Date   

Re: Explain a Centimorgan #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Barry Sieger asked us to "Explain a Centimorgan". It is not a centimorgan
that is important for defining who you are related to. It are the
segments that are important. DNA is pass down in segments of random
length alternating between the two chromosomes, one >from each parent,
within each of the chromosome pairs. Since only half of each parent DNA
is pass randomly to each of their children, some of their segments are
lost or split causing some lost of its length. What the companies do in
hoping to find one matches, they look at total amount of common DNA,
number of common segments, and/or the length of the longest common
segment. However for endogamy population, like Ashkenazic Jewish
community, their methods do not work well when the numbers of passing
between persons are 7 or more. You may want to read my article in Spring
2017 issue of Avotaynu.

Sidney Sachs


DNA Research #DNA Re: Explain a Centimorgan #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Barry Sieger asked us to "Explain a Centimorgan". It is not a centimorgan
that is important for defining who you are related to. It are the
segments that are important. DNA is pass down in segments of random
length alternating between the two chromosomes, one >from each parent,
within each of the chromosome pairs. Since only half of each parent DNA
is pass randomly to each of their children, some of their segments are
lost or split causing some lost of its length. What the companies do in
hoping to find one matches, they look at total amount of common DNA,
number of common segments, and/or the length of the longest common
segment. However for endogamy population, like Ashkenazic Jewish
community, their methods do not work well when the numbers of passing
between persons are 7 or more. You may want to read my article in Spring
2017 issue of Avotaynu.

Sidney Sachs


The family names Berdie and METZGER #germany

ronald Wallace
 

Has anyone in their research in Germany or Alsace Lorraine ever come across
the family name Berdie. I would be very interested to hear >from anyone who
may have come across this name. There is one family that came to the US
and lived in the Minnesota. Michigan Illinois and Wisconsin areas about
which I have comprehensive details, but I am interested in any other
branches of a family with this name especially any that may have come
from Metz in France or somewhere along the Rhine River in the Pfalz area.
They may have emigrated to the UK.

I am also interested in any METZGER family >from Landau in der Pfalz. This is
a very common German name and I am only interested in Jewish Metzgers from
Landau in the 19th century, especially between 1820 and 1870. The family
were not Butchers. Any assistance would be much appreciated. Thanks

Ronny Wallace, Apollo Beach, Florida ronald@thewallaces.net


German SIG #Germany The family names Berdie and METZGER #germany

ronald Wallace
 

Has anyone in their research in Germany or Alsace Lorraine ever come across
the family name Berdie. I would be very interested to hear >from anyone who
may have come across this name. There is one family that came to the US
and lived in the Minnesota. Michigan Illinois and Wisconsin areas about
which I have comprehensive details, but I am interested in any other
branches of a family with this name especially any that may have come
from Metz in France or somewhere along the Rhine River in the Pfalz area.
They may have emigrated to the UK.

I am also interested in any METZGER family >from Landau in der Pfalz. This is
a very common German name and I am only interested in Jewish Metzgers from
Landau in the 19th century, especially between 1820 and 1870. The family
were not Butchers. Any assistance would be much appreciated. Thanks

Ronny Wallace, Apollo Beach, Florida ronald@thewallaces.net


Re: Translation of a short German phrase from 19th cty. news article - Thank You #germany

ronald Wallace
 

Thank you to all who responded to my request for a translation of the old
German word allda and the sentence in which it was included. I got may
different responses, but the bottom line is that it confirmed my own
interpretation of the sentence. It has helped me enormously in solving a
very convoluted family relationship. Thank You all very much

Ronny Wallace, Apollo Beach, FL ronald@thewallaces.net


German SIG #Germany Re: Translation of a short German phrase from 19th cty. news article - Thank You #germany

ronald Wallace
 

Thank you to all who responded to my request for a translation of the old
German word allda and the sentence in which it was included. I got may
different responses, but the bottom line is that it confirmed my own
interpretation of the sentence. It has helped me enormously in solving a
very convoluted family relationship. Thank You all very much

Ronny Wallace, Apollo Beach, FL ronald@thewallaces.net


Obermayer German Jewish History Awards 2018 #germany

Yvonne Stern
 

Obermayer German Jewish History Awards announced the 2018 winners:

Karl and Hanna BRITZ (Kehl, Baden-Wuerttemberg)
The Joseph Gruppe (Berlin)
Volker MALL and Harald ROTH (Herrenberg, Baden-Wuerttemberg)
Horst MOOG (Hamm/Sieg, North Rhine-Westphalia)
Brunhilde STUERMER (Niederzissen, Rhineland-Palatinate)

A Distinguished Service Award will be presented to Margot FRIEDLAENDER

The award ceremony will take place at the Berlin Parliament on January 22, 2018.

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro - Brasil yvonne.stern17@gmail.com


BOOK CITE Historical German-English dictionary (Google Books) #germany

Andreas Schwab
 

Google Books has the 1745 Teutsch-englisches Lexicon (German-English dictionary)
by Christian Ludwig, Gleditsch.

The book is searchable and is uselful to find words >from older German
texts that are now obsolete or have changed meaning.

Andreas Schwab, Beaconsfield, Quebec, Canada <andreas.j.schwab@icloud.com>


German SIG #Germany Obermayer German Jewish History Awards 2018 #germany

Yvonne Stern
 

Obermayer German Jewish History Awards announced the 2018 winners:

Karl and Hanna BRITZ (Kehl, Baden-Wuerttemberg)
The Joseph Gruppe (Berlin)
Volker MALL and Harald ROTH (Herrenberg, Baden-Wuerttemberg)
Horst MOOG (Hamm/Sieg, North Rhine-Westphalia)
Brunhilde STUERMER (Niederzissen, Rhineland-Palatinate)

A Distinguished Service Award will be presented to Margot FRIEDLAENDER

The award ceremony will take place at the Berlin Parliament on January 22, 2018.

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro - Brasil yvonne.stern17@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany BOOK CITE Historical German-English dictionary (Google Books) #germany

Andreas Schwab
 

Google Books has the 1745 Teutsch-englisches Lexicon (German-English dictionary)
by Christian Ludwig, Gleditsch.

The book is searchable and is uselful to find words >from older German
texts that are now obsolete or have changed meaning.

Andreas Schwab, Beaconsfield, Quebec, Canada <andreas.j.schwab@icloud.com>


SILBERT, Louis and Bella of Harrisburg PA #lithuania

Joel Hayflick
 

I'm seeking descendants of my great uncle, Louis SILBERT and his
wife, Bella (nee ZANDEL). They came >from Zidikai and Viekshnai,
respectively, and lived in Harrisburg, PA >from ~1904-1948. Their
daughter Helen SILBERT married Charles COOPER. Helen died in
Norwalk, CN in 1980.

Any reminiscences of Louis, Bella, Helen, or Charles or
connection to living descendants would be most appreciated.

Best regards,
Joel Hayflick

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania SILBERT, Louis and Bella of Harrisburg PA #lithuania

Joel Hayflick
 

I'm seeking descendants of my great uncle, Louis SILBERT and his
wife, Bella (nee ZANDEL). They came >from Zidikai and Viekshnai,
respectively, and lived in Harrisburg, PA >from ~1904-1948. Their
daughter Helen SILBERT married Charles COOPER. Helen died in
Norwalk, CN in 1980.

Any reminiscences of Louis, Bella, Helen, or Charles or
connection to living descendants would be most appreciated.

Best regards,
Joel Hayflick

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


VIEWMATE translation request Polish CHERSZARYC #poland

Jill Lewis
 

Hello, I've posted a vital record in Polish for a marriage >from which
I need information on the spouse's family. It is on ViewMate at the
following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60951

The record is >from Warsaw in 1873.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
Jill Lewis


JRI Poland #Poland VIEWMATE translation request Polish CHERSZARYC #poland

Jill Lewis
 

Hello, I've posted a vital record in Polish for a marriage >from which
I need information on the spouse's family. It is on ViewMate at the
following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60951

The record is >from Warsaw in 1873.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
Jill Lewis


Re: Finding Burial place of Jews who died shortly after being liberated #general

Jan Bousse <janbousse@...>
 

Hello Ben,

Hersh Ferszt came to live in Antwerp between 1916-1930. There is a file on
him and his family in the Register of Foreigners (Vreemdelingenregister)
#189097. Born 11/11/1926 in Warschau. Same file contains his father Jacob,
b. Warschau 1885, Gerzon Mendel b. Warschau 12/11/1921. The file usually
gives information about address, profession, etc. Probably not his date of
death. Still, it may be worth looking at it.

You may find useful information at the site of the Kazerne Dossin in
Mechelen (Malines). e-mail info@kazerne dossin.eu. They have the details of
the transports and may have more info on his death and also pictures.

I used to go to Antwerp archives to view the file, but I am not able to do
it now. I may be able to refer you to someone who I believe goes there
often. I can also try to view the file on internet.

Good luck. Write back to me if the information is useful.

Jan BOUSSE, Oostende, Belgium
janbousse@skynet.be

From: Benjamin First <ben.first44@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2017 20:23:50 +0100

My great uncle Hersh Leib Ferszt went to Aushwitz after being
transported >from Malines. According to family tradition he survived
but was overfed and died shortly after being liberated (perhaps in
Switzerland). Does anyone have any ideas how I may be able to find
out where he was buried?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Finding Burial place of Jews who died shortly after being liberated #general

Jan Bousse <janbousse@...>
 

Hello Ben,

Hersh Ferszt came to live in Antwerp between 1916-1930. There is a file on
him and his family in the Register of Foreigners (Vreemdelingenregister)
#189097. Born 11/11/1926 in Warschau. Same file contains his father Jacob,
b. Warschau 1885, Gerzon Mendel b. Warschau 12/11/1921. The file usually
gives information about address, profession, etc. Probably not his date of
death. Still, it may be worth looking at it.

You may find useful information at the site of the Kazerne Dossin in
Mechelen (Malines). e-mail info@kazerne dossin.eu. They have the details of
the transports and may have more info on his death and also pictures.

I used to go to Antwerp archives to view the file, but I am not able to do
it now. I may be able to refer you to someone who I believe goes there
often. I can also try to view the file on internet.

Good luck. Write back to me if the information is useful.

Jan BOUSSE, Oostende, Belgium
janbousse@skynet.be

From: Benjamin First <ben.first44@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2017 20:23:50 +0100

My great uncle Hersh Leib Ferszt went to Aushwitz after being
transported >from Malines. According to family tradition he survived
but was overfed and died shortly after being liberated (perhaps in
Switzerland). Does anyone have any ideas how I may be able to find
out where he was buried?


Re: Elusive Ship Manifest Still MIA #general

A. E. Jordan
 

lgoldstein@tds.net wrote:
...One other thing I'm trying is the NYC marriage applications/affidavits/
licenses recently obtained under the FOIL ... These are not the marriage
certificate, but are more detailed and may give me more of the information I seek.
It's all done by snail mail, so I'm eagerly waiting.

A few comments to clarify continuing misconceptions about New York records.

The marriage licenses have been available at the Municipal Archives for many many
years now so what was achieved was putting the images of the index online. The
index and the certificates were long ago put in the shelf at the Municipal Archives
and numerous people had talked about them here. Last year the Marriage Bureau
transferred the licenses though 1949 to the Archives as well but the Archives
already had the index into 1950 on the shelf.

There is a very common misconception that because the license files are two or
three pages that they are far more detailed. First if you read the three page
files you will see the questions and the information is the same between the first
and second page. Same questions and same answers. The first page is the marriage
details supplied by whoever performed the ceremony.

The questions are not only the same between the first and second page but the same
as what was asked by the Health Department on the more familiar files. In many
cases the bride and groom answered the questions answered the questions exactly
the same. Think about it, if someone asks you today where were you born you said
New York (for example) consistently. One time you do not say East 72nd Street in
Manhattan and the next time New York and the third time such and such hospital.
Our ancestors did the same when they were asked the questions. So if they said
Russia it was always Russia and most of the clerks said very good. Some clerks
seemed to push for more detail but that is very rare.

The same is true with things like names. If you said you mother born Malka was
Mollie you did not change the answer and the clerk did not say "Are you sure?".
The answers are most often exactly the same.

Where the two sets of records most frequently are different is when there was a
divorce involved or sometimes when the bride was very young. The Health Department
did not care about the divorce and simply recorded that either or both parties were
divorced and took down the number of marriages. The City Clerk however was more
inquisitive and wanted the details. The forms changed over time but they generally
recorded when and where the divorce took place and later on even the terms of the
divorce, if the spouse was still living and their name. So if you have a divorce
in the tree get the marriage license if you want to know about prior spouses. I
have even seen divorce decrees attached to the license file as proof (and if it is
there the Archives includes it with the copy).

I have also seen in the file back up documentation about ages but more often it
seems to come >from Italian origins or Catholic weddings. You find baptismal
certificates or letters >from the father granting the daughter the right to marry
or saying she is of age and those got attached and copied right along with the
license file.

That is not to say it is not worth getting the license but I want to manage
expectations and perceptions. There are some other reasons to get both files
because sometimes it is hard to read something and by cross referencing you get
better clarity.

As for it being snail mail ... yes that is true unless of course you use a
research or someone like me who does retrievals.

It is worth checking the people on the passenger list. I had a name for my great
grandfather and I checked them and searched them out. Nothing. When we did the
DNA we figured it all out and they were related.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Elusive Ship Manifest Still MIA #general

A. E. Jordan
 

lgoldstein@tds.net wrote:
...One other thing I'm trying is the NYC marriage applications/affidavits/
licenses recently obtained under the FOIL ... These are not the marriage
certificate, but are more detailed and may give me more of the information I seek.
It's all done by snail mail, so I'm eagerly waiting.

A few comments to clarify continuing misconceptions about New York records.

The marriage licenses have been available at the Municipal Archives for many many
years now so what was achieved was putting the images of the index online. The
index and the certificates were long ago put in the shelf at the Municipal Archives
and numerous people had talked about them here. Last year the Marriage Bureau
transferred the licenses though 1949 to the Archives as well but the Archives
already had the index into 1950 on the shelf.

There is a very common misconception that because the license files are two or
three pages that they are far more detailed. First if you read the three page
files you will see the questions and the information is the same between the first
and second page. Same questions and same answers. The first page is the marriage
details supplied by whoever performed the ceremony.

The questions are not only the same between the first and second page but the same
as what was asked by the Health Department on the more familiar files. In many
cases the bride and groom answered the questions answered the questions exactly
the same. Think about it, if someone asks you today where were you born you said
New York (for example) consistently. One time you do not say East 72nd Street in
Manhattan and the next time New York and the third time such and such hospital.
Our ancestors did the same when they were asked the questions. So if they said
Russia it was always Russia and most of the clerks said very good. Some clerks
seemed to push for more detail but that is very rare.

The same is true with things like names. If you said you mother born Malka was
Mollie you did not change the answer and the clerk did not say "Are you sure?".
The answers are most often exactly the same.

Where the two sets of records most frequently are different is when there was a
divorce involved or sometimes when the bride was very young. The Health Department
did not care about the divorce and simply recorded that either or both parties were
divorced and took down the number of marriages. The City Clerk however was more
inquisitive and wanted the details. The forms changed over time but they generally
recorded when and where the divorce took place and later on even the terms of the
divorce, if the spouse was still living and their name. So if you have a divorce
in the tree get the marriage license if you want to know about prior spouses. I
have even seen divorce decrees attached to the license file as proof (and if it is
there the Archives includes it with the copy).

I have also seen in the file back up documentation about ages but more often it
seems to come >from Italian origins or Catholic weddings. You find baptismal
certificates or letters >from the father granting the daughter the right to marry
or saying she is of age and those got attached and copied right along with the
license file.

That is not to say it is not worth getting the license but I want to manage
expectations and perceptions. There are some other reasons to get both files
because sometimes it is hard to read something and by cross referencing you get
better clarity.

As for it being snail mail ... yes that is true unless of course you use a
research or someone like me who does retrievals.

It is worth checking the people on the passenger list. I had a name for my great
grandfather and I checked them and searched them out. Nothing. When we did the
DNA we figured it all out and they were related.

Allan Jordan


Elusive Ship Manifest Still MIA #general

Louise Goldstein <lgoldstein@...>
 

Thanks to all of you who responded when I posted last week about the
difficulties I've had locating my grandmother Malke CHALOWSKY's ship
manifest. I am so grateful for the interest people took in my problem!
Most of the suggestions are things I've already tried but I'm persevering.
One other thing I'm trying is the NYC marriage applications/affidavits/
licenses recently obtained under the FOIL by that marvelous new
organization, Reclaim the Records. These are not the marriage certificate,
but are more detailed and may give me more of the information I seek. It's
all done by snail mail, so I'm eagerly waiting. I'm also looking into the
people Malke's sister Chaije and brother Harry were going to, per their
ship manifests, Laser SAITZ on Winslow Street in Roxbury, MA and someone
that looks like "Lazar LESHANSKY" on 4th Street in New York. They are
listed as relatives.

Louise Goldstein

CHALOWSKY/GOLDBERG, Krivoye Ozera, Ukraine;
GOLDSTEIN/GOLDSTERN/ROSENSUMMEN/HERSCHENFELD/WEINSTROM/BRANDT, Terespol,
Poland/Brest Litovsk, Belarus; BATTALEN/WOLOFF, Voronezh, Russia; RONEN,
Kiev, Ukraine; PASHKOFF, Fastov, Ukraine.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Elusive Ship Manifest Still MIA #general

Louise Goldstein <lgoldstein@...>
 

Thanks to all of you who responded when I posted last week about the
difficulties I've had locating my grandmother Malke CHALOWSKY's ship
manifest. I am so grateful for the interest people took in my problem!
Most of the suggestions are things I've already tried but I'm persevering.
One other thing I'm trying is the NYC marriage applications/affidavits/
licenses recently obtained under the FOIL by that marvelous new
organization, Reclaim the Records. These are not the marriage certificate,
but are more detailed and may give me more of the information I seek. It's
all done by snail mail, so I'm eagerly waiting. I'm also looking into the
people Malke's sister Chaije and brother Harry were going to, per their
ship manifests, Laser SAITZ on Winslow Street in Roxbury, MA and someone
that looks like "Lazar LESHANSKY" on 4th Street in New York. They are
listed as relatives.

Louise Goldstein

CHALOWSKY/GOLDBERG, Krivoye Ozera, Ukraine;
GOLDSTEIN/GOLDSTERN/ROSENSUMMEN/HERSCHENFELD/WEINSTROM/BRANDT, Terespol,
Poland/Brest Litovsk, Belarus; BATTALEN/WOLOFF, Voronezh, Russia; RONEN,
Kiev, Ukraine; PASHKOFF, Fastov, Ukraine.

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