that the Central Archives holds and is acquiring in
eastern Europe. Yochai ben Ghedalia will discuss these modes of
cooperation as well as new ways of cooperating in the near future.

*Ukraine SIG Open Board Meeting*
Thursday, 8 August, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm, White Hill Room, 4th Floor
All Board Members should plan on attending this meeting. We will
discuss plans for thecoming year and problems that have arisen in the
past two years. EVERYONE is welcome to attend and participate in the
Board meeting. This is a good opportunity to meet the SIG’s leaders and
to offer suggestions for improving the SIG’s activities.

*Breakfast with the Experts*
==============================

*Ukraine SIG: Breakfast with the Experts, Yochai Ben Ghedalia & Michael
Goldstein*
Cost for a Breakfast with the Experts session is $36. Attendance is limited.
To register, go to http://www.iajgs2013.org/meals.cfm
Thursday, 8 August, 7:00 am – 8:15 am, Stuart Room, 4th Floor

The Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People in
Jerusalem (CAHJP) is an important repository for documents about >from
Ukraine. Israel research experts –
Yochai Ben Ghedalia, Director of CAHJP and Michael Goldstein, IAJGS
President and an Israel based professional genealogist, will be available
to answer questions about finding relatives in Israel, research on
victims and survivors of the Shoah, and extending your research in countries
where Jews once lived. There are many source in Israel about Jewish
communities in Europe, North America, and the Middle East.
Whether you are a beginner or more experienced researcher, this is the
perfect time to ask questions and get useful advice >from an authority in
the field.

*Breakfast with the Experts, Olga Muzychuk and Miriam Weiner*
*Cost for a Breakfast with the Experts session is $36.
Attendance is limited.
To register, go to http://www.iajgs2013.org/meals.cfm*
Tuesday, 7 August & Thursday, 8 August, 7:00 am – 8:15 am, White Hill
Room, 4th Floor

Ukraine research experts – Miriam Weiner, author of "Jewish Roots
in Ukraine and Moldova" and recipient of the IAJGS Lifetime
Achievement Award and
Olga Muzychuk, Deputy Head of the State Archival Service of Ukraine –
will be available to answer questions relating to starting or extending
your Ukraine research, where records can be found, what they many contain,
how to acquire copies, and strategies for maximizing the
benefits of your research. Whether you are a beginner or more
experienced researcher, this is the perfect time to ask questions
and get useful advice >from an authority in the field.
Note: This event is not sponsored by Ukraine SIG.


*Birds of a Feather Meetings (BOF)*
======================================

*Kremenets District (Ukraine) Research Group (KDRG) BOF Meeting*
Sunday, 4 August, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm, Hancock Room, 4th Floor
This is the annual meeting of KDRG. Anyone interested in the towns
of the Kremenets District in southwestern Ukraine should try to attend
this meeting. We will discuss progress and new datasets completed in the
past year, those currently in translation, and those waiting for
translation. We’ll preview upcoming datasets and KDRG’s finances.
Contact Ron Doctor (rddpdx@...
<mailto:rddpdx@...>) for
more information.

*Mogilev-Podolsky (Mohyliv Podilskyy, Ukraine) BOF*
Tuesday, 6 August, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm, Charles River Room, 4th Floor

Contact Phyllis Gold Berenson (phyllis.berenson@...
<mailto:phyllis.berenson@...>) for more information.

*Novogrod-Volhynsky (Zvhil Ukraine) BOF*
Tuesday, 6 August, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm, Charles River Room, 4th Floor

Contact Marvin Turkanis (marvintur@...) or Richard Baum
(rxbaum@... <mailto:rxbaum@...>) for more information.


*Presentations*
===============

*Interpreting 19th Century Russian Language Documents*
Sunday, 4 August, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm, Cambridge Room, 4^th Floor
Jane Rollins

*The Changing Borders of Eastern Europe*
Sunday, 4 August, 1:45 pm – 3:00 pm, Plaza Room, Mezzanine
Hal Bookbinder

*Internal Jewish Migration to Agricultural Colonies in the Russian Empire*
Monday, 5 August, 8:15 am – 9:30 am, Plaza Room, Mezzanine
Alan Shuchat

*Genealogical Research in the Ukraine Archives: Updates and Upgrades*
Monday, 5 August, 9:45 am – 11:00 am, Imperial Room, Mezzanine
Olga Muzychuk

*Genealogical & Archival Databases: An Update >from the "Old Country"*
Monday, 5 August, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm, Imperial Room, Mezzanine
Miriam Weiner

*Archival Resources for the Interwar Years in Western Ukraine*
Monday, 5 August, 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm, Plaza Ballroom, Mezzanine
Natalie Dunai, Alex Dunai

*Polish Magnate Landowner Records: Bringing “The Lords’ Jews” to Life*
Monday, 5 August, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm, Plaza Ballroom, Mezzanine
Natalie Dunai, Pamela Weisberger

*Shtetl Travel throughout Ukraine*
Wednesday, 7 August, 8:15 am – 9:30 am, Georgian Room, Mezzanine
Alex Dunai

*Life in Ukrainian Jewish Shtetlach Now and Then - a Multimedia
Presentation*
Thursday, 8 August, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm, St. James Room, 4^th Floor
Anna Royzner

*Traditional and Less-Traditional Genealogical Sources at the Central
Archives of the History of the Jewish People (Sponsored by Ukraine SIG)*
Thursday, 8 August, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm, Imperial Ballroom, Mezzanine
Yochai Ben Ghedalia


Please be sure to review the online program for last minute changes and to
sign up for the SIG Luncheon and the Breakfast with the Experts sessions
(both of which require reservations and a fee).

See you in Boston,

Ron

Ron Doctor (rddpdx@...)
Coordinator, JewishGen Ukraine SIG
www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine
where Jewish genealogy is personal

Researching DOCTOR (DIOKHTER), VARER, AVERBAKH, KORENFELD ... all >from
Kremenets, Oleksinets, Yampol, Vishnevets
and KAZDOY (KOSODOY), DUBINSKI, DUBOWSKY ... all >from Kiev, Uman, Odessa