Date   

Fuerth #germany

Lande
 

Gisela Naomi Blume at gn.blume@web.de has made the kind offer to help
researchers with family roots in Fuerth. She notes that she has compiled
the inscriptions of more than 4,000 existing gravestones on the old Jewish
cemetery in Fuerth.

Peter Lande Washington, D.C. pdlande@starpower.net


German SIG #Germany Fuerth #germany

Lande
 

Gisela Naomi Blume at gn.blume@web.de has made the kind offer to help
researchers with family roots in Fuerth. She notes that she has compiled
the inscriptions of more than 4,000 existing gravestones on the old Jewish
cemetery in Fuerth.

Peter Lande Washington, D.C. pdlande@starpower.net


Re: GASSMANN/KLEIN from BERLIN #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Carolyn:

I'm a little mystified about the "fleeing Prussia" part, since
Koenigsberg was the capital of East Prussia and technically *the* royal
city of the Kings of Prussia.

In a previous posting you mentioned that the man had 12 children. Were
these born before or after 1848? Either way, Berlin birth records
before that date, and quite a few Koenigsberg records after, are
available on microfilm. Moreover, Jacob Jacobson's compilation of
Berlin citizen books (Buergerbuecher) for 1812-1859 could be of great help.

Also, there are no KLEINs on the Berlin citizenship register of 1812.
GASSMANN appears only in two places in Germany back then: Gleiwitz and
surroundings in Upper Silesia (part of Prussia), and Mannheim (clear the
other end of Germany). As it was an unusual name, choosing it might not
have been a good way to go undercover...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA Research co-ordinator, GerSIG

Carolyn Simon wrote:
" I've inquired in the past about a ggf who was forced to flee Prussia, change
his name >from KLEIN to GASSMANN and move to KONIGSBURG (now Kalingrad)
when he found himself on the losing side of a coup in about 1848. He was born
in BERLIN in 1808. Is anyone missing a relative who matches this information?"


German SIG #Germany Re: GASSMANN/KLEIN from BERLIN #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Carolyn:

I'm a little mystified about the "fleeing Prussia" part, since
Koenigsberg was the capital of East Prussia and technically *the* royal
city of the Kings of Prussia.

In a previous posting you mentioned that the man had 12 children. Were
these born before or after 1848? Either way, Berlin birth records
before that date, and quite a few Koenigsberg records after, are
available on microfilm. Moreover, Jacob Jacobson's compilation of
Berlin citizen books (Buergerbuecher) for 1812-1859 could be of great help.

Also, there are no KLEINs on the Berlin citizenship register of 1812.
GASSMANN appears only in two places in Germany back then: Gleiwitz and
surroundings in Upper Silesia (part of Prussia), and Mannheim (clear the
other end of Germany). As it was an unusual name, choosing it might not
have been a good way to go undercover...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA Research co-ordinator, GerSIG

Carolyn Simon wrote:
" I've inquired in the past about a ggf who was forced to flee Prussia, change
his name >from KLEIN to GASSMANN and move to KONIGSBURG (now Kalingrad)
when he found himself on the losing side of a coup in about 1848. He was born
in BERLIN in 1808. Is anyone missing a relative who matches this information?"


Re: What geographic area does Belarus cover? #belarus

Jrbaston
 

Sue Welch asked:

<< I have difficulty in being sure of what geographic areas are included
in
"Belarus". Did the boundaries shift with time periods such as after the
Russian Revolution? WWI? WWII? Or is this a modern overlay of a
specific geographic area that doesn't change no matter what the time
period? . Is there duplication with other SIGs because of this? >>

In some cases, when towns were on the border between Belarus and
another country (in this example, Lithuania), both the BelarusSIG and
LitvakSIG will be involved in translating records. Which archive holds
the records -- i.e., Grodno or Vilnius -- will most likely determine which
SIG will undertake the translation.

LitvakSIG for years has had District Research Groups for the Lida,
Oshmiany and Disna districts, and now for Svencionys. All the towns
in Oshmiany and Disna Districts are in Belarus, but many records are
in the Lithuanian State Historical Archives in Vilnius, accessible to
LitvakSIG.

Under JewishGen's "All Country" database system, records translated
by one SIG can be shared with another SIG's database when towns
were in one country when the records were created but are now in
another.

If you have towns that were considered "border towns", it's important
to find out which research projects ALL relevant SIGs are undertaking
and support them to the best of your ability.

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: What geographic area does Belarus cover? #belarus

Jrbaston
 

Sue Welch asked:

<< I have difficulty in being sure of what geographic areas are included
in
"Belarus". Did the boundaries shift with time periods such as after the
Russian Revolution? WWI? WWII? Or is this a modern overlay of a
specific geographic area that doesn't change no matter what the time
period? . Is there duplication with other SIGs because of this? >>

In some cases, when towns were on the border between Belarus and
another country (in this example, Lithuania), both the BelarusSIG and
LitvakSIG will be involved in translating records. Which archive holds
the records -- i.e., Grodno or Vilnius -- will most likely determine which
SIG will undertake the translation.

LitvakSIG for years has had District Research Groups for the Lida,
Oshmiany and Disna districts, and now for Svencionys. All the towns
in Oshmiany and Disna Districts are in Belarus, but many records are
in the Lithuanian State Historical Archives in Vilnius, accessible to
LitvakSIG.

Under JewishGen's "All Country" database system, records translated
by one SIG can be shared with another SIG's database when towns
were in one country when the records were created but are now in
another.

If you have towns that were considered "border towns", it's important
to find out which research projects ALL relevant SIGs are undertaking
and support them to the best of your ability.

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group.


Re: "The Way Things Are" vs. Family Tree Software #general

Ittai Hershman
 

I have received confirmation >from several Genners that Ancestry.com's Family Tree
Maker handles both cases without need for workarounds, as well as the open source
GRAMPS for Unix-based systems.

Thanks to all,
Ittai Hershman

It turns out that Family Tree Builder (Version 4.0.0.916) >from MyHeritage.com
appears unable to tree: 1) single parents (e.g. a child conceived >from a mother
through sperm donation); or, 2) A married couple, each with children >from a
previous marriage that have their own families.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: "The Way Things Are" vs. Family Tree Software #general

Ittai Hershman
 

I have received confirmation >from several Genners that Ancestry.com's Family Tree
Maker handles both cases without need for workarounds, as well as the open source
GRAMPS for Unix-based systems.

Thanks to all,
Ittai Hershman

It turns out that Family Tree Builder (Version 4.0.0.916) >from MyHeritage.com
appears unable to tree: 1) single parents (e.g. a child conceived >from a mother
through sperm donation); or, 2) A married couple, each with children >from a
previous marriage that have their own families.


Convoy #11 Drancy to Auschwitz July 27, 1942 #general

Debby Gincig Painter
 

My Grandparents, Lea Elisabeth, nee Klinger, and Benjamin Hirsch Lustig, were
deported >from Drancy on July 27, 1942 on Convoy #11 arriving in Auschwitz July 29.
According to Serge Klausfeld's book, there were 742 women and 248 men and on
arrival all were registered. The women given numbers 12340-13081; the men
53829-54076 (this equals the number Mr. Klarsfeld gives for the convoy).

I have had contact with the International Tracing Service as well as the Holocaust
Museum in Washington DC. It was been confirmed that these numbers were indeed
"issued" for this convoy but no records have ever been found for my Grandmother.
With all the new information being released lately, can someone tell if there is
somewhere else we can look for information? I currently have a request pending at
the Auschwitz Musuem.

Thank you
Debby Painter
Michigan, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Convoy #11 Drancy to Auschwitz July 27, 1942 #general

Debby Gincig Painter
 

My Grandparents, Lea Elisabeth, nee Klinger, and Benjamin Hirsch Lustig, were
deported >from Drancy on July 27, 1942 on Convoy #11 arriving in Auschwitz July 29.
According to Serge Klausfeld's book, there were 742 women and 248 men and on
arrival all were registered. The women given numbers 12340-13081; the men
53829-54076 (this equals the number Mr. Klarsfeld gives for the convoy).

I have had contact with the International Tracing Service as well as the Holocaust
Museum in Washington DC. It was been confirmed that these numbers were indeed
"issued" for this convoy but no records have ever been found for my Grandmother.
With all the new information being released lately, can someone tell if there is
somewhere else we can look for information? I currently have a request pending at
the Auschwitz Musuem.

Thank you
Debby Painter
Michigan, USA


Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #general

Nolan Altman
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #general

Nolan Altman
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton


Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #france

bounce-1967339-772957@...
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton


French SIG #France Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #france

bounce-1967339-772957@...
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton


Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #courland #latvia

Nolan Altman
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton


Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #southafrica

Nolan Altman
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #courland #latvia

Nolan Altman
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #southafrica

Nolan Altman
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton


Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #austria-czech

bounce-1967339-772950@...
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Screencasting Comes to JewishGen's JOWBR Site #austria-czech

bounce-1967339-772950@...
 

To assist donors who are interested in submitting data and/or photos to the
JOWBR database, JewishGen has developed a series of "How To" screencasts
(short online movies). When you watch these screencasts, you will be able
to watch and hear an explanation of how to make a complete and successful
JOWBR submission. (Even if you're not making a submission, the first 2 and
the last screencast will give you background and a walk-through the JOWBR
site.)

The screencasts can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

The screencasts cover all the questions we typically receive, >from "How do I
know if my cemetery is online?" to "What will my data look like when I'm
done?" And of course, the majority of the screencasts describe how to
properly complete the standard JOWBR excel template by making specific
entries in the Cemetery Info tab and the Burial Template.

Each screencast addresses a specific topic or type of entry. You can watch
the entire series or just the ones you have questions on, and like all
online videos, you can pause or replay them as desired. (An alternative to
watching the screencasts is the written "Submitting Data to JOWBR page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm)

The following is a list of the screencasts available and their length:

1. JOWBR - An Introduction (0:57)
2. Getting Started (3:55)
3. The Cemetery Info Tab (4:34)
4. The Burial Template - Overview (2:12)
5. Entering Names (4:48)
6. Entering Place Names (2:09)
7. Entering Dates (2:34)
8. Entering Plot Locations and the Comments Field (1:13)
9. Linking Photos to Your Records (2:41)
10. Putting it all Together - Viewing Your Output (3:09)

We hope this submission aide will help you see that submitting records to
JOWBR is not at all difficult. The ability to share data with researchers
and family members around the world is invaluable and we hope that you'll
consider making a submission of your own.

If you have any questions, please contact me at
NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisiton