Date   

Rabbi David LANDAU of Dresden 1803-1818 #germany

Ruben Weiser <weiser@...>
 

HI.
I am looking for information about rabbi David LANDAU rabbi of Dresden from
1803 to 1818.
Can anybody help? Thanks

Ruben Weiser Buenos Aires Argentina <weiser@ba.net>


German SIG #Germany Rabbi David LANDAU of Dresden 1803-1818 #germany

Ruben Weiser <weiser@...>
 

HI.
I am looking for information about rabbi David LANDAU rabbi of Dresden from
1803 to 1818.
Can anybody help? Thanks

Ruben Weiser Buenos Aires Argentina <weiser@ba.net>


Re: Records in Cyrillic - learning to read them #general

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

For Sam and others with the same question:

Yes, it is possible.
When I received the seven rolls of microfilm for the
Mogilev Crown Rabbinate records years ago, I could not
read any Russian.
We had some new immigrant friends back then but
everyone was busy and no one could sit with me for
hours going over each and every record.
However, I did ask several of them to write clearly on
a piece of paper the names I was looking for. I asked
them to print, write in cursive handwriting. I
specifically asked them to write in cursive clearly
and also in a "scribbled" fashion, as those who wrote
the records did not receive penmanship awards.
I also checked some online alphabet sources for
Cyrillic, giving printed and handwritten forms, and
tried to write the name myself, thus ensuring that I
would have at least one form of horrible handwriting
in an unknown languge!
I was fortunate that TALALAY looks somewhat like the
sound a cat makes (mieow) in handwriting.
I looked for the "meowing" and was able to scan the
records rather quickly.

Although I could read the Hebrew, again handwriting,
or rather scribbling, is a problem in these records. I
asked friends fluent in Hebrew to write the name in
various formats again (printed, cursive in good and
bad handwriting). And I even asked a Yiddish-speaker
to write it down.
it helped to have numerous people with different
handwriting contribute to this to form a better idea
of how the name might appear.

Getting people to write down the names took the
longest part of this project!
When I started going through the reels, I stopped
frequently to compare the handwritten chart with the
records. After awhile, I did not have to compare and
it went very quickly.

At one point, I asked one of our Russian friends to
check what I had done, and almost all of the records I
had located were correct. A very small number were
wrong because the handwriting was so bad my friend
even had trouble reading it.

It was a relatively (pun intended) easy process.
Today, I can certainly recognize TALALAY and many
other names in printed and handwritten forms in any
sort of record or list.

Today, of course, there are numerous helper items out
there: translations of the record columns,
translations of common words, etc.

It is certainly a practical undertaking, and in my
case was not that difficult.

I will say that it was delightful finding a birth
record for one of our TALALAY calligraphied into the
Mogilev birth records by the baby's father, a
well-known rabbi. Both the Hebrew and the Russian was
written in a beautiful hand.

In a funny anecdote relating to reading Cyrillic, we
went out with friends here in Israel several years
ago, and they took us to a a great Bukharan kebab
restaurant outside Tel Aviv. I tried to get the name
of the place >from them. The wife said, in Persian,
"Oh, it begins with P, something like PECTOPAH." It
didn't register until we drove up to the place, and I
saw the large blue neon sign. I realized this was
RESTORAN (restaurant). At least I know we won't
starve! By the way, we still don't know the real name
of the place!

Go for it!

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
President, JFRA Israel
schelly@allrelative.net
schelly@genealogy.org.il



Subject: Records in Cyrillic
From: "Sam Schleman" <Samara99@comcast.net>

I am wondering if anyone has successfully attempted to
teach themselves enough Russian to be able to find
vital records for their family on the films >from the
FHC?
If so, how long and/or arduous a process was it to
gain enough facility to be able to do this? Is this a
practical undertaking?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Records in Cyrillic - learning to read them #general

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

For Sam and others with the same question:

Yes, it is possible.
When I received the seven rolls of microfilm for the
Mogilev Crown Rabbinate records years ago, I could not
read any Russian.
We had some new immigrant friends back then but
everyone was busy and no one could sit with me for
hours going over each and every record.
However, I did ask several of them to write clearly on
a piece of paper the names I was looking for. I asked
them to print, write in cursive handwriting. I
specifically asked them to write in cursive clearly
and also in a "scribbled" fashion, as those who wrote
the records did not receive penmanship awards.
I also checked some online alphabet sources for
Cyrillic, giving printed and handwritten forms, and
tried to write the name myself, thus ensuring that I
would have at least one form of horrible handwriting
in an unknown languge!
I was fortunate that TALALAY looks somewhat like the
sound a cat makes (mieow) in handwriting.
I looked for the "meowing" and was able to scan the
records rather quickly.

Although I could read the Hebrew, again handwriting,
or rather scribbling, is a problem in these records. I
asked friends fluent in Hebrew to write the name in
various formats again (printed, cursive in good and
bad handwriting). And I even asked a Yiddish-speaker
to write it down.
it helped to have numerous people with different
handwriting contribute to this to form a better idea
of how the name might appear.

Getting people to write down the names took the
longest part of this project!
When I started going through the reels, I stopped
frequently to compare the handwritten chart with the
records. After awhile, I did not have to compare and
it went very quickly.

At one point, I asked one of our Russian friends to
check what I had done, and almost all of the records I
had located were correct. A very small number were
wrong because the handwriting was so bad my friend
even had trouble reading it.

It was a relatively (pun intended) easy process.
Today, I can certainly recognize TALALAY and many
other names in printed and handwritten forms in any
sort of record or list.

Today, of course, there are numerous helper items out
there: translations of the record columns,
translations of common words, etc.

It is certainly a practical undertaking, and in my
case was not that difficult.

I will say that it was delightful finding a birth
record for one of our TALALAY calligraphied into the
Mogilev birth records by the baby's father, a
well-known rabbi. Both the Hebrew and the Russian was
written in a beautiful hand.

In a funny anecdote relating to reading Cyrillic, we
went out with friends here in Israel several years
ago, and they took us to a a great Bukharan kebab
restaurant outside Tel Aviv. I tried to get the name
of the place >from them. The wife said, in Persian,
"Oh, it begins with P, something like PECTOPAH." It
didn't register until we drove up to the place, and I
saw the large blue neon sign. I realized this was
RESTORAN (restaurant). At least I know we won't
starve! By the way, we still don't know the real name
of the place!

Go for it!

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
President, JFRA Israel
schelly@allrelative.net
schelly@genealogy.org.il



Subject: Records in Cyrillic
From: "Sam Schleman" <Samara99@comcast.net>

I am wondering if anyone has successfully attempted to
teach themselves enough Russian to be able to find
vital records for their family on the films >from the
FHC?
If so, how long and/or arduous a process was it to
gain enough facility to be able to do this? Is this a
practical undertaking?


KOMINOWSKY, KAMIENOWSKI & variations #poland

dayna reader <zoeys_mom@...>
 

I have again been successful in locating names through
JRI-Poland that I never thought I would find. Now I
would like to put the name out there to the list and
see if anyone sees a connection (plus, I'd like to
tell the story, because it's another JRI success
story!).

I've posted a wedding photo >from c. 1900 on viewmate
on a few occasions. My Baba, before she died, gave us
a few pieces of information regarding the bride's
family in the photo (she knew nothing of the groom's
family).

She told us the following:
1) The family worked as leather makers and tannery
workers.
2) They lived in or around the area of Sejny, Poland
3) The bride was related to my Baba's mother, whose
family were KANOWICZs/KACHANOWSKAs or SZCZUPACKAs.
They were cousins, aunts and uncles of my g-grandma
(meaning that the bride's mother was either a KANOWICZ
or a SZCZUPACKA).
4) Anyone in the picture who was left alive at the
time of the Shoah was killed. (**This piece may or may
not be true. My Baba may have assumed that everyone
was killed)
5) There is a little girl in the photo and my Baba
told us her name was Sonja, and her mother (also
pictured) was Selme.
6) and finally, my Baba told us the family name of the
bride (the bride's maiden name) was KOWINOWSKI.

The other day I was looking thru the new 1929 Polish
Business Directory at JRI and scanning through the
town of Sejny for familiar surnames. The occupation of
leather/tanneries caught my eye and I noticed the
surname KAMIENOWSKI. This name seemed close enough to
KOWINOWSKI, the name my Baba had given us, for me to
wonder if perhaps we just heard her wrong and wrote
down a name that sounded more familiar. I quickly
looked on my JRI Sejny spreadsheet and there before me
was a child born to one Itta SZCZUPACKA and one Abram
Icko KAMIENOWSKI. Yet another entry for another of
their children listed Itta's father as Lejba (which
then, to me, identified her as my g-grandma's sister).
This was the connection that I'd searched for and
never thought I'd find.

I would still like to know the name of the bride
(first name), as well as the groom's family name. My
dream is to find a connection with someone and share
this absolutely beautiful photo that I've loved since
I was a little girl.

The bride would be a KAMIENOWSKA (variants;
KOMIENOWSKA, KOMIENOVSKA, KOMINOWSKA), daughter of
Itta nee SZCZUPACKA (da. of Lejb & Dvora) and Abram
Icko KAMIENOWSKI. Sister to Chana Rochka (b. 1865),
Lejzer Ber (b. about 1881), and Boruch Szmujlo (b.
1875). I would estimate the bride's date of birth as
being around 1882 (if the wedding took place about
1900).

Thank you if you read this far, and please respond
privately if you see a connection.

Dayna Chalif
San Francisco, CA.


JRI Poland #Poland KOMINOWSKY, KAMIENOWSKI & variations #poland

dayna reader <zoeys_mom@...>
 

I have again been successful in locating names through
JRI-Poland that I never thought I would find. Now I
would like to put the name out there to the list and
see if anyone sees a connection (plus, I'd like to
tell the story, because it's another JRI success
story!).

I've posted a wedding photo >from c. 1900 on viewmate
on a few occasions. My Baba, before she died, gave us
a few pieces of information regarding the bride's
family in the photo (she knew nothing of the groom's
family).

She told us the following:
1) The family worked as leather makers and tannery
workers.
2) They lived in or around the area of Sejny, Poland
3) The bride was related to my Baba's mother, whose
family were KANOWICZs/KACHANOWSKAs or SZCZUPACKAs.
They were cousins, aunts and uncles of my g-grandma
(meaning that the bride's mother was either a KANOWICZ
or a SZCZUPACKA).
4) Anyone in the picture who was left alive at the
time of the Shoah was killed. (**This piece may or may
not be true. My Baba may have assumed that everyone
was killed)
5) There is a little girl in the photo and my Baba
told us her name was Sonja, and her mother (also
pictured) was Selme.
6) and finally, my Baba told us the family name of the
bride (the bride's maiden name) was KOWINOWSKI.

The other day I was looking thru the new 1929 Polish
Business Directory at JRI and scanning through the
town of Sejny for familiar surnames. The occupation of
leather/tanneries caught my eye and I noticed the
surname KAMIENOWSKI. This name seemed close enough to
KOWINOWSKI, the name my Baba had given us, for me to
wonder if perhaps we just heard her wrong and wrote
down a name that sounded more familiar. I quickly
looked on my JRI Sejny spreadsheet and there before me
was a child born to one Itta SZCZUPACKA and one Abram
Icko KAMIENOWSKI. Yet another entry for another of
their children listed Itta's father as Lejba (which
then, to me, identified her as my g-grandma's sister).
This was the connection that I'd searched for and
never thought I'd find.

I would still like to know the name of the bride
(first name), as well as the groom's family name. My
dream is to find a connection with someone and share
this absolutely beautiful photo that I've loved since
I was a little girl.

The bride would be a KAMIENOWSKA (variants;
KOMIENOWSKA, KOMIENOVSKA, KOMINOWSKA), daughter of
Itta nee SZCZUPACKA (da. of Lejb & Dvora) and Abram
Icko KAMIENOWSKI. Sister to Chana Rochka (b. 1865),
Lejzer Ber (b. about 1881), and Boruch Szmujlo (b.
1875). I would estimate the bride's date of birth as
being around 1882 (if the wedding took place about
1900).

Thank you if you read this far, and please respond
privately if you see a connection.

Dayna Chalif
San Francisco, CA.


Bialystok 62nd Memorial Ceremony #poland

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

I attended the 62nd Annual Bialystok and Surrounding Towns Memorial Ceremony
in Yehud, Israel on Wed. nite, August 24th held outdoors in front of the
Synagogue. The event was quite well attended with several hundred guests, an
honor guard >from the IDF, and a local unit of the Youth Guard (scouts). In
addition to old-timers and people who had themselves experienced the horrors
of the Bialystok ghetto, there were quite a few dignitaries. The Mayor of
Yehud attended, as did the Chief Ashkenazi Rabbi, Rav Metzger, two Members
of the Knesset, Efraim Sneh and Orlev. It was a surprise for me to learn
that some of these dignitaries have personal attachments to pre-war
Bialystok.

Rav Metzger told an interesting tale of Jews who saved themselves from
execution by inviting the German officer and his troops into their houses
for wine and food to satiation so that they might forget their mission.There
was a strong hint of modern day politics which Rav Metzger lightly touched
upon. The ending of the tale was a moral lesson of discerning truth from
falsehood, something that requires "a good eye".(That's why, if you want to
lie, you find it difficult to look someone in the eye.)

The usual lighting by torch of memorial candles was deftly handled by the
scouts as each person who was called upon to light had his or her story
dramatically narrated >from the stage. It was amazing to see people who could
barely walk, eager to light the candles. The tales would make a great
collection for oral Jewish history told by eye witnesses. The genealogy
aspect was low, but names of victims were mentioned so as not to forget
them.

The Bialystok rebellion of course figured prominently in the narrations, and
Tannenbaum was mentioned for his role in organizing the revolt.

The Bialystok Museum and Memorial is a good place to visit in Israel as it
has many original photographs and documents, books and manuscripts, etc.,
some of which might be of genealogical importance.

It was a worthwhile evening.

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Jerusalem


Bialystokers in PA?? #poland

jay Lenefsky <hotdog@...>
 

Dear One and All:

I was wondering if there had ever been an organized Bialystoker
Organization in the Philadelphia area??

I am trying to trace a lost relative, Savel Alexandrovsky.

Thank you very much,

Jay Lenefsky -Israel


Re: Ostrowa, Prussia? #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Scott L. wrote: "Depending on the records I view (mostly marriage records for my
g-great grandmother and her siblings, and her own death record), the spelling for
the town in Prussia >from which she and her family came is listed as Ostrowa,
Ostrowo, and Ostrova. I have searched the internet and found quite a few matches
throughout Central Europe with these town names. Any advice on how I can pinpoint
which of these towns in Prussia my family came from?

Scott:
Tell us more about the records themselves. Where did you find them?
What, specifically, do they say? Can you show them to us on ViewMate or
otherwise?

http://www.literad.de/geschichte/ortsbuch39.html

is a fine source for info about German towns, villages, etc. It tells us that
there were eight (8) places named Ostrowo in Prussia: 7 in Posen province, 1 in
West Prussia. One of them (today's Ostrowo Wielkopolski) was the seat
of the county with the same name, and it's a good bet that among the 8,
that one is where your folks came from. In 1890 there were over 1,000
Jews there--over 10% of the general population. The other 7 seem to
have been wide places in the road, more or less.

Ostrowo is not well-served by the archives, alas. The only Jewish item
that the LDS library has on film is the 1836-8 family register, which
likely connects well with the Posen citizenship list that Ed Luft (Hi,
Ed!) published some years ago. If you have reel--er, real--patience,
the civil-registration books for 1874-1893 are also available on
microfilms--21 of them--but they cover everybody in town, not just the Jews.
On the other hand, the first 4 reels are indexes...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@verizon.net>
researching Upper Silesia, plus a Posen ancestor or two


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Bialystok 62nd Memorial Ceremony #poland

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

I attended the 62nd Annual Bialystok and Surrounding Towns Memorial Ceremony
in Yehud, Israel on Wed. nite, August 24th held outdoors in front of the
Synagogue. The event was quite well attended with several hundred guests, an
honor guard >from the IDF, and a local unit of the Youth Guard (scouts). In
addition to old-timers and people who had themselves experienced the horrors
of the Bialystok ghetto, there were quite a few dignitaries. The Mayor of
Yehud attended, as did the Chief Ashkenazi Rabbi, Rav Metzger, two Members
of the Knesset, Efraim Sneh and Orlev. It was a surprise for me to learn
that some of these dignitaries have personal attachments to pre-war
Bialystok.

Rav Metzger told an interesting tale of Jews who saved themselves from
execution by inviting the German officer and his troops into their houses
for wine and food to satiation so that they might forget their mission.There
was a strong hint of modern day politics which Rav Metzger lightly touched
upon. The ending of the tale was a moral lesson of discerning truth from
falsehood, something that requires "a good eye".(That's why, if you want to
lie, you find it difficult to look someone in the eye.)

The usual lighting by torch of memorial candles was deftly handled by the
scouts as each person who was called upon to light had his or her story
dramatically narrated >from the stage. It was amazing to see people who could
barely walk, eager to light the candles. The tales would make a great
collection for oral Jewish history told by eye witnesses. The genealogy
aspect was low, but names of victims were mentioned so as not to forget
them.

The Bialystok rebellion of course figured prominently in the narrations, and
Tannenbaum was mentioned for his role in organizing the revolt.

The Bialystok Museum and Memorial is a good place to visit in Israel as it
has many original photographs and documents, books and manuscripts, etc.,
some of which might be of genealogical importance.

It was a worthwhile evening.

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Jerusalem


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Bialystokers in PA?? #poland

jay Lenefsky <hotdog@...>
 

Dear One and All:

I was wondering if there had ever been an organized Bialystoker
Organization in the Philadelphia area??

I am trying to trace a lost relative, Savel Alexandrovsky.

Thank you very much,

Jay Lenefsky -Israel


German SIG #Germany Re: Ostrowa, Prussia? #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Scott L. wrote: "Depending on the records I view (mostly marriage records for my
g-great grandmother and her siblings, and her own death record), the spelling for
the town in Prussia >from which she and her family came is listed as Ostrowa,
Ostrowo, and Ostrova. I have searched the internet and found quite a few matches
throughout Central Europe with these town names. Any advice on how I can pinpoint
which of these towns in Prussia my family came from?

Scott:
Tell us more about the records themselves. Where did you find them?
What, specifically, do they say? Can you show them to us on ViewMate or
otherwise?

http://www.literad.de/geschichte/ortsbuch39.html

is a fine source for info about German towns, villages, etc. It tells us that
there were eight (8) places named Ostrowo in Prussia: 7 in Posen province, 1 in
West Prussia. One of them (today's Ostrowo Wielkopolski) was the seat
of the county with the same name, and it's a good bet that among the 8,
that one is where your folks came from. In 1890 there were over 1,000
Jews there--over 10% of the general population. The other 7 seem to
have been wide places in the road, more or less.

Ostrowo is not well-served by the archives, alas. The only Jewish item
that the LDS library has on film is the 1836-8 family register, which
likely connects well with the Posen citizenship list that Ed Luft (Hi,
Ed!) published some years ago. If you have reel--er, real--patience,
the civil-registration books for 1874-1893 are also available on
microfilms--21 of them--but they cover everybody in town, not just the Jews.
On the other hand, the first 4 reels are indexes...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@verizon.net>
researching Upper Silesia, plus a Posen ancestor or two


September Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

September Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: September 12, 2005
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road (Route 611) and Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA

****
Speaker: Jefferson Moak, Chief Archivist, Mid-Atlantic NARA
Topic:The Life of Max Einstein >from NARA Records

Jefferson M. Moak of the National Archives and Records
Administration in Philadelphia, has an academic background
in history, public administration, and library science. At NARA
he has been instrumental in the creation of their web-based
public access archival research tool, which included creating
an inventory of thousands of feet of records, making them more
accessible to the public. Previously he was employed at the
City of Philadelphia Archives.

Jeff will tell us about the research undertaken last year in order
to create the Max Einstein exhibit currently at NARA, focusing
not only on how the topic was chosen but also the various
research methods undertaken to create the final exhibit and report.
It is these methods which can be most helpful to us.

****
Come to the meeting 30 minutes early for a Question and Answer
session preceding the general meeting.

****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

****
Interested friends are always welcome!
Refreshments will be served following the meeting

****
Delaware County Main Line Affiliate

Date: Tuesday, September 20, 2005
Time: 7:30 PM
Place: Martins Run Life Care Community
11 Martins Run
Media, PA

Speakers: Naomi & Harry Zaslow
Topic: Tracing Five Generations of the Zaslow Family

For more information contact Shelda Sandler at stanshel@msn.com
****

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@aol.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen September Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

September Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: September 12, 2005
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road (Route 611) and Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA

****
Speaker: Jefferson Moak, Chief Archivist, Mid-Atlantic NARA
Topic:The Life of Max Einstein >from NARA Records

Jefferson M. Moak of the National Archives and Records
Administration in Philadelphia, has an academic background
in history, public administration, and library science. At NARA
he has been instrumental in the creation of their web-based
public access archival research tool, which included creating
an inventory of thousands of feet of records, making them more
accessible to the public. Previously he was employed at the
City of Philadelphia Archives.

Jeff will tell us about the research undertaken last year in order
to create the Max Einstein exhibit currently at NARA, focusing
not only on how the topic was chosen but also the various
research methods undertaken to create the final exhibit and report.
It is these methods which can be most helpful to us.

****
Come to the meeting 30 minutes early for a Question and Answer
session preceding the general meeting.

****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

****
Interested friends are always welcome!
Refreshments will be served following the meeting

****
Delaware County Main Line Affiliate

Date: Tuesday, September 20, 2005
Time: 7:30 PM
Place: Martins Run Life Care Community
11 Martins Run
Media, PA

Speakers: Naomi & Harry Zaslow
Topic: Tracing Five Generations of the Zaslow Family

For more information contact Shelda Sandler at stanshel@msn.com
****

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@aol.com>


Re: NY State Record Access #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

I doubt very much that the Federal Freedom of information act will apply to
an agency of State government. However, I understand that New York State
has its own Freedom of Information Act.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

<AGloger@aol.com> wrote


Since the facility >from which Alan was requesting information cited NY State
law as the reason for not giving any information and Alan is not asking for
medical information, perhaps Alan should make his request citing the Federal
Freedom of Information Act. Additionally, it is my understanding that the
rules of privacy no longer apply once the subject is deceased. This may vary
from State to State.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NY State Record Access #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

I doubt very much that the Federal Freedom of information act will apply to
an agency of State government. However, I understand that New York State
has its own Freedom of Information Act.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

<AGloger@aol.com> wrote


Since the facility >from which Alan was requesting information cited NY State
law as the reason for not giving any information and Alan is not asking for
medical information, perhaps Alan should make his request citing the Federal
Freedom of Information Act. Additionally, it is my understanding that the
rules of privacy no longer apply once the subject is deceased. This may vary
from State to State.


Re: Ellis Island Manifest question #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

It is an abbreviation of "ditto", meaning "same as on the line above". We
tend to use a single set of double quotes for this purpose today.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"Howie Axelrod" <highwind1@comcast.net> wrote

Can anyone tell me what the term "do" in the family name column of the EI
manifest means. It appears to indicate a reference to the name above it.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ellis Island Manifest question #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

It is an abbreviation of "ditto", meaning "same as on the line above". We
tend to use a single set of double quotes for this purpose today.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"Howie Axelrod" <highwind1@comcast.net> wrote

Can anyone tell me what the term "do" in the family name column of the EI
manifest means. It appears to indicate a reference to the name above it.


176 Clinton #general

Rabbi Ben-Zion Saydman <ravbenzi@...>
 

Shalom Jewishgenvelt:

My latest mystery involves a NYC death certficate. Riva MELTSNER died
October 17, 1909 at the Montefiore Home for Chronic Invalids. Has anyone
ever heard of this institution? If so, do they have records >from 1909? The
death certificate states that Riva lived at the Montefiore Home for 8 1/2
months prior to her passing. Her usual residence was 176 Clinton. It is
possible that family still lived at this address in 1910 and that they were
enumerated in the census. Searching for them by name on-line has not been
successful, so I would like to know how to search for them on-line by
address: 176 Clinton, NYC, 1910 census. If you have the answer, please
contact me. Thanks.

Additionally, if anyone has a connection to Congregation Beth Hamedrash
Hagodol, 60 Norfolk Street on New York's Lower East Side, or to either of
Beth Hamedrash Hagodol's burial grounds at Machpelah cemetery or Union
Fields cemetery, please contact me.

Finally, if anyone has a connection to Congregation Nachlath Tzvi of Harlem,
please contact me.
Zei gezunt!

Rabbi Ben-Zion Saydman
California

MAYPER, MELTSNER, ROMM, WERNER, SATINSKY, RAPHAEL, AUG, MARCUS, KANTER,
NEWMAN, NEVIAZHSKY, NUROCK, ROTHFORT, CHIPKIN, KRULL, SABSEVITZ
Rumsiskes, Novy Dvor, Zasliai, Bialystok, New York, Philadelphia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 176 Clinton #general

Rabbi Ben-Zion Saydman <ravbenzi@...>
 

Shalom Jewishgenvelt:

My latest mystery involves a NYC death certficate. Riva MELTSNER died
October 17, 1909 at the Montefiore Home for Chronic Invalids. Has anyone
ever heard of this institution? If so, do they have records >from 1909? The
death certificate states that Riva lived at the Montefiore Home for 8 1/2
months prior to her passing. Her usual residence was 176 Clinton. It is
possible that family still lived at this address in 1910 and that they were
enumerated in the census. Searching for them by name on-line has not been
successful, so I would like to know how to search for them on-line by
address: 176 Clinton, NYC, 1910 census. If you have the answer, please
contact me. Thanks.

Additionally, if anyone has a connection to Congregation Beth Hamedrash
Hagodol, 60 Norfolk Street on New York's Lower East Side, or to either of
Beth Hamedrash Hagodol's burial grounds at Machpelah cemetery or Union
Fields cemetery, please contact me.

Finally, if anyone has a connection to Congregation Nachlath Tzvi of Harlem,
please contact me.
Zei gezunt!

Rabbi Ben-Zion Saydman
California

MAYPER, MELTSNER, ROMM, WERNER, SATINSKY, RAPHAEL, AUG, MARCUS, KANTER,
NEWMAN, NEVIAZHSKY, NUROCK, ROTHFORT, CHIPKIN, KRULL, SABSEVITZ
Rumsiskes, Novy Dvor, Zasliai, Bialystok, New York, Philadelphia