Date   

Viewmate 13102 #general

lizdmiller@...
 

Hello,

I am looking for a translation(I believe Yiddish) of viewmate
13102 - http://jewishgen.org/viewmate.

The reverse side is a photo of my grandfather, Samuel Hiller taken
at the Mitchell Studios, 270 Main Street, Paterson, New Jersey. It may have
been sent back to Grojec/Gritse, Poland or Lodz.

Thanks.

Liz Ruderman Miller
lizdmiller@earthlink.net

Direct url:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=13102


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate 13102 #general

lizdmiller@...
 

Hello,

I am looking for a translation(I believe Yiddish) of viewmate
13102 - http://jewishgen.org/viewmate.

The reverse side is a photo of my grandfather, Samuel Hiller taken
at the Mitchell Studios, 270 Main Street, Paterson, New Jersey. It may have
been sent back to Grojec/Gritse, Poland or Lodz.

Thanks.

Liz Ruderman Miller
lizdmiller@earthlink.net

Direct url:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=13102


HORENSTEIN/MENDELSOHN in Berlin 1943 #general

Ittai Hershman
 

My great-great uncle, (Menachem) Mendel HORENSTEIN, amazingly survived
the Shoah in the Jewish Hospital in Berlin.After the war, he emigrated to
Buenos Aires where his son Henio (formally Samuel) Horenstein had been
living since before the war. Mendel died there in 1953 and is buried
in the Tablada cemetery.

Mendel's wife, Dora HORENSTEIN nee MENDELSOHN, was not as fortunate.
According to the Yad Vashem Database she was born 10 March 1884 and
deported to Auschwitz on 3 March 1943 and perished there.

It seems that both of Mendel and Dora's children were born in Warsaw
according to later passport information: Samuel (Henio) in 1904 and
Naftali (Tuli) in 1913. Mendel's parents were Gur Arye Hor(e)nstein and
Taube nee Horowitz of Bolechow and Radomysl.

I am wondering if anyone who has researched either the Berlin Jewish
Hospital story or the Mendelsohn family has come across any information
on either Mendel or Dora?

Many thanks,
Ittai Hershman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HORENSTEIN/MENDELSOHN in Berlin 1943 #general

Ittai Hershman
 

My great-great uncle, (Menachem) Mendel HORENSTEIN, amazingly survived
the Shoah in the Jewish Hospital in Berlin.After the war, he emigrated to
Buenos Aires where his son Henio (formally Samuel) Horenstein had been
living since before the war. Mendel died there in 1953 and is buried
in the Tablada cemetery.

Mendel's wife, Dora HORENSTEIN nee MENDELSOHN, was not as fortunate.
According to the Yad Vashem Database she was born 10 March 1884 and
deported to Auschwitz on 3 March 1943 and perished there.

It seems that both of Mendel and Dora's children were born in Warsaw
according to later passport information: Samuel (Henio) in 1904 and
Naftali (Tuli) in 1913. Mendel's parents were Gur Arye Hor(e)nstein and
Taube nee Horowitz of Bolechow and Radomysl.

I am wondering if anyone who has researched either the Berlin Jewish
Hospital story or the Mendelsohn family has come across any information
on either Mendel or Dora?

Many thanks,
Ittai Hershman


New York City Directories #general

Shoshana Kahan <lilishoshana@...>
 

Is there anyone who could please help me by looking up two addresses
in the New York City street directories, 1906 and 1912? I would love
to do this myself, but living in Gush Etzion I'm not sure what my
alternatives are (if anyone has any ideas about local resources,
please let me know.) The 1st address is 104 McKibben St. Brooklyn, for
March - Oct. of 1906. (I suspect the name will be Goldstein or Cooper,
if that helps.) The 2nd address is 45 Leonard St., Brooklyn, for June
or July of 1912 (this one I'm almost certain was Cooper, and I so hope
that I can find out what his given name was.)

Many thanks in advance,

Shoshana Kahan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New York City Directories #general

Shoshana Kahan <lilishoshana@...>
 

Is there anyone who could please help me by looking up two addresses
in the New York City street directories, 1906 and 1912? I would love
to do this myself, but living in Gush Etzion I'm not sure what my
alternatives are (if anyone has any ideas about local resources,
please let me know.) The 1st address is 104 McKibben St. Brooklyn, for
March - Oct. of 1906. (I suspect the name will be Goldstein or Cooper,
if that helps.) The 2nd address is 45 Leonard St., Brooklyn, for June
or July of 1912 (this one I'm almost certain was Cooper, and I so hope
that I can find out what his given name was.)

Many thanks in advance,

Shoshana Kahan


Yiddish Translation Help Please - just missing a few words! #ukraine

mel@...
 

In 1906, my grandmother in Felshtin, Podolia guberniya (Ukraine) wrote a
fascinating letter to her sister in Shumsk, Volhynia guberniya, urging
her to convince her husband to move to America.

I already have an English translation of most of this 4-page letter. However, the
translator was unable to fully translate some of the most important
sentences towards the end.

Would you please take a few minutes
to help me fill in the missing words in those few sentences?? They
appear to hold important information concerning members of my family.
(I have provided his translation of these sentences.)

The
translator's English text is at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14893

The 4 pages of the full letter are at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14889
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14890
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14891
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14892

OR you can find files VM14889-14893 on the following page:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate

Thank you so much.

Mel Werbach
Los Angeles


Researching:
VERBUKH, HORENSTEIN, KANFER, KOMISAR, KORENBLIT >from Volhynia, Podolia and Kiev guberniyas, Ukraine;
VERBUKH >from Moldova;
AUZENBERG, RUBINSKI, LEWINOWSKI, ABRAMSKI, BRODOWICZ, SEJNENSKI >from Suwalki
guberniya, Poland;
MISHURSKI, GOLDBERG, MENDELSON >from Kovne guberniya, Lithuania


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yiddish Translation Help Please - just missing a few words! #ukraine

mel@...
 

In 1906, my grandmother in Felshtin, Podolia guberniya (Ukraine) wrote a
fascinating letter to her sister in Shumsk, Volhynia guberniya, urging
her to convince her husband to move to America.

I already have an English translation of most of this 4-page letter. However, the
translator was unable to fully translate some of the most important
sentences towards the end.

Would you please take a few minutes
to help me fill in the missing words in those few sentences?? They
appear to hold important information concerning members of my family.
(I have provided his translation of these sentences.)

The
translator's English text is at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14893

The 4 pages of the full letter are at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14889
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14890
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14891
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14892

OR you can find files VM14889-14893 on the following page:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate

Thank you so much.

Mel Werbach
Los Angeles


Researching:
VERBUKH, HORENSTEIN, KANFER, KOMISAR, KORENBLIT >from Volhynia, Podolia and Kiev guberniyas, Ukraine;
VERBUKH >from Moldova;
AUZENBERG, RUBINSKI, LEWINOWSKI, ABRAMSKI, BRODOWICZ, SEJNENSKI >from Suwalki
guberniya, Poland;
MISHURSKI, GOLDBERG, MENDELSON >from Kovne guberniya, Lithuania


Re: strategy for approaching possible cousins #general

Sara Lynns
 

David, it's not clear to me if you just wrote these potential
relatives a literary paper rather than calling them. Genealogy
research is not an exact science. finding relatives however is
"emotional",not clinical. I can tell you >from personal experience.
Anticipate a positive outcome.

make sense?

Jacqueline Lerner aderman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: strategy for approaching possible cousins #general

Sara Lynns
 

David, it's not clear to me if you just wrote these potential
relatives a literary paper rather than calling them. Genealogy
research is not an exact science. finding relatives however is
"emotional",not clinical. I can tell you >from personal experience.
Anticipate a positive outcome.

make sense?

Jacqueline Lerner aderman


Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive # 100 #general

Ernest Kallmann
 

Just published :

Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, # ONE HUNDRED

Our members have answered the questionnaire.

Late 2007, we issued a questionnaire to all our members in order to get
a true picture of all of them. Some 35 percent replied early 2008. The
answers have been exploited according to strict professional rules by a
team of five Board members under the leadership of President JOELLE
ALLOUCHE-BENAYOUN. The statistical results are published in this paper
and cover all aspects of the relationship each member can have with the
society: the Revue, the monthly lectures, the Sigs, the library, the
website, the sections in the French provinces, etc. They are related to
the sociological analysis of the constituency, as it appears >from the
answers to the first sets of questions.

The descendency of Raphael Vorms >from Bionville, part two.

LOUIS VORMS and GUY WORMS publish the descendant list of the older son
of Raphael Worms, Hayman, over five generations. They know further
descendants, but the limitation results >from our rule not de publish
data about living persons. A number of well-known personalities who
could have been listed is nevertheless given. Two members of the list
have required in-depth research to be identified; the authors reveal the
details of their research

About the family name Haas (Guebwiller Belfort)

DENIS INGOLD makes a major discovery about the origin of the Christian
family Haas whose descendants include a French representative Emile
Keller and the Paris archbishop Cardinal Maurice Feltin. Their common
forefather Leopold Haas was a Jew who converted to Catholicism in
Guebwiller around 1617, at age 22. In his 1963 publication about the
Haas-Mayer family, Francois Klee had placed Leopold's birthplace near
Ottmarsheim. Ingold discovers that Klee has misread the Latin citation
in Leopold's death record and elaborates on a recently discovered
document by a remote descendant. The birthplace is in fact Jungholz,
where a Jewish Haas has been documented at the same period. Ingold
evaluates the pros and cons of two possibilities: Leopold adopting the
Christian name Haas after his baptism or David/Leopold carrying over his
Jewish nickname Haas/zum Hasen into his Christian life. The author opts
for the latter possibility.

Searching for my Dilsheimer ancestors

PATRICIA HAAS has started her genealogy prompted by her grandchildren's
birth. Her paternal grandmother Renee was born 1881 in Versailles from
Samuel Schorestene and Sophie Dilsheimer. Samuel's ancestors originate
in Alsace and are well documented, a Rrabbi/Cantor family. Sophie
Dilsheimer's origin is harder to find, but a stepwise approach through
Internet and visits to Paris cemeteries finally knacks the nut; Sophie
comes >from Aschaffenburg, Bavaria. The author neither speaks nor reads
German; by joining our society she receives the needed assistance to
track her Dilsheimer ancestors back to one born around 1720.

Algerian Jews obtain French citizenship before 1870 : the Senatus
Consultus of July 14, 1865. by PHILIPPE ZERATHE.

During his 1860 visit to Algeria Napoleon III was requested in a
petition signed by some 100,000 Jews to be collectively granted French
citizenship. In spite of a seemingly favorable answer in principle, the
July 14, 1865 decree put conditions and only less than 400 applied.
Their list is published in the article. All Jews in Algeria eventually
obtain full French citizenship on October 9, 1870 thanks to the Decret
Cremieux.

from Senior to Schneerso(h)n
ELIANE ROOS-SCHUHL elaborates on the Jewish names deriving >from the
Latin root senior, meaning the older, the lord. According to the
pronunciation (Ashkenazi or Sephardic) the variations are many. The
author selects examples >from all periods and all regions in the world,
thus letting us know many famous bearers of the name.

Ernest Kallmann, Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France

All questions, comments, etc. should be sent to office@genealoj.org
only. Thank you.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive # 100 #general

Ernest Kallmann
 

Just published :

Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, # ONE HUNDRED

Our members have answered the questionnaire.

Late 2007, we issued a questionnaire to all our members in order to get
a true picture of all of them. Some 35 percent replied early 2008. The
answers have been exploited according to strict professional rules by a
team of five Board members under the leadership of President JOELLE
ALLOUCHE-BENAYOUN. The statistical results are published in this paper
and cover all aspects of the relationship each member can have with the
society: the Revue, the monthly lectures, the Sigs, the library, the
website, the sections in the French provinces, etc. They are related to
the sociological analysis of the constituency, as it appears >from the
answers to the first sets of questions.

The descendency of Raphael Vorms >from Bionville, part two.

LOUIS VORMS and GUY WORMS publish the descendant list of the older son
of Raphael Worms, Hayman, over five generations. They know further
descendants, but the limitation results >from our rule not de publish
data about living persons. A number of well-known personalities who
could have been listed is nevertheless given. Two members of the list
have required in-depth research to be identified; the authors reveal the
details of their research

About the family name Haas (Guebwiller Belfort)

DENIS INGOLD makes a major discovery about the origin of the Christian
family Haas whose descendants include a French representative Emile
Keller and the Paris archbishop Cardinal Maurice Feltin. Their common
forefather Leopold Haas was a Jew who converted to Catholicism in
Guebwiller around 1617, at age 22. In his 1963 publication about the
Haas-Mayer family, Francois Klee had placed Leopold's birthplace near
Ottmarsheim. Ingold discovers that Klee has misread the Latin citation
in Leopold's death record and elaborates on a recently discovered
document by a remote descendant. The birthplace is in fact Jungholz,
where a Jewish Haas has been documented at the same period. Ingold
evaluates the pros and cons of two possibilities: Leopold adopting the
Christian name Haas after his baptism or David/Leopold carrying over his
Jewish nickname Haas/zum Hasen into his Christian life. The author opts
for the latter possibility.

Searching for my Dilsheimer ancestors

PATRICIA HAAS has started her genealogy prompted by her grandchildren's
birth. Her paternal grandmother Renee was born 1881 in Versailles from
Samuel Schorestene and Sophie Dilsheimer. Samuel's ancestors originate
in Alsace and are well documented, a Rrabbi/Cantor family. Sophie
Dilsheimer's origin is harder to find, but a stepwise approach through
Internet and visits to Paris cemeteries finally knacks the nut; Sophie
comes >from Aschaffenburg, Bavaria. The author neither speaks nor reads
German; by joining our society she receives the needed assistance to
track her Dilsheimer ancestors back to one born around 1720.

Algerian Jews obtain French citizenship before 1870 : the Senatus
Consultus of July 14, 1865. by PHILIPPE ZERATHE.

During his 1860 visit to Algeria Napoleon III was requested in a
petition signed by some 100,000 Jews to be collectively granted French
citizenship. In spite of a seemingly favorable answer in principle, the
July 14, 1865 decree put conditions and only less than 400 applied.
Their list is published in the article. All Jews in Algeria eventually
obtain full French citizenship on October 9, 1870 thanks to the Decret
Cremieux.

from Senior to Schneerso(h)n
ELIANE ROOS-SCHUHL elaborates on the Jewish names deriving >from the
Latin root senior, meaning the older, the lord. According to the
pronunciation (Ashkenazi or Sephardic) the variations are many. The
author selects examples >from all periods and all regions in the world,
thus letting us know many famous bearers of the name.

Ernest Kallmann, Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France

All questions, comments, etc. should be sent to office@genealoj.org
only. Thank you.


Seeking Jeffrey NORTON re: BENETOVICH #general

joyweave
 

I would like to contact Jeffrey NORTON who posted the surname BENETOVICH
from Chicago, IL and San Diego, CA at JGFF on 4 Dec. 2000. Email via
JGFF has not been answered and address may no longer be valid.
I believe, based on the locations, that he is connected to my cousin,
Martha (originally Mildred) ZUCKERMAN and her husband, Isadore
BENITIVICH. The spelling is not the same, but Isadore died in Chicago
and Martha in San Diego. This seems too coincidental to not be connected.
Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Jeffrey NORTON re: BENETOVICH #general

joyweave
 

I would like to contact Jeffrey NORTON who posted the surname BENETOVICH
from Chicago, IL and San Diego, CA at JGFF on 4 Dec. 2000. Email via
JGFF has not been answered and address may no longer be valid.
I believe, based on the locations, that he is connected to my cousin,
Martha (originally Mildred) ZUCKERMAN and her husband, Isadore
BENITIVICH. The spelling is not the same, but Isadore died in Chicago
and Martha in San Diego. This seems too coincidental to not be connected.
Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA


19th-Century Burials in Yafo #general

Helene Kenvin <hekenvin@...>
 

My great-great-great-grandparents were said to have been buried in Yafo
in the 1870s. Does anyone know whether any burial records for a
cemetery in Yafo might exist and, if yes, how they might be accessed?
With thanks, Helene Kenvin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 19th-Century Burials in Yafo #general

Helene Kenvin <hekenvin@...>
 

My great-great-great-grandparents were said to have been buried in Yafo
in the 1870s. Does anyone know whether any burial records for a
cemetery in Yafo might exist and, if yes, how they might be accessed?
With thanks, Helene Kenvin


Leyke same as Leah #general

Chris Gould <oldandintheway9@...>
 

I am most grateful for the many responses on this - the
overwhelming opinion is that they are essentially the same.

Thank you.
Chris GOULD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Leyke same as Leah #general

Chris Gould <oldandintheway9@...>
 

I am most grateful for the many responses on this - the
overwhelming opinion is that they are essentially the same.

Thank you.
Chris GOULD


GROSZMANN and KLEIN from Miskolc #hungary

oliverbryk@...
 

My wife's paternal ancestors are >from Miskolc. Her grandfather was Max
(Miksa) GROSZMANN b. 1889, the son of Moritz (Mor) GROSZMANN b. 1862 and
Hermina ROTH b. 1861 or 1862. Max's parents were Vilmos GROSZMANN b. 1830
and Eszti KLEIN b. 1839, married 1861. This information came >from the
Miskolc archives.

Can anyone suggest how I could find out where Vilmos and Eszti were born and
married; also who their parents were?

Oliver Bryk, San Francisco


Hungary SIG #Hungary GROSZMANN and KLEIN from Miskolc #hungary

oliverbryk@...
 

My wife's paternal ancestors are >from Miskolc. Her grandfather was Max
(Miksa) GROSZMANN b. 1889, the son of Moritz (Mor) GROSZMANN b. 1862 and
Hermina ROTH b. 1861 or 1862. Max's parents were Vilmos GROSZMANN b. 1830
and Eszti KLEIN b. 1839, married 1861. This information came >from the
Miskolc archives.

Can anyone suggest how I could find out where Vilmos and Eszti were born and
married; also who their parents were?

Oliver Bryk, San Francisco