Date   

FEITELBERG, Piltene #latvia

Michael Waas
 

Hi,

I'm looking for the FEITELBERG family of Piltene. I reexamined the
Courland Enlistment Registry for Piltene and discovered that listed as
family to my ancestors Abraham and Braine BLUMBERG was a man named
Chatzel FEITELBERG, son of Hirsch, who was 50 in 1871. I also
discovered that my ancestors Itzig LEVENSON, his wife Hanne BLUMBERG,
his father David LEVENSON, and his mother Linna had a much older
couple living with them in 1871. A man named Ruben FEITELBERG, son of
Nachmann, who was 80 in 1871 and his wife Freude.

I believe that all three families are interconnected as there is a lot
of intermarriage in my family between LEVENSON's, BLUMBERG's, and
another related family, the GLAZER's of Piltene.

Thank you for any help.

Best Regards,

Michael Waas
Miami and Sarasota, FL

Researching: LEVENSON, BLUMBERG, GLAZER, FEITELBERG (Piltene, Riga)


Latvia SIG #Latvia FEITELBERG, Piltene #latvia

Michael Waas
 

Hi,

I'm looking for the FEITELBERG family of Piltene. I reexamined the
Courland Enlistment Registry for Piltene and discovered that listed as
family to my ancestors Abraham and Braine BLUMBERG was a man named
Chatzel FEITELBERG, son of Hirsch, who was 50 in 1871. I also
discovered that my ancestors Itzig LEVENSON, his wife Hanne BLUMBERG,
his father David LEVENSON, and his mother Linna had a much older
couple living with them in 1871. A man named Ruben FEITELBERG, son of
Nachmann, who was 80 in 1871 and his wife Freude.

I believe that all three families are interconnected as there is a lot
of intermarriage in my family between LEVENSON's, BLUMBERG's, and
another related family, the GLAZER's of Piltene.

Thank you for any help.

Best Regards,

Michael Waas
Miami and Sarasota, FL

Researching: LEVENSON, BLUMBERG, GLAZER, FEITELBERG (Piltene, Riga)


Wiener last heard of Prague 1950 #austria-czech

juliet22@...
 

Hello,
I am new to this list and researching for a friend. Her grandfather was P
WIENER who escaped the Nazis and fled to England where he married in 1939.
The family believe that some members of the family (names yet unknown)
perished in camps, but 2 brothers named Fritz WIENER and Bruno WIENER
survived and were last heard of in Prague in 1950. They have no idea what
happened to them, whether they died or emigrated elsewhere.
The only clue I have found so far is a Fritz WIENER born 1912 who was
liberated >from Flack Kaserne Munich in 1945. This is almost certainly one
of the brothers but I cannot find anything further about him or any
reference to a Bruno.
Just hoping that somebody may have a clue - at least to where I can look
next.
Thanks for your time.
regards
Juliet Evans
Dorset
UK


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Wiener last heard of Prague 1950 #austria-czech

juliet22@...
 

Hello,
I am new to this list and researching for a friend. Her grandfather was P
WIENER who escaped the Nazis and fled to England where he married in 1939.
The family believe that some members of the family (names yet unknown)
perished in camps, but 2 brothers named Fritz WIENER and Bruno WIENER
survived and were last heard of in Prague in 1950. They have no idea what
happened to them, whether they died or emigrated elsewhere.
The only clue I have found so far is a Fritz WIENER born 1912 who was
liberated >from Flack Kaserne Munich in 1945. This is almost certainly one
of the brothers but I cannot find anything further about him or any
reference to a Bruno.
Just hoping that somebody may have a clue - at least to where I can look
next.
Thanks for your time.
regards
Juliet Evans
Dorset
UK


Importation of products into Austria before WW2 #austria-czech

marcpiel@...
 

Hello,
Does anyone give me any leads as to where I can
find out about importation of products into
Austria before WW2?
There must have been some sort of customs, maybe
customs duty or other control. I azam looking for
archives on this subject.
Thank you in advance for any help.
Marc Piel,
Paris, France.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Importation of products into Austria before WW2 #austria-czech

marcpiel@...
 

Hello,
Does anyone give me any leads as to where I can
find out about importation of products into
Austria before WW2?
There must have been some sort of customs, maybe
customs duty or other control. I azam looking for
archives on this subject.
Thank you in advance for any help.
Marc Piel,
Paris, France.


Belgian Cemetery records #general

Leah Fav <lfav123@...>
 

How much data is actually online >from the Belgium Cemetery (Machsike Hadass)? I
can't seem to find that information on the JOWBR site.
I do not find my great-grandfather's record >from 1945 but do find another record
from 1935 but without parents/spouse names. Does more information exist that can
be requested about those records?
Thanks.
Leah Fav


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Belgian Cemetery records #general

Leah Fav <lfav123@...>
 

How much data is actually online >from the Belgium Cemetery (Machsike Hadass)? I
can't seem to find that information on the JOWBR site.
I do not find my great-grandfather's record >from 1945 but do find another record
from 1935 but without parents/spouse names. Does more information exist that can
be requested about those records?
Thanks.
Leah Fav


Leyba #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

You are letting your romance language knowledge extend to yiddish. Leyba is
not normally a woman's name. I have seen many boys in official birth records
with given names that end in the letter A, including many Leybas, as well as
Itska and Shloma. I think it was a normal variant.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
lazer@sandiego.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Leyba #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

You are letting your romance language knowledge extend to yiddish. Leyba is
not normally a woman's name. I have seen many boys in official birth records
with given names that end in the letter A, including many Leybas, as well as
Itska and Shloma. I think it was a normal variant.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
lazer@sandiego.edu


application to regain US citizenship - SPIVAK early 1930's #general

Helene Bergman <helenebergman@...>
 

Having recently connected to a great-niece of my grandfather's first
cousin, I find that he was born in Philadelphia in 1883. His parents
(or maybe only father after mother's death) returned to Odessa and he
was raised by his grandparents, parents of my ggm. To ensure his
safety, they destroyed his US papers, and obtained Russian papers for
him. Here is her account:
According to Anki JENSEN SPIVAK, her husband, Juan SPIVAK, was born in
Philadelphia. He was born of Russian immigrants, but the family moved
back to Russia when he was only two years old. Because a pogrom had
been instituted against Jews in Russia at the time, only children born
in Russia would be allowed to stay, so the family decided to burn the
boyâ??s American paperwork. For some reason Juan was brought up by his
grandparents in Odessa. That is why I don't know their names. He came
to Berlin at a very young age to take voice lessons. >from there he went
to Vienna and had great success at the Wiener Staatsoper at the age of
only 21.
In 1926 Anki came >from Stettin to Berlin and married Juan SPIVAK. I
don't know exactly when. Juan was singing 'Fuerst Igor' and 'Boris
Godunov'at the Berlin Staatsoper, while Anki sang 'Michaela' in Carmen
at 'Theater des Westens' and had a Strauss recital . Juan practiced
with her to expand her repertoire for the Berlin Stattsoper, where she
was later engaged. In 1929-30 the trouble started for the Jews and it
became hard to maintain employment. Juan now went on a tour with Jushny
and his 'Blaue Vogel' troup to Sweden, while Anki went to Paris and
London and was broadcast on the radio in both countries. When 'Die
Blaue Vogel' planned a trip to the US Anki was invited to be member of
the group, as well. When they returned to Berlin their friends advised
them to go back to the U.S. and for Juan to get his American papers in
order. He had to contact family members in Paris, England, Italy and
Russia and have all his aunts sign papers to swear that it was true
that he was born in Philadelphia, USA and that his papers had been
burnt in Russia. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1933, but Anki had to
wait one and a half long years before she was able to enter the
country, let alone get a working permit, since it took this long for
the paperwork to be in order.

I have written about this SPIVAK family before, and this seems like a
solid lead. Does anyone know >from where I could obtain whatever papers
Juan filed with the US government? Those petitions would help establish
the name of the ancestors who moved to these other cities (I have a
photo of the one who went to London).

Thanks in advance for any leads...

Lanie Bergman
Bronx NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen application to regain US citizenship - SPIVAK early 1930's #general

Helene Bergman <helenebergman@...>
 

Having recently connected to a great-niece of my grandfather's first
cousin, I find that he was born in Philadelphia in 1883. His parents
(or maybe only father after mother's death) returned to Odessa and he
was raised by his grandparents, parents of my ggm. To ensure his
safety, they destroyed his US papers, and obtained Russian papers for
him. Here is her account:
According to Anki JENSEN SPIVAK, her husband, Juan SPIVAK, was born in
Philadelphia. He was born of Russian immigrants, but the family moved
back to Russia when he was only two years old. Because a pogrom had
been instituted against Jews in Russia at the time, only children born
in Russia would be allowed to stay, so the family decided to burn the
boyâ??s American paperwork. For some reason Juan was brought up by his
grandparents in Odessa. That is why I don't know their names. He came
to Berlin at a very young age to take voice lessons. >from there he went
to Vienna and had great success at the Wiener Staatsoper at the age of
only 21.
In 1926 Anki came >from Stettin to Berlin and married Juan SPIVAK. I
don't know exactly when. Juan was singing 'Fuerst Igor' and 'Boris
Godunov'at the Berlin Staatsoper, while Anki sang 'Michaela' in Carmen
at 'Theater des Westens' and had a Strauss recital . Juan practiced
with her to expand her repertoire for the Berlin Stattsoper, where she
was later engaged. In 1929-30 the trouble started for the Jews and it
became hard to maintain employment. Juan now went on a tour with Jushny
and his 'Blaue Vogel' troup to Sweden, while Anki went to Paris and
London and was broadcast on the radio in both countries. When 'Die
Blaue Vogel' planned a trip to the US Anki was invited to be member of
the group, as well. When they returned to Berlin their friends advised
them to go back to the U.S. and for Juan to get his American papers in
order. He had to contact family members in Paris, England, Italy and
Russia and have all his aunts sign papers to swear that it was true
that he was born in Philadelphia, USA and that his papers had been
burnt in Russia. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1933, but Anki had to
wait one and a half long years before she was able to enter the
country, let alone get a working permit, since it took this long for
the paperwork to be in order.

I have written about this SPIVAK family before, and this seems like a
solid lead. Does anyone know >from where I could obtain whatever papers
Juan filed with the US government? Those petitions would help establish
the name of the ancestors who moved to these other cities (I have a
photo of the one who went to London).

Thanks in advance for any leads...

Lanie Bergman
Bronx NY


Howard Steinmetz z'l #general

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
 

Howard Steinmetz passed away peacefully at home today 11/27/2010
after a long illness.

Howard was an active and beloved member of the JGS of Colorado
and recipient of the 2010 Spirit of JGS Colorado Award.
Howard attended IAJGS conferences and was one of the coordinators
of the Rohatyn, Ukraine SIG.

Funeral is Sunday, 11/28/2010, at Bonai Shalom Synagogue located
at Cherryvale and Arapahoe in Boulder, Colorado. Burial at
Christ Mountain View Cemetery on Kalmia Avenue near the Boulder JCC.

"May his soul be bound up in the bond of eternal life."

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
President, JGS Colorado
SHINDELMAN, KARGER, SPIEGEL, STEIN, LOWENSTEIN, ACKERMAN
Seckenberg, E. PRUSS; Lyubar, UKR; Kiralyhaza, HUN; Lessen, GER; Warsaw, POL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Howard Steinmetz z'l #general

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
 

Howard Steinmetz passed away peacefully at home today 11/27/2010
after a long illness.

Howard was an active and beloved member of the JGS of Colorado
and recipient of the 2010 Spirit of JGS Colorado Award.
Howard attended IAJGS conferences and was one of the coordinators
of the Rohatyn, Ukraine SIG.

Funeral is Sunday, 11/28/2010, at Bonai Shalom Synagogue located
at Cherryvale and Arapahoe in Boulder, Colorado. Burial at
Christ Mountain View Cemetery on Kalmia Avenue near the Boulder JCC.

"May his soul be bound up in the bond of eternal life."

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
President, JGS Colorado
SHINDELMAN, KARGER, SPIEGEL, STEIN, LOWENSTEIN, ACKERMAN
Seckenberg, E. PRUSS; Lyubar, UKR; Kiralyhaza, HUN; Lessen, GER; Warsaw, POL


A good experience with the Grodno (Hrodna), Belarus archives #general

Asparagirl
 

I wanted to report back on a recent good experience I had getting
information out of the National Historical Archives of Belarus in
Grodno (Hrodna). The entire process took several months of
back-and-forth contact over e-mail, but it yielded much more
information than I was expecting, it didn't cost terribly much, and I
didn't have to use a professional researcher or translator at any
stage. I have heard reports that it is often quite difficult for
people doing Jewish genealogy in Belarus to get information out from
the country, but in this case they actually went above and beyond the
call of duty in providing me with helpful information on family
members. So I hope this message will inspire people to at least try
using them as a resource, based on what I did and what worked for me.

My husband's paternal grandmother's ancestors came >from the city of
Bialystok and a nearby little town called Goniadz. Both of these are
located in far northeastern Poland today (near the modern border with
Belarus), but they used to be located in the Grodno Gubernia
(province) of the Russian Empire. As a result, most of the area's
19th Century vital records wound up stored in the Grodno (Hrodna)
archives in Belarus, rather than in Poland. The Grodno archives
actually have a very nice website, with an English version:
http://archives.gov.by/eng/index.php?id=377130

On March 28th of this year I sent an e-mail to the Grodno archives
with the following query:

"I am seeking a copy of the 1874 census for Jews, for Bialystok uezd in
Grodno province. Resources on the Internet say that it is stored in
Fond 24, Opis 7, Dyelo 213 at your archive. How much would it cost to
get a full copy of all the pages of this document? Please reply and
let me know. (I hope my Russian is not too bad -- I am using
automatic translation software >from Google Translate. Please excuse
any errors.)"

As you can tell, I actually sent this e-mail to them in two languages,
first in Russian text, which I translated and cut-and-pasted >from the
free and invaluable Google Translate service online
(translate.google.com), and then with my original English text pasted
below it, in the same e-mail. I continued this bilingual e-mail
exchange while writing back and forth to the archives over the
following months, and it was a big help to both them and to me, as
they do not write correspondence in English and I am doubtful if they
would have answered my e-mails if I had not included Russian text.
Actually, for most of my later e-mails, I stopped using Russian and
switched to Belorussian, which I noticed Google can now translate to
and from, thinking that this would be better (and carry fewer
unintentional political overtones for an ex-Soviet country). I took
care to write in overly simple sentence structures to avoid potential
translation problems, and I also often re-ran my Russian or
Belorussian text back through Google Translate into English to see if
it would still be readable and semi-grammatical, before sending it
out.

Back to my request... I had asked for a copy of the entire 1874
(Russian Empire) census for Jews, and the archives replied back a few
days later that I would need to provide the surnames of the people I
was researching, as they could not make a copy of the entire 1874
census. So I sent back an e-mail with the eight surnames >from my
husband's family that I am researching, made sure to note that I am
looking for spelling variants of those names too, and added the small
nearby town of Trzcianne, Poland to my search list too.

The archives then sent an e-mail saying that I would need to provide a
notarized document >from my husband stating that I was "allowed" to
search these surnames on his behalf (?!). Okay, if that's what was
needed to pacify the bureaucracy, so be it. So I drew up a one page
document that said I was researching such-and-such surnames from
such-and-such towns and that my husband gave me permission to conduct
this search, and we both trotted off to the local UPS Store to sign it
and have it witnessed by a notary public. I then scanned the document
and e-mailed it to the archives. Of course, since it was written in
English, goodness knows if they could read it, but whatever, it got
the job done.

Then, radio silence >from the archives for several weeks. I e-mailed
back asking if everything was okay, and they replied, saying that an
invoice would be sent to me shortly. Finally, about three months
later, a preliminary invoice was sent to me requesting payment (in
Belorussian funds), which I arranged through an international wire at
my local bank, and then a month or two later a request for the
remaining payment. It was unfortunate that I wasn't able to get an
estimated total of the cost of the research in advance, but luckily it
turned out to not be a terribly large amount.

Finally, this fall, I received in the mail (postal, not e-mail) my
completed research packet >from the archives. And they did a terrific
job! It turns out that they didn't just research the 1874 census of
the Jews, as I had originally asked, but they basically searched
through *all* of their holdings for the eight surnames I had
requested! This included the 1834 Russian Empire revision list (males
only), the 1850 revision list (males only), a book about Jews born in
the city of Bialystok in 1852, an alphabetical census of the city of
Bialystok in 1853 (comparing people in that census to their official
listings in the eighth and ninth revision lists >from 1834 and 1850),
an alphabetical census of the town of Goniadz in 1853 (ditto), the
name lists of Jewish landowners >from the town Trzcianne >from February
22, 1857, a list of Goniadz's Jews for 1874, Bialystok Jews who had
acquired "receipts" for military duty in 1874, "In testimony on the
postscript of the Jews" for 1875, and the Bialystok city census for
1897. In total, there were 18 single-spaced typewritten pages in the
report they sent me -- hundreds of names!

(Two of the surnames I was researching were Cohen, a.k.a. Kagan in
Cyrillic, and Levine, so as you can imagine there were a lot of "hits"
for those particular surnames.)

However, the research they sent me contained the data extracts typed
entirely in Russian Cyrillic. Now, I could have hired somebody to
translate it all for me, but I found a better way to handle it. I
scanned each of the 18 pages and saved the output as 18
high-resolution .TIF files. I then ran each .TIF file through this
free OCR (optical character recognition) website -- www.newocr.com --
making sure to choose "Russian" as the source language >from the
dropdown menu each time. The site would give me back the Russian
words >from the document in text that I could copy-and-paste. It had
problems recognizing what to do with columns of data and dates, but it
was still readable -- and still in Cyrillic. I opened the Google
Translate site in a different tab of my web browser and pasted the
Cyrillic text of each page into it and had it translate the page's
text into English. Presto change-o, I had changed the archives'
typewritten Russian text into English text that I could cut and paste
into a word processing document. Google Translate did choke a little
bit on some of the first names, particularly "Leib" and "Chaskel", but
I knew enough about common Hebrew/Yiddish names in the area and
remembered enough of the Cyrillic alphabet >from my seventh grade
language class to fix up problems as I saw them.

So, if you don't mind working entirely over e-mail, translating all
your messages into Russian or Belorussian, not knowing exactly how
much your research will cost ahead of time, not always hearing updates
for weeks or months at a time, waiting about eight months >from start
to finish, and receiving your results in Russian -- then you, too, can
use the Grodno archives to help you with your genealogical research!
:-) But seriously, they did a very nice job, did far more than I
asked of them, and I thought they deserved a good mention and thanks
for their work.

Finally, if you are researching any of the following surnames in the
towns of Bialystok, Goniadz, or Trzcianne (all now in Poland), please
let me know and I would be happy to share both the scans of the
original report and my translated document with you:

1) The LEWIN or LEVIN or LEVINE family
2) The KOROCHINSKY or KERECHINSKY or KOSCHINSKY family
3) The GREENSPAN family
4) The FARBER family
5) The FORMAN or FURMAN family
6) The COHEN or COHN family (a.k.a. KAGAN in the Russian records)
7) The KRAVITZ or KRAVETZ or KRAWIEC family
8) The FISH family

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A good experience with the Grodno (Hrodna), Belarus archives #general

Asparagirl
 

I wanted to report back on a recent good experience I had getting
information out of the National Historical Archives of Belarus in
Grodno (Hrodna). The entire process took several months of
back-and-forth contact over e-mail, but it yielded much more
information than I was expecting, it didn't cost terribly much, and I
didn't have to use a professional researcher or translator at any
stage. I have heard reports that it is often quite difficult for
people doing Jewish genealogy in Belarus to get information out from
the country, but in this case they actually went above and beyond the
call of duty in providing me with helpful information on family
members. So I hope this message will inspire people to at least try
using them as a resource, based on what I did and what worked for me.

My husband's paternal grandmother's ancestors came >from the city of
Bialystok and a nearby little town called Goniadz. Both of these are
located in far northeastern Poland today (near the modern border with
Belarus), but they used to be located in the Grodno Gubernia
(province) of the Russian Empire. As a result, most of the area's
19th Century vital records wound up stored in the Grodno (Hrodna)
archives in Belarus, rather than in Poland. The Grodno archives
actually have a very nice website, with an English version:
http://archives.gov.by/eng/index.php?id=377130

On March 28th of this year I sent an e-mail to the Grodno archives
with the following query:

"I am seeking a copy of the 1874 census for Jews, for Bialystok uezd in
Grodno province. Resources on the Internet say that it is stored in
Fond 24, Opis 7, Dyelo 213 at your archive. How much would it cost to
get a full copy of all the pages of this document? Please reply and
let me know. (I hope my Russian is not too bad -- I am using
automatic translation software >from Google Translate. Please excuse
any errors.)"

As you can tell, I actually sent this e-mail to them in two languages,
first in Russian text, which I translated and cut-and-pasted >from the
free and invaluable Google Translate service online
(translate.google.com), and then with my original English text pasted
below it, in the same e-mail. I continued this bilingual e-mail
exchange while writing back and forth to the archives over the
following months, and it was a big help to both them and to me, as
they do not write correspondence in English and I am doubtful if they
would have answered my e-mails if I had not included Russian text.
Actually, for most of my later e-mails, I stopped using Russian and
switched to Belorussian, which I noticed Google can now translate to
and from, thinking that this would be better (and carry fewer
unintentional political overtones for an ex-Soviet country). I took
care to write in overly simple sentence structures to avoid potential
translation problems, and I also often re-ran my Russian or
Belorussian text back through Google Translate into English to see if
it would still be readable and semi-grammatical, before sending it
out.

Back to my request... I had asked for a copy of the entire 1874
(Russian Empire) census for Jews, and the archives replied back a few
days later that I would need to provide the surnames of the people I
was researching, as they could not make a copy of the entire 1874
census. So I sent back an e-mail with the eight surnames >from my
husband's family that I am researching, made sure to note that I am
looking for spelling variants of those names too, and added the small
nearby town of Trzcianne, Poland to my search list too.

The archives then sent an e-mail saying that I would need to provide a
notarized document >from my husband stating that I was "allowed" to
search these surnames on his behalf (?!). Okay, if that's what was
needed to pacify the bureaucracy, so be it. So I drew up a one page
document that said I was researching such-and-such surnames from
such-and-such towns and that my husband gave me permission to conduct
this search, and we both trotted off to the local UPS Store to sign it
and have it witnessed by a notary public. I then scanned the document
and e-mailed it to the archives. Of course, since it was written in
English, goodness knows if they could read it, but whatever, it got
the job done.

Then, radio silence >from the archives for several weeks. I e-mailed
back asking if everything was okay, and they replied, saying that an
invoice would be sent to me shortly. Finally, about three months
later, a preliminary invoice was sent to me requesting payment (in
Belorussian funds), which I arranged through an international wire at
my local bank, and then a month or two later a request for the
remaining payment. It was unfortunate that I wasn't able to get an
estimated total of the cost of the research in advance, but luckily it
turned out to not be a terribly large amount.

Finally, this fall, I received in the mail (postal, not e-mail) my
completed research packet >from the archives. And they did a terrific
job! It turns out that they didn't just research the 1874 census of
the Jews, as I had originally asked, but they basically searched
through *all* of their holdings for the eight surnames I had
requested! This included the 1834 Russian Empire revision list (males
only), the 1850 revision list (males only), a book about Jews born in
the city of Bialystok in 1852, an alphabetical census of the city of
Bialystok in 1853 (comparing people in that census to their official
listings in the eighth and ninth revision lists >from 1834 and 1850),
an alphabetical census of the town of Goniadz in 1853 (ditto), the
name lists of Jewish landowners >from the town Trzcianne >from February
22, 1857, a list of Goniadz's Jews for 1874, Bialystok Jews who had
acquired "receipts" for military duty in 1874, "In testimony on the
postscript of the Jews" for 1875, and the Bialystok city census for
1897. In total, there were 18 single-spaced typewritten pages in the
report they sent me -- hundreds of names!

(Two of the surnames I was researching were Cohen, a.k.a. Kagan in
Cyrillic, and Levine, so as you can imagine there were a lot of "hits"
for those particular surnames.)

However, the research they sent me contained the data extracts typed
entirely in Russian Cyrillic. Now, I could have hired somebody to
translate it all for me, but I found a better way to handle it. I
scanned each of the 18 pages and saved the output as 18
high-resolution .TIF files. I then ran each .TIF file through this
free OCR (optical character recognition) website -- www.newocr.com --
making sure to choose "Russian" as the source language >from the
dropdown menu each time. The site would give me back the Russian
words >from the document in text that I could copy-and-paste. It had
problems recognizing what to do with columns of data and dates, but it
was still readable -- and still in Cyrillic. I opened the Google
Translate site in a different tab of my web browser and pasted the
Cyrillic text of each page into it and had it translate the page's
text into English. Presto change-o, I had changed the archives'
typewritten Russian text into English text that I could cut and paste
into a word processing document. Google Translate did choke a little
bit on some of the first names, particularly "Leib" and "Chaskel", but
I knew enough about common Hebrew/Yiddish names in the area and
remembered enough of the Cyrillic alphabet >from my seventh grade
language class to fix up problems as I saw them.

So, if you don't mind working entirely over e-mail, translating all
your messages into Russian or Belorussian, not knowing exactly how
much your research will cost ahead of time, not always hearing updates
for weeks or months at a time, waiting about eight months >from start
to finish, and receiving your results in Russian -- then you, too, can
use the Grodno archives to help you with your genealogical research!
:-) But seriously, they did a very nice job, did far more than I
asked of them, and I thought they deserved a good mention and thanks
for their work.

Finally, if you are researching any of the following surnames in the
towns of Bialystok, Goniadz, or Trzcianne (all now in Poland), please
let me know and I would be happy to share both the scans of the
original report and my translated document with you:

1) The LEWIN or LEVIN or LEVINE family
2) The KOROCHINSKY or KERECHINSKY or KOSCHINSKY family
3) The GREENSPAN family
4) The FARBER family
5) The FORMAN or FURMAN family
6) The COHEN or COHN family (a.k.a. KAGAN in the Russian records)
7) The KRAVITZ or KRAVETZ or KRAWIEC family
8) The FISH family

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


tombstones from Hasenpoth [Aizenpot] #courland #latvia

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

I have come into possession of some 17 photos of tombstones in the Hasenpoth
[Aizpute] cemetery. The names are BLUMBERG, DANZIGER, CAHN, FRIEDMANN, WEINBERG,
BERNER [LEVY], FEINBERG, MICHELSOHN, LIPMAN and a gorgeous tombstone, unfortunately
mostly unreadable, for Shlomo ben Moshe who lived a very long and illustrious life.
If any of these might be your family, I would be more than happy to pass them on
with a translation. I am trying to get ahold of the rest of the photos, so soon
there may be more, in which case I will let you know.

Martha Lev-Zion
Israel


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia tombstones from Hasenpoth [Aizenpot] #courland #latvia

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

I have come into possession of some 17 photos of tombstones in the Hasenpoth
[Aizpute] cemetery. The names are BLUMBERG, DANZIGER, CAHN, FRIEDMANN, WEINBERG,
BERNER [LEVY], FEINBERG, MICHELSOHN, LIPMAN and a gorgeous tombstone, unfortunately
mostly unreadable, for Shlomo ben Moshe who lived a very long and illustrious life.
If any of these might be your family, I would be more than happy to pass them on
with a translation. I am trying to get ahold of the rest of the photos, so soon
there may be more, in which case I will let you know.

Martha Lev-Zion
Israel


Pastel of Woman in 1830's Germany #general

Ronnie Hess
 

Dear JewishGeners,

Perhaps someone can help figure out what pastel my paternal aunt handed down
to my sister and me. It may or may not be a relative. All we know is that
the pastel picture, >from the late 1830s, seems to be of a young German,
presumably Jewish, young woman. To see the pastel and the back of the pastel
where there is a description in German, go to the following sites:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17371
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17372

I would like to know:
1. What does the description say?
2. Is there an indication of who the artist or the subject was?
3. Is this a portrait of a woman on her wedding day?
4. Are there any obvious aspects to the pastel that would indicate her
socio-economic background and/or religion?

Many thanks,

(Ms.) Ronnie Hess
Madison, WI
Researching HESS, KUHN, HIRSCHLAFF
Oberdorf, Munich, Berlin, Guben


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pastel of Woman in 1830's Germany #general

Ronnie Hess
 

Dear JewishGeners,

Perhaps someone can help figure out what pastel my paternal aunt handed down
to my sister and me. It may or may not be a relative. All we know is that
the pastel picture, >from the late 1830s, seems to be of a young German,
presumably Jewish, young woman. To see the pastel and the back of the pastel
where there is a description in German, go to the following sites:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17371
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17372

I would like to know:
1. What does the description say?
2. Is there an indication of who the artist or the subject was?
3. Is this a portrait of a woman on her wedding day?
4. Are there any obvious aspects to the pastel that would indicate her
socio-economic background and/or religion?

Many thanks,

(Ms.) Ronnie Hess
Madison, WI
Researching HESS, KUHN, HIRSCHLAFF
Oberdorf, Munich, Berlin, Guben