Date   

Re: Searching for a town #belarus

ALEX VOLKOV <volkoff@...>
 

Hello Barbara

I think I can help you with it, please let me know the name of
the town and as much as you can tell. If you have alternative
spellings or original writing in Russian or Ukranian, this will
help too

Answering through SIG posting, just to let everyone know, if you
have questions Russian, Ukranian, Belorussian or Moldovian-related,
like about geography, you are welcome to ask

Alex Volkov


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Searching for a town #ukraine

ALEX VOLKOV <volkoff@...>
 

Hello Barbara

I think I can help you with it, please let me know the name of
the town and as much as you can tell. If you have alternative
spellings or original writing in Russian or Ukranian, this will
help too

Answering through SIG posting, just to let everyone know, if you
have questions Russian, Ukranian, Belorussian or Moldovian-related,
like about geography, you are welcome to ask

Alex Volkov


How can I prove I'm me? #general

Stephen Esrati <stevsta@...>
 

Ohio, concerned about terrorist attacks, now requires positive ID for a
driver's license. In most cases, a birth certificate is adequate, but I
was born Stefan Hermann Hirsch in Germany and was naturalized as a
Palestinian citizen and British subject in a court in Jaffa in 1935. My
name was changed to Gidon Stefan Esrati.
Is there any way I can find a record of the name change to prove that my
birth certificate is really mine?

Searching HIRSCH (Berlin and Dortmund)

Stephen Esrati


Re: Rodesh Shalom / Rodeph Shalom #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Batya Olsen asked about the burial place of Rebecca AJZENSHMIDT WACHT
(1830-1923) in Rodesh Shalom Cemetery, which she supposed was in Queens,
because she had not been able to determine its location.

This is almost certainly Rodeph Sholom, which is a Reform Congregation
that was formerly located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, and moved
about 70 years ago to 7 West 83rd Street, New York, N.Y., 10024, on the
Upper West Side. It is still active and has a quite a large membership.
Their telephone number is 212-362-8800, their fax number is 212-877-6526,
and their e-mail address is info@rodephsholom.org. They have at least one
cemetery plot in Queens, in Union Field. You can try to call either
Rodeph Sholom, or perhaps even better, Union Field at telephone
718-366-3748, fax 718-366-8471, or e-mail ufc@unionfieldcemetery.org.

If I understand the Rodeph Sholom and Union Field web sites correctly,
Rodeph Sholom is the owner (or was the original owner) of Union Field, so
just because somebody is buried there, it does not mean that they were a
member of Congregation Rodeph Sholom; they could have been buried in the
plot of a landsmanshaft or organization that bought land there.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How can I prove I'm me? #general

Stephen Esrati <stevsta@...>
 

Ohio, concerned about terrorist attacks, now requires positive ID for a
driver's license. In most cases, a birth certificate is adequate, but I
was born Stefan Hermann Hirsch in Germany and was naturalized as a
Palestinian citizen and British subject in a court in Jaffa in 1935. My
name was changed to Gidon Stefan Esrati.
Is there any way I can find a record of the name change to prove that my
birth certificate is really mine?

Searching HIRSCH (Berlin and Dortmund)

Stephen Esrati


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rodesh Shalom / Rodeph Shalom #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Batya Olsen asked about the burial place of Rebecca AJZENSHMIDT WACHT
(1830-1923) in Rodesh Shalom Cemetery, which she supposed was in Queens,
because she had not been able to determine its location.

This is almost certainly Rodeph Sholom, which is a Reform Congregation
that was formerly located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, and moved
about 70 years ago to 7 West 83rd Street, New York, N.Y., 10024, on the
Upper West Side. It is still active and has a quite a large membership.
Their telephone number is 212-362-8800, their fax number is 212-877-6526,
and their e-mail address is info@rodephsholom.org. They have at least one
cemetery plot in Queens, in Union Field. You can try to call either
Rodeph Sholom, or perhaps even better, Union Field at telephone
718-366-3748, fax 718-366-8471, or e-mail ufc@unionfieldcemetery.org.

If I understand the Rodeph Sholom and Union Field web sites correctly,
Rodeph Sholom is the owner (or was the original owner) of Union Field, so
just because somebody is buried there, it does not mean that they were a
member of Congregation Rodeph Sholom; they could have been buried in the
plot of a landsmanshaft or organization that bought land there.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


First Name God' #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

The 1906 KIev Gubernya Duma Voters List offers this peculiar name:
VOLYNSKIJ, God'. Can anyone shed some light on the given name? Also,
under the heading Qualifications, many people have this: Po
imushch.tsenzu. What does this mean?

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen First Name God' #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

The 1906 KIev Gubernya Duma Voters List offers this peculiar name:
VOLYNSKIJ, God'. Can anyone shed some light on the given name? Also,
under the heading Qualifications, many people have this: Po
imushch.tsenzu. What does this mean?

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, AZ


Mt. Hebron Cemetery, N.Y. Photo of gravesite #general

Marilyn Siegel <jadzgran@...>
 

Hello All,
I have just discovered that my father's brother, my uncle, is buried
in Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Flushing, N.Y. He was one of my favorite uncles,
and I would love a photo, if possible, to include in my family history book
being done for my grandchildren.

Martin HELFMAN--Society-Clairmont Club
Block 7, Reference 1, Sec.D, Line 3, Grave 4.
Date of death-2/15/1959

I would be most appreciative if anyone can help.
Marilyn in Fl.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mt. Hebron Cemetery, N.Y. Photo of gravesite #general

Marilyn Siegel <jadzgran@...>
 

Hello All,
I have just discovered that my father's brother, my uncle, is buried
in Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Flushing, N.Y. He was one of my favorite uncles,
and I would love a photo, if possible, to include in my family history book
being done for my grandchildren.

Martin HELFMAN--Society-Clairmont Club
Block 7, Reference 1, Sec.D, Line 3, Grave 4.
Date of death-2/15/1959

I would be most appreciative if anyone can help.
Marilyn in Fl.


Phone call/address help in Mexico City #latinamerica

Joseph Lonstein
 

Hi,

About a year and a half ago, some of you were kind enough to provide me with
the telephone number of someone living in Mexico City who I thought might
have been the mother-in-law of a cousin. I am now going through some old
photos of my recently deceased grandmother, and find >from the inscriptions
on the backs that I did have the correct family in Mexico City. However,
nobody picked up at the phone number I was given.

Could someone again be kind enough to help me contact Israel GOLDBERG
SANDLER, the first cousin of my grandmother. His phone number and address
are listed on the online Mexican white pages, but I think it's unlikely that
he is still alive, as he would be almost 100 years old, if not older. I
also received no response last year when I wrote to the address listed
online for him, which is the same address I recently found for him in my
grandmother's address books >from the 1950s and 60s. His son, Coppel
SANDLER, passed away at least a decade ago, but his wife Rosita STOLARSKI
SANDLER is apparently still living in Mexico City. I cannot find a phone
number or address for Rosita, and nobody answered the number I have for
Rosita's mother (Sonia Stolarski) when I called last year. A mailing
address might be the most helpful, as I do not speak Spanish, and not sure I
could communicate well enough even if I made a telephone connection.

Thanks once again for your help.

Joe Lonstein
East Lansing, Michigan


Latin America #LatinAmerica Phone call/address help in Mexico City #latinamerica

Joseph Lonstein
 

Hi,

About a year and a half ago, some of you were kind enough to provide me with
the telephone number of someone living in Mexico City who I thought might
have been the mother-in-law of a cousin. I am now going through some old
photos of my recently deceased grandmother, and find >from the inscriptions
on the backs that I did have the correct family in Mexico City. However,
nobody picked up at the phone number I was given.

Could someone again be kind enough to help me contact Israel GOLDBERG
SANDLER, the first cousin of my grandmother. His phone number and address
are listed on the online Mexican white pages, but I think it's unlikely that
he is still alive, as he would be almost 100 years old, if not older. I
also received no response last year when I wrote to the address listed
online for him, which is the same address I recently found for him in my
grandmother's address books >from the 1950s and 60s. His son, Coppel
SANDLER, passed away at least a decade ago, but his wife Rosita STOLARSKI
SANDLER is apparently still living in Mexico City. I cannot find a phone
number or address for Rosita, and nobody answered the number I have for
Rosita's mother (Sonia Stolarski) when I called last year. A mailing
address might be the most helpful, as I do not speak Spanish, and not sure I
could communicate well enough even if I made a telephone connection.

Thanks once again for your help.

Joe Lonstein
East Lansing, Michigan


Re: Standesaemter and Birth Certificates #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/25/2006 fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de writes:
Lars Menk wrote:
Paragraph 61, sub-paragraph 1 of the German Personenstandsgesetz (law of
vital status) >from 08 Aug 1957 says that "the inspecting and examining of
registers of vital statistics and granting of vital status documents may
only be claimed by the authorities in the context of their responsibility
and by persons to which the record refers as well as by their husbands, ancestors
and descendants. Authorities have to indicate the purpose. Other persons only have
a right to inspect and examine the registers of vital statistics and to be granted
vital status documents when they make a legal interest credible."

<<My comment:
It is true that a legally valid birth certificate can only iussed to
descendants, but sometimes one can negotiate with the Standesamt clerks
for some kind of copy that does not have the official stamp on it and
from a legal perspective is therefore not valid as an official birth
certificate. I wonder how one can call this, "inoffizielle Kopie"
(inofficial copy) or something like that. I think I once got one this way ...
perhaps that helps >>

=====I stopped requesting documents >from Standesamter a long time ago. Whenever
possible I contact City or State Archivists. I discussed this at the
International Jewish Genealogy Conference in London in 2001 (it should be
available >from the conference records). Archivists are highly trained academics
who enjoy converting their raw data and dry pages into living history, unlike the
town clerks for whom your enquiry is more of a nuisance.

==With the information you already have on your ancestral family, you can
help round out the history of the town in which they lived, and of its Jewish
population--something that is highly valued by most German archivists. When
posing your query, drop a hint that you will repay with extensive
information--and make sure you live up to your promise.

==I have been told by more than one archivist that I would do well to
present myself as a researcher, journalist or historian, rather than just a
descendant. I guess that puts me in the category of "Other persons only have a
right to inspect and examine the registers of vital statistics and to be granted
vital status documents when they make a legal interest credible," as Lars Menk
explains. It seems to work. More than that, many archivists have really
gone out of their way to provide me with copies of documents that I had never
dreamed of, and background information on life in the location 50, 100, 200
years ago, its economy, its Jews, etc . . .

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@aol.com


German SIG #Germany Re: Standesaemter and Birth Certificates #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/25/2006 fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de writes:
Lars Menk wrote:
Paragraph 61, sub-paragraph 1 of the German Personenstandsgesetz (law of
vital status) >from 08 Aug 1957 says that "the inspecting and examining of
registers of vital statistics and granting of vital status documents may
only be claimed by the authorities in the context of their responsibility
and by persons to which the record refers as well as by their husbands, ancestors
and descendants. Authorities have to indicate the purpose. Other persons only have
a right to inspect and examine the registers of vital statistics and to be granted
vital status documents when they make a legal interest credible."

<<My comment:
It is true that a legally valid birth certificate can only iussed to
descendants, but sometimes one can negotiate with the Standesamt clerks
for some kind of copy that does not have the official stamp on it and
from a legal perspective is therefore not valid as an official birth
certificate. I wonder how one can call this, "inoffizielle Kopie"
(inofficial copy) or something like that. I think I once got one this way ...
perhaps that helps >>

=====I stopped requesting documents >from Standesamter a long time ago. Whenever
possible I contact City or State Archivists. I discussed this at the
International Jewish Genealogy Conference in London in 2001 (it should be
available >from the conference records). Archivists are highly trained academics
who enjoy converting their raw data and dry pages into living history, unlike the
town clerks for whom your enquiry is more of a nuisance.

==With the information you already have on your ancestral family, you can
help round out the history of the town in which they lived, and of its Jewish
population--something that is highly valued by most German archivists. When
posing your query, drop a hint that you will repay with extensive
information--and make sure you live up to your promise.

==I have been told by more than one archivist that I would do well to
present myself as a researcher, journalist or historian, rather than just a
descendant. I guess that puts me in the category of "Other persons only have a
right to inspect and examine the registers of vital statistics and to be granted
vital status documents when they make a legal interest credible," as Lars Menk
explains. It seems to work. More than that, many archivists have really
gone out of their way to provide me with copies of documents that I had never
dreamed of, and background information on life in the location 50, 100, 200
years ago, its economy, its Jews, etc . . .

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@aol.com


Re: How can I prove I'm me? #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Stephen Esrati" <stevsta@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:r8pxg.56313$VE1.37120@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...

Ohio, concerned about terrorist attacks, now requires positive ID for a
driver's license. In most cases, a birth certificate is adequate, but I
was born Stefan Hermann Hirsch in Germany and was naturalized as a
Palestinian citizen and British subject in a court in Jaffa in 1935. My
name was changed to Gidon Stefan Esrati.
Is there any way I can find a record of the name change to prove that my
birth certificate is really mine?
See http://www.bmv.ohio.gov/driver_license/nonrenewlic.htm . If you are not a
US citizen it tells you what to do - you would need to prove that you are in
the US legally - which presumably you are as otherwise you wouldn't have
posted.

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How can I prove I'm me? #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Stephen Esrati" <stevsta@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:r8pxg.56313$VE1.37120@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...

Ohio, concerned about terrorist attacks, now requires positive ID for a
driver's license. In most cases, a birth certificate is adequate, but I
was born Stefan Hermann Hirsch in Germany and was naturalized as a
Palestinian citizen and British subject in a court in Jaffa in 1935. My
name was changed to Gidon Stefan Esrati.
Is there any way I can find a record of the name change to prove that my
birth certificate is really mine?
See http://www.bmv.ohio.gov/driver_license/nonrenewlic.htm . If you are not a
US citizen it tells you what to do - you would need to prove that you are in
the US legally - which presumably you are as otherwise you wouldn't have
posted.

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)


Re: Rodesh Shalom Cemetery, NY #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 7:29 AM +0200 7/25/06, yoni ben-ari wrote:
Could also be "Doresh Shalom".
In theory, yes; "doresh" shalom means "seeking" peace ( a milder
version of "rodef" shalom, "pursuing" peace). And one can easily
imagine a slip of the tongue turning "doresh" into "rodesh" - by
metasthesis -- especially if the speaker does not know Hebrew.

However, the actual phrase that occurs famously in Mishnah Tractate
Avot (routinely printed in our prayer books) is in fact "Rodef
Shalom" (see Pirkei Avot, Ethics of the Fathers 1:12, referring to
Aaron as I mentioned earlier).

Moreover, I just googled Rodef Shalom and discovered several
references to cemeteries with that name!

Incidentally, Google is an amazingly helpful source for both Hebrew
and Yiddish expressions in transliteration. It jogs my memory when
I am having a senior moment (all too frequently!) as well as teaching
me stuff I didn't know before! Highly recommended to all jgenners,
even the younger ones.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rodesh Shalom Cemetery, NY #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 7:29 AM +0200 7/25/06, yoni ben-ari wrote:
Could also be "Doresh Shalom".
In theory, yes; "doresh" shalom means "seeking" peace ( a milder
version of "rodef" shalom, "pursuing" peace). And one can easily
imagine a slip of the tongue turning "doresh" into "rodesh" - by
metasthesis -- especially if the speaker does not know Hebrew.

However, the actual phrase that occurs famously in Mishnah Tractate
Avot (routinely printed in our prayer books) is in fact "Rodef
Shalom" (see Pirkei Avot, Ethics of the Fathers 1:12, referring to
Aaron as I mentioned earlier).

Moreover, I just googled Rodef Shalom and discovered several
references to cemeteries with that name!

Incidentally, Google is an amazingly helpful source for both Hebrew
and Yiddish expressions in transliteration. It jogs my memory when
I am having a senior moment (all too frequently!) as well as teaching
me stuff I didn't know before! Highly recommended to all jgenners,
even the younger ones.

Judith Romney Wegner


Ladomirova, Slovakia #general

jlp93@...
 

Please help,
I am looking for descendants >from the Slovakian Town of Ladomirova to help
restore the old cemetery there, if anyone is interested please let me know. My
name is Jacqueline Perle and my email is _JLP93@aol.com_
(mailto:JLP93@aol.com) . Thank you for your help.
Jacqueline Perle


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ladomirova, Slovakia #general

jlp93@...
 

Please help,
I am looking for descendants >from the Slovakian Town of Ladomirova to help
restore the old cemetery there, if anyone is interested please let me know. My
name is Jacqueline Perle and my email is _JLP93@aol.com_
(mailto:JLP93@aol.com) . Thank you for your help.
Jacqueline Perle