Date   

Discovery of letter trove - help needed with Translation #germany

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: The JewishGen ViewMate service is free of charge and intended
for use in cases like this. http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/

Dear Fellow Members

My Mother died just 10 days ago aged 96 and our last direct link with one
period in our history. Yesterday I spent much of the day sorting through her
effects and when opening a bundle of Greeting Cards >from Mum & Dad's 25th
Wedding Anniversary I discovered tucked behind a further bundle; this
comprised all the greetings both for their Wedding in Munich in 1936 and the
birth of my sister Ruth there in 1938 - just before they fled. Telegrams,
letters, cards, even florists cards - all in perfect condition, most in
original envelopes! What an unimagined hoard - I can see names of Aunts,
Uncles, Cousins, Grandmother etc.

I would dearly love to be able to read these but regrettably I speak no
German; also the handwriting is of that period - I always had difficulty in
reading Mum's letters to me at school! The task would be considerable as
there are some 70 plus pieces. If anyone can help me, or point me to someone
who might I would be most grateful.

Steven Emanuel Blackwater, Hampshire, U.K. <steven.emanuel@...>

Researching: EMANUEL - Obrigheim, Mainz, Wiesbaden, Boston
LOEWENSTEIN - Laufenselden, Mainz, Canada
BOEHM - Gleiwitz, Ratibor, Zabrze; STEINER Opava, Wien
BEINER - Succeava, Wien, Budapest, Munich, Sao Paolo


German SIG #Germany Discovery of letter trove - help needed with Translation #germany

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: The JewishGen ViewMate service is free of charge and intended
for use in cases like this. http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/

Dear Fellow Members

My Mother died just 10 days ago aged 96 and our last direct link with one
period in our history. Yesterday I spent much of the day sorting through her
effects and when opening a bundle of Greeting Cards >from Mum & Dad's 25th
Wedding Anniversary I discovered tucked behind a further bundle; this
comprised all the greetings both for their Wedding in Munich in 1936 and the
birth of my sister Ruth there in 1938 - just before they fled. Telegrams,
letters, cards, even florists cards - all in perfect condition, most in
original envelopes! What an unimagined hoard - I can see names of Aunts,
Uncles, Cousins, Grandmother etc.

I would dearly love to be able to read these but regrettably I speak no
German; also the handwriting is of that period - I always had difficulty in
reading Mum's letters to me at school! The task would be considerable as
there are some 70 plus pieces. If anyone can help me, or point me to someone
who might I would be most grateful.

Steven Emanuel Blackwater, Hampshire, U.K. <steven.emanuel@...>

Researching: EMANUEL - Obrigheim, Mainz, Wiesbaden, Boston
LOEWENSTEIN - Laufenselden, Mainz, Canada
BOEHM - Gleiwitz, Ratibor, Zabrze; STEINER Opava, Wien
BEINER - Succeava, Wien, Budapest, Munich, Sao Paolo


Re: Nickname question #general

Lisa Bracco <lisa5bracco4@...>
 

I didn't think of the possiblity you suggest--both of the names might be my
great-grandparents with my ggrandfather's name being mistakenly changed to
Goldberg. I guess, though, it's also possible my ggrandmother happened to
marry two men with the same first name.

Lisa

"Robert Israel" <israel@...> wrote in message
*****************

Lisa Bracco <lisa5bracco4@...> wrote:

I am trying to find out how my grandfather was related to his oldest
sister, who was his half-sister. My grandfather's parents are Amalia
Charmatz (aka Amelia Sharmatz) and Meyer Kronberg (aka Mayer Kronberg).
I have just gotten hold of the death certificate of his sister and it lists
her parents as Myer Goldberg and Mollie Sharmatz, neither of whom are the
exact same names as my grandfather's parents.

Do you think that "Mollie" could be a nickname for Amalia, which would make
her my greatgrandmother, or do you think that Myer's last name was listed
incorrectly, which would mean he was my great-grandfather?
Both are very possible. It's very likely that Mollie is an informal
version of Amalia/Amelia. Going >from Kronberg to Goldberg seems a bit
more of a stretch, but could easily be the result of faulty memory [at
least the "-berg" was right, and "Kron" means "crown" which is made of
gold...]. Even if this was really a half-sister, the death certificate
might have listed a step-parent instead of a biological parent, so these
might both be your great-grandparents. Remember that someone giving
the information for a death certificate, especially for an elderly
person, might not be very well acquainted with the family history, and
might not be thinking very clearly at the time.

Robert Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Nickname question #general

Lisa Bracco <lisa5bracco4@...>
 

I didn't think of the possiblity you suggest--both of the names might be my
great-grandparents with my ggrandfather's name being mistakenly changed to
Goldberg. I guess, though, it's also possible my ggrandmother happened to
marry two men with the same first name.

Lisa

"Robert Israel" <israel@...> wrote in message
*****************

Lisa Bracco <lisa5bracco4@...> wrote:

I am trying to find out how my grandfather was related to his oldest
sister, who was his half-sister. My grandfather's parents are Amalia
Charmatz (aka Amelia Sharmatz) and Meyer Kronberg (aka Mayer Kronberg).
I have just gotten hold of the death certificate of his sister and it lists
her parents as Myer Goldberg and Mollie Sharmatz, neither of whom are the
exact same names as my grandfather's parents.

Do you think that "Mollie" could be a nickname for Amalia, which would make
her my greatgrandmother, or do you think that Myer's last name was listed
incorrectly, which would mean he was my great-grandfather?
Both are very possible. It's very likely that Mollie is an informal
version of Amalia/Amelia. Going >from Kronberg to Goldberg seems a bit
more of a stretch, but could easily be the result of faulty memory [at
least the "-berg" was right, and "Kron" means "crown" which is made of
gold...]. Even if this was really a half-sister, the death certificate
might have listed a step-parent instead of a biological parent, so these
might both be your great-grandparents. Remember that someone giving
the information for a death certificate, especially for an elderly
person, might not be very well acquainted with the family history, and
might not be thinking very clearly at the time.

Robert Israel


Re: PODHORZER / PODHORCER of Tzfat, Tarnopol, Berezhany / Oziran, #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 5:24 PM -0700 10/19/06, Yaron Pedhazur wrote:

Dear Genners,

I am searching my PODHORZER roots.
Yaron Pedhazur
Tel-Aviv, Israel

Dear Yaron,

I found your surname, PEDHAZUR, of great interest as an example of the
fascinating process whereby Jewish surnames arrive at their ultimate forms.

It was immediately obvious that your family's choice of this Hebrew
name was deliberately intended to match-up with the existing family
surname, PODHORZER.

But I am curious about your spelling of PED-HA-ZUR The actual
biblical name with which the name PODHORZER was obviously "matching"
as a soundalike is traditionally pronounced and transliterated not as
PED-HA-ZUR but as PED-AH-ZUR -- who is first mentioned at Numbers
1:10 in connection with the census in the wilderness.

In other words, the "a" vowel actually comes *before* the heh and not *after* it.

So, I wondering whether the ancestor who originally selected PEDAHZUR
to match PODHORZER deliberately changed the spelling of PED-AH-ZUR to
PED-HA-ZUR because in the name PODHORETZ the "H" comes before the
"O" -- or whether the original ancestor had spelled PEDAHZUR
correctly, but somewhere lower down the line the order of the letters
was accidentally switched >from "A=H" to "H-A" simply by analogy with
the order of the letters in PODHORZER?

Incidentally, PODHORZER has no real historical connection with the
biblical PEDAHZUR. It must be another version of the well known name
"PODHORETZ" as in Norman PODHORETZ. he former Editor of Commentary
magazine. I tried in vain to find a town spelled "Podhoretx" So,
can someone tell us whether the name Podhoretz is connected with the
Yugoslav town spelled Podgarac -- in which the "c" is in fact
pronounced "tz" and the "g" would be pronounced "h" if spelled in Cyrillic?

As a Jgenner, I find nothing more fascinating than the origin and
evolution of Jewish surnames!

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: PODHORZER / PODHORCER of Tzfat, Tarnopol, Berezhany / Oziran, #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 5:24 PM -0700 10/19/06, Yaron Pedhazur wrote:

Dear Genners,

I am searching my PODHORZER roots.
Yaron Pedhazur
Tel-Aviv, Israel

Dear Yaron,

I found your surname, PEDHAZUR, of great interest as an example of the
fascinating process whereby Jewish surnames arrive at their ultimate forms.

It was immediately obvious that your family's choice of this Hebrew
name was deliberately intended to match-up with the existing family
surname, PODHORZER.

But I am curious about your spelling of PED-HA-ZUR The actual
biblical name with which the name PODHORZER was obviously "matching"
as a soundalike is traditionally pronounced and transliterated not as
PED-HA-ZUR but as PED-AH-ZUR -- who is first mentioned at Numbers
1:10 in connection with the census in the wilderness.

In other words, the "a" vowel actually comes *before* the heh and not *after* it.

So, I wondering whether the ancestor who originally selected PEDAHZUR
to match PODHORZER deliberately changed the spelling of PED-AH-ZUR to
PED-HA-ZUR because in the name PODHORETZ the "H" comes before the
"O" -- or whether the original ancestor had spelled PEDAHZUR
correctly, but somewhere lower down the line the order of the letters
was accidentally switched >from "A=H" to "H-A" simply by analogy with
the order of the letters in PODHORZER?

Incidentally, PODHORZER has no real historical connection with the
biblical PEDAHZUR. It must be another version of the well known name
"PODHORETZ" as in Norman PODHORETZ. he former Editor of Commentary
magazine. I tried in vain to find a town spelled "Podhoretx" So,
can someone tell us whether the name Podhoretz is connected with the
Yugoslav town spelled Podgarac -- in which the "c" is in fact
pronounced "tz" and the "g" would be pronounced "h" if spelled in Cyrillic?

As a Jgenner, I find nothing more fascinating than the origin and
evolution of Jewish surnames!

Judith Romney Wegner


Surname TOTTI, Hungarian "nobleman?" #romania

HeyJudy123@...
 

Is any Genner researching the TOTTI family, or in possession of any
information about it?

I checked the search engine "Google," and there only were three hits--only
one of which remained active.

The JGFF shows a number of people researching the TOTH family of, yes,
Hungary, converting TOTTI to TOTH by using the Daitch-Mokotoff sound-alike search
engine.

The legend is that the TOTTI family were Hungarian nobility, c. 1850.

Thanks,
Judy SEGAL
New York City USA


Romania SIG #Romania Surname TOTTI, Hungarian "nobleman?" #romania

HeyJudy123@...
 

Is any Genner researching the TOTTI family, or in possession of any
information about it?

I checked the search engine "Google," and there only were three hits--only
one of which remained active.

The JGFF shows a number of people researching the TOTH family of, yes,
Hungary, converting TOTTI to TOTH by using the Daitch-Mokotoff sound-alike search
engine.

The legend is that the TOTTI family were Hungarian nobility, c. 1850.

Thanks,
Judy SEGAL
New York City USA


Surname TOTTI, Hungarian "nobleman?" #austria-czech

HeyJudy123@...
 

Is any Genner researching the TOTTI family, or in possession of any
information about it?

I checked the search engine "Google," and there only were three hits--only
one of which remained active.

The JGFF shows a number of people researching the TOTH family of, yes,
Hungary, converting TOTTI to TOTH by using the Daitch-Mokotoff sound-alike
search engine.

The legend is that the TOTTI family were Hungarian nobility, c. 1850.

Thanks,
Judy SEGAL
New York City USA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Surname TOTTI, Hungarian "nobleman?" #austria-czech

HeyJudy123@...
 

Is any Genner researching the TOTTI family, or in possession of any
information about it?

I checked the search engine "Google," and there only were three hits--only
one of which remained active.

The JGFF shows a number of people researching the TOTH family of, yes,
Hungary, converting TOTTI to TOTH by using the Daitch-Mokotoff sound-alike
search engine.

The legend is that the TOTTI family were Hungarian nobility, c. 1850.

Thanks,
Judy SEGAL
New York City USA


Discovery of letter trove - help needed with Translation #austria-czech

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

Dear Fellow Members

My Mother died just 10 days ago aged 96 and our last direct link with one
period in our history. Yesterday I spent much of the day sorting through her
effects and when opening a bundle of Greeting Cards >from Mum & Dad's 25th
Wedding Anniversary I discovered tucked behind a further bundle; this
comprised all the greetings both for their Wedding in Munich in 1936 and the
birth of my sister Ruth there in 1938 - just before they fled. Telegrams,
letters, cards, even florists cards - all in perfect condition, most in
original envelopes! What an unimagined hoard - I can see names of Aunts,
Uncles, Cousins, Grandmother etc.

I would dearly love to be able to read these but regrettably I speak no
German; also the handwriting is of that period - I always had difficulty in
reading Mum's letters to me at school! The task would be considerable as
there are some 70 plus pieces. If anyone can help me, or point me to someone
who might I would be most grateful.

Steven Emanuel Blackwater,Hampshire,U.K.

Researching:
EMANUEL Obrigheim, Mainz, Wiesbaden, Boston
LOEWENSTEIN Laufenselden, Mainz, Canada
BOEHM Gleiwitz, Ratibor, Zabrze
BEINER Succeava, Wien, Budapest, Munich, Sao Paolo
STEINER Opava, Wien

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with offers of assistance.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Discovery of letter trove - help needed with Translation #austria-czech

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

Dear Fellow Members

My Mother died just 10 days ago aged 96 and our last direct link with one
period in our history. Yesterday I spent much of the day sorting through her
effects and when opening a bundle of Greeting Cards >from Mum & Dad's 25th
Wedding Anniversary I discovered tucked behind a further bundle; this
comprised all the greetings both for their Wedding in Munich in 1936 and the
birth of my sister Ruth there in 1938 - just before they fled. Telegrams,
letters, cards, even florists cards - all in perfect condition, most in
original envelopes! What an unimagined hoard - I can see names of Aunts,
Uncles, Cousins, Grandmother etc.

I would dearly love to be able to read these but regrettably I speak no
German; also the handwriting is of that period - I always had difficulty in
reading Mum's letters to me at school! The task would be considerable as
there are some 70 plus pieces. If anyone can help me, or point me to someone
who might I would be most grateful.

Steven Emanuel Blackwater,Hampshire,U.K.

Researching:
EMANUEL Obrigheim, Mainz, Wiesbaden, Boston
LOEWENSTEIN Laufenselden, Mainz, Canada
BOEHM Gleiwitz, Ratibor, Zabrze
BEINER Succeava, Wien, Budapest, Munich, Sao Paolo
STEINER Opava, Wien

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with offers of assistance.


Re: Nickname Question #general

Diane Jacobs <thegenie@...>
 

Yes, records are definitely a problem and if you have a common name you
could easily miss a correct record because names are entered incorrectly
and also ages, etc. I have two examples that may help others:

l. Birth Certificate: 1905 in Manhattan - parent's names are actually that
of the brother-in-law of the mother and her sister. Because the last names
are uncommon and I knew the child's name I was able to determine I had the
right person.

2. Death Certificate: around 1922 NYC - age of deceased 20 years off the
correct age. Because the last name is so uncommon, I knew I had the right
person and by name of informant.

Sometimes luck and using your grey matter to deduce incorrect records is
very important.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

Dear Lisa:

What you have forgotten to account for is that the person who filled out the
death certificate may not have given the proper info as they did not know it
correctly. For instance, when my great grandfather died, his son-in-law,
not his daughter, gave the info to the clerk. Due perhaps to the grief of
the moment or lack of knowledge of English, his gave the names of his
parents when asked for those of my great grandfather!!!!

In another example, a relative did not understand English well enough to
fill out the forms and the clerk did it. Therefore, what resulted is very
much different >from what should have been in the record.

Further, when there may be multiple wives in a family, very often the person

filling out the form may not have known about the other wife or wives in the

family. It is possible then that name of the one he/she was familiar with
will be given. It is common when a wife dies early and the children are
infants or toddlers and another one takes her place that the children may
not know about their own mother. Or, the husband may marry the wife's
sister which further complicates things.

In order to sort out your inconsistency for the family names, you should
obtain your step-great aunt's birth and marriage records and see what they
say and compare. Hopefully, at least, her parents would have given the info

on her birth record and she would have given it on her marriage record.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@... >>>>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Nickname Question #general

Diane Jacobs <thegenie@...>
 

Yes, records are definitely a problem and if you have a common name you
could easily miss a correct record because names are entered incorrectly
and also ages, etc. I have two examples that may help others:

l. Birth Certificate: 1905 in Manhattan - parent's names are actually that
of the brother-in-law of the mother and her sister. Because the last names
are uncommon and I knew the child's name I was able to determine I had the
right person.

2. Death Certificate: around 1922 NYC - age of deceased 20 years off the
correct age. Because the last name is so uncommon, I knew I had the right
person and by name of informant.

Sometimes luck and using your grey matter to deduce incorrect records is
very important.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

Dear Lisa:

What you have forgotten to account for is that the person who filled out the
death certificate may not have given the proper info as they did not know it
correctly. For instance, when my great grandfather died, his son-in-law,
not his daughter, gave the info to the clerk. Due perhaps to the grief of
the moment or lack of knowledge of English, his gave the names of his
parents when asked for those of my great grandfather!!!!

In another example, a relative did not understand English well enough to
fill out the forms and the clerk did it. Therefore, what resulted is very
much different >from what should have been in the record.

Further, when there may be multiple wives in a family, very often the person

filling out the form may not have known about the other wife or wives in the

family. It is possible then that name of the one he/she was familiar with
will be given. It is common when a wife dies early and the children are
infants or toddlers and another one takes her place that the children may
not know about their own mother. Or, the husband may marry the wife's
sister which further complicates things.

In order to sort out your inconsistency for the family names, you should
obtain your step-great aunt's birth and marriage records and see what they
say and compare. Hopefully, at least, her parents would have given the info

on her birth record and she would have given it on her marriage record.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@... >>>>>


Manhattan City directory help #general

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

I need some lookups in the 1899-1905 Manhattan city directories. If
anyone has access to them and is willing to do some research/lookups for
me please contact me at talasky@...

Terry Lasky
Colorado, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Manhattan City directory help #general

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

I need some lookups in the 1899-1905 Manhattan city directories. If
anyone has access to them and is willing to do some research/lookups for
me please contact me at talasky@...

Terry Lasky
Colorado, USA


Guard of Moses Everett, MA / USA-Cemetery Lookup #general

Carol <carol.edan@...>
 

If anyone is going to the Guard of Moses Everett, MA / USA I would
appreciate a lookup of the stone of PRICE Max.

The stone can be found in Section 3, side right, grave 10 . Mainly
interested in the fathers name, usually in Hebrew... Eliyahu Pinchas to see
if this is the correct Max.

I am looking for a Morris [Max]PRICE , brother to Joseph and Fannie.

Please reply personally

Thanks in advance

Carol Monosson Edan
Researching
MONOSSON/POLEY- Moscow/Gomel
PRICE/ARONSON/RUBIN/KUPIETSKY- Kalvarija/Augustow
RABINOVITZ- Novogrodok
MUSHNITCHSKY


Schranz #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Hi Genners,

Is there such word in Yiddish as "schranz"? What does it mean?

Thanks

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Guard of Moses Everett, MA / USA-Cemetery Lookup #general

Carol <carol.edan@...>
 

If anyone is going to the Guard of Moses Everett, MA / USA I would
appreciate a lookup of the stone of PRICE Max.

The stone can be found in Section 3, side right, grave 10 . Mainly
interested in the fathers name, usually in Hebrew... Eliyahu Pinchas to see
if this is the correct Max.

I am looking for a Morris [Max]PRICE , brother to Joseph and Fannie.

Please reply personally

Thanks in advance

Carol Monosson Edan
Researching
MONOSSON/POLEY- Moscow/Gomel
PRICE/ARONSON/RUBIN/KUPIETSKY- Kalvarija/Augustow
RABINOVITZ- Novogrodok
MUSHNITCHSKY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Schranz #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Hi Genners,

Is there such word in Yiddish as "schranz"? What does it mean?

Thanks

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.