Date   

A Suggested Project for the YT&V group #yiddish

David Harris <dorsharris@...>
 

To the YT&V Membership:

Some of the Special Interest Groups engage in unique projects.
Frequently, they involve translations into English for the benefit of
the bulk of their members.

I have two memoirs written by important Yiddish actors of the early
20th century; both were written in Yiddish. To my knowledge, they
have not yet been translated. If anyone knows of translations,
please notify the membership by posting a message.

1. Book of My Life by Boris Thomashefsky, 386 pages, divided into 20 chapters.
2. My Life in the Theater by Boez Yong, 411 pages, divided into
sections of 1 to 10 pages each.

If we have enough volunteers willing to translate a few pages each,
we can provide a unique service. I would scan and forward via email
the pages in relatively high definition, so the characters can be
easily read. An alternative is to raise funds for a professional translation.

Is there enough interest in the effort?
Which of the two books should be translated first?
Do we have volunteers willing to do the translation?
If you have questions regarding the effort or are willing to consider
translating a few pages, you can contact me directly at
<dorsharris@verizon.net>.

We will proceed only if there is enough interest to spread the effort, so as not
to be a burden to anyone.

Thank you.
David Harris
Moderator YT&V


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre A Suggested Project for the YT&V group #yiddish

David Harris <dorsharris@...>
 

To the YT&V Membership:

Some of the Special Interest Groups engage in unique projects.
Frequently, they involve translations into English for the benefit of
the bulk of their members.

I have two memoirs written by important Yiddish actors of the early
20th century; both were written in Yiddish. To my knowledge, they
have not yet been translated. If anyone knows of translations,
please notify the membership by posting a message.

1. Book of My Life by Boris Thomashefsky, 386 pages, divided into 20 chapters.
2. My Life in the Theater by Boez Yong, 411 pages, divided into
sections of 1 to 10 pages each.

If we have enough volunteers willing to translate a few pages each,
we can provide a unique service. I would scan and forward via email
the pages in relatively high definition, so the characters can be
easily read. An alternative is to raise funds for a professional translation.

Is there enough interest in the effort?
Which of the two books should be translated first?
Do we have volunteers willing to do the translation?
If you have questions regarding the effort or are willing to consider
translating a few pages, you can contact me directly at
<dorsharris@verizon.net>.

We will proceed only if there is enough interest to spread the effort, so as not
to be a burden to anyone.

Thank you.
David Harris
Moderator YT&V


CHAVER, KOTTON, VILDMAN #rabbinic

srhlsr@...
 

I have previously posted a message re R' Yoseph CHAVER of Jedwabne &
descendants; this message repeats the details slightly, for those
who haven't seen the previous post, and adds a new twist to it.

My great-great grandfather's (Rabbi Aharon Shlomo Zalman KLEPFISZ,
Ob"m) brother, Avraham Meir KLEPFISZ, Ob"m married the daughter of
Rabbi Yoseph CHAVER, Ob"m; I don't know her name.

(Before I go on with my CHAVER inquiry, let me just add that
according to the Goworowo, Poland Yizkor Book, (Goworowo is where my
great-great grandfather Rabbi Aharon Shlomo Zalman KLEPFISZ, Ob"m
was rabbi), Avraham Meir KLEPFISZ, Ob"m, studied with Rabbi Yosef
Dov HaLevi Soloveichik, Ob"m, and the "Netziv", Ob"m, in the Yeshiva
of Volozhin, before being appointed rabbi in the city of Jablonka,
near Wysokie Mazowieckie.)

I also looked online at the Yizkor Book for Jablonka, called Nowy
Targ Yizkor Book. <http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1970>; and
JewishGen's Nowy Targ Yizkor Book Translations, as well; I didn't
find KLEPFISZ, CHAVER, or KOTTON mentioned.

According to the Jedwabne Yizkor book (I looked online at
http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1468 ), Rabbi Yoseph CHAVER,
Ob"m, was a son of Rabbi Yitzchak Eizik CHAVER, Ob"m.

I e-mailed JGFF researchers of CHAVER, and of KOTTON, which I was
told "came from"/replaced CHAVER.

I'd like very much to be in contact with descendants of the above
KLEPFISZ-CHAVER/KOTTON.

None of the CHAVER/KOTTON surname "researchers" that I've been in
contact with know re descendants of this couple; and/or the wife
(nee CHAVER)'s name;

One JewishGenner e-mailed me a link to hebrewbooks.org which has
11,000 Seforim (religious Hebrew books) for Free Download, including
a number of texts by both Rabbi Yitzchak Eizik CHAVER, Ob"m, and
R' Yoseph CHAVER , Ob"m; very interesting- near both of their names
is another surname: (transliterated >from Hebrew); VILDMAN.

Can any readers comment on their familiarity with any of these
surnames: CHAVER, KOTTON, VILDMAN ?

I don't know which is more commonly used/by who/why the surname was
changed, if officially...?

I'd appreciate any help with this....

Thank you.

Sarah Lasry
Israel


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic CHAVER, KOTTON, VILDMAN #rabbinic

srhlsr@...
 

I have previously posted a message re R' Yoseph CHAVER of Jedwabne &
descendants; this message repeats the details slightly, for those
who haven't seen the previous post, and adds a new twist to it.

My great-great grandfather's (Rabbi Aharon Shlomo Zalman KLEPFISZ,
Ob"m) brother, Avraham Meir KLEPFISZ, Ob"m married the daughter of
Rabbi Yoseph CHAVER, Ob"m; I don't know her name.

(Before I go on with my CHAVER inquiry, let me just add that
according to the Goworowo, Poland Yizkor Book, (Goworowo is where my
great-great grandfather Rabbi Aharon Shlomo Zalman KLEPFISZ, Ob"m
was rabbi), Avraham Meir KLEPFISZ, Ob"m, studied with Rabbi Yosef
Dov HaLevi Soloveichik, Ob"m, and the "Netziv", Ob"m, in the Yeshiva
of Volozhin, before being appointed rabbi in the city of Jablonka,
near Wysokie Mazowieckie.)

I also looked online at the Yizkor Book for Jablonka, called Nowy
Targ Yizkor Book. <http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1970>; and
JewishGen's Nowy Targ Yizkor Book Translations, as well; I didn't
find KLEPFISZ, CHAVER, or KOTTON mentioned.

According to the Jedwabne Yizkor book (I looked online at
http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1468 ), Rabbi Yoseph CHAVER,
Ob"m, was a son of Rabbi Yitzchak Eizik CHAVER, Ob"m.

I e-mailed JGFF researchers of CHAVER, and of KOTTON, which I was
told "came from"/replaced CHAVER.

I'd like very much to be in contact with descendants of the above
KLEPFISZ-CHAVER/KOTTON.

None of the CHAVER/KOTTON surname "researchers" that I've been in
contact with know re descendants of this couple; and/or the wife
(nee CHAVER)'s name;

One JewishGenner e-mailed me a link to hebrewbooks.org which has
11,000 Seforim (religious Hebrew books) for Free Download, including
a number of texts by both Rabbi Yitzchak Eizik CHAVER, Ob"m, and
R' Yoseph CHAVER , Ob"m; very interesting- near both of their names
is another surname: (transliterated >from Hebrew); VILDMAN.

Can any readers comment on their familiarity with any of these
surnames: CHAVER, KOTTON, VILDMAN ?

I don't know which is more commonly used/by who/why the surname was
changed, if officially...?

I'd appreciate any help with this....

Thank you.

Sarah Lasry
Israel


KREIJZLER family #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

I'm looking for any information about the KREIJZLER family. Helene
(Chaja) KREIJZLER was born in Warsaw on 4 Mrch 1898. She married
Chaim BERLOWOJ (BERLEWI), born in Warsaw too. They arrived in France
in the 1920's. She had a sister named Mirka (Mireille). The three of
them were deported to Auschwitz in 1942, after the "Rafle du Vel
d'Hiv". Helene and Mirka KREIJZLER had a brother (first name and date
of birth unknown) who setttled in US. Maybe he has some descendants ?
Any clue would be welcome.
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
http://www.convoi73.org
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KREIJZLER family #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

I'm looking for any information about the KREIJZLER family. Helene
(Chaja) KREIJZLER was born in Warsaw on 4 Mrch 1898. She married
Chaim BERLOWOJ (BERLEWI), born in Warsaw too. They arrived in France
in the 1920's. She had a sister named Mirka (Mireille). The three of
them were deported to Auschwitz in 1942, after the "Rafle du Vel
d'Hiv". Helene and Mirka KREIJZLER had a brother (first name and date
of birth unknown) who setttled in US. Maybe he has some descendants ?
Any clue would be welcome.
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
http://www.convoi73.org
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


"Belchatow Bonanza" completed #general

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear Belchatow Researchers,

Back in 2002, we announced the "Belchatow
Bonanza." This was an initiative to index
Belchatow vital records in the Polish State
Archives >from 1901 to 1905. I am pleased to
announce we just received the final 2 years of
indices for this project: 1904 and 1905. This is
the time period when not only our grandparents and
their siblings were born and married, but also
when many of our parents, aunts and uncles were
born in Belchatow. Having the indices in one
database enables you to search for given names,
further research those who married into the
family, and manipulate the data in various other
ways to glean the most information.

Surnames listed 20 or more times in all the
Belchatow PSA years >from 1889 to 1905 are:
JAKUBOWICZ, SZMULEWICZ, GOLDBERG, FRAJMAN,
LIBERMAN, MARKOWICZ, LAJB, ROZENCWAJG,
BENCZKOWSKA, FELD, STATLENDER, WARSZAWSKA,
BENCZKOWSKI, NOWAK, SZMKOWICZ, LEWKOWICZ,
PRZYBYLSKA, KLUCZ, GELBART, PILA, GRUSZKA,
GRYNBERG, JOSKOWICZ, KONSENS, MOSKOWICZ,
NAPARSTEK, SZPIGELMAN, ALTMAN, PRZYBYLSKI,
MACHABONSKI, PRZEDBORSKA, WARSZAWSKI, GLIKSMAN,
ROZENBLAT, BORNSZTAJN, FAJWISZ.

For a complete list of surnames for these
years,see:
http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/belchatow_surn.htm

Names listed the *most* in only the two years just
added, 1904 and 1905, are: GOLDBERG, JAKUBOWICZ,
ROZENCWAJG, SZMULEWICZ, LEWKOWICZ, FEDER, FRAJTAG,
KLUCZ, and SZPIGELMAN.

Contact me for more information about this file.

See updates on the Belchatow ShtetLinks site:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/belchatow/

All the best,
Roni

[Mrs. Roni Seibel Liebowitz]
New York
Belchatow ShtetLink
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/belchatow/
Belchatow Shtetl CO-OP, Jewish Records Indexing-
Poland, http://www.jri-Poland.org/belchatow.htm
Belchatow Yizkor Book Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Belchatow Bonanza" completed #general

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear Belchatow Researchers,

Back in 2002, we announced the "Belchatow
Bonanza." This was an initiative to index
Belchatow vital records in the Polish State
Archives >from 1901 to 1905. I am pleased to
announce we just received the final 2 years of
indices for this project: 1904 and 1905. This is
the time period when not only our grandparents and
their siblings were born and married, but also
when many of our parents, aunts and uncles were
born in Belchatow. Having the indices in one
database enables you to search for given names,
further research those who married into the
family, and manipulate the data in various other
ways to glean the most information.

Surnames listed 20 or more times in all the
Belchatow PSA years >from 1889 to 1905 are:
JAKUBOWICZ, SZMULEWICZ, GOLDBERG, FRAJMAN,
LIBERMAN, MARKOWICZ, LAJB, ROZENCWAJG,
BENCZKOWSKA, FELD, STATLENDER, WARSZAWSKA,
BENCZKOWSKI, NOWAK, SZMKOWICZ, LEWKOWICZ,
PRZYBYLSKA, KLUCZ, GELBART, PILA, GRUSZKA,
GRYNBERG, JOSKOWICZ, KONSENS, MOSKOWICZ,
NAPARSTEK, SZPIGELMAN, ALTMAN, PRZYBYLSKI,
MACHABONSKI, PRZEDBORSKA, WARSZAWSKI, GLIKSMAN,
ROZENBLAT, BORNSZTAJN, FAJWISZ.

For a complete list of surnames for these
years,see:
http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/belchatow_surn.htm

Names listed the *most* in only the two years just
added, 1904 and 1905, are: GOLDBERG, JAKUBOWICZ,
ROZENCWAJG, SZMULEWICZ, LEWKOWICZ, FEDER, FRAJTAG,
KLUCZ, and SZPIGELMAN.

Contact me for more information about this file.

See updates on the Belchatow ShtetLinks site:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/belchatow/

All the best,
Roni

[Mrs. Roni Seibel Liebowitz]
New York
Belchatow ShtetLink
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/belchatow/
Belchatow Shtetl CO-OP, Jewish Records Indexing-
Poland, http://www.jri-Poland.org/belchatow.htm
Belchatow Yizkor Book Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html


Re: "Inmate" at Montefiore Home in NYC / Brooklyn Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables #general

s_wiener@...
 

Hello, JGenners,

Actually, Montifiore Hospital does have a bit of its
history on the web-site at:
http://www.montefiore.org/whoweare/history/
and
http://www.montefiore.org/media/twins/mmchistory/

Before the web-site was "updated" to its current
version, I had gleaned the following information from
a prior version of the hospital history:
Montefiore opend as a Home for Chronic Invalids in
1884. The hospital provided care primarily for
patients with tuberculosis. For those patients the
average length of stay was more than 350 days. In the
1890s, Montefiore participated in the early testing of
tuberculin, developed by Robert Koch for the diagnosis
and treatment of tuberculosis. In 1897 Montefiore
opened the Montefiore Home Country Sanitarium aka
Bedford Sanitarium in Bedford, NY [currently
Westchester County] to care for tuberculosis patients.
The sanitarium was in continuous operation until 1956.

On Sat, 17 Feb 2007 19:07:10 -0800 (PST) Ira Leviton
<iraleviton@yahoo.com> wrote:
<Hi Cousins,
The Montefiore Home was a hospital for patients
with chronic diseases that opened in Manhattan in
1884. It moved several times, most recently to the
Bronx in 1912, where it is still located, and over a
half century ago it evolved into its current form a
large, acute care hospital. It has a web site at
www.montefiore.org, which unfortunately doesn't have
any history... >

Regarding the word 'inmate' - in both the 1920 and
1930 censuses (censii?) one can see the term used for
those registered at a hospital on the day of the
census taker's visit. And the mentally ill who were
committed to the original 'Bedlam' were called inmates
[ca. 1400], although later they were referred to as
patients [ca. 1700] and unfortunates [ca. 1815].

And >from an old, reliable source - the dictionary:
inmate - any of a group occupying a single place of
residence; especially a person confined (as in a
prison or hospital)

As to the Brooklyn Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables -
our friends at the USG..W..C..P... [hope I didn't say
too much] have been working on brief transcriptions of
selected 1930 US Census columns for the entire US.
These descriptions by county list by microfiche roll
number the Assembly Districts and all the large
facilities [which housed inmates, I presume.]

For Kings County, towards the bottom of the page one
finds: Roll T626_1534 including Brooklyn Borough,
Assembly Dist. 19 (Part) and Assembly Dist. 20 (Part)
&
Institution(s): Home for the Aged (Little Sisters of
the Poor); Home of the Sorrowful Mother; Jewish
Sanitarium for Incurables; Menorah Home for Aged and
Infirm; Nuns of the Order of St. Dominic; Wyckoff
Heights Hospital and Nurses Home

Best of luck to all,
Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA

with family members who worked, were treated and died
at Montefiore in the 'teens and 1920s
and a gg-grandmother who lived her final 5 months and
died at the Brooklyn Hebrew Home for the Aged in 1930


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Re: "Inmate" at Montefiore Home in NYC / Brooklyn Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables #general

s_wiener@...
 

Hello, JGenners,

Actually, Montifiore Hospital does have a bit of its
history on the web-site at:
http://www.montefiore.org/whoweare/history/
and
http://www.montefiore.org/media/twins/mmchistory/

Before the web-site was "updated" to its current
version, I had gleaned the following information from
a prior version of the hospital history:
Montefiore opend as a Home for Chronic Invalids in
1884. The hospital provided care primarily for
patients with tuberculosis. For those patients the
average length of stay was more than 350 days. In the
1890s, Montefiore participated in the early testing of
tuberculin, developed by Robert Koch for the diagnosis
and treatment of tuberculosis. In 1897 Montefiore
opened the Montefiore Home Country Sanitarium aka
Bedford Sanitarium in Bedford, NY [currently
Westchester County] to care for tuberculosis patients.
The sanitarium was in continuous operation until 1956.

On Sat, 17 Feb 2007 19:07:10 -0800 (PST) Ira Leviton
<iraleviton@yahoo.com> wrote:
<Hi Cousins,
The Montefiore Home was a hospital for patients
with chronic diseases that opened in Manhattan in
1884. It moved several times, most recently to the
Bronx in 1912, where it is still located, and over a
half century ago it evolved into its current form a
large, acute care hospital. It has a web site at
www.montefiore.org, which unfortunately doesn't have
any history... >

Regarding the word 'inmate' - in both the 1920 and
1930 censuses (censii?) one can see the term used for
those registered at a hospital on the day of the
census taker's visit. And the mentally ill who were
committed to the original 'Bedlam' were called inmates
[ca. 1400], although later they were referred to as
patients [ca. 1700] and unfortunates [ca. 1815].

And >from an old, reliable source - the dictionary:
inmate - any of a group occupying a single place of
residence; especially a person confined (as in a
prison or hospital)

As to the Brooklyn Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables -
our friends at the USG..W..C..P... [hope I didn't say
too much] have been working on brief transcriptions of
selected 1930 US Census columns for the entire US.
These descriptions by county list by microfiche roll
number the Assembly Districts and all the large
facilities [which housed inmates, I presume.]

For Kings County, towards the bottom of the page one
finds: Roll T626_1534 including Brooklyn Borough,
Assembly Dist. 19 (Part) and Assembly Dist. 20 (Part)
&
Institution(s): Home for the Aged (Little Sisters of
the Poor); Home of the Sorrowful Mother; Jewish
Sanitarium for Incurables; Menorah Home for Aged and
Infirm; Nuns of the Order of St. Dominic; Wyckoff
Heights Hospital and Nurses Home

Best of luck to all,
Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA

with family members who worked, were treated and died
at Montefiore in the 'teens and 1920s
and a gg-grandmother who lived her final 5 months and
died at the Brooklyn Hebrew Home for the Aged in 1930


JGS Greater Miami, Inc. to hold Genealogy Workshop on Sunday, March, 11, 2007 #general

Barbara Musikar
 

JGS Greater Miami, Inc. will present a genealogy workshop for beginning,
intermediate and advanced genealogists >from 9 AM to 1 PM on Sunday, March 11
2007 at Federation. Marcia Finkel will teach beginning computer genealogy.
Barbara Musikar will present an intermediate and advanced workshop
discussing the use of newspapers in Jewish genealogical research, Canadian
and Viennese Jewish genealogical websites and how to use Yad Vashem Pages of
Testimony for genealogical research.

R.S.V.P. by March 8, 2007. Fee: $5 members early registration; $10 members
at door; $10 non-members advanced registration; $15 non-members at door

Spring forward, Fall back
Daylight Savings Time begins at 2 AM on Sunday, March 11. Remember to turn
your clock forward one hour on Saturday night or you will be late to the
Workshop.

The meeting will take place at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, 4200
Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33137, Phone: (305) 576-4000. Please bring picture
ID. Parking entrance is at rear of building on Federal Highway. For more
information and application, please contact Barbara Musikar at (305)
868-9226 or e-mail bar945@hotmail.com .

Barbara Musikar
President JGS of Greater Miami,Inc.
Surfside, FL


JGSBroward Genealogy Seminar #general

David Corito <daveylou@...>
 

JGSBroward Genealogy Seminar Sunday March 11.2007 12:30-5:00PM
Soref community Center
6501 W Sunrise Blvd
Plantation Florida

Trace your Jewish Roots:
Recommended for both beginners and family historians who want to expand
their skills. All subjects are taught by experienced genealogists.

Workshop Seminar Subjects:

Finding your ancestral town.

How to get the most out of the census.

Learn how to use the internet to find: vital records, marriage records,
naturalization records, ships manifests, Ellis Island data base.

Holocaust Research: Documenting victims and locating survivors.

How are we related? Learn the kinship between yourself and a common
ancestor.

Jewish Record Indexing.

How best to use Steve Morse website.

Organizing your family records.

Interviewing relatives.

Creating a Family Tree.

Fee: $20.00 per person
$15:00 additional family member
Refreshments will be served.

Seating is limited make your reservation today:
Jewish Genealogical Society of Broward County, Inc
PO Box 17251
Plantation FL 33318

E-mail: jgsbroward@yahoo.com
Website: www.jgsbroward.org
Phone: 954.243.6063

David Corito, Director, Publicity
Tamarac, Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Greater Miami, Inc. to hold Genealogy Workshop on Sunday, March, 11, 2007 #general

Barbara Musikar
 

JGS Greater Miami, Inc. will present a genealogy workshop for beginning,
intermediate and advanced genealogists >from 9 AM to 1 PM on Sunday, March 11
2007 at Federation. Marcia Finkel will teach beginning computer genealogy.
Barbara Musikar will present an intermediate and advanced workshop
discussing the use of newspapers in Jewish genealogical research, Canadian
and Viennese Jewish genealogical websites and how to use Yad Vashem Pages of
Testimony for genealogical research.

R.S.V.P. by March 8, 2007. Fee: $5 members early registration; $10 members
at door; $10 non-members advanced registration; $15 non-members at door

Spring forward, Fall back
Daylight Savings Time begins at 2 AM on Sunday, March 11. Remember to turn
your clock forward one hour on Saturday night or you will be late to the
Workshop.

The meeting will take place at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, 4200
Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33137, Phone: (305) 576-4000. Please bring picture
ID. Parking entrance is at rear of building on Federal Highway. For more
information and application, please contact Barbara Musikar at (305)
868-9226 or e-mail bar945@hotmail.com .

Barbara Musikar
President JGS of Greater Miami,Inc.
Surfside, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSBroward Genealogy Seminar #general

David Corito <daveylou@...>
 

JGSBroward Genealogy Seminar Sunday March 11.2007 12:30-5:00PM
Soref community Center
6501 W Sunrise Blvd
Plantation Florida

Trace your Jewish Roots:
Recommended for both beginners and family historians who want to expand
their skills. All subjects are taught by experienced genealogists.

Workshop Seminar Subjects:

Finding your ancestral town.

How to get the most out of the census.

Learn how to use the internet to find: vital records, marriage records,
naturalization records, ships manifests, Ellis Island data base.

Holocaust Research: Documenting victims and locating survivors.

How are we related? Learn the kinship between yourself and a common
ancestor.

Jewish Record Indexing.

How best to use Steve Morse website.

Organizing your family records.

Interviewing relatives.

Creating a Family Tree.

Fee: $20.00 per person
$15:00 additional family member
Refreshments will be served.

Seating is limited make your reservation today:
Jewish Genealogical Society of Broward County, Inc
PO Box 17251
Plantation FL 33318

E-mail: jgsbroward@yahoo.com
Website: www.jgsbroward.org
Phone: 954.243.6063

David Corito, Director, Publicity
Tamarac, Florida


Medical Register Keys #general

ilyaz <ilyaz@...>
 

I just got in the mail a copy of a page >from the 1902 Polk's Medical
Register and Directory of the US and Canada. Next to the Name on page 1384
(New York City), there is an abbreviation (Ecl) and number 243, the key to
which could be found on pages 131 to 172. This number indicates the college
of graduation. Unfortunately, I have no access to the book and cannot look
it up myself.
Is there anyone with the access to the Medical Register of 1902? May you
please look up college #243? Also, what Ecl could stand for? Hope there is
some explanation in the book.
Thank you for your help.
--
Ilya Zeldes
Fort Myers, Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Medical Register Keys #general

ilyaz <ilyaz@...>
 

I just got in the mail a copy of a page >from the 1902 Polk's Medical
Register and Directory of the US and Canada. Next to the Name on page 1384
(New York City), there is an abbreviation (Ecl) and number 243, the key to
which could be found on pages 131 to 172. This number indicates the college
of graduation. Unfortunately, I have no access to the book and cannot look
it up myself.
Is there anyone with the access to the Medical Register of 1902? May you
please look up college #243? Also, what Ecl could stand for? Hope there is
some explanation in the book.
Thank you for your help.
--
Ilya Zeldes
Fort Myers, Florida


The Jews of the Burgenland at the conference in SLC #austria-czech

Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@...>
 

I would like to thank all who have expressed an interest in this
topic. The Hungarian SIG has now made available a room for Thursday,
July 19, >from 5:00 to 6:15 pm. The room will be used for Birds of a
Feather and Q & A sessions and we can use this opportunity for a get
together of all those who are intested in the above subject. I plan to
bring some of the material which I have assembled and perhaps some
form of presentation could be arranged.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech The Jews of the Burgenland at the conference in SLC #austria-czech

Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@...>
 

I would like to thank all who have expressed an interest in this
topic. The Hungarian SIG has now made available a room for Thursday,
July 19, >from 5:00 to 6:15 pm. The room will be used for Birds of a
Feather and Q & A sessions and we can use this opportunity for a get
together of all those who are intested in the above subject. I plan to
bring some of the material which I have assembled and perhaps some
form of presentation could be arranged.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Re: Name changes - Latin <> Hebrew letters #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

We welcome Mathilde Tagger [Jerusalem] to our SIG with a first posting which
clarifies the situation. Thank you. Mathilde will soon see that it covers much
more than Vienna! I also received a mail entitled "The versatile *vav* saying:
The Hebrew letter vav is used to transliterate the vowels 'u' and 'o' as well
as the consonant 'v'

I knew we would get into deep water with the Hebrew letters, linguistics and
spelling side of things - but the detailed analysis of this complex matter is
not really appropriate for our SIG.

Nevertheless, the gist of the matter is that we discovered this problem by
observation, analysis and studying the censuses of Prague 1792-1794 and
comparing just *one* name WOTTITZ as it appears in Prague [nearly always as
UTTITZ] and throughout Bohemia [always as WOTTITZ - which is the German name
for the town of Votice].

Individuals transcribing German or Hebrew letters into each other and
vice-versa are bound to differ. There were probably no hard and fast rules and
mistakes could also be made. The subtle variations we have seen have remained
with us to this day.

Hanus Grab asked me to say that the Jews of Prague wrote their own names
(including their German and Czech names) with Hebrew letters. The Emperor Josef
II Edict that only Latin letters should be used meant that the names had to be
converted back again >from Hebrew letters to the German [or Czech format] and
this naturally led to confusion. Hanus also tells me that most names and
documents [commercial, legal, family matters] were written in Hebrew letters
throughout Bohemia, until the famous Josef II Edict.

However, I have noted that in the 16 Kreis of Bohemia, all the 1793 census
records were signed by the local Verwalter of the Kreisamt [Czech or German -
but not Jewish]. I assume that in these places [and again I have no proof] the
lists of residents' names were in German and kept as such in the Kreisamt and
by the Schutzherren on whose estates and domains the Jews of Bohemia lived.

Another *U* name I noted was USCH {Prague 1792} which I found eventually as
AUSCH {Prague 1794}. I presume [perhaps optimistically] it is a toponymic for
Auscha in Bohemia [Ustek] and should thus be AUSCH. The name appears in the
Leitmeritzer Kreis of Bohemia 1793 as AUSCHNER.

Finally you are quite right to point out Mathilde, that issue of
transliteration >from one alphabet to another is very important for retrieving
information.

We shall all be much more aware of it in the future in old records >from Bohemia
and Moravia.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnote:

1. If you find the name UTITZ or UTITZ has spread to Co. Down, N. Ireland, do
not be surprised - see http://tinyurl.com/24quqg
where you will read: Village of Shrigley 2km NW of Killyleagh in Tullyveery
townland "the UTITZ family bought the {cotton mill site in the 1930s} and ran
United Chrome Tanners on the site for a while."

So this family must have been in the leather business in Bohemia pre-WW2.

2. This book is mentioned for academic reasons only:
The Utitz Legacy: A Personalized History of Central European Jewry by Gerda
Hoffer, Jerusalem, Posner and Sons 1988


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Name changes - Latin <> Hebrew letters #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

We welcome Mathilde Tagger [Jerusalem] to our SIG with a first posting which
clarifies the situation. Thank you. Mathilde will soon see that it covers much
more than Vienna! I also received a mail entitled "The versatile *vav* saying:
The Hebrew letter vav is used to transliterate the vowels 'u' and 'o' as well
as the consonant 'v'

I knew we would get into deep water with the Hebrew letters, linguistics and
spelling side of things - but the detailed analysis of this complex matter is
not really appropriate for our SIG.

Nevertheless, the gist of the matter is that we discovered this problem by
observation, analysis and studying the censuses of Prague 1792-1794 and
comparing just *one* name WOTTITZ as it appears in Prague [nearly always as
UTTITZ] and throughout Bohemia [always as WOTTITZ - which is the German name
for the town of Votice].

Individuals transcribing German or Hebrew letters into each other and
vice-versa are bound to differ. There were probably no hard and fast rules and
mistakes could also be made. The subtle variations we have seen have remained
with us to this day.

Hanus Grab asked me to say that the Jews of Prague wrote their own names
(including their German and Czech names) with Hebrew letters. The Emperor Josef
II Edict that only Latin letters should be used meant that the names had to be
converted back again >from Hebrew letters to the German [or Czech format] and
this naturally led to confusion. Hanus also tells me that most names and
documents [commercial, legal, family matters] were written in Hebrew letters
throughout Bohemia, until the famous Josef II Edict.

However, I have noted that in the 16 Kreis of Bohemia, all the 1793 census
records were signed by the local Verwalter of the Kreisamt [Czech or German -
but not Jewish]. I assume that in these places [and again I have no proof] the
lists of residents' names were in German and kept as such in the Kreisamt and
by the Schutzherren on whose estates and domains the Jews of Bohemia lived.

Another *U* name I noted was USCH {Prague 1792} which I found eventually as
AUSCH {Prague 1794}. I presume [perhaps optimistically] it is a toponymic for
Auscha in Bohemia [Ustek] and should thus be AUSCH. The name appears in the
Leitmeritzer Kreis of Bohemia 1793 as AUSCHNER.

Finally you are quite right to point out Mathilde, that issue of
transliteration >from one alphabet to another is very important for retrieving
information.

We shall all be much more aware of it in the future in old records >from Bohemia
and Moravia.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnote:

1. If you find the name UTITZ or UTITZ has spread to Co. Down, N. Ireland, do
not be surprised - see http://tinyurl.com/24quqg
where you will read: Village of Shrigley 2km NW of Killyleagh in Tullyveery
townland "the UTITZ family bought the {cotton mill site in the 1930s} and ran
United Chrome Tanners on the site for a while."

So this family must have been in the leather business in Bohemia pre-WW2.

2. This book is mentioned for academic reasons only:
The Utitz Legacy: A Personalized History of Central European Jewry by Gerda
Hoffer, Jerusalem, Posner and Sons 1988