Date   

Locating a synagogue between Kletsk and Kapyl, circa 1924 #general

henryn <henryn@...>
 

Folks:

I'm trying to locate a synagogue that existed circa 1924 somewhere on a path
between Kapyl (Kopyl) and Kletsk (Klyetsk/Kletzk/Kleck/etc) southwest of
Minsk, now in Belarus.

At that time, some Jewish refugees, relatives of Kletsk family, secretly
made their way >from Kapyl to Kletsk by an unknown route. They made a rest
stop about 2/3 of the way at a synagogue. If I can find the synagogue, I
can get a much better idea of their actual route.

You can get a look at the area as it exists today by using this link:

www.multimap.com/map/browse.cgi?lat=53.0739&lon=26.8372&scale=500000&icon=x

The circle marker on this map is approximately 2/3 of the way on the most
direct route using minor roads that existed at that time. (The grey
east-west line is a railway that was built later.)

Of course, the refugees may have taken a different route, but I have reason
to believe their rest stop was approximately this far west, because they had
already negotiated the heavily guarded Russian-Polish border that at this
time ran approximately north-to-south at this location.

I've checked JewishGen locater pages for Jewish communities, for Kapyl:

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1944511

and for Kletsk:

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1944253

each of which give a list of nearby Jewish communities, which overlap. The
only one that is even close the likely area of the route is Timkovichi
(Tsimkavichi/Cimkavichy):

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1950604

but this town is only about 1/3 of the way and clearly on the wrong side of
the border.

No other Jewish communities are listed in the target area.

I have used JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker and old maps to locate many towns in
the area. I've researched the most likely of these without finding any sign
a synagogue in the target area.

Any other ideas or resources for finding the location of the synagogue?

Thanks very much, in advance, for your help!

Henry

Henry Neugass
Palo Alto, CA
henryn@zzzspacebbs.com remove 'zzz'
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kletsk/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Locating a synagogue between Kletsk and Kapyl, circa 1924 #general

henryn <henryn@...>
 

Folks:

I'm trying to locate a synagogue that existed circa 1924 somewhere on a path
between Kapyl (Kopyl) and Kletsk (Klyetsk/Kletzk/Kleck/etc) southwest of
Minsk, now in Belarus.

At that time, some Jewish refugees, relatives of Kletsk family, secretly
made their way >from Kapyl to Kletsk by an unknown route. They made a rest
stop about 2/3 of the way at a synagogue. If I can find the synagogue, I
can get a much better idea of their actual route.

You can get a look at the area as it exists today by using this link:

www.multimap.com/map/browse.cgi?lat=53.0739&lon=26.8372&scale=500000&icon=x

The circle marker on this map is approximately 2/3 of the way on the most
direct route using minor roads that existed at that time. (The grey
east-west line is a railway that was built later.)

Of course, the refugees may have taken a different route, but I have reason
to believe their rest stop was approximately this far west, because they had
already negotiated the heavily guarded Russian-Polish border that at this
time ran approximately north-to-south at this location.

I've checked JewishGen locater pages for Jewish communities, for Kapyl:

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1944511

and for Kletsk:

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1944253

each of which give a list of nearby Jewish communities, which overlap. The
only one that is even close the likely area of the route is Timkovichi
(Tsimkavichi/Cimkavichy):

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1950604

but this town is only about 1/3 of the way and clearly on the wrong side of
the border.

No other Jewish communities are listed in the target area.

I have used JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker and old maps to locate many towns in
the area. I've researched the most likely of these without finding any sign
a synagogue in the target area.

Any other ideas or resources for finding the location of the synagogue?

Thanks very much, in advance, for your help!

Henry

Henry Neugass
Palo Alto, CA
henryn@zzzspacebbs.com remove 'zzz'
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kletsk/


French refugees s.s. Massilia June 1940 #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I have a book "Bordeaux Capitale Tragique" which includes a passenger
list of refugees (many Jewish) of the s.s. Massilia
which sailed >from Bordeaux to Casablanca, arriving 24 Jun 1940.

A lot of celebrities were on board including Edouard Daladier, Pierre
Mendes France, Jean Zay, and others. Information given is name, age,
plrofession. There are about 150 names on the list. I will be happy
to look up names if anyone writes me.

Paul Silverstone
New York

www.paulsilverstone.com
Please reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen French refugees s.s. Massilia June 1940 #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I have a book "Bordeaux Capitale Tragique" which includes a passenger
list of refugees (many Jewish) of the s.s. Massilia
which sailed >from Bordeaux to Casablanca, arriving 24 Jun 1940.

A lot of celebrities were on board including Edouard Daladier, Pierre
Mendes France, Jean Zay, and others. Information given is name, age,
plrofession. There are about 150 names on the list. I will be happy
to look up names if anyone writes me.

Paul Silverstone
New York

www.paulsilverstone.com
Please reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


Atkatz Family St Petersburg FL #general

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear Genners,
If you know any of the family of my cousin the late Arnold H Atkatz (1936-1998)
or late parents Benjamin (1900-1985) and Sylvia (1907-1995) Atkatz of St
Petersburg, FL please contact me privately.
Thank you very much.
Susan Goldsmith
SF Bay Area US


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Atkatz Family St Petersburg FL #general

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear Genners,
If you know any of the family of my cousin the late Arnold H Atkatz (1936-1998)
or late parents Benjamin (1900-1985) and Sylvia (1907-1995) Atkatz of St
Petersburg, FL please contact me privately.
Thank you very much.
Susan Goldsmith
SF Bay Area US


St Petersburg FL seek cousin of Holocaust survivor #general

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear Genners,
If you live near the 1970s block of Carolina Ave NE in St Petersburg, FL please
email me privately. In Vilnius I met a cousin of mine, a child survivor. I am
seeking to contact close family of his.
Thank you very much,
Susan Goldsmith
SF Bay Area US


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen St Petersburg FL seek cousin of Holocaust survivor #general

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear Genners,
If you live near the 1970s block of Carolina Ave NE in St Petersburg, FL please
email me privately. In Vilnius I met a cousin of mine, a child survivor. I am
seeking to contact close family of his.
Thank you very much,
Susan Goldsmith
SF Bay Area US


Yiddish translation: "khe" as opposed to "ke" name suffixes #general

Aida Yite <atedege@...>
 

Martin Miller wrote:
" Reading this post caused me to recall my grandfather (original name DUBETSKY)
telling me that the townspeople in their shtetl referred to his mother as
Dubechekhe! I don't know if whether the -ch- in Dubechekhe is the result of a
linguistic alteration of the root or part of a compound suffix."

=====Yes, this is a good example of the explanation I gave to Felicia about her
Yiddish text on Viewmate. As for the "ts" sound in Dubets, it was probably
altered to the "tsh" sound. In this specific case the added suffix is "ekhe",
which is also familiar to me, as is the "ikhe" suffix, all these having the same
function:

to create the feminine version of a surname that doesn't exist in normative
naming. In Yiddish the nuance conveyed by "di Fridmankhe" is less respectful than
the formal Mrs. Fridman.

Evertjan Hannivoort wrote:
"I think it either means or started out as a diminuative like the '-ke' the
Flemish form of the Dutch "-[t]je" or the German "-chen"

=====There is a very big difference in Yiddish between the abovementioned "khe"
and the "ke" suffixes mentioned in this and other postings. "Ke" is an endearing
diminutive added in Yiddish to the given name only. (If added to the surname it
usually wasn't 'endearing' anymore...) About the "ka" suffix mentioned (Elenka,
Adelka, Brigitka) all I can say is that it does not belong to Yiddish, and are
probably slavic. The "chen", "lein", and other suffixes also mentioned here are
not Yiddish either, they probably belong to German. Although Yiddish has German
roots, it evolved along different paths. Yiddish has its own very rich list of
diminutives of which "ke" is only a small example. In some cases "ke", as opposed
to "khe", did indeed become part of a person's formal surname. For example: Sore
would become Sorke which would later turn into the surname Sorkin.
All the best to everyone,
Aida Rauch [Belgium]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish translation: "khe" as opposed to "ke" name suffixes #general

Aida Yite <atedege@...>
 

Martin Miller wrote:
" Reading this post caused me to recall my grandfather (original name DUBETSKY)
telling me that the townspeople in their shtetl referred to his mother as
Dubechekhe! I don't know if whether the -ch- in Dubechekhe is the result of a
linguistic alteration of the root or part of a compound suffix."

=====Yes, this is a good example of the explanation I gave to Felicia about her
Yiddish text on Viewmate. As for the "ts" sound in Dubets, it was probably
altered to the "tsh" sound. In this specific case the added suffix is "ekhe",
which is also familiar to me, as is the "ikhe" suffix, all these having the same
function:

to create the feminine version of a surname that doesn't exist in normative
naming. In Yiddish the nuance conveyed by "di Fridmankhe" is less respectful than
the formal Mrs. Fridman.

Evertjan Hannivoort wrote:
"I think it either means or started out as a diminuative like the '-ke' the
Flemish form of the Dutch "-[t]je" or the German "-chen"

=====There is a very big difference in Yiddish between the abovementioned "khe"
and the "ke" suffixes mentioned in this and other postings. "Ke" is an endearing
diminutive added in Yiddish to the given name only. (If added to the surname it
usually wasn't 'endearing' anymore...) About the "ka" suffix mentioned (Elenka,
Adelka, Brigitka) all I can say is that it does not belong to Yiddish, and are
probably slavic. The "chen", "lein", and other suffixes also mentioned here are
not Yiddish either, they probably belong to German. Although Yiddish has German
roots, it evolved along different paths. Yiddish has its own very rich list of
diminutives of which "ke" is only a small example. In some cases "ke", as opposed
to "khe", did indeed become part of a person's formal surname. For example: Sore
would become Sorke which would later turn into the surname Sorkin.
All the best to everyone,
Aida Rauch [Belgium]


More on "khe" suffix #general

Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@...>
 

Here in Israel people tack on the "khe" suffix to names of both genders.
One can hear both "Chaikhe" (for Chaya) and "Chaimkhe" (for Chaim). My late
uncle's Yiddish name was Mortkhe (Mordechai) and many of us may remember
Shmulkhe Bernstein's kosher restaurant in Manhattan. I believe that the
suffix simply indicates a warm familiarity with the person being addressed
and has no special definition in itself.
Shabbat Shalom,
Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More on "khe" suffix #general

Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@...>
 

Here in Israel people tack on the "khe" suffix to names of both genders.
One can hear both "Chaikhe" (for Chaya) and "Chaimkhe" (for Chaim). My late
uncle's Yiddish name was Mortkhe (Mordechai) and many of us may remember
Shmulkhe Bernstein's kosher restaurant in Manhattan. I believe that the
suffix simply indicates a warm familiarity with the person being addressed
and has no special definition in itself.
Shabbat Shalom,
Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel


Re: Yiddish Translation :"khe" suffixes #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Evertjan wrote
However, is there a Hebrew or Arameic source possibility?
No, its pure Russian.

"Russian" wife of a merchant (kupets) was known as kupchikha, wife of a
tailor (patnoy) was known as partnikha, mill owner (mielnik) as
mielnichikha, female cook (male: povar) is known as povarikha, and so on.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish Translation :"khe" suffixes #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Evertjan wrote
However, is there a Hebrew or Arameic source possibility?
No, its pure Russian.

"Russian" wife of a merchant (kupets) was known as kupchikha, wife of a
tailor (patnoy) was known as partnikha, mill owner (mielnik) as
mielnichikha, female cook (male: povar) is known as povarikha, and so on.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Re: Yiddish Translation :"khe" suffixes #general

Jules Levin
 

At any rate, the "khe" suffix was frequently used in spoken
Yiddish but was never a part of a person's formal name.
I know a Russian Elena who is Elenka.

I have found a website of Czech female names in the diminutive form. Many of
them end in -ka. eg Adela is Adelka, Brigita is Brigitka.

Nick Landau
The diminutive suffix -ka for feminine gender nouns is indigenous in all Slavic
languages. I don't know Germanic philology that well, but the German suffix may
be cognate (sharing a common descent with Slavic) or even borrowed >from Slavic.
Did Anglo-Saxon have a suffix related to German? We have -kin in words like
lambkins, but this is doubtless connected to German -chen. The masculine
equivalent is Russian -ok, Polish -ek, etc. Anyway, Yiddish is nicely situated to
reflect multiple causation, >from German and perhaps with Slavic influence, cf.
the -in last name suffix added to female names in -ka: Rivkin, Dvorkin, etc.
Jules Levin
Los Angeles


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish Translation :"khe" suffixes #general

Jules Levin
 

At any rate, the "khe" suffix was frequently used in spoken
Yiddish but was never a part of a person's formal name.
I know a Russian Elena who is Elenka.

I have found a website of Czech female names in the diminutive form. Many of
them end in -ka. eg Adela is Adelka, Brigita is Brigitka.

Nick Landau
The diminutive suffix -ka for feminine gender nouns is indigenous in all Slavic
languages. I don't know Germanic philology that well, but the German suffix may
be cognate (sharing a common descent with Slavic) or even borrowed >from Slavic.
Did Anglo-Saxon have a suffix related to German? We have -kin in words like
lambkins, but this is doubtless connected to German -chen. The masculine
equivalent is Russian -ok, Polish -ek, etc. Anyway, Yiddish is nicely situated to
reflect multiple causation, >from German and perhaps with Slavic influence, cf.
the -in last name suffix added to female names in -ka: Rivkin, Dvorkin, etc.
Jules Levin
Los Angeles


Leneyce? Linchess? Lynczyz? - found? #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Rivka Schirman is looking for the birth place of her late father in law
Szulem Einoch Leslau, which "is written on one doc as "Leneyce ", on another
child's card it is given as "Linchess" and on the third child's card, as
"Lynczyz" and "neither of the spellings, gives anything that makes sense
when I try to locate the place with shtetel seeker.". Family members came to
Brussels >from Lodz.

A Daitch-Mokotoff Search in ShtetlSeeker for Lynczyz, which seemed the "most
Polish" spelling, gives two chances...not very close in sound or distance,
about 150 and 200 miles >from Lodz. "Linchess", which I thought - not being
a Polish speaker - could be a relatively close phonetic equivalent for
Lynczyz, adds a third place. It does not look right either, and is 180 miles
away. Leneyce's 12 matches include "Lemiesze", tempting if the problem is
not the precise sound but possible spelling errors, still 105 miles away
from Lodz, and one Leczyca, which at first sight looks - to me - quite
different.

Still, Leczyca has a slashed L, a diacritic mark under the "e" which I
understand makes it sound like "en" before the "cz" and the sound for the
beginning of the name would become "Lench", closer to the "Linch..." and
"Lyncz....." I was looking for.

Perhaps a Polish reader could say how Leczyca would be pronounced with the
marks? The "c" is "ts"? Lenchitsa? But it is still more than 200 miles away
from Lodz. An alternate name is Lenz. (This mail does not show the marks in
the names of different Polish places I am mentioning).

Not very happy with what seems a not so close sound, but lacking "direct
hits", I at least wanted to see if there were other results closer to
Lodz.. Not that our families did not travel long distances! I then moved
from ShtetlSeeker to the Town Guide for the 1929 Poland business directory
in JRI-Poland.

A D-M Search for Lynczyz gives 6 hits. It includes one Leczyca in Leczyca
district, Lodz province - view Page 0867 . This Leczyca which did not show
at first in the DM search in ShtetlSeeker seems to be closer. A search can
now be made in ShtetlSeeker for towns with the exact name Leczyca, country
Poland, using the "Show the distance and direction from:" option, and
referring to Lodz. It now gives 5 matches, including two which are less than
25 miles >from Lodz:

Leczyca 52 04' 19 13' E M U Poland 24.3 miles NNW of Lodz

Leczyca 51 28' 19 20' E M U Poland 20.4 miles SSW of Lodz

The first one has a little logo with the link to a "JewishGen locality
page", which tells us the place was also known as Leczyca, Lechicha,
Lecycza, Lenchicha, Lenchitsha, Lentshits, Linchits, Lintchitz, Lunchich,
Luntzitz . Now, when I compare Rivka's "Lynczyz" or "Linchess" to "Linchits,
Lintchitz", I like it!

I imagine the "other" Leczyca, close by, 20.4 miles SSW of Lodz at 51 45'
19 28', may have also been known by quite similar names. Rivka will have to
work to see if one of these places is her husband´s family origin, and which
one...

The first one, according to the Locality Page, was in the Kalisz province of
the Russian Empire before WW I, and in the Lodz Polish province in between
wars. A search for LESLAU in JRI-Poland includes results for Kalisz
gubernia and, sadly among other sources, also for the Lodz ghetto victims
list.

There are 86 JGFF researchers for the first place, the one with a "JewishGen
locality page", and according to the Yizkor Book Database, there is also a
Memorial book of Leczyca:

Original Title: Sefer Linshits
English Title: Memorial book of Leczyca
Editor: J. Frenkel
Published: Tel Aviv 1953
Publisher: Former Residents of Leczyca in Israel
Pages: 223
Languages: H

I hope this helps

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Searching for GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN (Suwalki,
Marijampole, Augustow, Sejny,Sopotkin); ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ (Kremenchug,Vilno)
POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY (Suwalki, Seirijai)
HOLLANDERSKY, HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER (Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza)
TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL (Kremenchug, Kharkov)
FELSCHTINSKY (Kremenchug, Vilno), GOLUMBIEWSKY, GOLOMB (?), KRASNAPOLSKY (?)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Leneyce? Linchess? Lynczyz? - found? #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Rivka Schirman is looking for the birth place of her late father in law
Szulem Einoch Leslau, which "is written on one doc as "Leneyce ", on another
child's card it is given as "Linchess" and on the third child's card, as
"Lynczyz" and "neither of the spellings, gives anything that makes sense
when I try to locate the place with shtetel seeker.". Family members came to
Brussels >from Lodz.

A Daitch-Mokotoff Search in ShtetlSeeker for Lynczyz, which seemed the "most
Polish" spelling, gives two chances...not very close in sound or distance,
about 150 and 200 miles >from Lodz. "Linchess", which I thought - not being
a Polish speaker - could be a relatively close phonetic equivalent for
Lynczyz, adds a third place. It does not look right either, and is 180 miles
away. Leneyce's 12 matches include "Lemiesze", tempting if the problem is
not the precise sound but possible spelling errors, still 105 miles away
from Lodz, and one Leczyca, which at first sight looks - to me - quite
different.

Still, Leczyca has a slashed L, a diacritic mark under the "e" which I
understand makes it sound like "en" before the "cz" and the sound for the
beginning of the name would become "Lench", closer to the "Linch..." and
"Lyncz....." I was looking for.

Perhaps a Polish reader could say how Leczyca would be pronounced with the
marks? The "c" is "ts"? Lenchitsa? But it is still more than 200 miles away
from Lodz. An alternate name is Lenz. (This mail does not show the marks in
the names of different Polish places I am mentioning).

Not very happy with what seems a not so close sound, but lacking "direct
hits", I at least wanted to see if there were other results closer to
Lodz.. Not that our families did not travel long distances! I then moved
from ShtetlSeeker to the Town Guide for the 1929 Poland business directory
in JRI-Poland.

A D-M Search for Lynczyz gives 6 hits. It includes one Leczyca in Leczyca
district, Lodz province - view Page 0867 . This Leczyca which did not show
at first in the DM search in ShtetlSeeker seems to be closer. A search can
now be made in ShtetlSeeker for towns with the exact name Leczyca, country
Poland, using the "Show the distance and direction from:" option, and
referring to Lodz. It now gives 5 matches, including two which are less than
25 miles >from Lodz:

Leczyca 52 04' 19 13' E M U Poland 24.3 miles NNW of Lodz

Leczyca 51 28' 19 20' E M U Poland 20.4 miles SSW of Lodz

The first one has a little logo with the link to a "JewishGen locality
page", which tells us the place was also known as Leczyca, Lechicha,
Lecycza, Lenchicha, Lenchitsha, Lentshits, Linchits, Lintchitz, Lunchich,
Luntzitz . Now, when I compare Rivka's "Lynczyz" or "Linchess" to "Linchits,
Lintchitz", I like it!

I imagine the "other" Leczyca, close by, 20.4 miles SSW of Lodz at 51 45'
19 28', may have also been known by quite similar names. Rivka will have to
work to see if one of these places is her husband´s family origin, and which
one...

The first one, according to the Locality Page, was in the Kalisz province of
the Russian Empire before WW I, and in the Lodz Polish province in between
wars. A search for LESLAU in JRI-Poland includes results for Kalisz
gubernia and, sadly among other sources, also for the Lodz ghetto victims
list.

There are 86 JGFF researchers for the first place, the one with a "JewishGen
locality page", and according to the Yizkor Book Database, there is also a
Memorial book of Leczyca:

Original Title: Sefer Linshits
English Title: Memorial book of Leczyca
Editor: J. Frenkel
Published: Tel Aviv 1953
Publisher: Former Residents of Leczyca in Israel
Pages: 223
Languages: H

I hope this helps

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Searching for GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN (Suwalki,
Marijampole, Augustow, Sejny,Sopotkin); ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ (Kremenchug,Vilno)
POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY (Suwalki, Seirijai)
HOLLANDERSKY, HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER (Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza)
TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL (Kremenchug, Kharkov)
FELSCHTINSKY (Kremenchug, Vilno), GOLUMBIEWSKY, GOLOMB (?), KRASNAPOLSKY (?)


Re: Leneyce? Linchess? Lynczyz? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Rivka Schirman" wrote

I have finally found documents concerning my husband's maternal
family - these are records of the Jewish Registry >from Brussels,
concerning members of the LESLAU Family, who came to Brussels from
Lodz. However, the birth place of my late father in law - Szulem
Einoch Leslau is written on one doc as "Leneyce ", on another
child's card it is given as "Linchess" and on the third child's
card, as "Lynczyz". On the birth certificate of a 4th child, next
to the name of the father's birth place, it is noted "Pologne
russe (Russian Poland).

The problem is that neither of the spellings, gives any thing
that makes sense when I try to locate the place with shtetel seeker.

Anyone has an idea of what is this place and where ?
Oy, Rivkele,

This is town Leczyca, pron. [lehn cheeh tsah] at 5204 1913, 24 miles NNW
from Lodz
Zajn ma gezund
--
Regards,

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Leneyce? Linchess? Lynczyz? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Rivka Schirman" wrote

I have finally found documents concerning my husband's maternal
family - these are records of the Jewish Registry >from Brussels,
concerning members of the LESLAU Family, who came to Brussels from
Lodz. However, the birth place of my late father in law - Szulem
Einoch Leslau is written on one doc as "Leneyce ", on another
child's card it is given as "Linchess" and on the third child's
card, as "Lynczyz". On the birth certificate of a 4th child, next
to the name of the father's birth place, it is noted "Pologne
russe (Russian Poland).

The problem is that neither of the spellings, gives any thing
that makes sense when I try to locate the place with shtetel seeker.

Anyone has an idea of what is this place and where ?
Oy, Rivkele,

This is town Leczyca, pron. [lehn cheeh tsah] at 5204 1913, 24 miles NNW
from Lodz
Zajn ma gezund
--
Regards,

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor