Date   
ViewMate Translation request - German #general

Brian Lehman <blrrcn@...>
 

Hello,
I have added 2 marriage records to ViewMate, dated 1850/1857. I am requesting and
would be grateful for translation of as much of the text as possible, to record in
my records accurately. Please follow the link below:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23169

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23166

Thank you for your help and take care,
Brian Lehman
Researching:
Mielnica,Galicia - SCHUSTER, LEHMAN, MENDLOWITZ, WEISSMANN, STELMACH, SCHNEIDER,
GRISCHMANN. Czortkow,Galicia - FISCHTHAL, KLEINMAN, RINTEL, SCHNEIDER, KAHNER,
GRUNBERG. Chrzanow,Galicia - SCHNEIDER,BORENSTEIN,JOSEPH. Wiznitz,Bukovina -
PISTINER,PASTERNACK,FELDMANN,KALER. Muenzenheim,Germany - DIEDELSCHEIMER,ELSASSER,
HABISH,HABICHT,TURKHEIMER. Warsaw - SILVERSTEIN and similar,GROER.
And all variant spellings

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation request - German #general

Brian Lehman <blrrcn@...>
 

Hello,
I have added 2 marriage records to ViewMate, dated 1850/1857. I am requesting and
would be grateful for translation of as much of the text as possible, to record in
my records accurately. Please follow the link below:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23169

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23166

Thank you for your help and take care,
Brian Lehman
Researching:
Mielnica,Galicia - SCHUSTER, LEHMAN, MENDLOWITZ, WEISSMANN, STELMACH, SCHNEIDER,
GRISCHMANN. Czortkow,Galicia - FISCHTHAL, KLEINMAN, RINTEL, SCHNEIDER, KAHNER,
GRUNBERG. Chrzanow,Galicia - SCHNEIDER,BORENSTEIN,JOSEPH. Wiznitz,Bukovina -
PISTINER,PASTERNACK,FELDMANN,KALER. Muenzenheim,Germany - DIEDELSCHEIMER,ELSASSER,
HABISH,HABICHT,TURKHEIMER. Warsaw - SILVERSTEIN and similar,GROER.
And all variant spellings

Kaunas Gubernia Vital Records #lithuania

Dorfleiv@...
 

A milestone has been reached and for us, it is a momentous occasion.
LitvakSIG has completed the translation of ALL known vital records for
the KAUNAS GUBERNIA with the exception of the post 1911 birth records
which were not filmed . We cannot translate later birth records due to
the 100 year privacy law. For some towns, the 1912 - 1914 birth
records were filmed by the Mormons and we were able to translate
those records.

This includes shtetls in the districts of Kaunas, Panevezys, Raseiniai,
Sauliai, Telsiai, Ukmerge and Zarasai. Spreadsheets for these records
can be found on the relevant district research group sites. Many but
not all are already on the All Lithuania Database and the balance will
be available on the ALD in about 18 months time.

Just to remind you - the LitvakSIG Vital Records Translation (VRT)
Project focuses on translating the 19th and early 20th century
Lithuanian Jewish Communities' vital records (birth, marriage, death
and divorce records) that were microfilmed by the Latter Day Saints
(LDS) and has been extended to include vital records that were not
microfilmed as well.

The Vital Records Project began in 2000 and is organized by Gubernia:
(i)Kovno (Kaunas) Guberniya, (ii) Vilna (Vilnius) Gubernia, and(iii)
Suwalki Guberniya. Although Kaunas is for the time being complete,
there is still work to be done on Vilnius and Suwalki translations.

There are so very many people to thank for their efforts in making
this announcement possible: the volunteers who coordinated the
fundraising and translation work and those who have the skills and
gave their time to undertake some of the translation work. Thank you
to the many contributors who have funded this collective success. As
time passes, we will be able to translate the post 1920 births and
hope you will support us in that effort. This is a collective
endeavour and we all share in its achievement.

We hope you find your ancestors in these records but are very well
aware that many years are missing, having been destroyed in fire and
war or simply lost. So do not forget that the work of the District
Research Groups on many types of lists goes on with your support and
these are often the only sources for you to find the information you seek.

Howard Margol
Aaron Roetenberg
Dorothy Leivers

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Kaunas Gubernia Vital Records #lithuania

Dorfleiv@...
 

A milestone has been reached and for us, it is a momentous occasion.
LitvakSIG has completed the translation of ALL known vital records for
the KAUNAS GUBERNIA with the exception of the post 1911 birth records
which were not filmed . We cannot translate later birth records due to
the 100 year privacy law. For some towns, the 1912 - 1914 birth
records were filmed by the Mormons and we were able to translate
those records.

This includes shtetls in the districts of Kaunas, Panevezys, Raseiniai,
Sauliai, Telsiai, Ukmerge and Zarasai. Spreadsheets for these records
can be found on the relevant district research group sites. Many but
not all are already on the All Lithuania Database and the balance will
be available on the ALD in about 18 months time.

Just to remind you - the LitvakSIG Vital Records Translation (VRT)
Project focuses on translating the 19th and early 20th century
Lithuanian Jewish Communities' vital records (birth, marriage, death
and divorce records) that were microfilmed by the Latter Day Saints
(LDS) and has been extended to include vital records that were not
microfilmed as well.

The Vital Records Project began in 2000 and is organized by Gubernia:
(i)Kovno (Kaunas) Guberniya, (ii) Vilna (Vilnius) Gubernia, and(iii)
Suwalki Guberniya. Although Kaunas is for the time being complete,
there is still work to be done on Vilnius and Suwalki translations.

There are so very many people to thank for their efforts in making
this announcement possible: the volunteers who coordinated the
fundraising and translation work and those who have the skills and
gave their time to undertake some of the translation work. Thank you
to the many contributors who have funded this collective success. As
time passes, we will be able to translate the post 1920 births and
hope you will support us in that effort. This is a collective
endeavour and we all share in its achievement.

We hope you find your ancestors in these records but are very well
aware that many years are missing, having been destroyed in fire and
war or simply lost. So do not forget that the work of the District
Research Groups on many types of lists goes on with your support and
these are often the only sources for you to find the information you seek.

Howard Margol
Aaron Roetenberg
Dorothy Leivers

Ukraine SIG: Center for Genealogical Research Name Lists #ukraine

rondoctor@...
 

Dear Ukraine SIG Friends


I want to tell you about a tremendous new resource that Marilyn
Robinson, Tara Levin, and Bena Shklyanoy have uncovered, each working
independently. It is the Russian language website of the Center for
Genealogical Research (http://www.rosgenea.ru). Each entry is a short
biographical paragraph about an individual. The paragraph often includes
names of spouses or children. The entries are arranged alphabetically by
surname. According to the website, the list covers the European
territory of the former Russian Empire, people born before 1918. I
estimate that about 10% of the names are Jewish.

The website contains about 420,000 primary surnames (almost 2,600 pages
of primary surnames with about 160 names per page). Common surnames have
multiple secondary pages, each with up to 15 people listed. For example
the primary surname Kagan has six secondary pages with a total of 60 to
90 name entries. We estimate that the Center's website has more than 6
million individual name entries ... between 500,000 and 1 million Jewish
name entries. A.M. Paramonov's "Encyclopedia of Names, Kharkov Province"
seems to be drawn >from this list. (We are more than half finished with
the extraction of Jewish names and translating the entries. >from
Paramonov's Encyclopedia.)

The entries seem to be drawn >from 5 reference works (all in Russian):

1) /Address book of members of the All-Union Botanical Society/; as of
May 1, 1957. St. Petersburg. Publisher: USSR Academy of Sciences.
Leningrad, 1958. (scanning funded by the Center for Genealogical Research)
2) /City of Yekaterinburg. Collection of historical statistics and
background information on the city, with an address pointer and
including some information on the Yekaterinburg district. / A
publication of Yekaterinburg Mayor I.I. Simanova. Yekaterinburg. Printed
in /Yekaterinburg Week/ in 1889. (Scanning funded by /Ural Mining and
Metallurgical Company/).
3)/Picturesque Russia. / Volume 4. Part two. by P.P. Semionov; St.
Petersburg - Moscow: 1881-1901, M.O. Wolf (bookseller-typographer).
(scanning funded by /Ural Mining and Metallurgical Company/)
4) /Complete list of officer ranks of the Russian Imperial Army on 1
January 1909/. St. Petersburg: Military press (in the building of the
General Staff). (Scanning funded by the Center for Genealogical Research)
5) /Russia. The full geographical description of our country. Desktop
and road book. Volume 5. Urals and the Ural region./ St. Petersburg.
Publisher: A.F. DeVries, 1914. (scanning funded /Ural Mining and
Metallurgical Company/)

We need translators to extract the Jewish entries, translate them >from
printed Russian to English, and enter the translations in a spreadsheet.
We will provide you with the spreadsheet template. Bena will be Project
Manager until we can find a qualified Manager to take over the project.
I have entered this project and related data collection into our website
database. You can get to it at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/RES_Project.asp?id=310.

Please contact me if you can help with this project, either as project
manager or as a translator.

Ron

--
Ron Doctor (rddpdx@...)
Coordinator, JewishGen Ukraine SIG
www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine
where Jewish genealogy is personal

Researching DOCTOR (DIOKHTER), VARER, AVERBAKH, KORENFELD ... all >from Kremenets, Oleksinets, Yampol, Vishnevets
and KAZDOY (KOSODOY), DUBINSKI, DUBOWSKY ... all >from Kiev, Uman, Odessa

Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Ukraine SIG: Center for Genealogical Research Name Lists #ukraine

rondoctor@...
 

Dear Ukraine SIG Friends


I want to tell you about a tremendous new resource that Marilyn
Robinson, Tara Levin, and Bena Shklyanoy have uncovered, each working
independently. It is the Russian language website of the Center for
Genealogical Research (http://www.rosgenea.ru). Each entry is a short
biographical paragraph about an individual. The paragraph often includes
names of spouses or children. The entries are arranged alphabetically by
surname. According to the website, the list covers the European
territory of the former Russian Empire, people born before 1918. I
estimate that about 10% of the names are Jewish.

The website contains about 420,000 primary surnames (almost 2,600 pages
of primary surnames with about 160 names per page). Common surnames have
multiple secondary pages, each with up to 15 people listed. For example
the primary surname Kagan has six secondary pages with a total of 60 to
90 name entries. We estimate that the Center's website has more than 6
million individual name entries ... between 500,000 and 1 million Jewish
name entries. A.M. Paramonov's "Encyclopedia of Names, Kharkov Province"
seems to be drawn >from this list. (We are more than half finished with
the extraction of Jewish names and translating the entries. >from
Paramonov's Encyclopedia.)

The entries seem to be drawn >from 5 reference works (all in Russian):

1) /Address book of members of the All-Union Botanical Society/; as of
May 1, 1957. St. Petersburg. Publisher: USSR Academy of Sciences.
Leningrad, 1958. (scanning funded by the Center for Genealogical Research)
2) /City of Yekaterinburg. Collection of historical statistics and
background information on the city, with an address pointer and
including some information on the Yekaterinburg district. / A
publication of Yekaterinburg Mayor I.I. Simanova. Yekaterinburg. Printed
in /Yekaterinburg Week/ in 1889. (Scanning funded by /Ural Mining and
Metallurgical Company/).
3)/Picturesque Russia. / Volume 4. Part two. by P.P. Semionov; St.
Petersburg - Moscow: 1881-1901, M.O. Wolf (bookseller-typographer).
(scanning funded by /Ural Mining and Metallurgical Company/)
4) /Complete list of officer ranks of the Russian Imperial Army on 1
January 1909/. St. Petersburg: Military press (in the building of the
General Staff). (Scanning funded by the Center for Genealogical Research)
5) /Russia. The full geographical description of our country. Desktop
and road book. Volume 5. Urals and the Ural region./ St. Petersburg.
Publisher: A.F. DeVries, 1914. (scanning funded /Ural Mining and
Metallurgical Company/)

We need translators to extract the Jewish entries, translate them >from
printed Russian to English, and enter the translations in a spreadsheet.
We will provide you with the spreadsheet template. Bena will be Project
Manager until we can find a qualified Manager to take over the project.
I have entered this project and related data collection into our website
database. You can get to it at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/RES_Project.asp?id=310.

Please contact me if you can help with this project, either as project
manager or as a translator.

Ron

--
Ron Doctor (rddpdx@...)
Coordinator, JewishGen Ukraine SIG
www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine
where Jewish genealogy is personal

Researching DOCTOR (DIOKHTER), VARER, AVERBAKH, KORENFELD ... all >from Kremenets, Oleksinets, Yampol, Vishnevets
and KAZDOY (KOSODOY), DUBINSKI, DUBOWSKY ... all >from Kiev, Uman, Odessa

Re: The name Menachem Nuchem #ukraine

Hatte Blejer
 

I looked up the name in Beider' Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names
before I posted here originally. As Steve said, both Menachem and
Nachum / Nochum are Hebrew names in their own right. And as Fay said,
in many cases Nuchem (reduced vowel) is a derivative of Menachem. So
Nuchem can either be a derivative or a separate, Hebrew name.

What I was really interested in learning was whether Menachem Nuchem
became a name that was commonly given to boys born in the Ukraine in
Wolyn (Volhynia) due to the Chernobyl Rebbe, Menachem Nuchem Twersky.
My gg grandfather would have been born a couple of decades after the
Rebbe's death at most. And named his son Mordechai, which was the
name of the Rebbe's son who followed him.

Moderator's Note: We have discussed this issue sufficiently. The thread has ended.

Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: The name Menachem Nuchem #ukraine

Hatte Blejer
 

I looked up the name in Beider' Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names
before I posted here originally. As Steve said, both Menachem and
Nachum / Nochum are Hebrew names in their own right. And as Fay said,
in many cases Nuchem (reduced vowel) is a derivative of Menachem. So
Nuchem can either be a derivative or a separate, Hebrew name.

What I was really interested in learning was whether Menachem Nuchem
became a name that was commonly given to boys born in the Ukraine in
Wolyn (Volhynia) due to the Chernobyl Rebbe, Menachem Nuchem Twersky.
My gg grandfather would have been born a couple of decades after the
Rebbe's death at most. And named his son Mordechai, which was the
name of the Rebbe's son who followed him.

Moderator's Note: We have discussed this issue sufficiently. The thread has ended.

Ruzhany Yizkor Book in Print Now Available #belarus

joel.alpert@...
 

As a Belarus researcher we thought you would be
interested in learning of the recent publication
of the English translation of Ruzhany: A Memorial
to a Lost Jewish Community.

This is the latest in a new series of English
translations of Yizkor books being made available
through the auspices of JewishGen's "Yizkor Books
in Print Project." The book has 458 pages with
many illustrations offered in hard cover in a
6.69" by 9.61" format.

This book is a translation of the Ruzhany
Memorial (Yizkor) Book that was published in 1957
in Hebrew and Yiddish; it is based upon the
memoirs of former Jewish residents of the town
who had left before the war

Ruzhany, called "Rozana" in Polish and "Ruzhnoy"
in Yiddish, is now a small town in Belarus. It
was founded in the mid-1500s, when Jews were
first permitted and by 1939, the Jewish
population was 3,500, comprising 78% of the
town's population. In November 1942, every Jewish
resident was murdered by the Nazis and their
collaborators. The descriptions of the
destruction of the community and their end in the
Treblinka death camp are recorded in this book by
survivors >from other towns. No Jewish resident
from Ruzhany survived!
The town is also known as Ruzhany [Russian],
R=F3zana [Polish], Rozshinoi [Yiddish], Ruzany
[Belarussian], and Rozhanoy, Rozhinoy, Rozhinoi,
Ruz'inoi, Ruzhana, Rozhana, Ruzhyn

The list price for this book is $59.95 and it is
available on Amazon for about $46. For more
information and a link to Amazon see:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Ruzhany.html

For other books available >from the Yizkor Books
in Print project, go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

For non-US orders: try these distributors for "Yizkor Book in Print"
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Distributors.html

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor Books in Print Project

Belarus SIG #Belarus Ruzhany Yizkor Book in Print Now Available #belarus

joel.alpert@...
 

As a Belarus researcher we thought you would be
interested in learning of the recent publication
of the English translation of Ruzhany: A Memorial
to a Lost Jewish Community.

This is the latest in a new series of English
translations of Yizkor books being made available
through the auspices of JewishGen's "Yizkor Books
in Print Project." The book has 458 pages with
many illustrations offered in hard cover in a
6.69" by 9.61" format.

This book is a translation of the Ruzhany
Memorial (Yizkor) Book that was published in 1957
in Hebrew and Yiddish; it is based upon the
memoirs of former Jewish residents of the town
who had left before the war

Ruzhany, called "Rozana" in Polish and "Ruzhnoy"
in Yiddish, is now a small town in Belarus. It
was founded in the mid-1500s, when Jews were
first permitted and by 1939, the Jewish
population was 3,500, comprising 78% of the
town's population. In November 1942, every Jewish
resident was murdered by the Nazis and their
collaborators. The descriptions of the
destruction of the community and their end in the
Treblinka death camp are recorded in this book by
survivors >from other towns. No Jewish resident
from Ruzhany survived!
The town is also known as Ruzhany [Russian],
R=F3zana [Polish], Rozshinoi [Yiddish], Ruzany
[Belarussian], and Rozhanoy, Rozhinoy, Rozhinoi,
Ruz'inoi, Ruzhana, Rozhana, Ruzhyn

The list price for this book is $59.95 and it is
available on Amazon for about $46. For more
information and a link to Amazon see:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Ruzhany.html

For other books available >from the Yizkor Books
in Print project, go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

For non-US orders: try these distributors for "Yizkor Book in Print"
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Distributors.html

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor Books in Print Project

Searching: KARLINSKY from Ivavava/Janova #belarus

gary.karlin@...
 

Hi everyone,


I'm researching my great grandparents Benjamin & Fannie KARLINSKY from
Ivanava (near Pinsk), Belarus. The birth records are in Russian and
are not indexed. They were both born about 1885 and 1888 and left that
city in 1906. I have no idea which port they left and which port they
entered in the US (other than Ellis Island). I would pull the
microfilm in Salt Lake City and have it sent to Chicago, but I do not
read Russian. I would like to find Ben's parents, grandparents, etc.
I've heard there's a town founder by the name of Jan Karol Dolsky
(town of Karlin) and a Rabbi Dovid Karliner who was one of the Rabbis
who spread the Hassidic movement in Poland/Lithuania. I also have
distant cousins (I have met and have been told by my grandfather) with
the last name of Karlinsky/Karlin/Karolin/Kalin, etc.

Gary Karlin
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately

Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching: KARLINSKY from Ivavava/Janova #belarus

gary.karlin@...
 

Hi everyone,


I'm researching my great grandparents Benjamin & Fannie KARLINSKY from
Ivanava (near Pinsk), Belarus. The birth records are in Russian and
are not indexed. They were both born about 1885 and 1888 and left that
city in 1906. I have no idea which port they left and which port they
entered in the US (other than Ellis Island). I would pull the
microfilm in Salt Lake City and have it sent to Chicago, but I do not
read Russian. I would like to find Ben's parents, grandparents, etc.
I've heard there's a town founder by the name of Jan Karol Dolsky
(town of Karlin) and a Rabbi Dovid Karliner who was one of the Rabbis
who spread the Hassidic movement in Poland/Lithuania. I also have
distant cousins (I have met and have been told by my grandfather) with
the last name of Karlinsky/Karlin/Karolin/Kalin, etc.

Gary Karlin
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately

Marriage License Lookup (Brooklyn) #general

JudiZimmer
 

If anyone is going to do a lookup at the Chambers Street Dept. of
Records soon, and would be willing to look up a marriage license for me,
could you please contact me for the information? I have the names, date
and certificate number. What I need is the names of the parents of both
the bride and groom. Contact me privately.
Many thanks!
Judi Zimmer

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Marriage License Lookup (Brooklyn) #general

JudiZimmer
 

If anyone is going to do a lookup at the Chambers Street Dept. of
Records soon, and would be willing to look up a marriage license for me,
could you please contact me for the information? I have the names, date
and certificate number. What I need is the names of the parents of both
the bride and groom. Contact me privately.
Many thanks!
Judi Zimmer

Blodnia - Polish-Russian border #general

Angie Elfassi
 

yershamayskaya, Belarus
52°32' N 24°54' E
145 mi SW of Minsk
Pyershamayskaya [Bel], Bluden [Pol], Bluden [Rus], Bludzien [Bel],
Pervomayskaya [Rus], Piersamajskaja, Blodno


SovietUnion Bluden
Pruzana
Polesie
Poland Bluden
Pruzhany
Grodno
Russian Empire

Hi,

I am helping someone research his family - brothers Moshe - Morris and Hyman
STEIN - maybe the name was originally SHOCHAT >from somewhere that sounds like
Blodnia on the Russian-Polish border.

I found on JewishGen Communities - modern name:
Yershamayskaya, Belarus, formerly Pyershamayskaya (Bel), Bluden (Pol),
Bluden (Rus), Bluzien (Bel), Pervomayskaya (Rus), Piersamajskaja, Blodno.


Around 1950 the name for that town was: Bluden Soviet Union, around 1930 was
Bluden, Poland, and about 1900 Bluden, Russian Empire.

If anyone can help with any information I would appreciate it.

Thanks.

Regards
Angie Elfassi
Yehud, Israel
Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Blodnia - Polish-Russian border #general

Angie Elfassi
 

yershamayskaya, Belarus
52°32' N 24°54' E
145 mi SW of Minsk
Pyershamayskaya [Bel], Bluden [Pol], Bluden [Rus], Bludzien [Bel],
Pervomayskaya [Rus], Piersamajskaja, Blodno


SovietUnion Bluden
Pruzana
Polesie
Poland Bluden
Pruzhany
Grodno
Russian Empire

Hi,

I am helping someone research his family - brothers Moshe - Morris and Hyman
STEIN - maybe the name was originally SHOCHAT >from somewhere that sounds like
Blodnia on the Russian-Polish border.

I found on JewishGen Communities - modern name:
Yershamayskaya, Belarus, formerly Pyershamayskaya (Bel), Bluden (Pol),
Bluden (Rus), Bluzien (Bel), Pervomayskaya (Rus), Piersamajskaja, Blodno.


Around 1950 the name for that town was: Bluden Soviet Union, around 1930 was
Bluden, Poland, and about 1900 Bluden, Russian Empire.

If anyone can help with any information I would appreciate it.

Thanks.

Regards
Angie Elfassi
Yehud, Israel
Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds

Czech Registers #austria-czech

ronny@...
 

In case anyone has not already done so, it is worthwhile paying close
attention to any birth registers that feature a column headed "Pathen",
indicating an individual sponsoring the new-born child. By doing so, I
was able to form a table of children for which my
great-great-grandfather Salomon Z Aufrichtig had put his name forward.
Coincidence or otherwise, it transpired that the mothers of most of
these children were Aufrichtig girls who, although I knew they had at
one stage shared the same address as Salomon, did not have any official
documentation to confirm them as siblings. I now believe that Salomon's
involvement in their children's welfare reinforces the likelihood of
kinship. Does anyone know if the role of "Pathen" was one normally
adopted by a relative?

I wonder, too, if anyone else has come across "odd" entries when
researching family members. I have thus far concentrated all my efforts
on Boskovice, since that is where my direct line is traced back to the
1700s. In all registers, there are lines in which a column entry has been
entered as ditto (") marks. I had assumed these to indicate that the
entry in this column was a repeat of the one directly above.

This worked fine, until re-checking the entry on g-g-grandfather
Salomon's daughter Vogele. At that stage I noted that in the next two
lines in the Father column, directly beneath Salomon's name, each had
the male parent listed as " ". I uttered OMG and stared at these two
lines in disbelief! The Boskovice registers also have a column to denote
if the child be legitimate or born out of wedlock. Sure enough, both
these children were entered as illegitimate. In case anyone is willing
to have a look at it, it is within the 1832-1848 Boskovice Birth
Register, image 22 (April 1842).

Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

Ronny Roberts, London & Bradenton, FL
AUFRICHTIG, AUFRIKHTIG, OFRICHTIG, LOKSCHAN (Moravia), HUSSERL
(Moravia), WODAK (Moravia)

Viewmate translation request #austria-czech

Manettez@...
 

Hello to all:
I have posted a signature >from a Romanian birth record on Viewmate. I am
looking for an English translation of the Yiddish signature. Also, if anyone
has an ideas about the possible root meaning of the surname and a country
of origin affiliated with the surname I would be very interested in
learning. The signature is that of my Great Grandfather whom I know virtually
nothing about other than what is stated on this birth record of my Grandfather,
Solomon (Samuel Zeitler in the USA). The officials wrote the name of my GG
as, Filip Taitler on birth certificate. It states that he was a tailor
living on Poets Street in Bucharest, married to Miriam Joseph Grinberg. The
record is >from 1884. If anyone has any information on this family would you
please email me?
The Viewmate address is:
www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23104

Thank you,
Manette S. Zeitler
Bristol, Indiana

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Czech Registers #austria-czech

ronny@...
 

In case anyone has not already done so, it is worthwhile paying close
attention to any birth registers that feature a column headed "Pathen",
indicating an individual sponsoring the new-born child. By doing so, I
was able to form a table of children for which my
great-great-grandfather Salomon Z Aufrichtig had put his name forward.
Coincidence or otherwise, it transpired that the mothers of most of
these children were Aufrichtig girls who, although I knew they had at
one stage shared the same address as Salomon, did not have any official
documentation to confirm them as siblings. I now believe that Salomon's
involvement in their children's welfare reinforces the likelihood of
kinship. Does anyone know if the role of "Pathen" was one normally
adopted by a relative?

I wonder, too, if anyone else has come across "odd" entries when
researching family members. I have thus far concentrated all my efforts
on Boskovice, since that is where my direct line is traced back to the
1700s. In all registers, there are lines in which a column entry has been
entered as ditto (") marks. I had assumed these to indicate that the
entry in this column was a repeat of the one directly above.

This worked fine, until re-checking the entry on g-g-grandfather
Salomon's daughter Vogele. At that stage I noted that in the next two
lines in the Father column, directly beneath Salomon's name, each had
the male parent listed as " ". I uttered OMG and stared at these two
lines in disbelief! The Boskovice registers also have a column to denote
if the child be legitimate or born out of wedlock. Sure enough, both
these children were entered as illegitimate. In case anyone is willing
to have a look at it, it is within the 1832-1848 Boskovice Birth
Register, image 22 (April 1842).

Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

Ronny Roberts, London & Bradenton, FL
AUFRICHTIG, AUFRIKHTIG, OFRICHTIG, LOKSCHAN (Moravia), HUSSERL
(Moravia), WODAK (Moravia)

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Viewmate translation request #austria-czech

Manettez@...
 

Hello to all:
I have posted a signature >from a Romanian birth record on Viewmate. I am
looking for an English translation of the Yiddish signature. Also, if anyone
has an ideas about the possible root meaning of the surname and a country
of origin affiliated with the surname I would be very interested in
learning. The signature is that of my Great Grandfather whom I know virtually
nothing about other than what is stated on this birth record of my Grandfather,
Solomon (Samuel Zeitler in the USA). The officials wrote the name of my GG
as, Filip Taitler on birth certificate. It states that he was a tailor
living on Poets Street in Bucharest, married to Miriam Joseph Grinberg. The
record is >from 1884. If anyone has any information on this family would you
please email me?
The Viewmate address is:
www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23104

Thank you,
Manette S. Zeitler
Bristol, Indiana