Date   

re SOBELOFF-SOBILOFF-SOBELIEVSKI-SOBEL Elizavetgrad-Montreal-NY #ukraine

m.solman@...
 

Hello,

Sorry I can't make it to the conference!

I have posted two pictures on Viewmate with the hope that branches of my
SOBILOFF (SOBELIEVKI/SOBELOFF) family may recognize the individuals in question.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8324

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8325

The first picture is of David SOBILOFF, born 1885, son of Chaya Ida and Leib
SOBILOFF, originally >from Elizavetgrad (also Zlatopol), emigrated to Montreal
in 1907, photo taken in NY during a visit to his GOLD(EN)BERG first cousins
about 1912/1915. (David SOBILOFF had six other brothers and sisters, one of
whom was my grandmother.)

The second picture is of David SOBILOFF's uncle (standing, right) first name
unknown taken in Elizavetgrad, Russia about 1883. The unnamed uncle is
standing next to his brother Leib and behind his father Yakov, stepmother and
stepsister.

Does anyone recognize either David SOBILOFF or his unnamed uncle >from any of
their own pictures? Thank you.

Mel Solman
Toronto

Please reply directly to me at:
m.solman@utoronto.ca

Researching
SOBELOFF/SOBILOFF/SOBELIEVSKI Elizavetgrad/Zlatopol (Ukraine)
GOLD(EN)BERG Malecz/Mayletz (Belarus)
VINEBERG/VAINBERG Falticeni (Romania)
SALMANOVITZ/SALMANOVITCH Falticeni (Romania)
KRUK Warsaw (Poland) and England


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine re SOBELOFF-SOBILOFF-SOBELIEVSKI-SOBEL Elizavetgrad-Montreal-NY #ukraine

m.solman@...
 

Hello,

Sorry I can't make it to the conference!

I have posted two pictures on Viewmate with the hope that branches of my
SOBILOFF (SOBELIEVKI/SOBELOFF) family may recognize the individuals in question.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8324

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8325

The first picture is of David SOBILOFF, born 1885, son of Chaya Ida and Leib
SOBILOFF, originally >from Elizavetgrad (also Zlatopol), emigrated to Montreal
in 1907, photo taken in NY during a visit to his GOLD(EN)BERG first cousins
about 1912/1915. (David SOBILOFF had six other brothers and sisters, one of
whom was my grandmother.)

The second picture is of David SOBILOFF's uncle (standing, right) first name
unknown taken in Elizavetgrad, Russia about 1883. The unnamed uncle is
standing next to his brother Leib and behind his father Yakov, stepmother and
stepsister.

Does anyone recognize either David SOBILOFF or his unnamed uncle >from any of
their own pictures? Thank you.

Mel Solman
Toronto

Please reply directly to me at:
m.solman@utoronto.ca

Researching
SOBELOFF/SOBILOFF/SOBELIEVSKI Elizavetgrad/Zlatopol (Ukraine)
GOLD(EN)BERG Malecz/Mayletz (Belarus)
VINEBERG/VAINBERG Falticeni (Romania)
SALMANOVITZ/SALMANOVITCH Falticeni (Romania)
KRUK Warsaw (Poland) and England


Sam, Fannie & Florence KAPLAN family, MS & Michigan, Plus More Pictures relating to GINSBURG Family, Laurel,MS #belarus

Rachelle Berliner <rlberliner@...>
 

Please view these additional pictures to see if you know anyone in the
Confirmation Class of 1939 in MS, or one of the 3 people in the group of
pix, the Grandfather or Uncle of Henry GINSBURG.
We hope these additional pictures will open a connection for the family and
the memorabilia will be returned to descendants of Ellis, Bessie and Henry
Martin GINSBURG.
Information: Ellis GINSBURG and Sam KAPLAN (wife, Fanny) were co-owners of a
dress shop in Laurel, MS. Both Bessie GINSBURG and Fanny KAPLAN were born in
Michigan according to the 1930 Census. The two gentlemen were born in
Russia. The 1920 census shows Sam Caplin (different spelling but obviously
the same person) as a brother-in-law (BorI) and Florence as a niece. The
1920 Census shows Bessie born in Russia. Comparing the Census, there is not
a full 10 years difference in ages between 1920 and 1930 except for Florence
Kaplan/Caplin. Usually, the 1920 census is most accurate.
During the 1939 Confirmation, Henry Martin GINSBURG would have been 14 or 15
years old.
To view these new pictures, please log onto:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate, files VM 8317 and VM 8318.
Please reply privately.
Many thanks in advance for any help given.

Rachelle Berliner
Savannah, GA
rlberliner@comcast.net


Belarus SIG #Belarus Sam, Fannie & Florence KAPLAN family, MS & Michigan, Plus More Pictures relating to GINSBURG Family, Laurel,MS #belarus

Rachelle Berliner <rlberliner@...>
 

Please view these additional pictures to see if you know anyone in the
Confirmation Class of 1939 in MS, or one of the 3 people in the group of
pix, the Grandfather or Uncle of Henry GINSBURG.
We hope these additional pictures will open a connection for the family and
the memorabilia will be returned to descendants of Ellis, Bessie and Henry
Martin GINSBURG.
Information: Ellis GINSBURG and Sam KAPLAN (wife, Fanny) were co-owners of a
dress shop in Laurel, MS. Both Bessie GINSBURG and Fanny KAPLAN were born in
Michigan according to the 1930 Census. The two gentlemen were born in
Russia. The 1920 census shows Sam Caplin (different spelling but obviously
the same person) as a brother-in-law (BorI) and Florence as a niece. The
1920 Census shows Bessie born in Russia. Comparing the Census, there is not
a full 10 years difference in ages between 1920 and 1930 except for Florence
Kaplan/Caplin. Usually, the 1920 census is most accurate.
During the 1939 Confirmation, Henry Martin GINSBURG would have been 14 or 15
years old.
To view these new pictures, please log onto:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate, files VM 8317 and VM 8318.
Please reply privately.
Many thanks in advance for any help given.

Rachelle Berliner
Savannah, GA
rlberliner@comcast.net


Re: Avraham STERN #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

The moshav of Kokhav Yair is named for him. I attended a meeting there where
his son, born posthumously and named for him, spoke. You may try the
Jabotinsky Institute in Tel Aviv.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Omer, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Trevor Waner [mailto:wanertnt@shani.net]
Sent: Sunday, August 13, 2006 11:46 PM

Has anyone the family tree or genealogical information about Avraham Stern
from the Lehi group. He was killed by the British on February 12, 1942 in
Tel Aviv.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Avraham STERN #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

The moshav of Kokhav Yair is named for him. I attended a meeting there where
his son, born posthumously and named for him, spoke. You may try the
Jabotinsky Institute in Tel Aviv.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Omer, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Trevor Waner [mailto:wanertnt@shani.net]
Sent: Sunday, August 13, 2006 11:46 PM

Has anyone the family tree or genealogical information about Avraham Stern
from the Lehi group. He was killed by the British on February 12, 1942 in
Tel Aviv.


Gender of my Great Grandparents #general

Julius S Cohen 1
 

I have been receiving a great deal of help >from a volunteer geneologist. He has
identified the names of three of my great grandparents as "Matis", "Judah" and
"Fugah". I am uncertain as to the gender represented by each of these names.

Any guidance will be greatly appreciated.

Julius Cohen
Ann Arbor, Michigan USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Judah was one of the twelve sons of Jacob


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Gender of my Great Grandparents #general

Julius S Cohen 1
 

I have been receiving a great deal of help >from a volunteer geneologist. He has
identified the names of three of my great grandparents as "Matis", "Judah" and
"Fugah". I am uncertain as to the gender represented by each of these names.

Any guidance will be greatly appreciated.

Julius Cohen
Ann Arbor, Michigan USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Judah was one of the twelve sons of Jacob


UNGER from Tarnow #general

Deborah Wiener
 

Dear All
I am looking for descendants of Leib and Tova UNGER nee KNOBLOCH >from
Tarnow. She was my great grandmother. Her first marriage was to Ascher
WIENER (he died 1875) by whom she had my grandfather Samuel Wiener born 1874
and she remarried -I don't yet know when-Leib Unger and had Markus , born
1898, who died in Auschwitz in 1942. There was possibly another son
Ignac(perhaps a twin to Markus), and if Ignac was indeed a brother then
there was another brother David who made a POT 1957.
Debbie Wiener
Melbourne
dwiener@tpg.com.au

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen UNGER from Tarnow #general

Deborah Wiener
 

Dear All
I am looking for descendants of Leib and Tova UNGER nee KNOBLOCH >from
Tarnow. She was my great grandmother. Her first marriage was to Ascher
WIENER (he died 1875) by whom she had my grandfather Samuel Wiener born 1874
and she remarried -I don't yet know when-Leib Unger and had Markus , born
1898, who died in Auschwitz in 1942. There was possibly another son
Ignac(perhaps a twin to Markus), and if Ignac was indeed a brother then
there was another brother David who made a POT 1957.
Debbie Wiener
Melbourne
dwiener@tpg.com.au

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


Re: Family surnames #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"David Phillips" <ganeff@hotmail.com> wrote

Stan Goodman could not be more wrong. The British Royal family of
Saxe-Coburg-Gotha under King George V changed their family name to Windsor
in 1917. This surname remains with the current queen who is married to
Prince Philip Mountbatten. Prince Charles will be lthe last of this line
as George VII and his son, Prince William will be the first king with the
surname Mountbatten.

Prince Philip's family name was Battenberg, changed to Mountbatten, but
his family ruled elsewhere in Europe (Bulgaria). and had no direct
connection to the current queen until 1947. Mr Ginzburg was well ahead of
his time.

See: http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page135.asp
1 The family name of the British monarchy is still Windsor, although there
is talk of Prince Charles heirs (and George VII doesn't seem a done deal -
it has just been mentioned by royal enthusiasts) as Mountbatten-Windsor.

2 http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/page413.asp shows that Prince Philip and
the Queen are cousins as Queen Victoria is greatgreatgrandmother of both.

3 Prince Philip was part of the Greek royal family and they ruled until
overthrown in 1967.

The only connection to Jewish genealogy is possibly that Lord Mountbatten's
wife, Edwina, was said to be Jewish. She was a granddaughter of Sir Ernest
Cassel.

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted on leaving Russia/Belarus or
later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)

MODERATOR NOTE: The original posting referred (in error) to the Battenberg
family. Neither the British nor Greek Royal families were Battenbergs although
the website quoted above shows Prince Philip's mother as a Battenberg having had
her own mother marry into that family. Future postings will only be considered
if relevant to this forum.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Family surnames #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"David Phillips" <ganeff@hotmail.com> wrote

Stan Goodman could not be more wrong. The British Royal family of
Saxe-Coburg-Gotha under King George V changed their family name to Windsor
in 1917. This surname remains with the current queen who is married to
Prince Philip Mountbatten. Prince Charles will be lthe last of this line
as George VII and his son, Prince William will be the first king with the
surname Mountbatten.

Prince Philip's family name was Battenberg, changed to Mountbatten, but
his family ruled elsewhere in Europe (Bulgaria). and had no direct
connection to the current queen until 1947. Mr Ginzburg was well ahead of
his time.

See: http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page135.asp
1 The family name of the British monarchy is still Windsor, although there
is talk of Prince Charles heirs (and George VII doesn't seem a done deal -
it has just been mentioned by royal enthusiasts) as Mountbatten-Windsor.

2 http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/page413.asp shows that Prince Philip and
the Queen are cousins as Queen Victoria is greatgreatgrandmother of both.

3 Prince Philip was part of the Greek royal family and they ruled until
overthrown in 1967.

The only connection to Jewish genealogy is possibly that Lord Mountbatten's
wife, Edwina, was said to be Jewish. She was a granddaughter of Sir Ernest
Cassel.

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted on leaving Russia/Belarus or
later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)

MODERATOR NOTE: The original posting referred (in error) to the Battenberg
family. Neither the British nor Greek Royal families were Battenbergs although
the website quoted above shows Prince Philip's mother as a Battenberg having had
her own mother marry into that family. Future postings will only be considered
if relevant to this forum.


College alumni associations #general

Joseph Fibel <jfibel@...>
 

Dear genners,

A recent poster was trying to locate a missing relative but knew two
colleges >from which this relative had graduated.

She can contact the alumni associations of the two colleges and ask for the
graduate's address. If their policy is not to give out addresses they will
probably be willing to forward a letter to the graduates >from the enquirer.
Send them your letter, telling them of your search and asking them to
contact you. Enclose it in a non-addressed stamped envelope and also
enclose an empty self addressed stamped envelope for the reply.

While on the phone with the alumni associations wheedle a little. It
couldn't hurt.

I found a cousin this way.

Joe Fibel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen College alumni associations #general

Joseph Fibel <jfibel@...>
 

Dear genners,

A recent poster was trying to locate a missing relative but knew two
colleges >from which this relative had graduated.

She can contact the alumni associations of the two colleges and ask for the
graduate's address. If their policy is not to give out addresses they will
probably be willing to forward a letter to the graduates >from the enquirer.
Send them your letter, telling them of your search and asking them to
contact you. Enclose it in a non-addressed stamped envelope and also
enclose an empty self addressed stamped envelope for the reply.

While on the phone with the alumni associations wheedle a little. It
couldn't hurt.

I found a cousin this way.

Joe Fibel


Re: PALAGI and Rzeszow #galicia

Roy Pologe <roy@...>
 

RE: Palagi

Hello Ton:

Rabbi Chaim Palagi's grandfather, of same name, also was Rabbi in North
Africa, likely in Morocco, dating known branch of Palagi family tree back
to approximately 1700. Chaim, the grandfather, married Rachel, daughter of
Hannoun, or Bannoun family. Her father >from Morocco, and also Rabbi. One
of Chaim's sons, Rabbi Yakov Palagi, fathered Chaim Palagi, born 1788, who
served as Grand Rabbi of Smyrna/Izmir >from 1828, until his death in 1868.
Believe he was most widely known of Palagi Rabbi's. Younger Rabbi Chaim,
wrote at least 70 volumes, of which I've so far, collected 11, (including
one slim volume on Kabala, which my local Rabbi fears reading). All Chaim
Palagi books are written in Hebrew. Believe some still published in Israel.
An original edition of one of Chaim's works recently sold on an
internet auction site, had been published in Livorno, Italy in 1824.

Earliest evidence of name variant similar to Palache, is signature of
Yechiel Zev Palagee, (Latin spelling), on Ketuba marriage certificate,
also dated 1824, which he witnessed. Ketuba in California museum.

Chaim Palagi had three sons.

Earliest known paper trail of my immediate family is in town archives of
Rzeszow, Poland. Rzeszow's town history dates back to 1654, when reigning
Polish principality, invited Jews to settle under their protection, near
riverbank on their lands. Rzeszow's town history comprised an exhibit
seen in an Israeli museum. Town archive's prior to 1920, were vaulted
during WWII, thereby preserved. Census of 1920, indicates Rzeszow
maintained majority Jewish population, at least until then. Interestingly,
Lech Walesa's Polish "Solidarity" movement was centered in Rzeszow.

Rzeszow town archives, available since 1741, record Pologe, Paloge,
Paloga, name variants for known immediate family members. Curiously
however, most family names recorded go back many years previous to my own
family name appearance, in mid-1800's. Suggesting Palagi's originating
elsewhere, settled in Rzeszow, an already robust Jewish community in early
1800's.

Mordechai Pologe was my father's grandfather, and Benzion, was my father's
father. Benzion had 10 children, of which my father was the second
youngest. My father, Yisroel, (Israel, Irving) immigrated to America in
1923. Family members began arriving in America >from mid to late 1800's,
including Benzion's brother's Wolf, and Shmuel, (Samuel).

Other family in vicinity of Rzeszow, in Krakow, 90 miles to the east.

During WWII, Jewish partisans were active in areas surrounding Rzeszow.
Their operations, are depicted in "Heaven Shed No Tears", written by Henry
Herzog, a surviving partisan. The remaining Jewish population was forced
marched to Belzec death camp in October, 1942.

Several of immediate family reside in Israel. Others in America.

Roy Pologe,

roy@autoserv.com

Moderator Note: Subject changed by moderator. Rzeszow researchers would
be interested in Mr. Pologe's comments.

-----Original Message-----
From: t.tielen [mailto:t.tielen@zonnet.nl]
Sent: Sunday, August 13, 2006 7:16 AM
To: roy@autoserv.com
Subject: Palagi

I read your posting to jewishgen.org.
Other variants of the name are Palache and Pallache. I am researching this
family that starts in the sixteenth century with Isaac Pallache, rabbi in
Fez, Morocco. The family branched out to The Netherlands, Germany,
England, West Indies. One branch returned to Morocco, where they can be
traced during the seventeenth century, but not beyond.

The book to read is Samuel Pallache, a man of three worlds, by Mercedes
Garcia-Arenal and Gerard Wiegers.

There are several branches in Amsterdam and Hamburg in the seventeenth and
eighteenth century that I haven't been able to connect to the first
generations >from Fez. The irony is that more is known about the first
three generations than about their immediate descendants.

Hoping to hear >from you soon, kind regards,

Ton Tielen
The Hague, The Netherlands


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: PALAGI and Rzeszow #galicia

Roy Pologe <roy@...>
 

RE: Palagi

Hello Ton:

Rabbi Chaim Palagi's grandfather, of same name, also was Rabbi in North
Africa, likely in Morocco, dating known branch of Palagi family tree back
to approximately 1700. Chaim, the grandfather, married Rachel, daughter of
Hannoun, or Bannoun family. Her father >from Morocco, and also Rabbi. One
of Chaim's sons, Rabbi Yakov Palagi, fathered Chaim Palagi, born 1788, who
served as Grand Rabbi of Smyrna/Izmir >from 1828, until his death in 1868.
Believe he was most widely known of Palagi Rabbi's. Younger Rabbi Chaim,
wrote at least 70 volumes, of which I've so far, collected 11, (including
one slim volume on Kabala, which my local Rabbi fears reading). All Chaim
Palagi books are written in Hebrew. Believe some still published in Israel.
An original edition of one of Chaim's works recently sold on an
internet auction site, had been published in Livorno, Italy in 1824.

Earliest evidence of name variant similar to Palache, is signature of
Yechiel Zev Palagee, (Latin spelling), on Ketuba marriage certificate,
also dated 1824, which he witnessed. Ketuba in California museum.

Chaim Palagi had three sons.

Earliest known paper trail of my immediate family is in town archives of
Rzeszow, Poland. Rzeszow's town history dates back to 1654, when reigning
Polish principality, invited Jews to settle under their protection, near
riverbank on their lands. Rzeszow's town history comprised an exhibit
seen in an Israeli museum. Town archive's prior to 1920, were vaulted
during WWII, thereby preserved. Census of 1920, indicates Rzeszow
maintained majority Jewish population, at least until then. Interestingly,
Lech Walesa's Polish "Solidarity" movement was centered in Rzeszow.

Rzeszow town archives, available since 1741, record Pologe, Paloge,
Paloga, name variants for known immediate family members. Curiously
however, most family names recorded go back many years previous to my own
family name appearance, in mid-1800's. Suggesting Palagi's originating
elsewhere, settled in Rzeszow, an already robust Jewish community in early
1800's.

Mordechai Pologe was my father's grandfather, and Benzion, was my father's
father. Benzion had 10 children, of which my father was the second
youngest. My father, Yisroel, (Israel, Irving) immigrated to America in
1923. Family members began arriving in America >from mid to late 1800's,
including Benzion's brother's Wolf, and Shmuel, (Samuel).

Other family in vicinity of Rzeszow, in Krakow, 90 miles to the east.

During WWII, Jewish partisans were active in areas surrounding Rzeszow.
Their operations, are depicted in "Heaven Shed No Tears", written by Henry
Herzog, a surviving partisan. The remaining Jewish population was forced
marched to Belzec death camp in October, 1942.

Several of immediate family reside in Israel. Others in America.

Roy Pologe,

roy@autoserv.com

Moderator Note: Subject changed by moderator. Rzeszow researchers would
be interested in Mr. Pologe's comments.

-----Original Message-----
From: t.tielen [mailto:t.tielen@zonnet.nl]
Sent: Sunday, August 13, 2006 7:16 AM
To: roy@autoserv.com
Subject: Palagi

I read your posting to jewishgen.org.
Other variants of the name are Palache and Pallache. I am researching this
family that starts in the sixteenth century with Isaac Pallache, rabbi in
Fez, Morocco. The family branched out to The Netherlands, Germany,
England, West Indies. One branch returned to Morocco, where they can be
traced during the seventeenth century, but not beyond.

The book to read is Samuel Pallache, a man of three worlds, by Mercedes
Garcia-Arenal and Gerard Wiegers.

There are several branches in Amsterdam and Hamburg in the seventeenth and
eighteenth century that I haven't been able to connect to the first
generations >from Fez. The irony is that more is known about the first
three generations than about their immediate descendants.

Hoping to hear >from you soon, kind regards,

Ton Tielen
The Hague, The Netherlands


Re: *re: tombstone rubbing #hungary

Laurie Budgar <lbudgar@...>
 

Tom,
While I don't pretend to have much technical knowledge at all, I did
notice that the quality of the image was much higher with PDF than JPG
in this particular instance. Why that happened, I haven't a clue, but if
that's not the case generally, it's well worth noting -- thanks. Thanks
also for the tips on how to convert PDF to JPG. Also, thanks for the
info on how to properly take a tombstone rubbing. As I mentioned, we
were caught somewhat unprepared for the necessity of doing the rubbing
and as a result had few options (and very limited knowledge) available
to us. Next time we'll know better!

Laurie Budgar
Boulder, CO


Tom Venetianer wrote:

Dear Laurie and all,

I believe some of the below comments were published before, but it is worth repeating some tips about what Laurie wrote:

1. PDF is definitely NOT a graphical image format. It was conceived by Adobe for electronic documents transmission. So it shouldn't be used to produce digital images. As compared to the JPG format, which IS a graphical standard for digital images, JPG compresses much better then PDF - comparatively, the ratio could be as high as 20:1 - and it is also universally reproducible on monitors, printers, the Web browsers and other computer devices of the kind.

2. PDF pictures and pages CAN BE converted into JPG format quite easily. There are two methods: (a) to use a PDF to JPG converting software and (b) -> this is the easiest and most expedient way - using a screen capture program or the PC's standard "Control-Print Screen" capture feature.

3. As a matter of fact, one can amplify an image saved in PDF by using this trick. All one has to do is to zoom-in inside the PDF Reader program and then capture the screen.

One last comment about rubbing letters on a tombstone. It is well known that this procedure will damage the stone, mainly if using coal (burnt stick or similar). However, if the stone is very old and wearied, and getting a picture of the engraving is more important then conserving the stone, the best "rubbing" method is to fill in the engravings with shaving foam. After taking the picture, the foam can be washed away. And this method delivers excellent photographic results.

Regards
Tom


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: *re: tombstone rubbing #hungary

Laurie Budgar <lbudgar@...>
 

Tom,
While I don't pretend to have much technical knowledge at all, I did
notice that the quality of the image was much higher with PDF than JPG
in this particular instance. Why that happened, I haven't a clue, but if
that's not the case generally, it's well worth noting -- thanks. Thanks
also for the tips on how to convert PDF to JPG. Also, thanks for the
info on how to properly take a tombstone rubbing. As I mentioned, we
were caught somewhat unprepared for the necessity of doing the rubbing
and as a result had few options (and very limited knowledge) available
to us. Next time we'll know better!

Laurie Budgar
Boulder, CO


Tom Venetianer wrote:

Dear Laurie and all,

I believe some of the below comments were published before, but it is worth repeating some tips about what Laurie wrote:

1. PDF is definitely NOT a graphical image format. It was conceived by Adobe for electronic documents transmission. So it shouldn't be used to produce digital images. As compared to the JPG format, which IS a graphical standard for digital images, JPG compresses much better then PDF - comparatively, the ratio could be as high as 20:1 - and it is also universally reproducible on monitors, printers, the Web browsers and other computer devices of the kind.

2. PDF pictures and pages CAN BE converted into JPG format quite easily. There are two methods: (a) to use a PDF to JPG converting software and (b) -> this is the easiest and most expedient way - using a screen capture program or the PC's standard "Control-Print Screen" capture feature.

3. As a matter of fact, one can amplify an image saved in PDF by using this trick. All one has to do is to zoom-in inside the PDF Reader program and then capture the screen.

One last comment about rubbing letters on a tombstone. It is well known that this procedure will damage the stone, mainly if using coal (burnt stick or similar). However, if the stone is very old and wearied, and getting a picture of the engraving is more important then conserving the stone, the best "rubbing" method is to fill in the engravings with shaving foam. After taking the picture, the foam can be washed away. And this method delivers excellent photographic results.

Regards
Tom


Anonymity of moderators, and tone of discussion #hungary

Dan Breslau <sinespam@...>
 

I disagree with a fair number of Jewishgen policies, yet I am
disappointed with the tone taken by some of the emails (the strident
ones actually serve to support the policies that they're arguing
against!) Please remember that Jewishgen is a non-profit organization
with very few paid staff; most of the "real" work (including mailing
list moderation) is done by unpaid volunteers. If the moderators wish to
remain anonymous, that is their right and privilege under current policy
-- just as it is our right to choose whether or not to participate on
the list under these terms.

Since it is somewhat relevant, I would like to mention this here, but I
do not intend to continue a discussion about this on the list: I have
suggested to the JG support desk that JG should create an email list for
miscellaneous discussions -- including, among other things, discussions
of JG policies. (It might also provide a place for discussion of ongoing
and proposed projects, and for discussion about supporting the
all-important (but perhaps somewhat neglected) computer hardware and
software that JG's work relies on.) It's my belief that having these
discussions in the open would ultimately help to increase the volunteer
and financial support that JG receives (for brevity, I'll omit the "why"
part here :-) However, a JG official responded to me that they had no
interest in this suggestion.

-- Dan Breslau
Boston area, MA

MODERATOR's NOTE: There is a simple way to communicate with JewishGen's Moderating Team/Desk, using the <support@jewishgen.org> address. As mentioned, this thread is now closed.

--
Searching:
BRESLAU/BRESLOVSKI (Belarus/Poland);
COHEN, KANAREK(?), MICHAELSKI(?) (Poland);
SCHREIBER, GRAD, ROSENBAUM, DEUTSCH, GLUCK, NEUVOHNER, TIRMAN,
WEISSBURG, KESTENBAUM, ROSENBERG, ADLER, FRISCH, BREUER (Hungary);
LANDAU, GRUNFELD, GOTTLIEB, BECKER (Austria)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Anonymity of moderators, and tone of discussion #hungary

Dan Breslau <sinespam@...>
 

I disagree with a fair number of Jewishgen policies, yet I am
disappointed with the tone taken by some of the emails (the strident
ones actually serve to support the policies that they're arguing
against!) Please remember that Jewishgen is a non-profit organization
with very few paid staff; most of the "real" work (including mailing
list moderation) is done by unpaid volunteers. If the moderators wish to
remain anonymous, that is their right and privilege under current policy
-- just as it is our right to choose whether or not to participate on
the list under these terms.

Since it is somewhat relevant, I would like to mention this here, but I
do not intend to continue a discussion about this on the list: I have
suggested to the JG support desk that JG should create an email list for
miscellaneous discussions -- including, among other things, discussions
of JG policies. (It might also provide a place for discussion of ongoing
and proposed projects, and for discussion about supporting the
all-important (but perhaps somewhat neglected) computer hardware and
software that JG's work relies on.) It's my belief that having these
discussions in the open would ultimately help to increase the volunteer
and financial support that JG receives (for brevity, I'll omit the "why"
part here :-) However, a JG official responded to me that they had no
interest in this suggestion.

-- Dan Breslau
Boston area, MA

MODERATOR's NOTE: There is a simple way to communicate with JewishGen's Moderating Team/Desk, using the <support@jewishgen.org> address. As mentioned, this thread is now closed.

--
Searching:
BRESLAU/BRESLOVSKI (Belarus/Poland);
COHEN, KANAREK(?), MICHAELSKI(?) (Poland);
SCHREIBER, GRAD, ROSENBAUM, DEUTSCH, GLUCK, NEUVOHNER, TIRMAN,
WEISSBURG, KESTENBAUM, ROSENBERG, ADLER, FRISCH, BREUER (Hungary);
LANDAU, GRUNFELD, GOTTLIEB, BECKER (Austria)