Date   

Much more for you from the Museum of Family History #yiddish

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

I have been very active in preparing new material for your perusal and
enjoyment:

from "The "Yiddish World": The next three chapters of the unique biography
of Yiddish acting great Maurice Schwartz and the Yiddish Art Theatre;
Eliyahu Goldenberg; The Hebrew Actor’s Union of 1923 and Josef Schmidt,
Lyric Tenor.

"Great Artists Series": This series of exhibitions "proudly salutes the
lives of Jewish artists whose contributions to the world were extraordinary
in terms of both the scope and quality of their work." The second exhibition
in this series is a biographical account of the life of the great Yiddish
playwright David Pinski—a very interesting and informative exhibition about
his early years in Europe, his family and professional life, and his works.
Listen to a sound clip >from a 1954 Haifa radio interview, as well as several
touching audio tributes by his grandson Gabriel.

You can now visit the main Great Artists Series page where you can find
links to the Pinski exhibition, as well as a link to the previously
announced exhibition about artist Max Weber. You can also see previews to
upcoming Great Artists exhibitions about Yiddish actor Maurice Schwartz,
tenor Richard Tucker, and the one and only Al Jolson (a Jolson song will
begin to play when you arrive at the Jolson preview page, so you might like
to turn your speakers on to a low to moderate volume before you click on the
Jolson link.) The Great Artists Series link is
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/gas-main.htm .

You can also find the links to all of these exhibitions on either the Museum’s
Site Map page at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/sm.htm , or the main Yiddish
World page at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/y-main.htm, where you can find
links to all the site's Yiddish World material . There is also a webpage
dedicated to native Czernowitzer lyric tenor Josef Schmidt that can be found
at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/yw-schmidt-josef.htm

Best,

Steven Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com
steve@...


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Much more for you from the Museum of Family History #yiddish

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

I have been very active in preparing new material for your perusal and
enjoyment:

from "The "Yiddish World": The next three chapters of the unique biography
of Yiddish acting great Maurice Schwartz and the Yiddish Art Theatre;
Eliyahu Goldenberg; The Hebrew Actor’s Union of 1923 and Josef Schmidt,
Lyric Tenor.

"Great Artists Series": This series of exhibitions "proudly salutes the
lives of Jewish artists whose contributions to the world were extraordinary
in terms of both the scope and quality of their work." The second exhibition
in this series is a biographical account of the life of the great Yiddish
playwright David Pinski—a very interesting and informative exhibition about
his early years in Europe, his family and professional life, and his works.
Listen to a sound clip >from a 1954 Haifa radio interview, as well as several
touching audio tributes by his grandson Gabriel.

You can now visit the main Great Artists Series page where you can find
links to the Pinski exhibition, as well as a link to the previously
announced exhibition about artist Max Weber. You can also see previews to
upcoming Great Artists exhibitions about Yiddish actor Maurice Schwartz,
tenor Richard Tucker, and the one and only Al Jolson (a Jolson song will
begin to play when you arrive at the Jolson preview page, so you might like
to turn your speakers on to a low to moderate volume before you click on the
Jolson link.) The Great Artists Series link is
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/gas-main.htm .

You can also find the links to all of these exhibitions on either the Museum’s
Site Map page at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/sm.htm , or the main Yiddish
World page at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/y-main.htm, where you can find
links to all the site's Yiddish World material . There is also a webpage
dedicated to native Czernowitzer lyric tenor Josef Schmidt that can be found
at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/yw-schmidt-josef.htm

Best,

Steven Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com
steve@...


Mogulesko and Edelstein #yiddish

Mike <doctormike@...>
 

Hello,

My name is Michael Rothschild, and I am working on a project with my
cousin, Lester Rosen. Our genealogical research has brought us to
Sigmund Mogulesko (the well known Yiddish performer), and Joseph
Edelstein (a manager of a theatre in New York in the early 20th
century).

Lester's maternal grandmother Ernestina Finkelstein was a member of
Sigmund Mogulesko's Romanian troupe which emigrated in 1886 and
performed in New York during 1887-1888

She was a young actress who sang and played minor roles. The company
disbanded in 1888 and Ernestina retired >from the stage at age 19 and
subsequently married Benjamin Harris.

To our knowledge she had a sister in the troupe, Paulina
(Finkelstein) Edelstein (married to Joseph Edelstein). We also are
working under the assumption that she had another sister named Amelia
Finkelstein (married to Sigmund Mogulesko.)

In addition, the Moguleskos and their daughter Bessie are known >from
Zilbercwaig's "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre", and a US Passport
application shows Alexander Fichandler married to an Elizabeth
(common alternate name for Bessie) Mogulesko. Lester's mother Daisy
Harris knew the Fichandler family well and always referred to
Elizabeth as her cousin.

Thus the inference that Amalie was a sister to Ernestina and Pauline
is based upon her known maiden name Finkelstein, and Lester's
recollection of hearing her referred to as his mom's cousin, in the
1930's.

Genealogically speaking, however, we would like like additional
evidence. For example, Edelstein and especially Mogulesko were
celebrities, and I imagine that someone in the past 100 years may
have known and described them as brothers-in-law.

We also have another unrelated question: The New York Times obituary
for Sigmund Mogulesko in 1914 states that he was survived by his
wife, a son Julius, and two unnamed daughters. Only one daughter,
Besasie, can be found anywhere since that time.

Thanks for your help!

Best,

Michael Rothschild

Moderator's note: All posters; please remember to include your location in addition
to your name.


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Mogulesko and Edelstein #yiddish

Mike <doctormike@...>
 

Hello,

My name is Michael Rothschild, and I am working on a project with my
cousin, Lester Rosen. Our genealogical research has brought us to
Sigmund Mogulesko (the well known Yiddish performer), and Joseph
Edelstein (a manager of a theatre in New York in the early 20th
century).

Lester's maternal grandmother Ernestina Finkelstein was a member of
Sigmund Mogulesko's Romanian troupe which emigrated in 1886 and
performed in New York during 1887-1888

She was a young actress who sang and played minor roles. The company
disbanded in 1888 and Ernestina retired >from the stage at age 19 and
subsequently married Benjamin Harris.

To our knowledge she had a sister in the troupe, Paulina
(Finkelstein) Edelstein (married to Joseph Edelstein). We also are
working under the assumption that she had another sister named Amelia
Finkelstein (married to Sigmund Mogulesko.)

In addition, the Moguleskos and their daughter Bessie are known >from
Zilbercwaig's "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre", and a US Passport
application shows Alexander Fichandler married to an Elizabeth
(common alternate name for Bessie) Mogulesko. Lester's mother Daisy
Harris knew the Fichandler family well and always referred to
Elizabeth as her cousin.

Thus the inference that Amalie was a sister to Ernestina and Pauline
is based upon her known maiden name Finkelstein, and Lester's
recollection of hearing her referred to as his mom's cousin, in the
1930's.

Genealogically speaking, however, we would like like additional
evidence. For example, Edelstein and especially Mogulesko were
celebrities, and I imagine that someone in the past 100 years may
have known and described them as brothers-in-law.

We also have another unrelated question: The New York Times obituary
for Sigmund Mogulesko in 1914 states that he was survived by his
wife, a son Julius, and two unnamed daughters. Only one daughter,
Besasie, can be found anywhere since that time.

Thanks for your help!

Best,

Michael Rothschild

Moderator's note: All posters; please remember to include your location in addition
to your name.


Re: TOFF [The very last word on this topic] #germany

Michael Bernet <mbernet@...>
 

This message was received before discussion of this subject was cut off by
the Moderator. It was put on hold by mistake and is sent to the list now.
There will be no further discussion of this subject. Please continue by
private email. ==============>

In a message dated 3/7/2008 , Ury Link uryl@...
as usual comes up with some wise and knowledgable suggestions
for the surname TOFF:

UL - No 3: Another explanation is that the name get out >from the given name David
. Perhaps was in this family a person with the name David and the nickname
of David is Tevel or Tyvel and >from this we get the name Toff through this
way :David - Tevel - Teffel- Toffel -Toff.

MB - David and Tuvyah (Tobias) were often interchanged. My late father-in-law
in England, of Litvak heritage was named David in English and Tuvyah in
Hebrew. The V is pronounced FF in most of Germany. The step >from Tuffyah
to Toff is not very large.

UL - No 4 : Alexander Beider in his book Jewish Surnames in Poland give the
suggestion that the name Tov - Toff get out >from the German name Teper
(page 438). Teper mean a kettle-maker and Top in German mean a kettle.
It can be that the bearer of this name was a kettle-maker or a merchant in
kettles.

MB -I have a great respect for Beider, but the German word for pot (not kettle
--which is Kessel) is Topf. A potmaker is Toepfer (the oe combination
sounds like the u in turn). In Yiddish, though, according to Weinreich, it
would be Top or Tepel, and the potter is Tepper.

MB - I believe the original query related to Germany. I doubt Topf or Toepfer
would have altered to Toff in Germany. Anything may have happened to the
name further East.

Michael Bernet, New York mbernet@...


German SIG #Germany Re: TOFF [The very last word on this topic] #germany

Michael Bernet <mbernet@...>
 

This message was received before discussion of this subject was cut off by
the Moderator. It was put on hold by mistake and is sent to the list now.
There will be no further discussion of this subject. Please continue by
private email. ==============>

In a message dated 3/7/2008 , Ury Link uryl@...
as usual comes up with some wise and knowledgable suggestions
for the surname TOFF:

UL - No 3: Another explanation is that the name get out >from the given name David
. Perhaps was in this family a person with the name David and the nickname
of David is Tevel or Tyvel and >from this we get the name Toff through this
way :David - Tevel - Teffel- Toffel -Toff.

MB - David and Tuvyah (Tobias) were often interchanged. My late father-in-law
in England, of Litvak heritage was named David in English and Tuvyah in
Hebrew. The V is pronounced FF in most of Germany. The step >from Tuffyah
to Toff is not very large.

UL - No 4 : Alexander Beider in his book Jewish Surnames in Poland give the
suggestion that the name Tov - Toff get out >from the German name Teper
(page 438). Teper mean a kettle-maker and Top in German mean a kettle.
It can be that the bearer of this name was a kettle-maker or a merchant in
kettles.

MB -I have a great respect for Beider, but the German word for pot (not kettle
--which is Kessel) is Topf. A potmaker is Toepfer (the oe combination
sounds like the u in turn). In Yiddish, though, according to Weinreich, it
would be Top or Tepel, and the potter is Tepper.

MB - I believe the original query related to Germany. I doubt Topf or Toepfer
would have altered to Toff in Germany. Anything may have happened to the
name further East.

Michael Bernet, New York mbernet@...


Theodore NETTLER/Mannheim #germany

David Krupp <d_krupp@...>
 

Hello, GersSig subscribers.

This is my first post. I consider myself a beginner
insofar as German genealogy is concerned. I am an
advanced computer user. I live in Chicago, Illinois.

The family names and ancestral towns that I have
entered in JewishGen Family Finder are as follows:

NETTLER in Koenigsberg and Mannheim.

My grandparents, who were known in the US as David &
Sarah LIPSCHITZ (and later, LIPSCHULTZ) emigrated to
Chicago in 1884 and died there. David died in 1918,
Sarah in 1936. They met in Mannheim in 1882. Both were
born in or about 1865.

In 1882 and 1883, David pursued cantorial studies with
a Theodore NETTLER, who was the Oberkantor of the
Jewish synagogues in Mannheim. Sarah was Theodore
NETTLER's niece. She was born in Koenigsberg, East
Prussia. Her father (first name unknown) was a
NETTLER. When David and Sarah met, Sarah was living in
the household of her uncle Theodore NETTLER.

In 1883, Theodore NETTLER gave David L a letter of
reference, written in German, with respect to David's
voice, musical ability, and good character. I believe
that David & Sarah were married just prior to their
removal to Chicago.

I am interested in finding any documentary footprint
of Theodore NETTLER, who was my GG uncle. I do not
know where to look for it. Many searches of JewishGen
hosted data bases have not led me to any documents.
Theodore signed my grandfather's letter of reference
in his capacity as Chief Cantor of the Jewish
Community Synagogue.

Do any Mannheim Jewish community records still exist?
If so, how might I access them? One reason for my
interest is to find information concerning my g
grandfather NETTLER's first name which would make the
genealogical research easier. Another possibility that
occurs to me is to find Theodore's gravestone, which
might also have inscribed on it the first name of his
father. But I do not know where or when Theodore N died.

All I know for certain about my g grandfather NETTLER
is that he was a fur trader. Information obtained from
cousins suggests that he may have been born in Retowa
(Rievatas), Lithuania.

Any tips or suggestions would be highly appreciated.

David J. Krupp d_krupp@sbcglobalnet Chicago, IL


German SIG #Germany Theodore NETTLER/Mannheim #germany

David Krupp <d_krupp@...>
 

Hello, GersSig subscribers.

This is my first post. I consider myself a beginner
insofar as German genealogy is concerned. I am an
advanced computer user. I live in Chicago, Illinois.

The family names and ancestral towns that I have
entered in JewishGen Family Finder are as follows:

NETTLER in Koenigsberg and Mannheim.

My grandparents, who were known in the US as David &
Sarah LIPSCHITZ (and later, LIPSCHULTZ) emigrated to
Chicago in 1884 and died there. David died in 1918,
Sarah in 1936. They met in Mannheim in 1882. Both were
born in or about 1865.

In 1882 and 1883, David pursued cantorial studies with
a Theodore NETTLER, who was the Oberkantor of the
Jewish synagogues in Mannheim. Sarah was Theodore
NETTLER's niece. She was born in Koenigsberg, East
Prussia. Her father (first name unknown) was a
NETTLER. When David and Sarah met, Sarah was living in
the household of her uncle Theodore NETTLER.

In 1883, Theodore NETTLER gave David L a letter of
reference, written in German, with respect to David's
voice, musical ability, and good character. I believe
that David & Sarah were married just prior to their
removal to Chicago.

I am interested in finding any documentary footprint
of Theodore NETTLER, who was my GG uncle. I do not
know where to look for it. Many searches of JewishGen
hosted data bases have not led me to any documents.
Theodore signed my grandfather's letter of reference
in his capacity as Chief Cantor of the Jewish
Community Synagogue.

Do any Mannheim Jewish community records still exist?
If so, how might I access them? One reason for my
interest is to find information concerning my g
grandfather NETTLER's first name which would make the
genealogical research easier. Another possibility that
occurs to me is to find Theodore's gravestone, which
might also have inscribed on it the first name of his
father. But I do not know where or when Theodore N died.

All I know for certain about my g grandfather NETTLER
is that he was a fur trader. Information obtained from
cousins suggests that he may have been born in Retowa
(Rievatas), Lithuania.

Any tips or suggestions would be highly appreciated.

David J. Krupp d_krupp@sbcglobalnet Chicago, IL


Godowsky and Radowsky #lithuania

Solly Radowsky
 

Dear Marion,

I can't recall whether we have been in touch previously.

I have similarly thoughts on the "possible" connection between
Godowsky and Radovsky. I have spent much time on this and
have not reached a reliable conclusion as yet.

My Radovsky family name originated >from a very small place Radovka,
modern name Roduka, a few kilometres near to Merkine.

I am sure you have all the records available and have also come
across surnames in the records >from the area, such as Gadovsky,
Godovsky and Radavsky. However, as I understand Hebrew spelling
the letters "G" and "R" are quite different. My surmise is that
if the names are of one and the same family then probably
ORIGINALLY the scribe was hard of hearing or for some reason
or another got the first letter of the surname wrong.

I'd appreciate your response and any further information you may
have or suggestion you might make.

Solly Radowsky
Cape Town
South Africa

-----Original Message-----
From: LitvakSIG digest [mailto:litvaksig@...]
Sent: 07 March 2008 08:04 AM
To: litvaksig digest recipients

Dear Litvaks,

I am trying to prove a connection between my husband's GODOFSKY
family, primarily >from Merkine, and the famous
composer/pianist/conductor Leopold GODOWSKY.

I just ran across a fantastic article in the Palestine Post about
GODOWSKY's quest for a birth certificate that was foiled by changed
borders in the 1930's. In Vilna, he sought to get a taxi to the
"suburb" of Shoshli and was told that it was over the border in
Lithuania. (Vilna at that time was Polish) The most likely place to
fit this description was Zasliai, but I would hardly consider it a
"suburb" of Vilna!

Another hint was that Zasliai's records in the All Lithuania Database
include some RADOVSKYs, who are likely to be relatives. (RADOVSKY and
GODOFSKY may have once been the same family.)

Can anyone shed some light on this?

Marion H. Bernstein
San Antonio, TX


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Godowsky and Radowsky #lithuania

Solly Radowsky
 

Dear Marion,

I can't recall whether we have been in touch previously.

I have similarly thoughts on the "possible" connection between
Godowsky and Radovsky. I have spent much time on this and
have not reached a reliable conclusion as yet.

My Radovsky family name originated >from a very small place Radovka,
modern name Roduka, a few kilometres near to Merkine.

I am sure you have all the records available and have also come
across surnames in the records >from the area, such as Gadovsky,
Godovsky and Radavsky. However, as I understand Hebrew spelling
the letters "G" and "R" are quite different. My surmise is that
if the names are of one and the same family then probably
ORIGINALLY the scribe was hard of hearing or for some reason
or another got the first letter of the surname wrong.

I'd appreciate your response and any further information you may
have or suggestion you might make.

Solly Radowsky
Cape Town
South Africa

-----Original Message-----
From: LitvakSIG digest [mailto:litvaksig@...]
Sent: 07 March 2008 08:04 AM
To: litvaksig digest recipients

Dear Litvaks,

I am trying to prove a connection between my husband's GODOFSKY
family, primarily >from Merkine, and the famous
composer/pianist/conductor Leopold GODOWSKY.

I just ran across a fantastic article in the Palestine Post about
GODOWSKY's quest for a birth certificate that was foiled by changed
borders in the 1930's. In Vilna, he sought to get a taxi to the
"suburb" of Shoshli and was told that it was over the border in
Lithuania. (Vilna at that time was Polish) The most likely place to
fit this description was Zasliai, but I would hardly consider it a
"suburb" of Vilna!

Another hint was that Zasliai's records in the All Lithuania Database
include some RADOVSKYs, who are likely to be relatives. (RADOVSKY and
GODOFSKY may have once been the same family.)

Can anyone shed some light on this?

Marion H. Bernstein
San Antonio, TX


Re: "Claimant" on an ITS card? #general

Brian Stern <brians99@...>
 

On Mar 6, 2008, at 5:48 PM, Peter Lebensold wrote:
I have just received an email in response to my enquiry to the
International Tracing Service (ITS) regarding my Warsaw paternal
grandparents (last heard from, by mail >from within the Ghetto, in
1941). It seems that in both cases, the ITS has been able to locate
"a card" - "(please note [ITS writes] that these cards only refer to
original documents and often do not contain all of the available
information)".

In both cases a "claimant" is listed: "Amt f. Wg. Bln., f. RA Herr,
Bln."

Can anyone decipher this for me: I can guess that "Bln." means
"Berlin", but can't imagine what the rest might mean, nor what a
"claimant" in this case might refer to. And what does the existence
of "a card" signify?
I can only give a partial answer.

Amt is German for "Office" but can mean Department or Administration.

f. is probably an abbreviation for the German "fuer" or "for" in English

I don't know what Wg. is an abbreviation for.

So Amt. f. Wg. is or was an official Department of something (Wg.) in
Berlin.

RA Herr looks like a name. Perhaps he was the contact person in the
Department.

Avotaynu has a few example cards and an example about the purpose of
the cards at this page:

http://www.avotaynu.com/Arolsen.html

Essentially each card was made to refer to a person who was mentioned
in an original source document, like a list of prisoners.

Cards also were created when any requests for information were made to
Arolsen. Maybe your card represents some kind of request for
information made by someone.

--
Brian Stern, Lexington KY
brians99@...


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Re: "Claimant" on an ITS card? #warsaw #poland

Brian Stern <brians99@...>
 

On Mar 6, 2008, at 5:48 PM, Peter Lebensold wrote:
I have just received an email in response to my enquiry to the
International Tracing Service (ITS) regarding my Warsaw paternal
grandparents (last heard from, by mail >from within the Ghetto, in
1941). It seems that in both cases, the ITS has been able to locate
"a card" - "(please note [ITS writes] that these cards only refer to
original documents and often do not contain all of the available
information)".

In both cases a "claimant" is listed: "Amt f. Wg. Bln., f. RA Herr,
Bln."

Can anyone decipher this for me: I can guess that "Bln." means
"Berlin", but can't imagine what the rest might mean, nor what a
"claimant" in this case might refer to. And what does the existence
of "a card" signify?
I can only give a partial answer.

Amt is German for "Office" but can mean Department or Administration.

f. is probably an abbreviation for the German "fuer" or "for" in English

I don't know what Wg. is an abbreviation for.

So Amt. f. Wg. is or was an official Department of something (Wg.) in
Berlin.

RA Herr looks like a name. Perhaps he was the contact person in the
Department.

Avotaynu has a few example cards and an example about the purpose of
the cards at this page:

http://www.avotaynu.com/Arolsen.html

Essentially each card was made to refer to a person who was mentioned
in an original source document, like a list of prisoners.

Cards also were created when any requests for information were made to
Arolsen. Maybe your card represents some kind of request for
information made by someone.

--
Brian Stern, Lexington KY
brians99@...


access to old police records in Detroit #general

Feige Stern
 

Hi,
I have been helping a friend research his family. It turns out that
his grandfather was a member of the Purple gang in Detroit, Michigan
in the 1930s. I googled his grandfather's name and came up with an
FBI file >from 1932 that contains his name on a list of people involved
with the purple gang and his police file number. Does anyone know if
I would be able to access the record? I am curious if anyone has
tried to get this type of record? I'd appreciate any ideas as to
where the records would be held.
Thanks in advance,
Feige Kauvar (Klevarsky) Stern
Researching:
KLEVARSKY (KAUVAR), Seduva, Lithuania; SILVERSTEIN, Rasseiniai,
Lithuania; NAFTEL, Rasseiniai, Lithuania; SCHENKER, Dankera,
Latvia and Birzai, Lithuania; MEYLACH, Dankera, Latvia and Birzai,
Lithuania; HOFFMAN, Kishinev, Moldova; SCHWARTZ, Braila, Romania;
STERN, Kovno, Lithuania; YUDKOVITCH, Warsaw, Poland; SOBEL,
Kleparov, (Lvov), Ukraine; PROBST, Kleparov (Lvov), Ukraine;
SINSHEIMER, Kleparov, Lvov, Ukraine and Wurzburg and Friedburg,
Germany; FRIEDMAN, Odessa, Ukraine. LEVITES; Cherson.


Missouri Posts death certificates on-line form 1910-1957 #general

jan meisels allen <janmallen@...>
 

Missouri has posted their death certificates on-line >from 1910-1957
(50 years old and over). There is a searchable index that links to a
digitized image of the original death certificate. The index can be
searched by first name and last name, county, and by year and month.
http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates/#search

As this is ongoing project not all records are posted as yet. For those
searching death certificates less than 50 years of age the site has a link
to the Missouri Bureau of Vital Records.

Pre- 1910 death and birth records have an interesting past with
requirements starting in 1883 and repeal in 1893 and starting again
in 1910. Those records are on microfilm at the state archives.
For more information as to the birth and death records database on
the pre 1910 birth and death records, go to:
http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/birthdeath/

Thank you to GeneaBlogie for first citing the death certificate
index on-line project.

Jan Meisels Allen
Director, IAJGS and
Chairperson. Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen access to old police records in Detroit #general

Feige Stern
 

Hi,
I have been helping a friend research his family. It turns out that
his grandfather was a member of the Purple gang in Detroit, Michigan
in the 1930s. I googled his grandfather's name and came up with an
FBI file >from 1932 that contains his name on a list of people involved
with the purple gang and his police file number. Does anyone know if
I would be able to access the record? I am curious if anyone has
tried to get this type of record? I'd appreciate any ideas as to
where the records would be held.
Thanks in advance,
Feige Kauvar (Klevarsky) Stern
Researching:
KLEVARSKY (KAUVAR), Seduva, Lithuania; SILVERSTEIN, Rasseiniai,
Lithuania; NAFTEL, Rasseiniai, Lithuania; SCHENKER, Dankera,
Latvia and Birzai, Lithuania; MEYLACH, Dankera, Latvia and Birzai,
Lithuania; HOFFMAN, Kishinev, Moldova; SCHWARTZ, Braila, Romania;
STERN, Kovno, Lithuania; YUDKOVITCH, Warsaw, Poland; SOBEL,
Kleparov, (Lvov), Ukraine; PROBST, Kleparov (Lvov), Ukraine;
SINSHEIMER, Kleparov, Lvov, Ukraine and Wurzburg and Friedburg,
Germany; FRIEDMAN, Odessa, Ukraine. LEVITES; Cherson.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Missouri Posts death certificates on-line form 1910-1957 #general

jan meisels allen <janmallen@...>
 

Missouri has posted their death certificates on-line >from 1910-1957
(50 years old and over). There is a searchable index that links to a
digitized image of the original death certificate. The index can be
searched by first name and last name, county, and by year and month.
http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates/#search

As this is ongoing project not all records are posted as yet. For those
searching death certificates less than 50 years of age the site has a link
to the Missouri Bureau of Vital Records.

Pre- 1910 death and birth records have an interesting past with
requirements starting in 1883 and repeal in 1893 and starting again
in 1910. Those records are on microfilm at the state archives.
For more information as to the birth and death records database on
the pre 1910 birth and death records, go to:
http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/birthdeath/

Thank you to GeneaBlogie for first citing the death certificate
index on-line project.

Jan Meisels Allen
Director, IAJGS and
Chairperson. Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Researching: DEMATOFF - Dymer near Kiev #general

shirley@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,
I recently learned that my grandmother and her siblings came to
Chicago >from Dymer [Dimer, Demir] a town not fr >from Kiev, and
located at the crossing of the rivers Irpin and Dnieper.

The family name was DEMATOFF [Dematov, etc]. I am interested to
contact others who have information about the area or have come
across this rather unusual Jewish surname.

Dina Dematoff married Moshe/Morris Kantrowitz/Kanter, and had 6 children.
Chashke Dematoff married Israel Mandel and had several children.
Bennie Dematoff married twice and had a son, Eddie, who was raised by
my grandmother Dina.

All of these families lived in Chicago >from 1900.

Thanks in advance,
Shirley

Seeking DEMATOFF, KANTROWITZ, Chicago.

MODERATOR NOTE: If you have not already done so, register the names
and places you are researching with the JewishGen Family Finder


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Researching: DEMATOFF - Dymer near Kiev #general

shirley@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,
I recently learned that my grandmother and her siblings came to
Chicago >from Dymer [Dimer, Demir] a town not fr >from Kiev, and
located at the crossing of the rivers Irpin and Dnieper.

The family name was DEMATOFF [Dematov, etc]. I am interested to
contact others who have information about the area or have come
across this rather unusual Jewish surname.

Dina Dematoff married Moshe/Morris Kantrowitz/Kanter, and had 6 children.
Chashke Dematoff married Israel Mandel and had several children.
Bennie Dematoff married twice and had a son, Eddie, who was raised by
my grandmother Dina.

All of these families lived in Chicago >from 1900.

Thanks in advance,
Shirley

Seeking DEMATOFF, KANTROWITZ, Chicago.

MODERATOR NOTE: If you have not already done so, register the names
and places you are researching with the JewishGen Family Finder


JGSCT correction March 16 meeting #general

Marcia Indianer Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Greetings,
 
Correction on date of JGSCT meeting - Sunday, March
16th, 1:30 at Godfrey Memorial Library in Middletown
CT.
 
Marcia Indianer Meyers
President


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSCT correction March 16 meeting #general

Marcia Indianer Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Greetings,
 
Correction on date of JGSCT meeting - Sunday, March
16th, 1:30 at Godfrey Memorial Library in Middletown
CT.
 
Marcia Indianer Meyers
President