Date   

Re: Historical Maps of Habsburg Empire #germany

Gunther Steinberg <gunste24@...>
 

On February 22, 2013, Pamela Weisberger wrote:
Announcing a new cartography website, "Historical Maps of the Hapsburg
Empire" or MAPIRE at:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/en/

==========>
That is a very nice and useful website. Thanks.
If you are into historical geography, let me recommend to you the
F.W.Putziger "Historischer Atlas - Atlas Historique "
(Historical Atlas) zur Welt- und Schweizer Geschichte. It covers
history since the stone age. Publisher is : Sauerlaender - Payot

Gunther Steinberg, Portola Valley California gunste24@...


German SIG #Germany RE: Historical Maps of Habsburg Empire #germany

Gunther Steinberg <gunste24@...>
 

On February 22, 2013, Pamela Weisberger wrote:
Announcing a new cartography website, "Historical Maps of the Hapsburg
Empire" or MAPIRE at:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/en/

==========>
That is a very nice and useful website. Thanks.
If you are into historical geography, let me recommend to you the
F.W.Putziger "Historischer Atlas - Atlas Historique "
(Historical Atlas) zur Welt- und Schweizer Geschichte. It covers
history since the stone age. Publisher is : Sauerlaender - Payot

Gunther Steinberg, Portola Valley California gunste24@...


Roger Lustig lecture on Germany at JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County March 2, 2014 #germany

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County
(JGSCV)-[California] will hold a general meeting, co-sponsored with and
located at Temple Adat Elohim, on Sunday, March 2, 2014 1:30-3:30 p.m.at
Temple Adat Elohim 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA.

The Program: A Hundred Germanies A Hundred Jewish Histories

" The Holy Roman Empire is neither holy, nor Roman, nor German." -Voltaire

Yet the "Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation" was German, and it defined
what "German" meant. It was also the home of an ancient Jewish
culture-dating back to the real Romans-and hundreds of Jewish communities,
large and small.
Until 1871 Germany's Jews were subjects of dozens of different states, each
with different laws and attitudes toward its Jewish population. Napoleon
emancipated most of Germany's Jews and led Prussia to do likewise for almost
all the rest; but as soon as he was gone, the many German states-most with
new boundaries-returned their Jews to one or another special legal status.
Those legal statuses, make the researcher's job more complicated, because
the same type of information-birth, change of residence, etc.-might be kept
by different authorities and in different ways. Roger will review where the
larger Jewish congregations and rural communities lived in Germany, and how
to determine which states ruled over them at a given time using examples of
how family histories are recorded across longer periods and crossing
boundaries.

Speaker: Roger Lustig is a genealogical researcher based in Princeton, NJ.
Since 2002 he has specialized in the Jewish families of Prussian Poland,
especially Upper Silesia and West Prussia. He has worked in archives in the
US, Germany and Poland He is the research coordinator for GerSIG .

Our schmoozing corner starts 20 minutes before the program (1:10 p.m.)
facilitated Debra Kay Blatt JGSCV founding member and Secretary. We will
have Categories A -D of our traveling library available beginning at 1:00 PM
to shortly after the meeting. The list of books which are in the JGSCV
traveling library is located on our website www.jgscv.org under
library-traveling.

If you have not yet joined or renewed your membership for 2014 this is an
ideal time to do so. Membership forms will be available at the registration
desk at the meeting and are available on our website under membership-the
link for the form is at the bottom of the page.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.

For more information, including directions to the meeting please see the
JGSCV website: www.jgscv.org

Looking forward to seeing you at the meeting!

Jan Meisels Allen, President, JGSCV


German SIG #Germany Roger Lustig lecture on Germany at JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County March 2, 2014 #germany

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County
(JGSCV)-[California] will hold a general meeting, co-sponsored with and
located at Temple Adat Elohim, on Sunday, March 2, 2014 1:30-3:30 p.m.at
Temple Adat Elohim 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA.

The Program: A Hundred Germanies A Hundred Jewish Histories

" The Holy Roman Empire is neither holy, nor Roman, nor German." -Voltaire

Yet the "Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation" was German, and it defined
what "German" meant. It was also the home of an ancient Jewish
culture-dating back to the real Romans-and hundreds of Jewish communities,
large and small.
Until 1871 Germany's Jews were subjects of dozens of different states, each
with different laws and attitudes toward its Jewish population. Napoleon
emancipated most of Germany's Jews and led Prussia to do likewise for almost
all the rest; but as soon as he was gone, the many German states-most with
new boundaries-returned their Jews to one or another special legal status.
Those legal statuses, make the researcher's job more complicated, because
the same type of information-birth, change of residence, etc.-might be kept
by different authorities and in different ways. Roger will review where the
larger Jewish congregations and rural communities lived in Germany, and how
to determine which states ruled over them at a given time using examples of
how family histories are recorded across longer periods and crossing
boundaries.

Speaker: Roger Lustig is a genealogical researcher based in Princeton, NJ.
Since 2002 he has specialized in the Jewish families of Prussian Poland,
especially Upper Silesia and West Prussia. He has worked in archives in the
US, Germany and Poland He is the research coordinator for GerSIG .

Our schmoozing corner starts 20 minutes before the program (1:10 p.m.)
facilitated Debra Kay Blatt JGSCV founding member and Secretary. We will
have Categories A -D of our traveling library available beginning at 1:00 PM
to shortly after the meeting. The list of books which are in the JGSCV
traveling library is located on our website www.jgscv.org under
library-traveling.

If you have not yet joined or renewed your membership for 2014 this is an
ideal time to do so. Membership forms will be available at the registration
desk at the meeting and are available on our website under membership-the
link for the form is at the bottom of the page.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.

For more information, including directions to the meeting please see the
JGSCV website: www.jgscv.org

Looking forward to seeing you at the meeting!

Jan Meisels Allen, President, JGSCV


Seeking LOUIS MENDEL in Brazil/Argentina #germany

WALTER ELIAS
 

I am seeking information on Louis MENDEL b. 1896 in Kirburg, Westerwald,
son of Sigmund MENDEL and Berta MOSES, siblings Irma GOTTSCHALK and
Selma LIEBMAN. Emigrated pre-WWII to Brazil and then possibly to Argentina.

Walter S. Elias, St. Louis Park, Minnesota, wselias@... =


German SIG #Germany Seeking LOUIS MENDEL in Brazil/Argentina #germany

WALTER ELIAS
 

I am seeking information on Louis MENDEL b. 1896 in Kirburg, Westerwald,
son of Sigmund MENDEL and Berta MOSES, siblings Irma GOTTSCHALK and
Selma LIEBMAN. Emigrated pre-WWII to Brazil and then possibly to Argentina.

Walter S. Elias, St. Louis Park, Minnesota, wselias@... =


Re: 20 year limit for German Burials ? #germany

Irene Peters <iupfamilyresearch@...>
 

Yes, these limitations exist. I know that in my family we have renewed
graves in Germany several times before. However, I don't know what
they do with the bodies if a grave site does not get renewed - I guess
I have always been too reluctant to ask. Maybe someone else can shed
some light on this.

Irene Peters, uffpet@... Dallas, TX

Debby Painter, Michigan, USA <gincig@...>
Asked about this notice at a website for a cemetery in Dortmund:
"...Please note that the final resting places in Germany are not eternal,
due to lack of space. This cemetery has a "period of repose" of 20
years. Once the time is up for a renewal of the "lease" the cemetery
administration will place a small sticker on the gravestone to alert the
family to contact the office of the cemetery. Unless the family of the
deceased pays for another period of 30 years, or the grave is of
historical importance (in that case the town will carry the costs), it
will be leveled and re-used. Leftover stones will be collected and
eventually crushed and used as gravel in road construction...."

Is this really true?
If so, how does one find out what happened to family members buried?
Do they remove the bodies or bury new graves above them. Thank you,


German SIG #Germany Re: 20 year limit for German Burials ? #germany

Irene Peters <iupfamilyresearch@...>
 

Yes, these limitations exist. I know that in my family we have renewed
graves in Germany several times before. However, I don't know what
they do with the bodies if a grave site does not get renewed - I guess
I have always been too reluctant to ask. Maybe someone else can shed
some light on this.

Irene Peters, uffpet@... Dallas, TX

Debby Painter, Michigan, USA <gincig@...>
Asked about this notice at a website for a cemetery in Dortmund:
"...Please note that the final resting places in Germany are not eternal,
due to lack of space. This cemetery has a "period of repose" of 20
years. Once the time is up for a renewal of the "lease" the cemetery
administration will place a small sticker on the gravestone to alert the
family to contact the office of the cemetery. Unless the family of the
deceased pays for another period of 30 years, or the grave is of
historical importance (in that case the town will carry the costs), it
will be leveled and re-used. Leftover stones will be collected and
eventually crushed and used as gravel in road construction...."

Is this really true?
If so, how does one find out what happened to family members buried?
Do they remove the bodies or bury new graves above them. Thank you,


Good Living Street: Portrait of a Patron Family, Vienna 1900 #austria-czech

meretz
 

Australian author Tim Bonyhady has written a portrait of a patron family,
his Viennese Ancestors Gallia.
Vienna and its Secessionist movement at the turn of the last century is the
focus of this extraordinary social portrait told through an eminent Jewish
Viennese family, headed by Hermine and Moriz Gallia, who were among the
great patrons of early-twentieth-century Viennese culture at its peak.

Uriel Meretz, Israel


"Historical Maps of the Habsburg Empire" - MAPIRE a new cartography site #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

Announcing a new cartography website, "Historical Maps of the Hapsburg
Empire" or MAPIRE at:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/en/

The site offers a selection of historical maps >from the
Austro-Hungarian Empire geo-referenced with present day maps (on
Google or OpenStreetMap) providing layering technology for researchers
to compare the past with the present.

Completed is the second military survey of Habsburg Empire and in
progress are the first and third surveys and cadastral surveys of
Croatia and Hungary. Project participants are the Austrian State
Archives (Osterreichisches Staatsarchiv,) Arcanum in Budapest.

There were two types of maps >from that time period: the military
surveys (typically scaled 1 to 28.800) and the more detailed cadastral
maps (scaled 1 to 2.880,) with both of them covering the entire
territory. The original manuscript map sheets of the military surveys
can be found in the Austrian National Archives, but cadastral
(extremely details property maps on the town level) are found in
various archives of the successor states. For example, cadastral maps
for the province of Galicia are held the following regional or
historical archives: Krakow, Przemsyl, Rzeszow in Poland and Lviv and
Ternopil in Ukraine. (Examples of Galician cadastral maps can be
found in Gesher Galicia's map room: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

To use the site, scroll down. When you see the passing selection of
maps, click "complete view" on one that interests you. You can also
scroll further and choose "Complete View" to see the entire Empire in
context, or choose to focus on the following territories:

Bohemia
Bukovina
Coastal Zone
Croatia
Dalmatia
Galicia
Illyria
Lichtenstein
Lombardy
Modena
Moravia
Parma
Silesia
Slavonia
Styria
Salzberg
Tyrol
Venice
Vorarlberg

Click on the area and then start zooming in. You can adjust the
"opacity" using the slider bar at the top of the page to switch views
between the historical map layered with the current GIS map. This
feature is very useful for those researching historical place names
that may not show up on current maps.

The Second (also known as Franciscan) Military Survey (1806-1809) has
outstanding quality and while not a cadastral survey, when you zoom in
at the closest range you will be able to view plots of land and
buildings, especially ones detailed along the banks of rivers that ran
through these communities.

Arcanum, based in Budapest, specializes in digitization projects, and
has already covered the entire collection of maps of the City Archives
of Budapest, the hand-written map collection of the Hungarian National
Library, and the cadastral maps of Hungarian Archives and Croatia.

A more thorough explanation of these maps can be found in the
"Digitized Maps of the Habsburg Empire" paper here:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/static/pdf/mkf_booklet.pdf

Or the "Digitizing and Geo-Referencing of the Historical Cadastral
Maps (1856-60) of Hungary" here:

http://www.academia.edu/3614065/Digitizing_and_georeferencing_of_the_historical_cadastral_maps_1856-60_of_Hungary

The MAPIRE site is also available in German and Hungarian.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...


Bolechow Cadastral Map 1850/1878 - Gesher Galicia Map room #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

Announcing the latest addition to the Gesher Galicia Map Room:

The Bolechow Cadastral Map 1850/1878

Direct link to the map:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/bolechow-bolekhiv-1878/

This is a black-and-white cadastral map of Bolechow (Bolekhiv) survey
edition (Feldskizzen) of 1850, reambulation of 1878, which includes
the communities of Bolechow Ruski, Do=C5=82szka, and Salamonowa Gora.

There are only 12 of original 18 sheets, which cover all of the
densely-populated town areas. This update includes extensive redline
and black pencil revisions to property boundaries, houses, and
property numbering, with many property owners' names. The town center
includes a church and a likely synagogue, a Jewish community building,
and the market; elsewhere, a Jewish cemetery is shown south of the
town center, among several suburban communities and intricate
waterways. (To find the cemetery, looks between the words "Zidowiec"
and "Dzika" for the open space marked with gravestone and triangle
images.

On the page overview, make sure to note the separate "town center"
(downtown Bolechow) map on the lower right hand side. You can zoom in
on both maps and make out most of the names. Some of the Jewish names
that were easily readable in the smaller map are:

Berl Taup
Bronja Langer
Cuder Gross
David Vioral
Feige Leiberman
Hersch Granbart
Hersch Schindler
Jakob Reifeisen
Jossel Berger
Laisor Ziering
Mechel Halpern
Mechel Kleinberg
Moses Fruchter
Moses Hersch Gross
Moses Kaufman
Moses Lichtstein
Moses Schmidt
Munisch Fruchter
Salamon Chaim Rubin
Salamon Groll
Samuel Halper
Simon Reifeisen
Yankiel Tepper
Zach Bernsweig
(no first name, but surname) Handel

This map is a higher resolution scan of the same Bolechow map that was
stitched by Joan Adler and Fred Fogelson in 2010 >from paper copies.
We thank them again for volunteering their time and skills to create a
large scale, laminated map to bring to conferences, and we are
grateful to Gesher Galicia map room coordinator, Jay Osborn, for
tackling the difficult stitching of a map with many missing pages. GG
has a landowner records book for Bolechow that we are in the process
of indexing, with the results to be posted to the All Galicia Database
soon.

There are many Galitzianers with ties to Bolechow (the town that
Daniel Mendelsohn wrote about in "The Lost: A Search for Six of Six
Million,") and there is a very active birds-of-a-feather/non-profit
organization, the Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society, whose members are
working on restoring the cemetery and creating a museum in the town.

To learn more about the activities of the Bolechow Jewish Heritage
Society click here: http://www.bolechow.org/

To learn more about Daniel Mendelsohn's experience in researching and
traveling to the town, click here:
http://bolechow.ajmendelsohn.com/html/bolechow.html

You can access all of the maps in the GG map room by going to:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org and scrolling down to the alphabetical
listings of cadastral maps. Gesher Galicia hopes this iteration of
the Bolechow map will help many people discover relatives on these
pages and to get a true sense of the scope of Bolechow and its
history.

If you are interested in adding your Galician community to this list
and want to learn more about the Cadastral Map & Landowner Records
Project click here:
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/cadastral-map-and-landowner-records/

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://www.maps.geshergalicia.org


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Good Living Street: Portrait of a Patron Family, Vienna 1900 #austria-czech

meretz
 

Australian author Tim Bonyhady has written a portrait of a patron family,
his Viennese Ancestors Gallia.
Vienna and its Secessionist movement at the turn of the last century is the
focus of this extraordinary social portrait told through an eminent Jewish
Viennese family, headed by Hermine and Moriz Gallia, who were among the
great patrons of early-twentieth-century Viennese culture at its peak.

Uriel Meretz, Israel


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech "Historical Maps of the Habsburg Empire" - MAPIRE a new cartography site #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

Announcing a new cartography website, "Historical Maps of the Hapsburg
Empire" or MAPIRE at:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/en/

The site offers a selection of historical maps >from the
Austro-Hungarian Empire geo-referenced with present day maps (on
Google or OpenStreetMap) providing layering technology for researchers
to compare the past with the present.

Completed is the second military survey of Habsburg Empire and in
progress are the first and third surveys and cadastral surveys of
Croatia and Hungary. Project participants are the Austrian State
Archives (Osterreichisches Staatsarchiv,) Arcanum in Budapest.

There were two types of maps >from that time period: the military
surveys (typically scaled 1 to 28.800) and the more detailed cadastral
maps (scaled 1 to 2.880,) with both of them covering the entire
territory. The original manuscript map sheets of the military surveys
can be found in the Austrian National Archives, but cadastral
(extremely details property maps on the town level) are found in
various archives of the successor states. For example, cadastral maps
for the province of Galicia are held the following regional or
historical archives: Krakow, Przemsyl, Rzeszow in Poland and Lviv and
Ternopil in Ukraine. (Examples of Galician cadastral maps can be
found in Gesher Galicia's map room: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

To use the site, scroll down. When you see the passing selection of
maps, click "complete view" on one that interests you. You can also
scroll further and choose "Complete View" to see the entire Empire in
context, or choose to focus on the following territories:

Bohemia
Bukovina
Coastal Zone
Croatia
Dalmatia
Galicia
Illyria
Lichtenstein
Lombardy
Modena
Moravia
Parma
Silesia
Slavonia
Styria
Salzberg
Tyrol
Venice
Vorarlberg

Click on the area and then start zooming in. You can adjust the
"opacity" using the slider bar at the top of the page to switch views
between the historical map layered with the current GIS map. This
feature is very useful for those researching historical place names
that may not show up on current maps.

The Second (also known as Franciscan) Military Survey (1806-1809) has
outstanding quality and while not a cadastral survey, when you zoom in
at the closest range you will be able to view plots of land and
buildings, especially ones detailed along the banks of rivers that ran
through these communities.

Arcanum, based in Budapest, specializes in digitization projects, and
has already covered the entire collection of maps of the City Archives
of Budapest, the hand-written map collection of the Hungarian National
Library, and the cadastral maps of Hungarian Archives and Croatia.

A more thorough explanation of these maps can be found in the
"Digitized Maps of the Habsburg Empire" paper here:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/static/pdf/mkf_booklet.pdf

Or the "Digitizing and Geo-Referencing of the Historical Cadastral
Maps (1856-60) of Hungary" here:

http://www.academia.edu/3614065/Digitizing_and_georeferencing_of_the_historical_cadastral_maps_1856-60_of_Hungary

The MAPIRE site is also available in German and Hungarian.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Bolechow Cadastral Map 1850/1878 - Gesher Galicia Map room #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

Announcing the latest addition to the Gesher Galicia Map Room:

The Bolechow Cadastral Map 1850/1878

Direct link to the map:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/bolechow-bolekhiv-1878/

This is a black-and-white cadastral map of Bolechow (Bolekhiv) survey
edition (Feldskizzen) of 1850, reambulation of 1878, which includes
the communities of Bolechow Ruski, Do=C5=82szka, and Salamonowa Gora.

There are only 12 of original 18 sheets, which cover all of the
densely-populated town areas. This update includes extensive redline
and black pencil revisions to property boundaries, houses, and
property numbering, with many property owners' names. The town center
includes a church and a likely synagogue, a Jewish community building,
and the market; elsewhere, a Jewish cemetery is shown south of the
town center, among several suburban communities and intricate
waterways. (To find the cemetery, looks between the words "Zidowiec"
and "Dzika" for the open space marked with gravestone and triangle
images.

On the page overview, make sure to note the separate "town center"
(downtown Bolechow) map on the lower right hand side. You can zoom in
on both maps and make out most of the names. Some of the Jewish names
that were easily readable in the smaller map are:

Berl Taup
Bronja Langer
Cuder Gross
David Vioral
Feige Leiberman
Hersch Granbart
Hersch Schindler
Jakob Reifeisen
Jossel Berger
Laisor Ziering
Mechel Halpern
Mechel Kleinberg
Moses Fruchter
Moses Hersch Gross
Moses Kaufman
Moses Lichtstein
Moses Schmidt
Munisch Fruchter
Salamon Chaim Rubin
Salamon Groll
Samuel Halper
Simon Reifeisen
Yankiel Tepper
Zach Bernsweig
(no first name, but surname) Handel

This map is a higher resolution scan of the same Bolechow map that was
stitched by Joan Adler and Fred Fogelson in 2010 >from paper copies.
We thank them again for volunteering their time and skills to create a
large scale, laminated map to bring to conferences, and we are
grateful to Gesher Galicia map room coordinator, Jay Osborn, for
tackling the difficult stitching of a map with many missing pages. GG
has a landowner records book for Bolechow that we are in the process
of indexing, with the results to be posted to the All Galicia Database
soon.

There are many Galitzianers with ties to Bolechow (the town that
Daniel Mendelsohn wrote about in "The Lost: A Search for Six of Six
Million,") and there is a very active birds-of-a-feather/non-profit
organization, the Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society, whose members are
working on restoring the cemetery and creating a museum in the town.

To learn more about the activities of the Bolechow Jewish Heritage
Society click here: http://www.bolechow.org/

To learn more about Daniel Mendelsohn's experience in researching and
traveling to the town, click here:
http://bolechow.ajmendelsohn.com/html/bolechow.html

You can access all of the maps in the GG map room by going to:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org and scrolling down to the alphabetical
listings of cadastral maps. Gesher Galicia hopes this iteration of
the Bolechow map will help many people discover relatives on these
pages and to get a true sense of the scope of Bolechow and its
history.

If you are interested in adding your Galician community to this list
and want to learn more about the Cadastral Map & Landowner Records
Project click here:
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/cadastral-map-and-landowner-records/

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://www.maps.geshergalicia.org


Re: Translation of 19th century occupation in the military requested #poland

Igor Holyboroda
 

Hello!
Yes, it means "sanitary troops", "military sanitary serviceman"
Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv, Ukraine

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Translation of 19th century occupation in the military requested
From: RuthNW <ruthnw@...>
Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 16:57:09 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1

Among some marriage records I just came across the words
(presumably abbreviations) indicating the occupation of the groom:

sanit wojsk

Does that mean that while he was in military service he worked in
sanitation?

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, CA USA
ruthnw@...


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Translation of 19th century occupation in the military requested #poland

Igor Holyboroda
 

Hello!
Yes, it means "sanitary troops", "military sanitary serviceman"
Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv, Ukraine

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Translation of 19th century occupation in the military requested
From: RuthNW <ruthnw@...>
Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 16:57:09 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1

Among some marriage records I just came across the words
(presumably abbreviations) indicating the occupation of the groom:

sanit wojsk

Does that mean that while he was in military service he worked in
sanitation?

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, CA USA
ruthnw@...


military occupation term #poland

Fay Bussgang
 

Sanit. is an abbreviation for "Sanitariusz"
which means: medical orderly, or stretcher bearer,
or a person on the medical ambulance

Julian Bussgang
Dedham, MA


Subject: Translation of 19th century occupation in the military
requested
From: RuthNW <ruthnw@...>
Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 16:57:09 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1

Among some marriage records I just came across the words
(presumably abbreviations) indicating the occupation of the groom:

sanit wojsk

Does that mean that while he was in military service he worked in
sanitation?

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, CA USA
ruthnw@...


JRI Poland #Poland military occupation term #poland

Fay Bussgang
 

Sanit. is an abbreviation for "Sanitariusz"
which means: medical orderly, or stretcher bearer,
or a person on the medical ambulance

Julian Bussgang
Dedham, MA


Subject: Translation of 19th century occupation in the military
requested
From: RuthNW <ruthnw@...>
Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 16:57:09 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1

Among some marriage records I just came across the words
(presumably abbreviations) indicating the occupation of the groom:

sanit wojsk

Does that mean that while he was in military service he worked in
sanitation?

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, CA USA
ruthnw@...


D-M Soundex #poland

Israel P
 

I did a "sounds like" search on JRI-Poland for the surname Bialystoker and
was surprised to get only two results. Later in the day, a visiting young
cousin had a look and got 1425 results. Why the difference? He searched
"Bialystocker."

I had always been under the impression that the soundex functions did not
distinguish between "k" and "ck."

I ran this by Gary Mokotoff (the "M" in "D-M") and he confirmed that in fact
the two are different.

I figure I can't be the only person who didn't know this. This has been a
public service announcement.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem
blogging weekly at http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com


JRI Poland #Poland D-M Soundex #poland

Israel P
 

I did a "sounds like" search on JRI-Poland for the surname Bialystoker and
was surprised to get only two results. Later in the day, a visiting young
cousin had a look and got 1425 results. Why the difference? He searched
"Bialystocker."

I had always been under the impression that the soundex functions did not
distinguish between "k" and "ck."

I ran this by Gary Mokotoff (the "M" in "D-M") and he confirmed that in fact
the two are different.

I figure I can't be the only person who didn't know this. This has been a
public service announcement.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem
blogging weekly at http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com

128401 - 128420 of 669754