Date   

emigration from "Russia" to U.S. #general

Sharon R. Korn <s.r.korn@...>
 

My grandparents and some great-grandparents all emigrated between 1898 and 1908
from what was then Russia to the U.S. I have found manifests for the ships they
took >from different cities (Bremen, Rotterdam, Liverpool, Antwerp) to Ellis Island,
but they needed to travel by some means to those cities. They could have used a
combination of railroads and ships. In one case, part of the journey was via a
farmer's wagon, in another case on foot. I would like to estimate how long their
total journeys might have taken >from what are now western Lithuania and a small
town 190 km (about 120 miles) west of Kiev. Has anyone researched this subject?

Sharon Block Korn
San Diego, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen emigration from "Russia" to U.S. #general

Sharon R. Korn <s.r.korn@...>
 

My grandparents and some great-grandparents all emigrated between 1898 and 1908
from what was then Russia to the U.S. I have found manifests for the ships they
took >from different cities (Bremen, Rotterdam, Liverpool, Antwerp) to Ellis Island,
but they needed to travel by some means to those cities. They could have used a
combination of railroads and ships. In one case, part of the journey was via a
farmer's wagon, in another case on foot. I would like to estimate how long their
total journeys might have taken >from what are now western Lithuania and a small
town 190 km (about 120 miles) west of Kiev. Has anyone researched this subject?

Sharon Block Korn
San Diego, CA


Re: Terrapole Chasson Russia #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Bruce Dumes wrote:
I have a relative who's WW1 Draft Registration indicates he was >from a
place that appears to read "Terrapole Chasson Russia". I can find no
place like this with any spelling variants that I have tried.
Bruce,

It actually reads: Tiraspol, Cherson (Kherson) [Guberniya], Russia
This large Jewish Bessarabian town is currently located in Moldova
-
Regards,
Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Found Albertina Piterbarg #general

susan lieberman <viukerville@...>
 

Due to the kindness of several Jewish Gen folk I have an up to date
telephone number and email for Albertina.

Thank you everyone!
Susan VIUKER Lieberman Landau


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Terrapole Chasson Russia #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Bruce Dumes wrote:
I have a relative who's WW1 Draft Registration indicates he was >from a
place that appears to read "Terrapole Chasson Russia". I can find no
place like this with any spelling variants that I have tried.
Bruce,

It actually reads: Tiraspol, Cherson (Kherson) [Guberniya], Russia
This large Jewish Bessarabian town is currently located in Moldova
-
Regards,
Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Found Albertina Piterbarg #general

susan lieberman <viukerville@...>
 

Due to the kindness of several Jewish Gen folk I have an up to date
telephone number and email for Albertina.

Thank you everyone!
Susan VIUKER Lieberman Landau


Searching the name of a submitter of POT #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

I found a Page of Testimony, on the website of Yad Vashem, the submitter of which
seems to live in Israel. I'm looking for someone who would be willing to
tranliterate the Hebrew script with the name of the person who filled that POT only
two years ago. Please respond privately and I'll send the POT as an attachment.
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
http://www.convoi73.org
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching the name of a submitter of POT #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

I found a Page of Testimony, on the website of Yad Vashem, the submitter of which
seems to live in Israel. I'm looking for someone who would be willing to
tranliterate the Hebrew script with the name of the person who filled that POT only
two years ago. Please respond privately and I'll send the POT as an attachment.
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
http://www.convoi73.org
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


Re: Contacting Albertina PITERBARG #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Joe Fibel made the suggestion - when trying to reach someone overseas or locally
(the U.S is overseas for me!) - of contacting local Jewish Genealogical Societies,
after identifying them through the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies site www.iajgs.org

Irrespective of Joe's valuable suggestion, and just to avoid duplication of efforts
in this particular case, please allow me to say that the contact with Albertina
PITERBARG is already solved, and the contact information has been shared privately.

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina


Confusion over surnames #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

<< From: Shulamit <singingsandy2004@yahoo.com>
According to Herman Rosenthal in the Jewish
Encyclopedia of 1901 it was common practice in the
early 19th century for a man to adopt surname of his
father-in-law after marriage rather than using his
father's surname.
Apparently it was only later that women began to adopt
their husband's surnames after marriage. >>

With all due respect to Herman Rosenthal, I doubt if
the practice was all that common. In Eastern Europe,
up until about 1792, Jews did not have surnames. After
that, they were forced to adopt surnames but it was not
a universal practice until about 1834.

In some cases, a male Jew married a female whose father
was wealthy. To curry favor with his new father-in-law, the
groom occasionally took the surname of his father-in-law. This was
also done if the wealthy Jew had no sons and he wanted to continue
the family surname.

I would hardly call this a common practice.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Contacting Albertina PITERBARG #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Joe Fibel made the suggestion - when trying to reach someone overseas or locally
(the U.S is overseas for me!) - of contacting local Jewish Genealogical Societies,
after identifying them through the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies site www.iajgs.org

Irrespective of Joe's valuable suggestion, and just to avoid duplication of efforts
in this particular case, please allow me to say that the contact with Albertina
PITERBARG is already solved, and the contact information has been shared privately.

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Confusion over surnames #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

<< From: Shulamit <singingsandy2004@yahoo.com>
According to Herman Rosenthal in the Jewish
Encyclopedia of 1901 it was common practice in the
early 19th century for a man to adopt surname of his
father-in-law after marriage rather than using his
father's surname.
Apparently it was only later that women began to adopt
their husband's surnames after marriage. >>

With all due respect to Herman Rosenthal, I doubt if
the practice was all that common. In Eastern Europe,
up until about 1792, Jews did not have surnames. After
that, they were forced to adopt surnames but it was not
a universal practice until about 1834.

In some cases, a male Jew married a female whose father
was wealthy. To curry favor with his new father-in-law, the
groom occasionally took the surname of his father-in-law. This was
also done if the wealthy Jew had no sons and he wanted to continue
the family surname.

I would hardly call this a common practice.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia


Re: Translating English to Jewish/Hebrew #general

Wegner, Peter
 

James Belson wrote:

...translate the American name Joanne to Hebrew phonetically for a tombstone. I
believe the translation is YUHANA. Can you comfirm, correct, or send me to the
right web location for the right information. I notice that all names I have seen
starting with "J" become "Y". My name James for instance is Yontov.

Dear James,
Your query raises several points of general interest, so I am responding to the
group as a whole. First, it turns out that your question involves not
"translation" but "transliteration" >from one alphabet to another. That's because
the original transliteration of this particular name was not >from English to Hebrew
but exactly the reverse! In fact, "Joanne" is not an "American name" at all, but
a Hebrew name: Yohanah; for the tombstone, you would need the original Hebrew
spelling: yod-vav-het-nun-heh.

The name Yohanah was first transliterated into Greek in the New Testament as
"Ioanna" and later into Latin as "Joanna" (see Luke 24:10). Obviously, the
"American" version Joanne is a very slight modification of the Latin spelling.
In the N.T., Joanna is one of Jesus' Jewish followers. Her original Hebrew name,
Yohanah, was the feminine equivalent of the male Biblical name Yohanan. The latest
(post-exilic) books of the Hebrew Bible record several men with that name (see e.g.
Jeremiah 40:16). Indeed, the name seems to have been as common back then as its
English counterpart "John" is today!

In the N.T., we have John the Baptist and John the Apostle (the purported author
of the Fourth Gospel). In both cases the Hebrew name "Yohanan" was transliterated
as "Ioannes" in Greek. (In later centuries, it would be rendered Johannes in Latin
and German, Giovanni in Italian, Jean in French and John in English -- with female
equivalents in all of those languages (thus in English, we have not only Joanna but
also Jane and Joan, and in French Jeanne and Jeannette.

Postscript: Your own Hebrew name is not actually spelled Yontov with an "n" but
Yomtov with an "m." (The Hebrew spelling is: yod-vav-mem tet-vav-bet.) "Yom Tov"
means literally "a good day" -- meaning specifically, a holy day in the Hebrew
calendar. "Yontov" or "Yontif" is a Yiddishized version of the original Hebrew.
As for the name James itself, this is a modification of Iakobos or Jacobus ( New
Testament Greek and Latin renderings of the Biblical name Ya'akov ( Jacob). So
James is actually the precise English equivalent of the Hebrew name Ya'akov. But
the original "b" of Jacobus got lost along the way (cf. Italian Iacomo ) So it
ended up as James in English!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Translating English to Jewish/Hebrew #general

Wegner, Peter
 

James Belson wrote:

...translate the American name Joanne to Hebrew phonetically for a tombstone. I
believe the translation is YUHANA. Can you comfirm, correct, or send me to the
right web location for the right information. I notice that all names I have seen
starting with "J" become "Y". My name James for instance is Yontov.

Dear James,
Your query raises several points of general interest, so I am responding to the
group as a whole. First, it turns out that your question involves not
"translation" but "transliteration" >from one alphabet to another. That's because
the original transliteration of this particular name was not >from English to Hebrew
but exactly the reverse! In fact, "Joanne" is not an "American name" at all, but
a Hebrew name: Yohanah; for the tombstone, you would need the original Hebrew
spelling: yod-vav-het-nun-heh.

The name Yohanah was first transliterated into Greek in the New Testament as
"Ioanna" and later into Latin as "Joanna" (see Luke 24:10). Obviously, the
"American" version Joanne is a very slight modification of the Latin spelling.
In the N.T., Joanna is one of Jesus' Jewish followers. Her original Hebrew name,
Yohanah, was the feminine equivalent of the male Biblical name Yohanan. The latest
(post-exilic) books of the Hebrew Bible record several men with that name (see e.g.
Jeremiah 40:16). Indeed, the name seems to have been as common back then as its
English counterpart "John" is today!

In the N.T., we have John the Baptist and John the Apostle (the purported author
of the Fourth Gospel). In both cases the Hebrew name "Yohanan" was transliterated
as "Ioannes" in Greek. (In later centuries, it would be rendered Johannes in Latin
and German, Giovanni in Italian, Jean in French and John in English -- with female
equivalents in all of those languages (thus in English, we have not only Joanna but
also Jane and Joan, and in French Jeanne and Jeannette.

Postscript: Your own Hebrew name is not actually spelled Yontov with an "n" but
Yomtov with an "m." (The Hebrew spelling is: yod-vav-mem tet-vav-bet.) "Yom Tov"
means literally "a good day" -- meaning specifically, a holy day in the Hebrew
calendar. "Yontov" or "Yontif" is a Yiddishized version of the original Hebrew.
As for the name James itself, this is a modification of Iakobos or Jacobus ( New
Testament Greek and Latin renderings of the Biblical name Ya'akov ( Jacob). So
James is actually the precise English equivalent of the Hebrew name Ya'akov. But
the original "b" of Jacobus got lost along the way (cf. Italian Iacomo ) So it
ended up as James in English!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


LEWY, NAWRATZKI item on auction #germany #poland #danzig #gdansk

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

An envelope sent in 1934 >from Dr. Gerson LEWY in Danzig to Dr. Curt
NAWRATZKI in Tel Aviv is being sold on a major auction website for its
philatelic interest (currently unknown whether the contents of the envelope
are available). For further details, contact me privately.

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland LEWY, NAWRATZKI item on auction #poland #danzig #gdansk #germany

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

An envelope sent in 1934 >from Dr. Gerson LEWY in Danzig to Dr. Curt
NAWRATZKI in Tel Aviv is being sold on a major auction website for its
philatelic interest (currently unknown whether the contents of the envelope
are available). For further details, contact me privately.

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Jack (Yankel) SKORKA #general

irvela@...
 

I am looking for information about my Uncle Jack (Yankel) SKORKA, my father
Herman's brother. I tried to contact him when I became interested in Genealogy but
I was too late, as he had died.

Jack was in Konskie, Poland when World War II broke out. He was married and had
either one or 2 children. He escaped to Russia without his family (I do not know
the circumstances). I cannot find any record of his first wife or family at Yad
Vashem. After the war he travelled to a Displaced Persons (DP) Camp in Germany. He
met a woman who he later married and they relocated to Australia, where he owned a
bakery. He later emigrated to the US, divorced his second wife and married a third
wife. While here, he lived in New York and worked at the Bialistoker Home on
Houston Street as a baker. He spent time at holiday occasions at my mother and
father's home in the Bronx. Unfortunately I never heard the details of his story n
or were they told to me. I recently was able to find him mentioned in Australian
immigration files and intend to search for more info there.

Any information that can be supplied will be appreciated.
I can be reached at: irvela@comcast.net. Thank you in advance.

Sincerely,
Irv Skorka


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jack (Yankel) SKORKA #general

irvela@...
 

I am looking for information about my Uncle Jack (Yankel) SKORKA, my father
Herman's brother. I tried to contact him when I became interested in Genealogy but
I was too late, as he had died.

Jack was in Konskie, Poland when World War II broke out. He was married and had
either one or 2 children. He escaped to Russia without his family (I do not know
the circumstances). I cannot find any record of his first wife or family at Yad
Vashem. After the war he travelled to a Displaced Persons (DP) Camp in Germany. He
met a woman who he later married and they relocated to Australia, where he owned a
bakery. He later emigrated to the US, divorced his second wife and married a third
wife. While here, he lived in New York and worked at the Bialistoker Home on
Houston Street as a baker. He spent time at holiday occasions at my mother and
father's home in the Bronx. Unfortunately I never heard the details of his story n
or were they told to me. I recently was able to find him mentioned in Australian
immigration files and intend to search for more info there.

Any information that can be supplied will be appreciated.
I can be reached at: irvela@comcast.net. Thank you in advance.

Sincerely,
Irv Skorka


Re: Terrapole Chasson Russia #general

welcomemoshiach
 

B"H

There is a Terepol northeast of Rovno. There is a Terespol in Poland. It may be
the same as Terepol. There is also a Ternopil. Ternopil , Rus. Ternopol, Pol.
Tarnopol, city (1989 pop. 205,000), capital of Ternopil region, W Ukraine, on the
Seret River, a tributary of the Dniester. It is an important rail junction and
highway hub. Industries include food processing and the manufacture of machinery,
building materials, consumer goods, and porcelain. Founded by the princes of
Galicia in 1540 as a castle, Ternopil was fortified and developed as a trade
center. It declined after passing to Austria in 1772 but revived in the 19th cent.
with the coming of the railroad. The city became part of Poland in 1919 and of
Ukraine in 1939.

Hope this may be useful.

Yosef Kaner
Researching KANER, KEINER, UNITCHMAN and the Maggid of MEZRITCH

-

I have a relative who's WW1 Draft Registration indicates he was >from a place that
appears to read "Terrapole Chasson Russia". I can find no place like this...
Bruce Dumes


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Terrapole Chasson Russia #general

welcomemoshiach
 

B"H

There is a Terepol northeast of Rovno. There is a Terespol in Poland. It may be
the same as Terepol. There is also a Ternopil. Ternopil , Rus. Ternopol, Pol.
Tarnopol, city (1989 pop. 205,000), capital of Ternopil region, W Ukraine, on the
Seret River, a tributary of the Dniester. It is an important rail junction and
highway hub. Industries include food processing and the manufacture of machinery,
building materials, consumer goods, and porcelain. Founded by the princes of
Galicia in 1540 as a castle, Ternopil was fortified and developed as a trade
center. It declined after passing to Austria in 1772 but revived in the 19th cent.
with the coming of the railroad. The city became part of Poland in 1919 and of
Ukraine in 1939.

Hope this may be useful.

Yosef Kaner
Researching KANER, KEINER, UNITCHMAN and the Maggid of MEZRITCH

-

I have a relative who's WW1 Draft Registration indicates he was >from a place that
appears to read "Terrapole Chasson Russia". I can find no place like this...
Bruce Dumes