Date   

Yizkor Book Project update for September 2007 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Joyce Field
 

During September 2007 the Yizkor Book Project added seven new books
and 14 updates. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
which is the alphabetical listing of all our online translations,
organized by Regions, Communities,
Miscellaneous, and Other Languages. Also check the section on Regions
for the tables of contents of Pinkas HaKehillot volumes to see if
there are articles on your ancestral towns that you could have
translated and check the Yizkor Book Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html to see if there are
yizkor books on your town.

In addition, we are pleased to note that four books were completed
during this month:
Dzialoszyce: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html
Novogrudok: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Novogrudok/Novogrudok.html
Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
Suchowola: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Congratulations to the project coordinators of these books for a job well done.

New books:

-Chelm, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm1/chelm1.html
-Chrzanow, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Chrzanow1/Chrzanow1.html
-David Gorodok, Belarus
-Dubno, Ukraine
-Dynow, Poland
-Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Volume 4: 2 parts, Northwest Germany
-Suchowola, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Updates:

-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Lenin, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland

As always, we are grateful to our donors of translations, without
whose work the Yizkor Book Project would not have been around for a
decade. In October 1997 the first translation went online; there are
now 474 books and 831 entries online. To our volunteers--Lance
Ackerfeld, Osnat Ramaty, and Max Heffler--my congratulations and
heartfelt thanks on your dedication to the Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Project update for September 2007 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

During September 2007 the Yizkor Book Project added seven new books
and 14 updates. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
which is the alphabetical listing of all our online translations,
organized by Regions, Communities,
Miscellaneous, and Other Languages. Also check the section on Regions
for the tables of contents of Pinkas HaKehillot volumes to see if
there are articles on your ancestral towns that you could have
translated and check the Yizkor Book Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html to see if there are
yizkor books on your town.

In addition, we are pleased to note that four books were completed
during this month:
Dzialoszyce: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html
Novogrudok: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Novogrudok/Novogrudok.html
Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
Suchowola: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Congratulations to the project coordinators of these books for a job well done.

New books:

-Chelm, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm1/chelm1.html
-Chrzanow, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Chrzanow1/Chrzanow1.html
-David Gorodok, Belarus
-Dubno, Ukraine
-Dynow, Poland
-Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Volume 4: 2 parts, Northwest Germany
-Suchowola, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Updates:

-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Lenin, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland

As always, we are grateful to our donors of translations, without
whose work the Yizkor Book Project would not have been around for a
decade. In October 1997 the first translation went online; there are
now 474 books and 831 entries online. To our volunteers--Lance
Ackerfeld, Osnat Ramaty, and Max Heffler--my congratulations and
heartfelt thanks on your dedication to the Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Project update for September 2007 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

During September 2007 the Yizkor Book Project added seven new books
and 14 updates. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
which is the alphabetical listing of all our online translations,
organized by Regions, Communities,
Miscellaneous, and Other Languages. Also check the section on Regions
for the tables of contents of Pinkas HaKehillot volumes to see if
there are articles on your ancestral towns that you could have
translated and check the Yizkor Book Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html to see if there are
yizkor books on your town.

In addition, we are pleased to note that four books were completed
during this month:
Dzialoszyce: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html
Novogrudok: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Novogrudok/Novogrudok.html
Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
Suchowola: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Congratulations to the project coordinators of these books for a job well done.

New books:

-Chelm, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm1/chelm1.html
-Chrzanow, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Chrzanow1/Chrzanow1.html
-David Gorodok, Belarus
-Dubno, Ukraine
-Dynow, Poland
-Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Volume 4: 2 parts, Northwest Germany
-Suchowola, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Updates:

-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Lenin, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland

As always, we are grateful to our donors of translations, without
whose work the Yizkor Book Project would not have been around for a
decade. In October 1997 the first translation went online; there are
now 474 books and 831 entries online. To our volunteers--Lance
Ackerfeld, Osnat Ramaty, and Max Heffler--my congratulations and
heartfelt thanks on your dedication to the Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Yizkor Book Project update for September 2007 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Joyce Field
 

During September 2007 the Yizkor Book Project added seven new books
and 14 updates. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
which is the alphabetical listing of all our online translations,
organized by Regions, Communities,
Miscellaneous, and Other Languages. Also check the section on Regions
for the tables of contents of Pinkas HaKehillot volumes to see if
there are articles on your ancestral towns that you could have
translated and check the Yizkor Book Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html to see if there are
yizkor books on your town.

In addition, we are pleased to note that four books were completed
during this month:
Dzialoszyce: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html
Novogrudok: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Novogrudok/Novogrudok.html
Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
Suchowola: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Congratulations to the project coordinators of these books for a job well done.

New books:

-Chelm, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm1/chelm1.html
-Chrzanow, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Chrzanow1/Chrzanow1.html
-David Gorodok, Belarus
-Dubno, Ukraine
-Dynow, Poland
-Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Volume 4: 2 parts, Northwest Germany
-Suchowola, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Updates:

-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Lenin, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland

As always, we are grateful to our donors of translations, without
whose work the Yizkor Book Project would not have been around for a
decade. In October 1997 the first translation went online; there are
now 474 books and 831 entries online. To our volunteers--Lance
Ackerfeld, Osnat Ramaty, and Max Heffler--my congratulations and
heartfelt thanks on your dedication to the Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Latvia SIG #Latvia Yizkor Book Project update for September 2007 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

During September 2007 the Yizkor Book Project added seven new books
and 14 updates. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
which is the alphabetical listing of all our online translations,
organized by Regions, Communities,
Miscellaneous, and Other Languages. Also check the section on Regions
for the tables of contents of Pinkas HaKehillot volumes to see if
there are articles on your ancestral towns that you could have
translated and check the Yizkor Book Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html to see if there are
yizkor books on your town.

In addition, we are pleased to note that four books were completed
during this month:
Dzialoszyce: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html
Novogrudok: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Novogrudok/Novogrudok.html
Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
Suchowola: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Congratulations to the project coordinators of these books for a job well done.

New books:

-Chelm, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm1/chelm1.html
-Chrzanow, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Chrzanow1/Chrzanow1.html
-David Gorodok, Belarus
-Dubno, Ukraine
-Dynow, Poland
-Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Volume 4: 2 parts, Northwest Germany
-Suchowola, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Updates:

-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Lenin, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland

As always, we are grateful to our donors of translations, without
whose work the Yizkor Book Project would not have been around for a
decade. In October 1997 the first translation went online; there are
now 474 books and 831 entries online. To our volunteers--Lance
Ackerfeld, Osnat Ramaty, and Max Heffler--my congratulations and
heartfelt thanks on your dedication to the Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Yizkor Book Project update for September 2007 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

During September 2007 the Yizkor Book Project added seven new books
and 14 updates. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
which is the alphabetical listing of all our online translations,
organized by Regions, Communities,
Miscellaneous, and Other Languages. Also check the section on Regions
for the tables of contents of Pinkas HaKehillot volumes to see if
there are articles on your ancestral towns that you could have
translated and check the Yizkor Book Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html to see if there are
yizkor books on your town.

In addition, we are pleased to note that four books were completed
during this month:
Dzialoszyce: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html
Novogrudok: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Novogrudok/Novogrudok.html
Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
Suchowola: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Congratulations to the project coordinators of these books for a job well done.

New books:

-Chelm, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm1/chelm1.html
-Chrzanow, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Chrzanow1/Chrzanow1.html
-David Gorodok, Belarus
-Dubno, Ukraine
-Dynow, Poland
-Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Volume 4: 2 parts, Northwest Germany
-Suchowola, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Updates:

-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Lenin, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland

As always, we are grateful to our donors of translations, without
whose work the Yizkor Book Project would not have been around for a
decade. In October 1997 the first translation went online; there are
now 474 books and 831 entries online. To our volunteers--Lance
Ackerfeld, Osnat Ramaty, and Max Heffler--my congratulations and
heartfelt thanks on your dedication to the Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Re: Lithuania to France-1870's to 1890's #general

Lifshitz-Krams Anne
 

Just in addition to these as always clear informations >from Basile:

1. >from at least 1893 and until at least WW1, any froreigner settling in a
place was supposed to register with the town hall: I read that this
obligation was not systematically checked everywhere. And anyway these
registrations have not been
kept.

== The registrations are frequently kept in the naturalization file when it
exist, but if the wife and husband did not enter together you will only find
the registration of the husband (he is the one who makes the request)

2. It seems that the most common point entry, by far, was Paris.
=== Most of them came to Paris, but where they entered in France depends on
what was their way to France. By earth, they probably came thru Poland and
Germany. Then they entered via Lorraine or Alsace. Or maybe after Germany
they continued thru Belgium before entering to France by north. Most
probably they stayed some times in all these places and you may have
informations about this travel in the naturalization file, but only for the
husband or for the couple if they were married at that time.

3. Here the answer is sure: wife had to apply for naturalization in France
even though the husband was applying. She just had to write on her husband's
letter "I associate to my husband's request"
== always the same answer: the husband is the one who answers the questions
and there is only one form for all the family. That means that, at least
before 1900, to find it you will have to look at the name of the husband.
from 1889 on, the form is very complete and you will find good informations
about the wife and children, but 1870-1889 files are not always so good and
sometimes you will just find an indication of her name, (maybe the name of
her parents and her place of birth) and the number of children but not
always their names. Before 1870, you will frequently just find "he is
married and with one child" and sometimes you will find the name of the wife
in the documents accompaniing the request.

Until 1927 the wife was supposed to follow her husband. That means that a
french girl who married a foreiner loosed her french nationality. But the
situation was not so clear about what happened when the husband asked for
naturalization. And untill 1889-1900 most of them did not ask to join the
naturalization, just because they ignored that they were no more french, or
that the naturalization was not applied to them, or maybe because the
nationality did not change anything for them. So I have seen very pathetic
requests in 1914-18 where widows who were born in France >from parents and
grand parents born in France were on to be put in camps as german while
their sons where making war in the French army, just because they ignored
they had lost nationality when married and should have asked for
reintegration when their husband was naturalized.

Anne Lifshitz-Krams
CGJ - Paris


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Lithuania to France-1870's to 1890's #general

Lifshitz-Krams Anne
 

Just in addition to these as always clear informations >from Basile:

1. >from at least 1893 and until at least WW1, any froreigner settling in a
place was supposed to register with the town hall: I read that this
obligation was not systematically checked everywhere. And anyway these
registrations have not been
kept.

== The registrations are frequently kept in the naturalization file when it
exist, but if the wife and husband did not enter together you will only find
the registration of the husband (he is the one who makes the request)

2. It seems that the most common point entry, by far, was Paris.
=== Most of them came to Paris, but where they entered in France depends on
what was their way to France. By earth, they probably came thru Poland and
Germany. Then they entered via Lorraine or Alsace. Or maybe after Germany
they continued thru Belgium before entering to France by north. Most
probably they stayed some times in all these places and you may have
informations about this travel in the naturalization file, but only for the
husband or for the couple if they were married at that time.

3. Here the answer is sure: wife had to apply for naturalization in France
even though the husband was applying. She just had to write on her husband's
letter "I associate to my husband's request"
== always the same answer: the husband is the one who answers the questions
and there is only one form for all the family. That means that, at least
before 1900, to find it you will have to look at the name of the husband.
from 1889 on, the form is very complete and you will find good informations
about the wife and children, but 1870-1889 files are not always so good and
sometimes you will just find an indication of her name, (maybe the name of
her parents and her place of birth) and the number of children but not
always their names. Before 1870, you will frequently just find "he is
married and with one child" and sometimes you will find the name of the wife
in the documents accompaniing the request.

Until 1927 the wife was supposed to follow her husband. That means that a
french girl who married a foreiner loosed her french nationality. But the
situation was not so clear about what happened when the husband asked for
naturalization. And untill 1889-1900 most of them did not ask to join the
naturalization, just because they ignored that they were no more french, or
that the naturalization was not applied to them, or maybe because the
nationality did not change anything for them. So I have seen very pathetic
requests in 1914-18 where widows who were born in France >from parents and
grand parents born in France were on to be put in camps as german while
their sons where making war in the French army, just because they ignored
they had lost nationality when married and should have asked for
reintegration when their husband was naturalized.

Anne Lifshitz-Krams
CGJ - Paris


Colorado JGS - Oct 14 General Meeting #general

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado presents nationally
recognized speaker Ron Arons who will speak on "Putting the Flesh on The
Bones" at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, October 14, 2007. The meeting will be
held at B'nai Havurah, 6445 East Ohio Avenue (one block east of Monaco
Blvd; one block south of Leetsdale) in Denver.

Most family researchers concentrate their time on expanding family
trees. They look for documents that provide names, dates and places of
the whom, when and where. Another approach is to answer the question
why. Why did our ancestors act the way they did? What influenced
them? By concentrating on one individual at a time, you will learn many
other things. This approach led Ron Arons to expand his tree four more
generations back in time and to find many, previously unknown living
relatives.

Terry Lasky,
Colorado JGS.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Colorado JGS - Oct 14 General Meeting #general

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado presents nationally
recognized speaker Ron Arons who will speak on "Putting the Flesh on The
Bones" at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, October 14, 2007. The meeting will be
held at B'nai Havurah, 6445 East Ohio Avenue (one block east of Monaco
Blvd; one block south of Leetsdale) in Denver.

Most family researchers concentrate their time on expanding family
trees. They look for documents that provide names, dates and places of
the whom, when and where. Another approach is to answer the question
why. Why did our ancestors act the way they did? What influenced
them? By concentrating on one individual at a time, you will learn many
other things. This approach led Ron Arons to expand his tree four more
generations back in time and to find many, previously unknown living
relatives.

Terry Lasky,
Colorado JGS.


JGS of Cleveland -- October meeting #general

Cynthia Spikell <proprius@...>
 

The October meeting of the JGS of Cleveland will be held on
Sunday, October 7, at 1 p.m. in the Miller Auditorium on the second
floor of Menorah Park at 27100 Cedar Road, Beachwood.

The public is invited to this open house meeting. A panel of our experts will
attempt to answer the most perplexing research problems presented by our guests
and our members.

Nominations for officers will be accepted. The election for 2008
officers will be held at the December meeting.

Cynthia Spikell
2nd V. P.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Cleveland -- October meeting #general

Cynthia Spikell <proprius@...>
 

The October meeting of the JGS of Cleveland will be held on
Sunday, October 7, at 1 p.m. in the Miller Auditorium on the second
floor of Menorah Park at 27100 Cedar Road, Beachwood.

The public is invited to this open house meeting. A panel of our experts will
attempt to answer the most perplexing research problems presented by our guests
and our members.

Nominations for officers will be accepted. The election for 2008
officers will be held at the December meeting.

Cynthia Spikell
2nd V. P.


Tiferes Yisroel married to Dore/Dobrush WARESCH? #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Our FHL indexing project has encountered an entry in a cemetery register for
Dore/Dobrush (d. 22 Jan 1856), daughter of Rabbi Shmuel WARESCH, wife of
Rabbi Israel LUEPPSCHUETZ. Is anyone aware of other sources that might help
to identify the wife/wives of the Tiferes Yisroel?

Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Tiferes Yisroel married to Dore/Dobrush WARESCH? #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Our FHL indexing project has encountered an entry in a cemetery register for
Dore/Dobrush (d. 22 Jan 1856), daughter of Rabbi Shmuel WARESCH, wife of
Rabbi Israel LUEPPSCHUETZ. Is anyone aware of other sources that might help
to identify the wife/wives of the Tiferes Yisroel?

Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Yizkor Book Project update for September 2007 #belarus

Joyce Field
 

During September 2007 the Yizkor Book Project added seven new books
and 14 updates. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
which is the alphabetical listing of all our online translations,
organized by Regions, Communities,
Miscellaneous, and Other Languages. Also check the section on Regions
for the tables of contents of Pinkas HaKehillot volumes to see if
there are articles on your ancestral towns that you could have
translated and check the Yizkor Book Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html to see if there are
yizkor books on your town.

In addition, we are pleased to note that four books were completed
during this month:
Dzialoszyce: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html
Novogrudok: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Novogrudok/Novogrudok.html
Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
Suchowola: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Congratulations to the project coordinators of these books for a job well done.

New books:

-Chelm, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm1/chelm1.html
-Chrzanow, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Chrzanow1/Chrzanow1.html
-David Gorodok, Belarus
-Dubno, Ukraine
-Dynow, Poland
-Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Volume 4: 2 parts, Northwest Germany
-Suchowola, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Updates:

-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Lenin, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland

As always, we are grateful to our donors of translations, without
whose work the Yizkor Book Project would not have been around for a
decade. In October 1997 the first translation went online; there are
now 474 books and 831 entries online. To our volunteers--Lance
Ackerfeld, Osnat Ramaty, and Max Heffler--my congratulations and
heartfelt thanks on your dedication to the Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Belarus SIG #Belarus Yizkor Book Project update for September 2007 #belarus

Joyce Field
 

During September 2007 the Yizkor Book Project added seven new books
and 14 updates. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
which is the alphabetical listing of all our online translations,
organized by Regions, Communities,
Miscellaneous, and Other Languages. Also check the section on Regions
for the tables of contents of Pinkas HaKehillot volumes to see if
there are articles on your ancestral towns that you could have
translated and check the Yizkor Book Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html to see if there are
yizkor books on your town.

In addition, we are pleased to note that four books were completed
during this month:
Dzialoszyce: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html
Novogrudok: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Novogrudok/Novogrudok.html
Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
Suchowola: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Congratulations to the project coordinators of these books for a job well done.

New books:

-Chelm, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm1/chelm1.html
-Chrzanow, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Chrzanow1/Chrzanow1.html
-David Gorodok, Belarus
-Dubno, Ukraine
-Dynow, Poland
-Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Volume 4: 2 parts, Northwest Germany
-Suchowola, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/suchowola1/suchowola1.html

Updates:

-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Lenin, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Schindler: Stepping Stone to Life
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland

As always, we are grateful to our donors of translations, without
whose work the Yizkor Book Project would not have been around for a
decade. In October 1997 the first translation went online; there are
now 474 books and 831 entries online. To our volunteers--Lance
Ackerfeld, Osnat Ramaty, and Max Heffler--my congratulations and
heartfelt thanks on your dedication to the Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Y-DNA questions #dna

Glenn J. Hill
 

Hi again !

It is interesting that in my Y-DNA test results, I had fourteen, one
and two and three mutation Jewish matches, all Ashkenazi Jews.

The haplotype is R1b1c, and the ancestry is mostly Scottish/English
according to the matches I have at FTDNA. I can only go to 1806 in
my HILL line. I am part of a very large HILL family study, but have
not matched with any other HILLs at all. I wonder if my HILL line is
actually transplanted >from eastern European ancestry. All the Jewish
near-matches are Russian, Belarus, Ukraine, and such. but there are
also lots of near miss British Isles matched as well. Perhaps I have
some intermarried Jews >from Eastern Europe, who converted back in
the 1200s when the English-Jewish removal happened?

Thanks,
Glenn Hill


DNA Research #DNA Y-DNA questions #dna

Glenn J. Hill
 

Hi again !

It is interesting that in my Y-DNA test results, I had fourteen, one
and two and three mutation Jewish matches, all Ashkenazi Jews.

The haplotype is R1b1c, and the ancestry is mostly Scottish/English
according to the matches I have at FTDNA. I can only go to 1806 in
my HILL line. I am part of a very large HILL family study, but have
not matched with any other HILLs at all. I wonder if my HILL line is
actually transplanted >from eastern European ancestry. All the Jewish
near-matches are Russian, Belarus, Ukraine, and such. but there are
also lots of near miss British Isles matched as well. Perhaps I have
some intermarried Jews >from Eastern Europe, who converted back in
the 1200s when the English-Jewish removal happened?

Thanks,
Glenn Hill


LUBARSKY - LYUBAR #ukraine

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
 

LUBARSKY and similar spellings are listed in the JewishGen Family Finder for
many different towns in Ukraine. I have often heard >from people with this
surname when they learn about the shtetl called Lyubar that is located
between Zhitomir and Berdichev in what was Volhynia Guberniya.

There is a Lyubar Shtetlinks website with extensive information about
resources and families for that town at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lyubar/.

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
Lyubar Webmaster


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine LUBARSKY - LYUBAR #ukraine

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
 

LUBARSKY and similar spellings are listed in the JewishGen Family Finder for
many different towns in Ukraine. I have often heard >from people with this
surname when they learn about the shtetl called Lyubar that is located
between Zhitomir and Berdichev in what was Volhynia Guberniya.

There is a Lyubar Shtetlinks website with extensive information about
resources and families for that town at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lyubar/.

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
Lyubar Webmaster