Date   

Hebrew/Gregorian Perpetual Calendar #general

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

I just heard about the following website, which is in Hebrew, only.

http://tinyurl.com/akkg4

I have perpetual calendar software installed on my PC, but I thought I'd
pass this on in any event.

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hebrew/Gregorian Perpetual Calendar #general

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

I just heard about the following website, which is in Hebrew, only.

http://tinyurl.com/akkg4

I have perpetual calendar software installed on my PC, but I thought I'd
pass this on in any event.

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


post-1900 birth records for towns in Rozdol admin. district #galicia

alexallen@...
 

I am indebted to readers of this site who answered my posting seeking information about my
grandfather’s town in Galicia and guided me to the index of records for JRI-Poland. Even
without the source documents, the index itself has proved to be a treasure trove of information
about the history of my family and enabled me to identify family members who lived in a nearby
town, and who preceded by grandfather to New York. An examination of the birth records >from
the Rozdol administrative sub-district of Stanislawow for 1869 to1900 allowed me to identify by
name 2 brothers and 3 sisters of my grandfather. My grandfather said that he had 6 sisters and
the notations on the reverse of photographs he received >from Galicia confirm that. Three sisters
must have been born after 1900.

QUESTION: Are there more birth records for the period after 1900 for Rozdol? Are they accessible?

Allen HAUSMAN
Alexandria, Virginia, USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia post-1900 birth records for towns in Rozdol admin. district #galicia

alexallen@...
 

I am indebted to readers of this site who answered my posting seeking information about my
grandfather’s town in Galicia and guided me to the index of records for JRI-Poland. Even
without the source documents, the index itself has proved to be a treasure trove of information
about the history of my family and enabled me to identify family members who lived in a nearby
town, and who preceded by grandfather to New York. An examination of the birth records >from
the Rozdol administrative sub-district of Stanislawow for 1869 to1900 allowed me to identify by
name 2 brothers and 3 sisters of my grandfather. My grandfather said that he had 6 sisters and
the notations on the reverse of photographs he received >from Galicia confirm that. Three sisters
must have been born after 1900.

QUESTION: Are there more birth records for the period after 1900 for Rozdol? Are they accessible?

Allen HAUSMAN
Alexandria, Virginia, USA


VM 6832 - 6835 Cyrillic (Russian?) 1913 Passport needing translation (4 images) #general

edward potereiko <epotereiko9@...>
 

Dear Jewish Gen members,

Anyone willing to translate my maternal grandmother's
1913 passport >from Wilno (presumably Vilnius,
Lithuania today), written in cyrillic, presumably
Russian, I would appreciate it.

A verbatim translation, with explanation, as needed
would be greatly appreciated. I note even the
slightest information that may be gleaned >from a
document, as you never know when it will be the key to
some other puzzle somewhere else in your genealogy.

My understanding was that her maiden name was:
Bazarewitz,

this is an:
Russian Passport for international travel, circa 1913:

stating she was:
25 years old

and was being:
"sent out of the country",

and that she was the wife of an "accolade" or of a
"government clerk."

My further understanding is that the name is:
Ruzia (Rose) or something to that effect, Bairashevskaya.

I would like to know what of the above is correct, and
once translated, what can be told of this lady,
date of departure, arrival, anything...

whether Wilno is the Vilnius, Lithuania of today,

whether she is beiong "sent >from the country", as I
was told it said, which sounds like someone being
exiled, or whether she was just leaving the country.

If she was being "sent >from the country", why would a
person be "sent out of a country?" i.e., is this
somehow "bad" ?

Any indication (inference) as to the husband's name,
occupation, or anything that would permit me to locate
those relatives.

My mother had no inkling that her mother had ever been
married before.

The ship's manifest started with "Bayra ..", this was
lined thru, and the surname Bazarewitz was written.
Nationality/Race was listed as Hebrew, though I do not
think she was, though she definitely did live among
Jewish people in her community

Was her husband dead ?
Retired?
A government worker?
an accolade? (if so, what is an accolade?)

Why wouldn't her husband be travelling with her?

Any indication of children?

Is Bairashevskaya the equivalent of Bazarewitz ?

This is a very puzzling passport to us.


At the bottom of the passport, in a very small
micro-print, not legible in the image, but only upon
great magnification, were the words in cyrillic, Libav
)Libau) Lithograph.

Go to:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

VM 6832 - 6835

Thank all of you individuals who personally took the
time to not only translate the tombstones I had
posted, but also passed along further observations.

This was truly appreciated.

I am sure Viewmate, which has come through 3 years
ago, and now last week, will do so once again, showing
the superb and generous assistance of its volunteer
translators and members.

Please send responses to me personally:

edwardp@writeme.com

Sincerely,

Edward Potereiko
Colorado Springs, CO

P.S. - If I can assist someone with something needing
to be done in Colorado Springs, please let me know.

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct links to these images are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6832
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6833
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6834
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6835


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen VM 6832 - 6835 Cyrillic (Russian?) 1913 Passport needing translation (4 images) #general

edward potereiko <epotereiko9@...>
 

Dear Jewish Gen members,

Anyone willing to translate my maternal grandmother's
1913 passport >from Wilno (presumably Vilnius,
Lithuania today), written in cyrillic, presumably
Russian, I would appreciate it.

A verbatim translation, with explanation, as needed
would be greatly appreciated. I note even the
slightest information that may be gleaned >from a
document, as you never know when it will be the key to
some other puzzle somewhere else in your genealogy.

My understanding was that her maiden name was:
Bazarewitz,

this is an:
Russian Passport for international travel, circa 1913:

stating she was:
25 years old

and was being:
"sent out of the country",

and that she was the wife of an "accolade" or of a
"government clerk."

My further understanding is that the name is:
Ruzia (Rose) or something to that effect, Bairashevskaya.

I would like to know what of the above is correct, and
once translated, what can be told of this lady,
date of departure, arrival, anything...

whether Wilno is the Vilnius, Lithuania of today,

whether she is beiong "sent >from the country", as I
was told it said, which sounds like someone being
exiled, or whether she was just leaving the country.

If she was being "sent >from the country", why would a
person be "sent out of a country?" i.e., is this
somehow "bad" ?

Any indication (inference) as to the husband's name,
occupation, or anything that would permit me to locate
those relatives.

My mother had no inkling that her mother had ever been
married before.

The ship's manifest started with "Bayra ..", this was
lined thru, and the surname Bazarewitz was written.
Nationality/Race was listed as Hebrew, though I do not
think she was, though she definitely did live among
Jewish people in her community

Was her husband dead ?
Retired?
A government worker?
an accolade? (if so, what is an accolade?)

Why wouldn't her husband be travelling with her?

Any indication of children?

Is Bairashevskaya the equivalent of Bazarewitz ?

This is a very puzzling passport to us.


At the bottom of the passport, in a very small
micro-print, not legible in the image, but only upon
great magnification, were the words in cyrillic, Libav
)Libau) Lithograph.

Go to:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

VM 6832 - 6835

Thank all of you individuals who personally took the
time to not only translate the tombstones I had
posted, but also passed along further observations.

This was truly appreciated.

I am sure Viewmate, which has come through 3 years
ago, and now last week, will do so once again, showing
the superb and generous assistance of its volunteer
translators and members.

Please send responses to me personally:

edwardp@writeme.com

Sincerely,

Edward Potereiko
Colorado Springs, CO

P.S. - If I can assist someone with something needing
to be done in Colorado Springs, please let me know.

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct links to these images are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6832
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6833
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6834
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6835


Help Needed with Philadelphia arrivals #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Perhaps someone has a suggestion that will help, as I am in relatively
the same boat as Adam Eisen (see below).

My great-grandfather arrived in Philadelphia in 1899-1892 (latest), from
Vilnius/Lida - all his documents state 'Vilnius'/'Vilna', but this could
also be the gubernia to simplify matters for officials - we believe he came >from
Lida.

I have many of his US documents - application for naturalization,
naturalization, marriage document, his 5 children's birth documents,
census records, etc. I have tried searching Steve Morse's sites,
other port arrivals, commercial sites, Philadelphia Jewish bank
lists, to no avail. The name was different before arriving in the US,
but no spelling of either name or soundex search has helped.

NB: he brought his family, including his in-laws and their entire family
to Montreal in 1909. I have my ggf's Canadian naturalization records, as
well.

With thanks,
Merle Kastner
Montreal, Canada
merlek@videotron.ca
Researching:
KASTNER & OSTFELD, Radauti, Bukovina;
NATHANSON & MENDELSSOHN, Piatra Neamt, Negulesti, Falticeni, Romania;
DENENBERG/DYNABURSKI & GARBARSKI/GOLDBERG, Sejny, Suwalki gubernia, Poland,
New York, NY;
KUSSNER, Bendery, Bessarabia/Moldova, Philadelphia, PA;
MILLER/SZCZUCZYNSKI, Lida, Vilnius, Lithuania/Belarus, Philadelphia, PA.
~~~

Subject: Help Needed with Philadelphia arrivals for EISENSTEIN
I am having trouble finding the immigration record for my great grandfather
Wolf EISENSTEIN and was hoping someone might have some suggestions.
<snip>
I have found the immigration record for Wolf's wife and children, who came
to Philadelphia in September 1896 on SS Belgenland >from Liverpool. The
family emigrated >from Manchester, where they had lived for ca. 10 years.
Rgds,
Adam Eisen
Stockholm, Sweden
aeisen@sprynet.com >>>


Re: Double forenames, the MaHRSHaL and the name Schneur #rabbinic

Mr L Reich <lreich@...>
 

On 2005.09.05, I had written:

The MaHRSHaL adds the following. "And I, the small one, know that
my grandfather (z'kayni), R' Menachem Tzion, whose father was called
Meir, and whose father-in-law was called Uri, had a son and the same
argument arose."
On 2005.09.09, Larry Tauber <ltauber@ctswlaw.com> replied

I had always seen that the MaHaRSHaL's (R. Shlomo LURIA) paternal
grandfather was R. Avraham LURIA and his maternal grandfather was
R. Yitzchak KLAUBER. Do you know the exact relationship? Did the
MaHaRSHaL mean by "z'kayni" great-grandfather, making Menachem
Tzion the father-in-law of R. Avraham LURIA or R. Yitzchak KLAUBER
or R. Yitzchak KLAUBER's father? Or perhaps even his wife's
grandfather?
Yes, I was a little puzzled about this myself.

One of Larry Tauber's suggestions is probably right.

Leslie Reich


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help Needed with Philadelphia arrivals #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Perhaps someone has a suggestion that will help, as I am in relatively
the same boat as Adam Eisen (see below).

My great-grandfather arrived in Philadelphia in 1899-1892 (latest), from
Vilnius/Lida - all his documents state 'Vilnius'/'Vilna', but this could
also be the gubernia to simplify matters for officials - we believe he came >from
Lida.

I have many of his US documents - application for naturalization,
naturalization, marriage document, his 5 children's birth documents,
census records, etc. I have tried searching Steve Morse's sites,
other port arrivals, commercial sites, Philadelphia Jewish bank
lists, to no avail. The name was different before arriving in the US,
but no spelling of either name or soundex search has helped.

NB: he brought his family, including his in-laws and their entire family
to Montreal in 1909. I have my ggf's Canadian naturalization records, as
well.

With thanks,
Merle Kastner
Montreal, Canada
merlek@videotron.ca
Researching:
KASTNER & OSTFELD, Radauti, Bukovina;
NATHANSON & MENDELSSOHN, Piatra Neamt, Negulesti, Falticeni, Romania;
DENENBERG/DYNABURSKI & GARBARSKI/GOLDBERG, Sejny, Suwalki gubernia, Poland,
New York, NY;
KUSSNER, Bendery, Bessarabia/Moldova, Philadelphia, PA;
MILLER/SZCZUCZYNSKI, Lida, Vilnius, Lithuania/Belarus, Philadelphia, PA.
~~~

Subject: Help Needed with Philadelphia arrivals for EISENSTEIN
I am having trouble finding the immigration record for my great grandfather
Wolf EISENSTEIN and was hoping someone might have some suggestions.
<snip>
I have found the immigration record for Wolf's wife and children, who came
to Philadelphia in September 1896 on SS Belgenland >from Liverpool. The
family emigrated >from Manchester, where they had lived for ca. 10 years.
Rgds,
Adam Eisen
Stockholm, Sweden
aeisen@sprynet.com >>>


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Double forenames, the MaHRSHaL and the name Schneur #rabbinic

Mr L Reich <lreich@...>
 

On 2005.09.05, I had written:

The MaHRSHaL adds the following. "And I, the small one, know that
my grandfather (z'kayni), R' Menachem Tzion, whose father was called
Meir, and whose father-in-law was called Uri, had a son and the same
argument arose."
On 2005.09.09, Larry Tauber <ltauber@ctswlaw.com> replied

I had always seen that the MaHaRSHaL's (R. Shlomo LURIA) paternal
grandfather was R. Avraham LURIA and his maternal grandfather was
R. Yitzchak KLAUBER. Do you know the exact relationship? Did the
MaHaRSHaL mean by "z'kayni" great-grandfather, making Menachem
Tzion the father-in-law of R. Avraham LURIA or R. Yitzchak KLAUBER
or R. Yitzchak KLAUBER's father? Or perhaps even his wife's
grandfather?
Yes, I was a little puzzled about this myself.

One of Larry Tauber's suggestions is probably right.

Leslie Reich


ZIMRING #rabbinic

Howard Zimering <howard@...>
 

My great-grandfather was Rabbi Schulem Schachne ZIMRING (b. ca. 1860
in E. Galicia; d. ca. 1920 somewhere in Galicia, probably near
Strusow but not sure). His father, Jacob Samuel ZIMRING, was
supposedly a rabbi too. Below are their known relatives. If anyone
has information about them or their family, I would appreciate the
assistance.

1. (Rabbi?) Samuel Jacob ZIMRING
__ m. Ruchel ????
____ 2. Rabbi Schulem Schachne ZIMRING b.1860
_______ m. Chaje (b.ca.1860 in Jazlowice) bas Isaac Hersh GROSS
_________ 3. Leizer ZIMRING b.1885 in Moliegnica (1921 in Strusow)
_________ 3. Moses ZIMRING b.1888 in Moliegnica
_________ 3. Deborah ZIMRING b.1890 in Moliegnica
_________ 3. Golda ZIMRING b.1892 in Moliegnica
_________ 3. Hersch Lieb ZIMRING b.1894 in Moliegnica
_________ 3. Dora ZIMRING
_________ 3. Zvi ZIMRING
_________ 3. Samuel ZIMRING b.ca.1905
_________ 3. Sarah "Sally" ZIMRING b.ca.1905
_________ 3. Mendel "Max" ZIMRING b.1907
____ 2. Cipre ZIMRING b.1868
____ 2. Maier ZIMRING b.1862

Howard Zimering


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic ZIMRING #rabbinic

Howard Zimering <howard@...>
 

My great-grandfather was Rabbi Schulem Schachne ZIMRING (b. ca. 1860
in E. Galicia; d. ca. 1920 somewhere in Galicia, probably near
Strusow but not sure). His father, Jacob Samuel ZIMRING, was
supposedly a rabbi too. Below are their known relatives. If anyone
has information about them or their family, I would appreciate the
assistance.

1. (Rabbi?) Samuel Jacob ZIMRING
__ m. Ruchel ????
____ 2. Rabbi Schulem Schachne ZIMRING b.1860
_______ m. Chaje (b.ca.1860 in Jazlowice) bas Isaac Hersh GROSS
_________ 3. Leizer ZIMRING b.1885 in Moliegnica (1921 in Strusow)
_________ 3. Moses ZIMRING b.1888 in Moliegnica
_________ 3. Deborah ZIMRING b.1890 in Moliegnica
_________ 3. Golda ZIMRING b.1892 in Moliegnica
_________ 3. Hersch Lieb ZIMRING b.1894 in Moliegnica
_________ 3. Dora ZIMRING
_________ 3. Zvi ZIMRING
_________ 3. Samuel ZIMRING b.ca.1905
_________ 3. Sarah "Sally" ZIMRING b.ca.1905
_________ 3. Mendel "Max" ZIMRING b.1907
____ 2. Cipre ZIMRING b.1868
____ 2. Maier ZIMRING b.1862

Howard Zimering


Re: Is a marriage to ones wife's sister allowed or prohibited? #unitedkingdom

Gary Luke <gary@...>
 

At 04:30 AM 12/09/2005, you wrote:

Laurence

It was permitted in Sydney at the Great Synagogue in 1904. The first wife
of a brother of my grandfather died in 1898 after eight children, all
except three having died in their first year. The wife's sister moved in to
help with the children and a few years later they were married. The second
wife, the sister, was not previously married but had one illicit child at
the time. Incidently, the husband and the two sisters were second cousins.


As a general case, if the husband had died, and a brother was not married,
isn't it mandated in Jewish law that he should marry his brother's widow?
Yours and my cases are the reverse, but if one is mandated, shouldn't the
other at least be permitted?


Gary

=======================

Around 1820 there was a marriage in the Great Synagogue, London. Both the
bride and groom were born in Amsterdam. This couple had two children
following their marriage. Then the wife died around 1828.

Would the surviving husband be permitted, around 1830, (under Jewish
law/custom and/or English law) to marry the sister of his first wife in an
orthodox synagogue wedding in England? Or was such a marriage prohibited
under English or Jewish Law at that time?


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Re: Is a marriage to ones wife's sister allowed or prohibited? #unitedkingdom

Gary Luke <gary@...>
 

At 04:30 AM 12/09/2005, you wrote:

Laurence

It was permitted in Sydney at the Great Synagogue in 1904. The first wife
of a brother of my grandfather died in 1898 after eight children, all
except three having died in their first year. The wife's sister moved in to
help with the children and a few years later they were married. The second
wife, the sister, was not previously married but had one illicit child at
the time. Incidently, the husband and the two sisters were second cousins.


As a general case, if the husband had died, and a brother was not married,
isn't it mandated in Jewish law that he should marry his brother's widow?
Yours and my cases are the reverse, but if one is mandated, shouldn't the
other at least be permitted?


Gary

=======================

Around 1820 there was a marriage in the Great Synagogue, London. Both the
bride and groom were born in Amsterdam. This couple had two children
following their marriage. Then the wife died around 1828.

Would the surviving husband be permitted, around 1830, (under Jewish
law/custom and/or English law) to marry the sister of his first wife in an
orthodox synagogue wedding in England? Or was such a marriage prohibited
under English or Jewish Law at that time?


Re: NYC accomodations #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

If you look up New York budget accommodation on the Internet you will find
lots of places offering such accommodation. I stayed in such a place 3 years
ago - aimed at students, backpackers etc.

I always obtain a Youth Hostel card when I travel just in case I need to
stay in one. These days you don't generally need to be a member beforehand.

I stayed in the one in Philadelphia which was in a lovely historic house.

Naturally the main thing is to make sure that you and your belongings are
safe.

Nick Landau
London, UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC accomodations #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

If you look up New York budget accommodation on the Internet you will find
lots of places offering such accommodation. I stayed in such a place 3 years
ago - aimed at students, backpackers etc.

I always obtain a Youth Hostel card when I travel just in case I need to
stay in one. These days you don't generally need to be a member beforehand.

I stayed in the one in Philadelphia which was in a lovely historic house.

Naturally the main thing is to make sure that you and your belongings are
safe.

Nick Landau
London, UK


Re: Mt. Zion Cemetery, Brooklyn #general

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

Contact Karen Grego KarenG@mountzioncemetery.com. and ask her if they still take
photos of gravestones and how much. They also provide copies of burial cards.
Regards,
Joanie

Joan Parker, Immediate Past President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@intergate.com
Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN, BERGER-Plock, Poland/Russia and Brooklyn, NY;
PINKUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, Litovsk; Grodno, Russia maybe Odessa, Ukraine,
Bronx and Brooklyn, NY;
GELFAND, YEHUDIS, KATZ-Minsk, Bronx, NY, Miami and Miami Beach, FL.

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Mt. Zion Cemetery, Brooklyn
Discovered great parents and a grand-uncle buried at Mt. Zion in Brooklyn.
Anyone out that way who would be kind enough to visit and take a digital
photo?

Robert A. Dodell
Scottsdale, Arizona
RADodell@worldnet.att.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Mt. Zion Cemetery, Brooklyn #general

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

Contact Karen Grego KarenG@mountzioncemetery.com. and ask her if they still take
photos of gravestones and how much. They also provide copies of burial cards.
Regards,
Joanie

Joan Parker, Immediate Past President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@intergate.com
Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN, BERGER-Plock, Poland/Russia and Brooklyn, NY;
PINKUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, Litovsk; Grodno, Russia maybe Odessa, Ukraine,
Bronx and Brooklyn, NY;
GELFAND, YEHUDIS, KATZ-Minsk, Bronx, NY, Miami and Miami Beach, FL.

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Mt. Zion Cemetery, Brooklyn
Discovered great parents and a grand-uncle buried at Mt. Zion in Brooklyn.
Anyone out that way who would be kind enough to visit and take a digital
photo?

Robert A. Dodell
Scottsdale, Arizona
RADodell@worldnet.att.net


Re: NYC accomodations #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

In regards to the original posting,

You might also consider staying at the conference hotel, but sharing
the room with a roommate or two.

There is a lot to be gained by being in the conference hotel.
You can leave things in your room during the day, because it would be
easy to go get them if you need them.
You won't spend time traveling which could be spent networking or
doing research. (I've been in White Plains, and it's about a 40+
minute commute into NYC.)
Just being in the hotel (using the elevator or having breakfast, for
example), you might meet someone to chat with and compare information.
You will feel much more like "a part of the group".

Several years ago, I had a conference in NYC (not IAJGS). The other
rep >from our company suggested we stay in a nearby hotel to save
money. I found myself leaving evening events early to avoid being on
the subway or streets late. When I got to the hotel each morning,
people were already chatting over breakfast and coffee, and I felt
left out. And I felt I had to carry everything I might need during
the day, because I didn't want to take the time to go back to my room.

On the other hand, for the last IAJGS NYC conference, I arrived
several days early to do research. I found a roommate, and we stayed
near Chelsea, a less expensive area, much closer to NARA and the NYC
archives. We moved to the conference hotel when the conference
began, adding a third roommate. The hotel provided a rollaway bed at
no charge. (We also had a small refrigerator put in our room,so we
saved additional money by keeping snacks, drinks, leftovers, etc.)

Yes, it was "close quarters", but we didn't spend all that much time
in the room anyway. . . . We were fine.

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC accomodations #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

In regards to the original posting,

You might also consider staying at the conference hotel, but sharing
the room with a roommate or two.

There is a lot to be gained by being in the conference hotel.
You can leave things in your room during the day, because it would be
easy to go get them if you need them.
You won't spend time traveling which could be spent networking or
doing research. (I've been in White Plains, and it's about a 40+
minute commute into NYC.)
Just being in the hotel (using the elevator or having breakfast, for
example), you might meet someone to chat with and compare information.
You will feel much more like "a part of the group".

Several years ago, I had a conference in NYC (not IAJGS). The other
rep >from our company suggested we stay in a nearby hotel to save
money. I found myself leaving evening events early to avoid being on
the subway or streets late. When I got to the hotel each morning,
people were already chatting over breakfast and coffee, and I felt
left out. And I felt I had to carry everything I might need during
the day, because I didn't want to take the time to go back to my room.

On the other hand, for the last IAJGS NYC conference, I arrived
several days early to do research. I found a roommate, and we stayed
near Chelsea, a less expensive area, much closer to NARA and the NYC
archives. We moved to the conference hotel when the conference
began, adding a third roommate. The hotel provided a rollaway bed at
no charge. (We also had a small refrigerator put in our room,so we
saved additional money by keeping snacks, drinks, leftovers, etc.)

Yes, it was "close quarters", but we didn't spend all that much time
in the room anyway. . . . We were fine.

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia