Date   

Descendants of Rabbi Mordechai ZACKHEIM-Ruzanov and Pinsk mid 19th Cent. #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Looking for descendants of Rabbi Mordechai ZACKHEIM who served in
Ruzanov and Pinsk mid 19th cent.

I know there is "The Scattered Seeds" .

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Where is Gora Mokre? #general

Isabel Cymerman
 

Dear Genners,

I found this "place" listed for an individual in a marriage record in
Poland. What is it? Where is it? Most of the family lived in Przedborz,
Poland.

Kolonia Mojzeszow wsi/ Gora Mokre

Thank you All!

Isabel Cymerman
Southbury, CT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Descendants of Rabbi Mordechai ZACKHEIM-Ruzanov and Pinsk mid 19th Cent. #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Looking for descendants of Rabbi Mordechai ZACKHEIM who served in
Ruzanov and Pinsk mid 19th cent.

I know there is "The Scattered Seeds" .

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Where is Gora Mokre? #general

Isabel Cymerman
 

Dear Genners,

I found this "place" listed for an individual in a marriage record in
Poland. What is it? Where is it? Most of the family lived in Przedborz,
Poland.

Kolonia Mojzeszow wsi/ Gora Mokre

Thank you All!

Isabel Cymerman
Southbury, CT


Yizkor Book Project, January 2015 #general

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day was commemorated,
marking 70 years since Auschwitz was liberated of by the Allies. As we grow
further and further away >from the events of the Holocaust, so does our need
grow to save every scrap of memory of the communities and the people that
were taken >from us forever. The Yizkor Book Project mission of disseminating
information on the lost communities freely available has continued in the
past month involving the translation of the original Yiddish and Hebrew
books into English, but not only... You will certainly notice below that
some of the additions and updates this past month are in Hebrew and Polish.
On one hand, Yiddish sections of a number of books have been translated into
Hebrew, making this material accessible to those whose mother tongue is
Hebrew and are less comfortable with English and on the other hand,
translations have been prepared in Polish for the people of Poland who
quite often have little information on the events that took place in their
own country during World War Two and are frequently thirsty for such
information.

Other than that, it was a milestone month for the Yizkor Books in Print
Project with no less than three books becoming available during January.
Congratulations to the volunteers behind this remarkable achievement! The
books are:

- Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and Vicinity
- Dubossary Memorial Book
- The Book of Klobucko; In Memory of a Martyred Community

As time progresses, we are seeing more and more correspondence >from people
interested in obtaining hard copies of the Yizkor Book translations. Whilst
the translations continue to be freely available online in the Yizkor Book
Project, there is a growing interest in seeing the translations in a
concrete, "touchable" format on people's bookshelves. The only thing here is
that in order to reach the publishing stage, we obviously need to complete
the translation of the books beforehand. This generally requires quite a
deal of financial report and, as always, if you feel strongly about seeing
the books translated and are able to assist in any way, your donations would
be very much appreciated and perhaps, in the end, would mean you seeing the
book you supported sitting proudly on your bookshelf at home.

If you wish to learn more about the Yizkor Book in Print Project or how you
can support one of the Yizkor Book Translation projects, please see the
links at the end of this message.

Lastly, I would like to point out a new page which has been added to the YB
Project called Yizkor Book Insights at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybinsights.html . The first of the articles
which appear here have been kindly donated by Shalom Bronstein and Dr. Ida
Selavan Schwarcz and I'm sure you'll find their insights into Yizkor books
particularly enlightening. Hopefully, more of these type of articles will be
added with time.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Eisiskes, Lithuania (Ejszyszki, its History and Destruction)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Eisiskes/Eisiskes.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Memorial Book of Krzemieniec)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets4/kremenetsh.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Yizkor book of Luboml)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lyuboml1/Lyubomlh.html [Hebrew]

- Sosnove, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ludvipol1/ludvipolh.html [Hebrew]

Added 10 entries:

- Bogdan Voda, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar185.html

- Birsana, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar177.html

- Nanesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194.html

- Oncesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar193.html

- Poienile Izei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar192b.html

- Salistea de Sus, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar178.html

- Slatina, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194b.html

- Sieu, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar183.html

- Strimatra, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar181.html

- Valen, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar195.html

We have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Czenstochov; a new supplement to the book
"Czenstochover Yidn")
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa/Czestochowa.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Krosno, Poland (Krosno by the Wislok River)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krosno/Krosno.html

- Lithuania (Lite) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Nowy Zmigrod, Poland (Halbow near Nowy Zmigrod)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_zmigrod1/nowy_zmigrod1.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ryki, Poland (A Memorial to the Community of Ryki, Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ryki/rykp000.html [Polish]

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Skarzysko-Kamienna, Poland (The Yischor book in memoriam of the Jewish
community of Skarzysko and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Skarzysko/Skarzysko.html

- Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/pinkas_slovakia.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wlodawa, Poland (Yizkor book in memory of Vlodava and region)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wlodawa/wlodowa.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yizkor Book Project, January 2015 #general

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day was commemorated,
marking 70 years since Auschwitz was liberated of by the Allies. As we grow
further and further away >from the events of the Holocaust, so does our need
grow to save every scrap of memory of the communities and the people that
were taken >from us forever. The Yizkor Book Project mission of disseminating
information on the lost communities freely available has continued in the
past month involving the translation of the original Yiddish and Hebrew
books into English, but not only... You will certainly notice below that
some of the additions and updates this past month are in Hebrew and Polish.
On one hand, Yiddish sections of a number of books have been translated into
Hebrew, making this material accessible to those whose mother tongue is
Hebrew and are less comfortable with English and on the other hand,
translations have been prepared in Polish for the people of Poland who
quite often have little information on the events that took place in their
own country during World War Two and are frequently thirsty for such
information.

Other than that, it was a milestone month for the Yizkor Books in Print
Project with no less than three books becoming available during January.
Congratulations to the volunteers behind this remarkable achievement! The
books are:

- Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and Vicinity
- Dubossary Memorial Book
- The Book of Klobucko; In Memory of a Martyred Community

As time progresses, we are seeing more and more correspondence >from people
interested in obtaining hard copies of the Yizkor Book translations. Whilst
the translations continue to be freely available online in the Yizkor Book
Project, there is a growing interest in seeing the translations in a
concrete, "touchable" format on people's bookshelves. The only thing here is
that in order to reach the publishing stage, we obviously need to complete
the translation of the books beforehand. This generally requires quite a
deal of financial report and, as always, if you feel strongly about seeing
the books translated and are able to assist in any way, your donations would
be very much appreciated and perhaps, in the end, would mean you seeing the
book you supported sitting proudly on your bookshelf at home.

If you wish to learn more about the Yizkor Book in Print Project or how you
can support one of the Yizkor Book Translation projects, please see the
links at the end of this message.

Lastly, I would like to point out a new page which has been added to the YB
Project called Yizkor Book Insights at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybinsights.html . The first of the articles
which appear here have been kindly donated by Shalom Bronstein and Dr. Ida
Selavan Schwarcz and I'm sure you'll find their insights into Yizkor books
particularly enlightening. Hopefully, more of these type of articles will be
added with time.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Eisiskes, Lithuania (Ejszyszki, its History and Destruction)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Eisiskes/Eisiskes.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Memorial Book of Krzemieniec)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets4/kremenetsh.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Yizkor book of Luboml)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lyuboml1/Lyubomlh.html [Hebrew]

- Sosnove, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ludvipol1/ludvipolh.html [Hebrew]

Added 10 entries:

- Bogdan Voda, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar185.html

- Birsana, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar177.html

- Nanesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194.html

- Oncesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar193.html

- Poienile Izei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar192b.html

- Salistea de Sus, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar178.html

- Slatina, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194b.html

- Sieu, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar183.html

- Strimatra, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar181.html

- Valen, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar195.html

We have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Czenstochov; a new supplement to the book
"Czenstochover Yidn")
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa/Czestochowa.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Krosno, Poland (Krosno by the Wislok River)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krosno/Krosno.html

- Lithuania (Lite) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Nowy Zmigrod, Poland (Halbow near Nowy Zmigrod)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_zmigrod1/nowy_zmigrod1.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ryki, Poland (A Memorial to the Community of Ryki, Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ryki/rykp000.html [Polish]

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Skarzysko-Kamienna, Poland (The Yischor book in memoriam of the Jewish
community of Skarzysko and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Skarzysko/Skarzysko.html

- Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/pinkas_slovakia.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wlodawa, Poland (Yizkor book in memory of Vlodava and region)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wlodawa/wlodowa.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Descendants of Sam and Lillian Katz New York #general

Debbie Rose
 

My grandmother, Eva (Kweitzer) Kushner, came >from Vinnitsa to Canada via
Romania between 1920 and 1924. Her brother, Sam, emigrated to New York
and changed his name >from KWEITZER to KATZ. I found Sam with his
family in New York in the 1930, and 1940 censuses (and Sam on his own
in 1920) and I have records >from the US government regarding Sam's work
history. Somewhere between 1948 and 1950, Sam separated >from Lillian
and may have been estranged >from his family. In any case, I have no
knowledge of what happened to his three children. Sam died in 1958.

Sam's wife was Lillian Freewald and their children were Florence,
Solomon and Elsie. I would love to be able to find and connect with any
descendants. Please contact me privately if you have any information.

Many thanks

Debbie Rose
Toronto
Searching; SIEGEL (and variations), LEVIN, WITKIN, FRIEDKIN, LIEBERMAN,
OZERSKY, BASS, KUSHNIRSKIY, KATZ, KOROTKIN, KWECHER/ KWEITZER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Descendants of Sam and Lillian Katz New York #general

Debbie Rose
 

My grandmother, Eva (Kweitzer) Kushner, came >from Vinnitsa to Canada via
Romania between 1920 and 1924. Her brother, Sam, emigrated to New York
and changed his name >from KWEITZER to KATZ. I found Sam with his
family in New York in the 1930, and 1940 censuses (and Sam on his own
in 1920) and I have records >from the US government regarding Sam's work
history. Somewhere between 1948 and 1950, Sam separated >from Lillian
and may have been estranged >from his family. In any case, I have no
knowledge of what happened to his three children. Sam died in 1958.

Sam's wife was Lillian Freewald and their children were Florence,
Solomon and Elsie. I would love to be able to find and connect with any
descendants. Please contact me privately if you have any information.

Many thanks

Debbie Rose
Toronto
Searching; SIEGEL (and variations), LEVIN, WITKIN, FRIEDKIN, LIEBERMAN,
OZERSKY, BASS, KUSHNIRSKIY, KATZ, KOROTKIN, KWECHER/ KWEITZER


Re: Death at Birth #general

A. E. Jordan
 

-----Original Message-----
From: emeraldeyesm@msn.com

a male child who
was either stillborn or died during or shortly after birthing (about
1918). I don't know if the child was named.
Would this kind of death have been recorded?? If so, where?


These are two different circumstances for the purpose of the records.

New York City did start tracking still births as a separate part of the
death index. I am not sure if they date all the way back to 1918 and it
is important to know they were recorded as a separate section of the death index.
I am not sure if the Italian Gen project took this into account or if the
Morse one step permits a search for still birth. They could be checked on
the microfilms of the death index looking at the end of the section to
see specifically the still births.

However if the child was alive at birth even if the child only lived for
hours a death certificate was issued. Those would be in the death index.
In this case I was able to find using the Morse tool deaths of as little as 1
hour and going back to 1869.

Since the child might not have been named the death certificate may well
show the first name as "Baby" or "Male" or "Female". You might want to use
those search parameters or you can find in both the birth year and death year
as the same to bring out a search result for this type of infant death.

The certificates themselves are the same as the ones issued for adults
and are in the New York records the same way as an adult death certificates.

As for burial the death certificate should answer that. Children were often
buried in their own section of society plots or if the family did not
have the means it could have been a charity burial at a charity plot.
Even if the child got a grave at the society plot the stones were often smaller
and made of lesser materials so that they do not survive the years the same
way as adult stones. If you know the society plot it is worth asking the
cemetery office to check the map to see if there was a separate space for
the children's graves.

In the case of this particular questioner I did a search on the death index
for a male child born 1918 with the family name SCHULTZ. No more
parameters than that. And low and behold there is a death certificate for a
male baby SCHULTZ born in 1918 who is listed as living 1 day in the Bronx.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Death at Birth #general

A. E. Jordan
 

-----Original Message-----
From: emeraldeyesm@msn.com

a male child who
was either stillborn or died during or shortly after birthing (about
1918). I don't know if the child was named.
Would this kind of death have been recorded?? If so, where?


These are two different circumstances for the purpose of the records.

New York City did start tracking still births as a separate part of the
death index. I am not sure if they date all the way back to 1918 and it
is important to know they were recorded as a separate section of the death index.
I am not sure if the Italian Gen project took this into account or if the
Morse one step permits a search for still birth. They could be checked on
the microfilms of the death index looking at the end of the section to
see specifically the still births.

However if the child was alive at birth even if the child only lived for
hours a death certificate was issued. Those would be in the death index.
In this case I was able to find using the Morse tool deaths of as little as 1
hour and going back to 1869.

Since the child might not have been named the death certificate may well
show the first name as "Baby" or "Male" or "Female". You might want to use
those search parameters or you can find in both the birth year and death year
as the same to bring out a search result for this type of infant death.

The certificates themselves are the same as the ones issued for adults
and are in the New York records the same way as an adult death certificates.

As for burial the death certificate should answer that. Children were often
buried in their own section of society plots or if the family did not
have the means it could have been a charity burial at a charity plot.
Even if the child got a grave at the society plot the stones were often smaller
and made of lesser materials so that they do not survive the years the same
way as adult stones. If you know the society plot it is worth asking the
cemetery office to check the map to see if there was a separate space for
the children's graves.

In the case of this particular questioner I did a search on the death index
for a male child born 1918 with the family name SCHULTZ. No more
parameters than that. And low and behold there is a death certificate for a
male baby SCHULTZ born in 1918 who is listed as living 1 day in the Bronx.

Allan Jordan


Re: Given Name Jacques (derived from Jacob) and Key Austro-Hungarian Dates for Jewish Integration Including Germanization of Jewish Surnames and Given Names for Slovakian Jews #germany

Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer
 

Hi, James,

Keep in mind also that borders in Europe were flexible. For example,
at least part of Bavaria was under control of the French around the
time that your Jacques was born. My husband's great-great-grandmother
born in 1819 in Fuerth was Jeanette Loewenstein, and two of her
daughters, Babette and Marie Anna, also had French names. French names
may also have been fashionable in areas where the French weren't in
control. Peace Christine

Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer, Hyde Park, christine3cats@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Re: Given Name Jacques (derived from Jacob) and Key Austro-Hungarian Dates for Jewish Integration Including Germanization of Jewish Surnames and Given Names for Slovakian Jews #germany

Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer
 

Hi, James,

Keep in mind also that borders in Europe were flexible. For example,
at least part of Bavaria was under control of the French around the
time that your Jacques was born. My husband's great-great-grandmother
born in 1819 in Fuerth was Jeanette Loewenstein, and two of her
daughters, Babette and Marie Anna, also had French names. French names
may also have been fashionable in areas where the French weren't in
control. Peace Christine

Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer, Hyde Park, christine3cats@gmail.com


Information on Kishinev from the Bessarabia SIG website #bessarabia

Alan Levitt
 

The information below may be especially useful to new members of our
SIG. It was compiled by Yefim Kogan, our Bessarabia SIG Coordinator.
It does not include information about Kishinev that many be found in
other sections our our website such as Family Stories, Travel Stories,
Music, Theater, etc.

Some of this information was obtained because of your donations, but
there is a substantial amount of additional material that still needs to be
translated, graves photographed, etc. To many of us (and our families)
some of this information is like bits of gold dust. That's why I encourage
you to donate whatever you can to our SIG. You can do that at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_catC


1. Kishinev on a map of 1846 - 1863
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/maps/NewMaps/29-7%20Kishinev%20Orgeev%20Dubossary%20Kreulyany.png

2. Kishinev on a map on German map >from 1930
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/maps/Kiszinyew_(ethnic).jpg

3. Topographical map (1:25000) of Kishinev and surround areas, German, 1917
http://www.wwii-photos-maps.com/bessarabianmaps/index.html

4. Website with maps, photos of Center of Kishinev, in Romanian 2003-2006)
http://www.monument.sit.md/

5. NYPL Digital Gallery, Kishinev, maps, photos, cards
http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchresult.cfm?parent_id(8271&word=ldova&s=notword=====lWord=Field=Scope=Level=Label=num
&img%20s

6. Old Kishinev, history, photos, cemeteries, etc. great site!
http://oldchisinau.com/

7. >from JewishGen conference, Boston, 2013, Kishinev ? My Native Town:
History of Jews and Genealogy, by Yefim Kogan;
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/conferences/2013/Kishinev.pdf

8. Film Seven Songs about 100 Years created by Arnold Brodichansky in
2003, It is about Bessarabia, Kishinev, its history, pogroms,
Zionists, Yiddish culture, fascists in Kishinev, liberation by
Soviets, emigration >from Bessarabia. (film is at the Bessarabia SIG
website / Jewish History section -
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/JewishHistory.html

9. The Jews of Moldova, by Dr. Clara Jignea, Professor Yakov Kopansky
and Semion Shoikhet. The Miriam Weiner Routes to Roots Foundation.
http://www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/UK-arch-Ch10Kopansky.pdf

10. Kishinev at YIVO http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Kishinev

11. >from Kishineff to Bialystok. A table of pogroms >from 1903 to 1906
- Museum of Family History.
http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/ajc-yb-v08-pogroms.htm

12. Pogroms in Bessarabia, including Kishinev,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/JewishHistory.html

13. The Voice of America on Kishineff. Edited by Cyrus Adler,
Philadelphia, 1904, Internet Archive
http://www.archive.org/stream/voiceamericaonk00adlegoog#page/n6/mode/1up

14. Kishinev Yizkor Book. Yehudei Kishinev, part of it translated, see at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

15. Section >from Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
2, all translated
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00400.html

16. Graduation records >from Kishinev Gymnasium 1872-1882:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/projects/19KishinevGymnazium/JewsGraduatesKishinev.pdf

17. 1940 Kishinev Business directory, it is in JewishGen already, and
also at http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/Databases.html

18. 1924-25 Business directory, includes large set of business for
Kishinev, at same page http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/Databases.html

19. Today Kishinev Jewish life:
Jewish Cultural Center KEDEM Kishinev, Moldova; Jewish Public Library
Jewish Cultural Center KEDEM Kishinev, Moldova ; Museum and Research &
Educational Center Jewish Cultural Center KEDEM
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/projects/34NationalArchiveMoldova/KEDEM.pdf

20. Bessarabia Vital records - a majority of it is on Kishinev

21. Bessarabia Revision Lists - some sets have already been
translated, and many are going to be done in several years.

22. There are a number of places with LDS Microfilms, especially the
12 microfilms received after the conference in Salt Lake City. There
are a lot of Kishinev records among them. See at the 33 Family Search
(LDS) project at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/ResearchProjects.html.

23. Kishinev- Doyna Cemetery ? project is 90% completed and about
10,000 records downloaded to JOWBR. See Cemetery section
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/Cemetery.html

24. Kishinev Main Jewish Cemetery - agreement is signed with the
publisher of the Burial registry for the cemetery, and an individual who
will start this year to photograph the tombstones has been identified.
There are about 18,000 standing.

+ More coming.

Alan Levitt
Discussion Group Moderator
Bessarabia SIG


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Information on Kishinev from the Bessarabia SIG website #bessarabia

Alan Levitt
 

The information below may be especially useful to new members of our
SIG. It was compiled by Yefim Kogan, our Bessarabia SIG Coordinator.
It does not include information about Kishinev that many be found in
other sections our our website such as Family Stories, Travel Stories,
Music, Theater, etc.

Some of this information was obtained because of your donations, but
there is a substantial amount of additional material that still needs to be
translated, graves photographed, etc. To many of us (and our families)
some of this information is like bits of gold dust. That's why I encourage
you to donate whatever you can to our SIG. You can do that at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_catC


1. Kishinev on a map of 1846 - 1863
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/maps/NewMaps/29-7%20Kishinev%20Orgeev%20Dubossary%20Kreulyany.png

2. Kishinev on a map on German map >from 1930
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/maps/Kiszinyew_(ethnic).jpg

3. Topographical map (1:25000) of Kishinev and surround areas, German, 1917
http://www.wwii-photos-maps.com/bessarabianmaps/index.html

4. Website with maps, photos of Center of Kishinev, in Romanian 2003-2006)
http://www.monument.sit.md/

5. NYPL Digital Gallery, Kishinev, maps, photos, cards
http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchresult.cfm?parent_id(8271&word=ldova&s=notword=====lWord=Field=Scope=Level=Label=num
&img%20s

6. Old Kishinev, history, photos, cemeteries, etc. great site!
http://oldchisinau.com/

7. >from JewishGen conference, Boston, 2013, Kishinev ? My Native Town:
History of Jews and Genealogy, by Yefim Kogan;
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/conferences/2013/Kishinev.pdf

8. Film Seven Songs about 100 Years created by Arnold Brodichansky in
2003, It is about Bessarabia, Kishinev, its history, pogroms,
Zionists, Yiddish culture, fascists in Kishinev, liberation by
Soviets, emigration >from Bessarabia. (film is at the Bessarabia SIG
website / Jewish History section -
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/JewishHistory.html

9. The Jews of Moldova, by Dr. Clara Jignea, Professor Yakov Kopansky
and Semion Shoikhet. The Miriam Weiner Routes to Roots Foundation.
http://www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/UK-arch-Ch10Kopansky.pdf

10. Kishinev at YIVO http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Kishinev

11. >from Kishineff to Bialystok. A table of pogroms >from 1903 to 1906
- Museum of Family History.
http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/ajc-yb-v08-pogroms.htm

12. Pogroms in Bessarabia, including Kishinev,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/JewishHistory.html

13. The Voice of America on Kishineff. Edited by Cyrus Adler,
Philadelphia, 1904, Internet Archive
http://www.archive.org/stream/voiceamericaonk00adlegoog#page/n6/mode/1up

14. Kishinev Yizkor Book. Yehudei Kishinev, part of it translated, see at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

15. Section >from Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
2, all translated
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00400.html

16. Graduation records >from Kishinev Gymnasium 1872-1882:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/projects/19KishinevGymnazium/JewsGraduatesKishinev.pdf

17. 1940 Kishinev Business directory, it is in JewishGen already, and
also at http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/Databases.html

18. 1924-25 Business directory, includes large set of business for
Kishinev, at same page http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/Databases.html

19. Today Kishinev Jewish life:
Jewish Cultural Center KEDEM Kishinev, Moldova; Jewish Public Library
Jewish Cultural Center KEDEM Kishinev, Moldova ; Museum and Research &
Educational Center Jewish Cultural Center KEDEM
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/projects/34NationalArchiveMoldova/KEDEM.pdf

20. Bessarabia Vital records - a majority of it is on Kishinev

21. Bessarabia Revision Lists - some sets have already been
translated, and many are going to be done in several years.

22. There are a number of places with LDS Microfilms, especially the
12 microfilms received after the conference in Salt Lake City. There
are a lot of Kishinev records among them. See at the 33 Family Search
(LDS) project at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/ResearchProjects.html.

23. Kishinev- Doyna Cemetery ? project is 90% completed and about
10,000 records downloaded to JOWBR. See Cemetery section
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/Cemetery.html

24. Kishinev Main Jewish Cemetery - agreement is signed with the
publisher of the Burial registry for the cemetery, and an individual who
will start this year to photograph the tombstones has been identified.
There are about 18,000 standing.

+ More coming.

Alan Levitt
Discussion Group Moderator
Bessarabia SIG


(Portugal) Portuguese Cabinet Approves Law Offering Dual Citizenship to Descendants of Sephardic Jews Affected by the Inquisition #sephardic

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On Thursday, January 29, 2015, the Portuguese Cabinet approved a law
offering dual citizenship to descendants of Sephardic Jews who were victims
of the Inquisition over 500 years ago. The Portuguese Inquisition began
Easter 1506 The Inquisition burned Jews at the stake, expelling them or
forcing them to convert to Christianity. Some Jews maintained their Judaism
in secret. The Inquisition's descendants must demonstrate a "traditional"
connection to Portuguese Sephardic Jews through "family names, family
language and direct or collateral ancestry".

The effective date of the law has not yet been announced. Spain is also
considering similar legislation. Both countries say they are doing this to
redress a historic wrong. At one time there were tens of thousands of Jews
in Portugal-today less than 1,000. Applicants will have to be vetted by the
government and Portuguese Jewish organizations. Applicants will have to
demonstrate knowledge about Portugal. As Portugal is a member country of
the European Union, those who achieve Portuguese dual citizenship also may
"benefit " >from being a n European Union citizen.

To read more about this see: http://yhoo.it/1yI05Wx
Original url:
http://news.yahoo.com/portugal-approves-sephardic-jew-citizenship-plan-133531088.html

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, AP for alerting us to this new law.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim (Portugal) Portuguese Cabinet Approves Law Offering Dual Citizenship to Descendants of Sephardic Jews Affected by the Inquisition #sephardic

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On Thursday, January 29, 2015, the Portuguese Cabinet approved a law
offering dual citizenship to descendants of Sephardic Jews who were victims
of the Inquisition over 500 years ago. The Portuguese Inquisition began
Easter 1506 The Inquisition burned Jews at the stake, expelling them or
forcing them to convert to Christianity. Some Jews maintained their Judaism
in secret. The Inquisition's descendants must demonstrate a "traditional"
connection to Portuguese Sephardic Jews through "family names, family
language and direct or collateral ancestry".

The effective date of the law has not yet been announced. Spain is also
considering similar legislation. Both countries say they are doing this to
redress a historic wrong. At one time there were tens of thousands of Jews
in Portugal-today less than 1,000. Applicants will have to be vetted by the
government and Portuguese Jewish organizations. Applicants will have to
demonstrate knowledge about Portugal. As Portugal is a member country of
the European Union, those who achieve Portuguese dual citizenship also may
"benefit " >from being a n European Union citizen.

To read more about this see: http://yhoo.it/1yI05Wx
Original url:
http://news.yahoo.com/portugal-approves-sephardic-jew-citizenship-plan-133531088.html

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, AP for alerting us to this new law.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JGSCT February 2015 Program #general

gkr
 

SLIFKA CENTER EXHIBIT TOUR

Please join the Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut on at 1:30
pm on Sunday, February 15, 2015 at the Slifka Center in New Haven, CT
as Patricia Kliendiest leads us through her exhibit No One Remembers
Alone: MEMORY, MIGRATION, AND THE MAKING OF AN AMERICAN FAMILY.

The exhibit recreates the poignant story of how one Jewish family
escaped Czarist Russia and re-established itself in America, which was
like solving a mystery by unpacking a suitcase filled with postcards,
photographs, and other ephemera.

The Slifka Center is located at 80 Wall Street, New Haven, CT.
Parking is located behind the building.

Free and open to the public. For additional information, please visit
www.jgsct.org.

Gail Kalison Reynolds, Publicity Chair, JGSCT
Higganum, CT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSCT February 2015 Program #general

gkr
 

SLIFKA CENTER EXHIBIT TOUR

Please join the Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut on at 1:30
pm on Sunday, February 15, 2015 at the Slifka Center in New Haven, CT
as Patricia Kliendiest leads us through her exhibit No One Remembers
Alone: MEMORY, MIGRATION, AND THE MAKING OF AN AMERICAN FAMILY.

The exhibit recreates the poignant story of how one Jewish family
escaped Czarist Russia and re-established itself in America, which was
like solving a mystery by unpacking a suitcase filled with postcards,
photographs, and other ephemera.

The Slifka Center is located at 80 Wall Street, New Haven, CT.
Parking is located behind the building.

Free and open to the public. For additional information, please visit
www.jgsct.org.

Gail Kalison Reynolds, Publicity Chair, JGSCT
Higganum, CT


(Portugal) Portuguese Cabinet Approves Law Offering Dual Citizenship to Descendants of Sephardic Jews Affected by the Inquisition #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On Thursday, January 29, 2015, the Portuguese Cabinet approved a law
offering dual citizenship to descendants of Sephardic Jews who were victims
of the Inquisition over 500 years ago. The Portuguese Inquisition began
Easter 1506 The Inquisition burned Jews at the stake, expelling them or
forcing them to convert to Christianity. Some Jews maintained their Judaism
in secret. The Inquisition's descendants must demonstrate a "traditional"
connection to Portuguese Sephardic Jews through "family names, family
language and direct or collateral ancestry".

The effective date of the law has not yet been announced. Spain is also
considering similar legislation. Both countries say they are doing this to
redress a historic wrong. At one time there were tens of thousands of Jews
in Portugal-today less than 1,000. Applicants will have to be vetted by the
government and Portuguese Jewish organizations. Applicants will have to
demonstrate knowledge about Portugal. As Portugal is a member country of
the European Union, those who achieve Portuguese dual citizenship also may
"benefit " >from being an European Union citizen.

To read more about this see: http://yhoo.it/1yI05Wx
Original url:
http://news.yahoo.com/portugal-approves-sephardic-jew-citizenship-plan-13353
1088.html

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, AP for alerting us to this new law.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Portugal) Portuguese Cabinet Approves Law Offering Dual Citizenship to Descendants of Sephardic Jews Affected by the Inquisition #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On Thursday, January 29, 2015, the Portuguese Cabinet approved a law
offering dual citizenship to descendants of Sephardic Jews who were victims
of the Inquisition over 500 years ago. The Portuguese Inquisition began
Easter 1506 The Inquisition burned Jews at the stake, expelling them or
forcing them to convert to Christianity. Some Jews maintained their Judaism
in secret. The Inquisition's descendants must demonstrate a "traditional"
connection to Portuguese Sephardic Jews through "family names, family
language and direct or collateral ancestry".

The effective date of the law has not yet been announced. Spain is also
considering similar legislation. Both countries say they are doing this to
redress a historic wrong. At one time there were tens of thousands of Jews
in Portugal-today less than 1,000. Applicants will have to be vetted by the
government and Portuguese Jewish organizations. Applicants will have to
demonstrate knowledge about Portugal. As Portugal is a member country of
the European Union, those who achieve Portuguese dual citizenship also may
"benefit " >from being an European Union citizen.

To read more about this see: http://yhoo.it/1yI05Wx
Original url:
http://news.yahoo.com/portugal-approves-sephardic-jew-citizenship-plan-13353
1088.html

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, AP for alerting us to this new law.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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