Date   

Re: origin of family name AMSTERDAM #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/10/2006 5:50:43 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
Hank@WebFeats.com writes:

< . . . . More than one relative has told me that the consonants in
Amsterdam(ski) form a Hebrew (or perhaps Yiddish) acronym that has
some kind of mystical Jewish significance, the implication being that
someone may have adopted the name Amsterdam(ski) for that reason
(rather than for the reason of having some connection to the city of
Amsterdam). If nobody here can expand on that sketchy explanation
(and if anyone would like to know more about it), let
me know, I'll contact some of my relatives for more details.

==Lars Menk lists only the city of Amsterdam as the source for the Amsterdam
name in his dictionary of German Jewish surnames. He lists a nunmber of
differeent families in Frankfurt/Mainin 1679, 1686, and 1710, also in Friedberg
which is near Frankfurt, and in Glogau which, I think, is in Posen

==BenZion Kaganoff does not list Amsterdam but lists Amster, which he says
is derived >from the German for hamster and may be a name for "a diligent,
industrious individual."

==I speculate the name may also be an "elaboration" of the German-Jewish
first name Anselm/Amsel/Anschel which is a kinnuy for Ascher (one of the 12
tribes). This would be similar to the origin of Berlin/er in many cases, >from
Issachar (a tribe) to Beer (kinnuy) to Berlin, an important city.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: origin of family name AMSTERDAM #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/10/2006 5:50:43 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
Hank@WebFeats.com writes:

< . . . . More than one relative has told me that the consonants in
Amsterdam(ski) form a Hebrew (or perhaps Yiddish) acronym that has
some kind of mystical Jewish significance, the implication being that
someone may have adopted the name Amsterdam(ski) for that reason
(rather than for the reason of having some connection to the city of
Amsterdam). If nobody here can expand on that sketchy explanation
(and if anyone would like to know more about it), let
me know, I'll contact some of my relatives for more details.

==Lars Menk lists only the city of Amsterdam as the source for the Amsterdam
name in his dictionary of German Jewish surnames. He lists a nunmber of
differeent families in Frankfurt/Mainin 1679, 1686, and 1710, also in Friedberg
which is near Frankfurt, and in Glogau which, I think, is in Posen

==BenZion Kaganoff does not list Amsterdam but lists Amster, which he says
is derived >from the German for hamster and may be a name for "a diligent,
industrious individual."

==I speculate the name may also be an "elaboration" of the German-Jewish
first name Anselm/Amsel/Anschel which is a kinnuy for Ascher (one of the 12
tribes). This would be similar to the origin of Berlin/er in many cases, >from
Issachar (a tribe) to Beer (kinnuy) to Berlin, an important city.

Michael Bernet, New York


Sally COHEN and his wife Malwine #germany

Dan S. Frank <andsfg@...>
 

Dear fellow GerSIGers,

I am looking for more information about Sally, also Salli or Sali,
COHEN and his wife Malwine, (her maiden name was HORN) and their
children. The couple had two or three boys, and one daughter: Selma.

Sally was A son of Levi COHEN, Sally COHEN was born in Borken, Westphalia,
Dec. 1, 1868. His job was announced as Kultusbeamter.
Selma, their daughter was born in Cologne, Halderstrasse, Sept.
3,1903. She grew up in Augsburg. [Source of this data?]

Selma was deported >from Borken, where she moved to in 1939. She survived the
Riga-KZ. I suppose that Sally worked in a Synagogue in Cologne or nearby.

Does anybody know this family?

I would be happy if some one can help me to gather more information about them.

Will be glad to have your answers to my E-Mail address. Thanks in advance.

Dan Frank Afula Israel E-Mail: andsfg@gmail.com

Searching: KOENIGSTHAL, Bad-Carlshafen. Hessen;
FRANK, Velen; Borken-Weseke=85 and surroundings, North Rhine-Westphalia
Herne-Zodingen; North Rhine-Westphalia; Merzbach (Bayren);
COHEN, Coesfeld; Olfen. NR-Westphalia;
STERN, Sudheim; Lower-Saxony;
WERTHEIM, Bad-Carlshafen. Hessen;
KESSLER, Gissen. Hessen. Hagen/Iserlohn, North-Rhine Westphalia;
RHOTSCHILD, Sudheim; Lower-Saxony;
SUSSKIND, Luedenschid, North Rhine-Westphalia, Gissen, Hessen
Bergen op Zoom/Amsterdam Holland;
OPPENHEIMER, Uslar Lower Saxony, Witzenhusen & Frankfurt a/m Hessen, Berlin.


Yiddish translation request - ViewMate VM8307 - VM8309 #general

Rose and Robert Raymen <rr.raymen@...>
 

Dear Genners

I require assistance in the translation of several photo inscriptions
written in Yiddish. The photographs were taken in Danzig (Poland) and were
sent by my father to his family in Kalisz (Poland). These can be viewed at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8307
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8308
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8309

Please respond privately.

Best Wishes
Rose Raymen
rr.raymen@optusnet.com.au


German SIG #Germany Sally COHEN and his wife Malwine #germany

Dan S. Frank <andsfg@...>
 

Dear fellow GerSIGers,

I am looking for more information about Sally, also Salli or Sali,
COHEN and his wife Malwine, (her maiden name was HORN) and their
children. The couple had two or three boys, and one daughter: Selma.

Sally was A son of Levi COHEN, Sally COHEN was born in Borken, Westphalia,
Dec. 1, 1868. His job was announced as Kultusbeamter.
Selma, their daughter was born in Cologne, Halderstrasse, Sept.
3,1903. She grew up in Augsburg. [Source of this data?]

Selma was deported >from Borken, where she moved to in 1939. She survived the
Riga-KZ. I suppose that Sally worked in a Synagogue in Cologne or nearby.

Does anybody know this family?

I would be happy if some one can help me to gather more information about them.

Will be glad to have your answers to my E-Mail address. Thanks in advance.

Dan Frank Afula Israel E-Mail: andsfg@gmail.com

Searching: KOENIGSTHAL, Bad-Carlshafen. Hessen;
FRANK, Velen; Borken-Weseke=85 and surroundings, North Rhine-Westphalia
Herne-Zodingen; North Rhine-Westphalia; Merzbach (Bayren);
COHEN, Coesfeld; Olfen. NR-Westphalia;
STERN, Sudheim; Lower-Saxony;
WERTHEIM, Bad-Carlshafen. Hessen;
KESSLER, Gissen. Hessen. Hagen/Iserlohn, North-Rhine Westphalia;
RHOTSCHILD, Sudheim; Lower-Saxony;
SUSSKIND, Luedenschid, North Rhine-Westphalia, Gissen, Hessen
Bergen op Zoom/Amsterdam Holland;
OPPENHEIMER, Uslar Lower Saxony, Witzenhusen & Frankfurt a/m Hessen, Berlin.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish translation request - ViewMate VM8307 - VM8309 #general

Rose and Robert Raymen <rr.raymen@...>
 

Dear Genners

I require assistance in the translation of several photo inscriptions
written in Yiddish. The photographs were taken in Danzig (Poland) and were
sent by my father to his family in Kalisz (Poland). These can be viewed at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8307
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8308
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8309

Please respond privately.

Best Wishes
Rose Raymen
rr.raymen@optusnet.com.au


1930's Polish army photo #general

Rose and Robert Raymen <rr.raymen@...>
 

Dear Genners

Could anyone assist me with a 1930's photo taken of my father and a friend
in the Polish army? I would be interested to know if he was conscripted and
where his regiment was based? He was born in Kalisz but lived in Danzig for
several years. Also, what is the food item depicted in the photo and was it
part of the Polish army diet? The photograph can be viewed at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8304

Thanks in advance.

Best Wishes
Rose Raymen
rr.raymen@optusnet.com.au


German translation request - ViewMate VM8306 #general

Rose and Robert Raymen <rr.raymen@...>
 

Dear Genners

I require assistance in the translation of a photo inscription written in
German. The photograph is of my grandmother and her family taken in
Kalisz (Poland) and sent to my father. This can be viewed at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8306

Please respond privately.

Best Wishes
Rose Raymen
rr.raymen@optusnet.com.au


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1930's Polish army photo #general

Rose and Robert Raymen <rr.raymen@...>
 

Dear Genners

Could anyone assist me with a 1930's photo taken of my father and a friend
in the Polish army? I would be interested to know if he was conscripted and
where his regiment was based? He was born in Kalisz but lived in Danzig for
several years. Also, what is the food item depicted in the photo and was it
part of the Polish army diet? The photograph can be viewed at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8304

Thanks in advance.

Best Wishes
Rose Raymen
rr.raymen@optusnet.com.au


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen German translation request - ViewMate VM8306 #general

Rose and Robert Raymen <rr.raymen@...>
 

Dear Genners

I require assistance in the translation of a photo inscription written in
German. The photograph is of my grandmother and her family taken in
Kalisz (Poland) and sent to my father. This can be viewed at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8306

Please respond privately.

Best Wishes
Rose Raymen
rr.raymen@optusnet.com.au


Re: What does Rav mean? #general

Benzy Shani <bzs@...>
 

Walter Spector wrote:
I had a great uncle's tombstone translated. His father's name(my ggfather)
was translated as Rav Yosef. On the nine other tombstones for his children
is just Yosef. Does Rav have a special significance?
___

What it really says is "Reb Yosef".
"Reb" is a way of respecting someone who is not actually a Rabbi. It is
tantamount to inscribing "the honorable", or "Mr.".
On the tombstone of an "ordained" Rabbi it would have said "Harav".
Usually "Reb" is not spelled out, and instead it will say Resh-apostrophe.
The absence of "Reb" on any other tombstone is insignificant as the title is
not an official one and is not mandatory.

To make a short story long, the title "Rav", in the rabbinical sense,
followed by the first name (Rav Yosef) or full patronymic (Rav Shmuel bar
Nachman), is reserved for the Babylonian Amoraim, the Sevoraim, and the
Gaonim - the scholars of the Babylonian Talmud and post-Talmudic era.
(The Gaonim had the title Gaon following their name, e. g., Rav Saadiah
Gaon).
This was probably designed to demonstrate the defference of these scholars
to the Tannaim - the Mishnaic scholars - who were referred to as "Rabbi"
(pronounced with a long "e" sound at the end), followed by either their
first name alone (Rabbi Akiva) , their full patronymic (Rabbi Elazar ben
Azaria), or their first name followed by their location (Rabbi Yehuda ish
Kefar Ichos) or profession (Rabbi Yochanan Hasandlar).
Mishnaic scholars who were not "ordained" as Rabbis, did not carry the title
"Rabbi" (ben Zoma, ben Bagbag).

The title "Rabban" was only used in reference to Presidents of the
Sanhedrin, but this title only came into use after the destruction of the
Temple. (The Talmud teaches that "greater than Rabban is his own name", i.e.
the greatest greats need no title before their names (Hillel, Shamai, etc.).

The Palestinian Amoraim - the scholars of the Jerusalem Talmud - retained
the title "Rabbi", but this isn't to say that they deferred to the Tannaim
to any lesser extent than their Babylonian conterparts.

In the middle-ages, Rabbis were addressed as "Rabbeinu" (our Rabbi), or as
"Rabbi". The reason this latter was less common is that the

The form Harav-First Name- Surname, is the modern usage.

All the Best,
Benzy Shani

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses related to genealogy will be considered
for posting. Others should be sent privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What does Rav mean? #general

Benzy Shani <bzs@...>
 

Walter Spector wrote:
I had a great uncle's tombstone translated. His father's name(my ggfather)
was translated as Rav Yosef. On the nine other tombstones for his children
is just Yosef. Does Rav have a special significance?
___

What it really says is "Reb Yosef".
"Reb" is a way of respecting someone who is not actually a Rabbi. It is
tantamount to inscribing "the honorable", or "Mr.".
On the tombstone of an "ordained" Rabbi it would have said "Harav".
Usually "Reb" is not spelled out, and instead it will say Resh-apostrophe.
The absence of "Reb" on any other tombstone is insignificant as the title is
not an official one and is not mandatory.

To make a short story long, the title "Rav", in the rabbinical sense,
followed by the first name (Rav Yosef) or full patronymic (Rav Shmuel bar
Nachman), is reserved for the Babylonian Amoraim, the Sevoraim, and the
Gaonim - the scholars of the Babylonian Talmud and post-Talmudic era.
(The Gaonim had the title Gaon following their name, e. g., Rav Saadiah
Gaon).
This was probably designed to demonstrate the defference of these scholars
to the Tannaim - the Mishnaic scholars - who were referred to as "Rabbi"
(pronounced with a long "e" sound at the end), followed by either their
first name alone (Rabbi Akiva) , their full patronymic (Rabbi Elazar ben
Azaria), or their first name followed by their location (Rabbi Yehuda ish
Kefar Ichos) or profession (Rabbi Yochanan Hasandlar).
Mishnaic scholars who were not "ordained" as Rabbis, did not carry the title
"Rabbi" (ben Zoma, ben Bagbag).

The title "Rabban" was only used in reference to Presidents of the
Sanhedrin, but this title only came into use after the destruction of the
Temple. (The Talmud teaches that "greater than Rabban is his own name", i.e.
the greatest greats need no title before their names (Hillel, Shamai, etc.).

The Palestinian Amoraim - the scholars of the Jerusalem Talmud - retained
the title "Rabbi", but this isn't to say that they deferred to the Tannaim
to any lesser extent than their Babylonian conterparts.

In the middle-ages, Rabbis were addressed as "Rabbeinu" (our Rabbi), or as
"Rabbi". The reason this latter was less common is that the

The form Harav-First Name- Surname, is the modern usage.

All the Best,
Benzy Shani

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses related to genealogy will be considered
for posting. Others should be sent privately.


Re: What does Rav mean? #general

Joseph Hirschfield
 

Rav means rabbi. Rav Yosef was Rabbi Yosef.

Joe Hirschfield
Portage, MI
MINOWITSKI- Brest-Litovsk, Belarus
HIRSCHFELD, LINDENBAUM, BUXBAUM, BUCHSBAUM-Skwarzawa, Kamionka Strumilowa,
Glinany, Sielec Bienkow, Galicia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What does Rav mean? #general

Joseph Hirschfield
 

Rav means rabbi. Rav Yosef was Rabbi Yosef.

Joe Hirschfield
Portage, MI
MINOWITSKI- Brest-Litovsk, Belarus
HIRSCHFELD, LINDENBAUM, BUXBAUM, BUCHSBAUM-Skwarzawa, Kamionka Strumilowa,
Glinany, Sielec Bienkow, Galicia


San Francisco look ups #general

Evelyn Filippi
 

Dear Genners again many thanks for the response , the good advice ,
the photos and the manifests, the new things im learning and the help i am
getting which leads me to another request. If anybody is in the San
Fransico area in California.........i need a few look ups for obituarys
They are Julius and Regina LEWITZKY. She died sept 24 1994 and he
died dec 21 1982. It seems that the impossible is happening and thanks
to the good people in here another brick wall is coming down . Many thanks
Evelyn Filippi
Manhattan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen San Francisco look ups #general

Evelyn Filippi
 

Dear Genners again many thanks for the response , the good advice ,
the photos and the manifests, the new things im learning and the help i am
getting which leads me to another request. If anybody is in the San
Fransico area in California.........i need a few look ups for obituarys
They are Julius and Regina LEWITZKY. She died sept 24 1994 and he
died dec 21 1982. It seems that the impossible is happening and thanks
to the good people in here another brick wall is coming down . Many thanks
Evelyn Filippi
Manhattan


Radoszyce Project at the Kielce Archives #general

Erez Gotlieb <erezgot@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland project is happy
to announce that the indices to all the Jewish vital
records of Radoszyce - not filmed by the LDS (Mormons)
- have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw
as part of the Kielce Polish State Archives (PSA)
Project.

Radoszyce is located in the Konskie powiat, 41.1
kilometers NW of Kielce and 140.0 kilometers SSW of
Warsaw.

Summary of Radoszyce Records Being Indexed

There are more than 2,500 records being indexed as
part of this project. The types and years of records
are as follows:

Births: 1885-1904
Marriages: 1885-1904
Deaths: 1885-1904.

Surnames Found in the New Indices

These are the most common surnames found in the
Radoszyce indices.

ALEKSANDROWICZ (30), BARAN (22), BIRENBAUM (20),
CHORENSLUP (19), CHRZANOWICZ (35), FINKLER (21),
GANCARSKAIA (21), GANCARSKI (26), GOLDBERG (23),
JAKUBOWICZ (26), KAPELUSZ (23), KLAPER (24),
LISOPRAWSKAIA (20), LISOPRAWSKI (29), ROZENBERG (33),
ROZENBLUM (83), SKOCZYLAS (19), SPIRYTUS (19), SZEJER
(90), TENENBAUM (75), WAKS (50).


A list of all surnames appearing in the Radoszyce
indices is now online at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/radoszyce_surn.htm.

If you would like to know the number of times any
surname appears in the new indices or more about the
Radoszyce project or may be interested in becoming the
Radoszyce Town Leader, please contact me at:
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Many other towns in the Kielce area are part of this
project. If you are interested in any other town in
the Kielce area, please contact me at
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Best wishes and Peace on Israel,
Erez Gotlieb, Tenafly, New Jersey, erezgot@yahoo.com
Kielce PSA Project


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Radoszyce Project at the Kielce Archives #general

Erez Gotlieb <erezgot@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland project is happy
to announce that the indices to all the Jewish vital
records of Radoszyce - not filmed by the LDS (Mormons)
- have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw
as part of the Kielce Polish State Archives (PSA)
Project.

Radoszyce is located in the Konskie powiat, 41.1
kilometers NW of Kielce and 140.0 kilometers SSW of
Warsaw.

Summary of Radoszyce Records Being Indexed

There are more than 2,500 records being indexed as
part of this project. The types and years of records
are as follows:

Births: 1885-1904
Marriages: 1885-1904
Deaths: 1885-1904.

Surnames Found in the New Indices

These are the most common surnames found in the
Radoszyce indices.

ALEKSANDROWICZ (30), BARAN (22), BIRENBAUM (20),
CHORENSLUP (19), CHRZANOWICZ (35), FINKLER (21),
GANCARSKAIA (21), GANCARSKI (26), GOLDBERG (23),
JAKUBOWICZ (26), KAPELUSZ (23), KLAPER (24),
LISOPRAWSKAIA (20), LISOPRAWSKI (29), ROZENBERG (33),
ROZENBLUM (83), SKOCZYLAS (19), SPIRYTUS (19), SZEJER
(90), TENENBAUM (75), WAKS (50).


A list of all surnames appearing in the Radoszyce
indices is now online at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/radoszyce_surn.htm.

If you would like to know the number of times any
surname appears in the new indices or more about the
Radoszyce project or may be interested in becoming the
Radoszyce Town Leader, please contact me at:
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Many other towns in the Kielce area are part of this
project. If you are interested in any other town in
the Kielce area, please contact me at
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Best wishes and Peace on Israel,
Erez Gotlieb, Tenafly, New Jersey, erezgot@yahoo.com
Kielce PSA Project


Daleszyce Project at the Kielce Archives #general

Erez Gotlieb <erezgot@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland project is happy
to announce that the indices to all the Jewish vital
records of Daleszyce - not filmed by the LDS (Mormons)
- have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw
as part of the Kielce Polish State Archives (PSA)
Project.

Daleszyce is located in the Kielce powiat, 9.5
kilometers E of Kielce and 159.9 kilometers S of
Warsaw.

Summary of Daleszyce Records Being Indexed

There are more than 320 records being indexed as part
of this project. The types and years of records are
as follows:

Births: 1897-1904
Marriages: 1897-1904
Deaths: 1897-1904.

Surnames Found in the New Indices

These are the most common surnames found in the
Daleszyce indices.

BEKERMAN (21), CHIRSZMAN (6), DROKMACHER (5),
FAJGENBAUM (4), FRAJDMAN (4), JOSKOWICZ (4),
KIRSZENBAUM (5), KLAJMAN (4), KUFLEWICZ (5), KUPERBERG
(13), MACHTYNGER (5), MIODECKA (5), PASTERNAK (5),
RAWET (4), ROZENBERG (7), RUBINOWICZ (5), SZTARKMAN
(12), WAJNSZTAT (5), WAJNSZTOK (5), WAKSMAN (4),
WLOSZCZOWSKI (4), WULFOWICZ (9), ZABA (4), ZAJDENBERG
(4), ZILBERBERG (8).

A list of all surnames appearing in the Daleszyce
indices is now online at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/daleszyce_surn.htm.

If you would like to know the number of times any
surname appears in the new indices or more about the
Daleszyce project or may be interested in becoming the
Daleszyce Town Leader, please contact me at:
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Many other towns in the Kielce area are part of this
project. If you are interested in any other town in
the Kielce area, please contact me at
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Best wishes and Peace on Israel,
Erez Gotlieb, Tenafly, New Jersey, erezgot@yahoo.com
Kielce PSA Project


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Daleszyce Project at the Kielce Archives #general

Erez Gotlieb <erezgot@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland project is happy
to announce that the indices to all the Jewish vital
records of Daleszyce - not filmed by the LDS (Mormons)
- have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw
as part of the Kielce Polish State Archives (PSA)
Project.

Daleszyce is located in the Kielce powiat, 9.5
kilometers E of Kielce and 159.9 kilometers S of
Warsaw.

Summary of Daleszyce Records Being Indexed

There are more than 320 records being indexed as part
of this project. The types and years of records are
as follows:

Births: 1897-1904
Marriages: 1897-1904
Deaths: 1897-1904.

Surnames Found in the New Indices

These are the most common surnames found in the
Daleszyce indices.

BEKERMAN (21), CHIRSZMAN (6), DROKMACHER (5),
FAJGENBAUM (4), FRAJDMAN (4), JOSKOWICZ (4),
KIRSZENBAUM (5), KLAJMAN (4), KUFLEWICZ (5), KUPERBERG
(13), MACHTYNGER (5), MIODECKA (5), PASTERNAK (5),
RAWET (4), ROZENBERG (7), RUBINOWICZ (5), SZTARKMAN
(12), WAJNSZTAT (5), WAJNSZTOK (5), WAKSMAN (4),
WLOSZCZOWSKI (4), WULFOWICZ (9), ZABA (4), ZAJDENBERG
(4), ZILBERBERG (8).

A list of all surnames appearing in the Daleszyce
indices is now online at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/daleszyce_surn.htm.

If you would like to know the number of times any
surname appears in the new indices or more about the
Daleszyce project or may be interested in becoming the
Daleszyce Town Leader, please contact me at:
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Many other towns in the Kielce area are part of this
project. If you are interested in any other town in
the Kielce area, please contact me at
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Best wishes and Peace on Israel,
Erez Gotlieb, Tenafly, New Jersey, erezgot@yahoo.com
Kielce PSA Project