Date   
KATZ family from Mandern, Bad Wildungen, and Wuerzburg - INTRO #germany

Amanda Jermyn <astrogirl200@...>
 

Hello,
I am researching my KATZ family >from Mandern which is now part of
Bad Wildungen. The earliest ancestor I know of there was Joel KATZ,
born 1763. In 1795 he married Zerline BIERMANN, b. 1776, >from nearby
Ungedanken.

Children of Zerline and Joel KATZ were David, b. 1796, Jacob, b. 1800
(my direct ancestor), Sara, b. 1815, Suesschen, Meta, Roeschen and
Brainchen. My grandfather's handwritten family tree lists the birthplace
of Joel KATZ as Mandern. However, I was recently told by another relative
about written testimony >from a man called Jakob LEVI, born about 1900
in Bad Wildungen, whose ancestors married into the KATZ family.

According to Mr. LEVI, Joel KATZ was born in Wuerzburg, traded horses
between Wuerzburg and Ungedanken (very close to Mandern), and then settled
in Mandern and started a family. However, I understand that Jews were not
allowed to settle in Wuerzburg before 1803, and that it is possible that
Joel's family lived in Heidingsfeld, a village close to Wuerzburg
where many Jews lived. Given that Joel had sons named David and Jacob,
it is possible they were named after a deceased grandfather, so the father
of Joel may have been named David or Jacob KATZ or HA COHEN.

If anyone knows about this family please contact me privately. Also,
I would be grateful if anyone has advice on where I may find records
for Jews >from the Wuerzburg area.

Amanda Katz Jermyn, Masachusetts, USA astrogirl200@...

German SIG #Germany KATZ family from Mandern, Bad Wildungen, and Wuerzburg - INTRO #germany

Amanda Jermyn <astrogirl200@...>
 

Hello,
I am researching my KATZ family >from Mandern which is now part of
Bad Wildungen. The earliest ancestor I know of there was Joel KATZ,
born 1763. In 1795 he married Zerline BIERMANN, b. 1776, >from nearby
Ungedanken.

Children of Zerline and Joel KATZ were David, b. 1796, Jacob, b. 1800
(my direct ancestor), Sara, b. 1815, Suesschen, Meta, Roeschen and
Brainchen. My grandfather's handwritten family tree lists the birthplace
of Joel KATZ as Mandern. However, I was recently told by another relative
about written testimony >from a man called Jakob LEVI, born about 1900
in Bad Wildungen, whose ancestors married into the KATZ family.

According to Mr. LEVI, Joel KATZ was born in Wuerzburg, traded horses
between Wuerzburg and Ungedanken (very close to Mandern), and then settled
in Mandern and started a family. However, I understand that Jews were not
allowed to settle in Wuerzburg before 1803, and that it is possible that
Joel's family lived in Heidingsfeld, a village close to Wuerzburg
where many Jews lived. Given that Joel had sons named David and Jacob,
it is possible they were named after a deceased grandfather, so the father
of Joel may have been named David or Jacob KATZ or HA COHEN.

If anyone knows about this family please contact me privately. Also,
I would be grateful if anyone has advice on where I may find records
for Jews >from the Wuerzburg area.

Amanda Katz Jermyn, Masachusetts, USA astrogirl200@...

Re: Seeking Information about Unusual First name in Polish Documents #general

tom
 

Hananiah is a very nice biblical Hebrew that could be related to
Hanane. (it is found in the books of Ezra, Nechemia, Jeremiah, and
Daniel.)

Why it cannot be found in the Jewishgen given names database is just
one of those mysteries of the universe.

....... tom klein, toronto


"Mady Land" <madyland@...> wrote:
I've found 8 birth documents for an ancestral family in which the father's
first name is Hanane.
snip...............

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking Information about Unusual First name in Polish Documents #general

tom
 

Hananiah is a very nice biblical Hebrew that could be related to
Hanane. (it is found in the books of Ezra, Nechemia, Jeremiah, and
Daniel.)

Why it cannot be found in the Jewishgen given names database is just
one of those mysteries of the universe.

....... tom klein, toronto


"Mady Land" <madyland@...> wrote:
I've found 8 birth documents for an ancestral family in which the father's
first name is Hanane.
snip...............

Orsha Cemetery Question #belarus

Sherri Venezia
 

My grandfather came >from Orsha, a town in what is now Belarus, but
part of Russia when he left in 1906. I have read that the Jewish
population there was destroyed by the invading Nazis and that many
were slain in what was one of the Jewish cemeteries. Does anyone
know if any of the former Jewish cemeteries are still intact and if
they have headstones standing? If I travel there I would want to be
able to visit what was the former Jewish area and see if any family
graves are standing if there is a walkable cemetery site remaining.
I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who may have been there or who
knows this >from another source.

Thanks,
Sherri Venezia
Davis, CA
MODERATOR NOTE: You may also want to enter your grandfather's name on
JewishGen's online worldwide burial registry of over 1.7
million names for more information. Just click on:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/

Belarus SIG #Belarus Orsha Cemetery Question #belarus

Sherri Venezia
 

My grandfather came >from Orsha, a town in what is now Belarus, but
part of Russia when he left in 1906. I have read that the Jewish
population there was destroyed by the invading Nazis and that many
were slain in what was one of the Jewish cemeteries. Does anyone
know if any of the former Jewish cemeteries are still intact and if
they have headstones standing? If I travel there I would want to be
able to visit what was the former Jewish area and see if any family
graves are standing if there is a walkable cemetery site remaining.
I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who may have been there or who
knows this >from another source.

Thanks,
Sherri Venezia
Davis, CA
MODERATOR NOTE: You may also want to enter your grandfather's name on
JewishGen's online worldwide burial registry of over 1.7
million names for more information. Just click on:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/

Re: Litomerice archive online #austria-czech

Bob Lenk
 

Thanks, Randy, for this news about the online records >from the
Litomerice archive.

If folks aren't aware, some records >from Litomerice archive are
available at the Mormon / Family History Library site. These include
the 1921 census (a civil census, including all religions):

https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/collection/1930345/waypoints
or
http://tinyurl.com/litomerice-1921-census

and some vital records, including some Jewish records (a relatively
small number) >from the archives of Litomerice and (apparently) Zamrsk:

https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.familysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fwaypoint%2FMM26-SYQ%3A802204874%3Fcc%3D1804263
or
http://tinyurl.com/litomerice-jewish-registers

The places with Jewish records are:
Okres Louny: Dolni Rocov and Horni Rocov
Okres Most: Havran

I don't know if there are any Jewish records included in any of the
Catholic registers. I also don't know if there is any overlap with
what's on the archive's official site.

I have found most of what I expected to find in the census record. I
was not able to find any towns of interest to me in the vital records.

They also have some Jewish records >from the Opava and Trebon archives.
I haven't looked at those at all (not where any of my ancestors are from).

Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, USA

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Litomerice archive online #austria-czech

Bob Lenk
 

Thanks, Randy, for this news about the online records >from the
Litomerice archive.

If folks aren't aware, some records >from Litomerice archive are
available at the Mormon / Family History Library site. These include
the 1921 census (a civil census, including all religions):

https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/collection/1930345/waypoints
or
http://tinyurl.com/litomerice-1921-census

and some vital records, including some Jewish records (a relatively
small number) >from the archives of Litomerice and (apparently) Zamrsk:

https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.familysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fwaypoint%2FMM26-SYQ%3A802204874%3Fcc%3D1804263
or
http://tinyurl.com/litomerice-jewish-registers

The places with Jewish records are:
Okres Louny: Dolni Rocov and Horni Rocov
Okres Most: Havran

I don't know if there are any Jewish records included in any of the
Catholic registers. I also don't know if there is any overlap with
what's on the archive's official site.

I have found most of what I expected to find in the census record. I
was not able to find any towns of interest to me in the vital records.

They also have some Jewish records >from the Opava and Trebon archives.
I haven't looked at those at all (not where any of my ancestors are from).

Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, USA

Litomerice archive online #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Erika Kalkofen-Frahne of Dortmund, Germany alerted me to the website of
the State Archives in Litomerice Vital Records Search,
http://matriky.soalitomerice.cz/matriky_lite/ . She says she has found
references to a number of converted Jewish families in the marriage
record books, especially for "Konfessionslos" (no religion), but also,
less frequently, in the Catholic and Protestant (Evangelisch) records.
For those of you researching in the Litomerice (North Bohemia) region,
you may with to comb through the online resources at this site.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Litomerice archive online #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Erika Kalkofen-Frahne of Dortmund, Germany alerted me to the website of
the State Archives in Litomerice Vital Records Search,
http://matriky.soalitomerice.cz/matriky_lite/ . She says she has found
references to a number of converted Jewish families in the marriage
record books, especially for "Konfessionslos" (no religion), but also,
less frequently, in the Catholic and Protestant (Evangelisch) records.
For those of you researching in the Litomerice (North Bohemia) region,
you may with to comb through the online resources at this site.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA

New article and video on Chechelnik KehilaLinks #ukraine

Ariel Parkansky
 

Hi everybody,

A new article about the visit of a Jewish group to Chechelnik in 2012 by Larissa Shabelnik (Chechelnik Herald Gazette) is available on the section "Chechelnik Today". It contains several images of the service in the Synagogue.

There's also a new video of the Chechelnik Synagogue in the "videos" section.

Regards,
Ariel Parkansky
Chechelnik Town Leader
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/chechelnik

Ordering records from Kiev archives #ukraine

yoshiyahooo@...
 

Hello friends,

I'm researching the Vulis family >from Khodorkov and the Litvinovsky
family that lived in Kiev. Miriam Weiner's Roots to Roots Foundation
site indicates that relevant records should exist in the following
locations:

1) CENTRAL STATE HISTORICAL ARCHIVES OF UKRAINE IN KIEV

2) STATE ARCHIVE OF KIEV OBLAST

3) KIEV ZAGS ARCHIVE

How do I order records >from these archives? (I am >from Israel and
don't know Ukrainian.) Can anyone share their experience or tips?

Thanks,
Omri Shareth

Ukraine SIG #Ukraine New article and video on Chechelnik KehilaLinks #ukraine

Ariel Parkansky
 

Hi everybody,

A new article about the visit of a Jewish group to Chechelnik in 2012 by Larissa Shabelnik (Chechelnik Herald Gazette) is available on the section "Chechelnik Today". It contains several images of the service in the Synagogue.

There's also a new video of the Chechelnik Synagogue in the "videos" section.

Regards,
Ariel Parkansky
Chechelnik Town Leader
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/chechelnik

Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Ordering records from Kiev archives #ukraine

yoshiyahooo@...
 

Hello friends,

I'm researching the Vulis family >from Khodorkov and the Litvinovsky
family that lived in Kiev. Miriam Weiner's Roots to Roots Foundation
site indicates that relevant records should exist in the following
locations:

1) CENTRAL STATE HISTORICAL ARCHIVES OF UKRAINE IN KIEV

2) STATE ARCHIVE OF KIEV OBLAST

3) KIEV ZAGS ARCHIVE

How do I order records >from these archives? (I am >from Israel and
don't know Ukrainian.) Can anyone share their experience or tips?

Thanks,
Omri Shareth

Re: Kosher Torahs #germany

tom
 

There definitely are "other kinds", namely torahs that not kosher for
various reasons, such as wear and tear or errors, some of which can
be repaired, and some which cannot. the rules for a torah being
"pasul" (void) are beyond the scope of jewishgen, but the upshot is
that they may not be used for services.

for a small synagogue, the number of (kosher) torahs is important,
because they are necessary but expensive. (and it's also a source of
pride.) For example, at certain times of the year, there are
readings >from more than one section, and it is customary to use a
different torah for each section, to avoid having to roll all the way
to the other section(s). On some holidays, up to 3 different torahs
are used, each cued up to different places. This can be accomplished
with a single torah, but much less conveniently, and it puts more
wear and tear on the torah itself.

If nothing else, it would seem to indicate that there were many,
small synagogues, rather than large ones (where there are usually
plenty of torahs). i would also hazard a guess that the proliferation
of small synagogues looked odd to the non-Jews, who probably belonged
to the nearest church, by district.

The comment that's interesting is: "where he has his own kosher
torah". Although it's not clear whether the torah belongs to the
father or the teacher, it's probably a clue that children were taught
from a torah scroll (which had to be kosher). And the comment about
supporting the teacher communally echoes the writing of the "arukh
hashulhan", by Rabbi yehiel mikhel halevi epstein, >from about the
same time period, on the subject of jewish education for children.
(he rules that the rich should hire teachers for their own children,
and the children of the poor should be taught in communally funded
and run schools. Obviously not the case where the father "has his
own kosher torah", if we read it that way.)

It might not be directly genealogical information as such, but it
does give a bit of insight into their lives.


....... tom klein, toronto


"Roger Lustig (GerSIG)" <GerSIG.Research@...> wrote:
...there's another kind?

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Kosher Torahs #general

tom
 

There definitely are "other kinds", namely torahs that not kosher for
various reasons, such as wear and tear or errors, some of which can
be repaired, and some which cannot. the rules for a torah being
"pasul" (void) are beyond the scope of jewishgen, but the upshot is
that they may not be used for services.

for a small synagogue, the number of (kosher) torahs is important,
because they are necessary but expensive. (and it's also a source of
pride.) For example, at certain times of the year, there are
readings >from more than one section, and it is customary to use a
different torah for each section, to avoid having to roll all the way
to the other section(s). On some holidays, up to 3 different torahs
are used, each cued up to different places. This can be accomplished
with a single torah, but much less conveniently, and it puts more
wear and tear on the torah itself.

If nothing else, it would seem to indicate that there were many,
small synagogues, rather than large ones (where there are usually
plenty of torahs). i would also hazard a guess that the proliferation
of small synagogues looked odd to the non-Jews, who probably belonged
to the nearest church, by district.

The comment that's interesting is: "where he has his own kosher
torah". Although it's not clear whether the torah belongs to the
father or the teacher, it's probably a clue that children were taught
from a torah scroll (which had to be kosher). And the comment about
supporting the teacher communally echoes the writing of the "arukh
hashulhan", by Rabbi yehiel mikhel halevi epstein, >from about the
same time period, on the subject of jewish education for children.
(he rules that the rich should hire teachers for their own children,
and the children of the poor should be taught in communally funded
and run schools. Obviously not the case where the father "has his
own kosher torah", if we read it that way.)

It might not be directly genealogical information as such, but it
does give a bit of insight into their lives.


....... tom klein, toronto


"Roger Lustig (GerSIG)" <GerSIG.Research@...> wrote:
...there's another kind?

Re: Deciphering 1923 Gravestone of Great-Great Aunt #general

tom
 

(it's better to post an image of the stone on the Jewishgen's Viewmate
(http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/), because it's very easy to
mistake certain hebrew letters.)

third line letters >from right to left:=DD Mem-Resh-Toff space Resh-Chet-Toff
space Lamed-Alef-Hey (her name was Mrs. Rochel Leah)

"mrs. rahel leah" (you have probably misread the lamed in rahel as a taf.)

fourth line letters >from right to left: Bet-Toff space Mem-Resh space
Shin-Ayin-Resh-Yud-Hey (bat Mr. Shaarya)

"daughter of mr shemaryah" (i'm only guessing,but shemaryah is common,
shaarya is not)

fifth line letters >from right to left:>Nun-Lamed-Tet-Kaff-Hey space Kaff-Toff-
Aleph-Vav-Mem
"died 25..."

Iit would be much better to post a picture.

...... tom klein, toronto

"Scott G. C. Levingston" <picoprops@...> wrote:
I have located the gravestone of my great-great aunt, who died in 1923.
She was born in Lithuania in the 860ss and was buried in 923 in Woburn,
Massachusetts, USA.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Deciphering 1923 Gravestone of Great-Great Aunt #general

tom
 

(it's better to post an image of the stone on the Jewishgen's Viewmate
(http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/), because it's very easy to
mistake certain hebrew letters.)

third line letters >from right to left:=DD Mem-Resh-Toff space Resh-Chet-Toff
space Lamed-Alef-Hey (her name was Mrs. Rochel Leah)

"mrs. rahel leah" (you have probably misread the lamed in rahel as a taf.)

fourth line letters >from right to left: Bet-Toff space Mem-Resh space
Shin-Ayin-Resh-Yud-Hey (bat Mr. Shaarya)

"daughter of mr shemaryah" (i'm only guessing,but shemaryah is common,
shaarya is not)

fifth line letters >from right to left:>Nun-Lamed-Tet-Kaff-Hey space Kaff-Toff-
Aleph-Vav-Mem
"died 25..."

Iit would be much better to post a picture.

...... tom klein, toronto

"Scott G. C. Levingston" <picoprops@...> wrote:
I have located the gravestone of my great-great aunt, who died in 1923.
She was born in Lithuania in the 860ss and was buried in 923 in Woburn,
Massachusetts, USA.

Re: Kubelziach near Lozdijai #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Jeff Marx wrote

I am searching for my Kubelsky family's town of origin, Kubelziach,
Lithuania.
snip......

Jeff,

I'm not aware about the existence of 18th or 19th centuries detailed
maps of the Sejny/Lozdjiai region.
Below is the link to 1929 1:100 000 region's map.

http://www.mapywig.org/m/wig100k/P32_S37_SEJNY.jpg

I'm just curious how did you managed to trace "Kubelziach" to 1850
and 1866 references when 1870 Poland Geographical Dictionary does not
list such place.
There is listing in The Dictionary for Kubilnice stream, a
contributory to Niemen River (it shown in modern Lithuanian maps as
Kubelnycia)

Best of luck with your quest.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Kubelziach near Lozdijai #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Jeff Marx wrote

I am searching for my Kubelsky family's town of origin, Kubelziach,
Lithuania.
snip......

Jeff,

I'm not aware about the existence of 18th or 19th centuries detailed
maps of the Sejny/Lozdjiai region.
Below is the link to 1929 1:100 000 region's map.

http://www.mapywig.org/m/wig100k/P32_S37_SEJNY.jpg

I'm just curious how did you managed to trace "Kubelziach" to 1850
and 1866 references when 1870 Poland Geographical Dictionary does not
list such place.
There is listing in The Dictionary for Kubilnice stream, a
contributory to Niemen River (it shown in modern Lithuanian maps as
Kubelnycia)

Best of luck with your quest.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor