Date   

Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay September Meeting #general

Sally Israel
 

Preservation and Storage of Photos and Digital Images

Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay

Sunday, September 11, 2011

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay will meet on Sunday
September 11th at 2:00 P.M. at Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services, 14041
Icot Blvd., Clearwater, Florida. The meeting program will feature Gregg
Hickman of Lake Shore Camera Exchange in Palm Harbor, who will speak on
the preservation, restoration and storage of photographs and documents

Gregg Hickman has been involved in photography since 1963. He is a
trained photographer who did freelance photography for more than 20
years with local, national and international publications. Gregg ran
the photo department for the FBI at the Tampa field office before
becoming a Clearwater Police officer where he was able to apply his
photo skills at numerous crime scenes and surveillances. Gregg
founded Lake Shore Camera Exchange in 1984, and he is continuing his
life long involvement in the photographic industry and in his community
through membership and activities with many related organizations.

Gregg will be covering some basics on: what prints are made up of, why
prints deteriorate (both color and black & white), expected longevity of
different forms of image capturing media, what medias to use to store
your images and the future of that media, the difference in media cards,
some scanning basics, digital image organization in your computer, and
image restoration examples.

A pre-program social with refreshments and library access
begins at 1:30 PM, and the featured program starts at 2:00 PM. For
information on the organization or directions to the meeting call Sally
Israel at 727-343-1652.

--
Sally U. Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay September Meeting #general

Sally Israel
 

Preservation and Storage of Photos and Digital Images

Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay

Sunday, September 11, 2011

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay will meet on Sunday
September 11th at 2:00 P.M. at Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services, 14041
Icot Blvd., Clearwater, Florida. The meeting program will feature Gregg
Hickman of Lake Shore Camera Exchange in Palm Harbor, who will speak on
the preservation, restoration and storage of photographs and documents

Gregg Hickman has been involved in photography since 1963. He is a
trained photographer who did freelance photography for more than 20
years with local, national and international publications. Gregg ran
the photo department for the FBI at the Tampa field office before
becoming a Clearwater Police officer where he was able to apply his
photo skills at numerous crime scenes and surveillances. Gregg
founded Lake Shore Camera Exchange in 1984, and he is continuing his
life long involvement in the photographic industry and in his community
through membership and activities with many related organizations.

Gregg will be covering some basics on: what prints are made up of, why
prints deteriorate (both color and black & white), expected longevity of
different forms of image capturing media, what medias to use to store
your images and the future of that media, the difference in media cards,
some scanning basics, digital image organization in your computer, and
image restoration examples.

A pre-program social with refreshments and library access
begins at 1:30 PM, and the featured program starts at 2:00 PM. For
information on the organization or directions to the meeting call Sally
Israel at 727-343-1652.

--
Sally U. Israel


(USA) Closing of Pittsfield MA National Archives Branch #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Previously reported on this forum last spring was due to budget cuts, the
National Archives would be closing the Pittsfield, MA branch. The final day
is September 16, 2011. http://www.archives.gov/northeast/pittsfield/

The over 71,000 rolls of microfilm (census records, passenger logs, etc) are
being transferred to the Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield's Public Library
See: http://tinyurl.com/3etlhkb
original url:
http://pittsfieldlibrary.wordpress.com/2011/04/08/athenaeum-will-receive-genealogical-microfilm/

The Waltham, MA National Archives regional branch remains open.
http://www.archives.gov/northeast/boston/

Thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society's The Weekly
Genealogist for information included in this posting.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (USA) Closing of Pittsfield MA National Archives Branch #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Previously reported on this forum last spring was due to budget cuts, the
National Archives would be closing the Pittsfield, MA branch. The final day
is September 16, 2011. http://www.archives.gov/northeast/pittsfield/

The over 71,000 rolls of microfilm (census records, passenger logs, etc) are
being transferred to the Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield's Public Library
See: http://tinyurl.com/3etlhkb
original url:
http://pittsfieldlibrary.wordpress.com/2011/04/08/athenaeum-will-receive-genealogical-microfilm/

The Waltham, MA National Archives regional branch remains open.
http://www.archives.gov/northeast/boston/

Thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society's The Weekly
Genealogist for information included in this posting.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Question about filed US Naturalization papers - Women and Naturalization #general

bette_sscf <bette_sscf@...>
 

Avram Brickner in Jerusalem, Israel inquired about U.S. naturalization
papers for single and married females.

Most of Avram's questions are answered in the excellent Prologue Magazine
two-part article "Any woman who is now or may hereafter be married . . ."
Women and Naturalization, ca. 1802-1940 By Marian L. Smith at
http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1998/summer/women-and-naturalization
-1.html
http://tinyurl.com/ykhgjv [MOD]

For information about a specific person's naturalization, search Ancestry's
U.S. Federal Census Collection. The 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930 censuses list
year of immigration, naturalization status (Al=alien, Pa=first papers,
Na=naturalized) and/or year of naturalization. Ancestry's Citizenship and
Naturalization databases may contain specific index references and, if you
are lucky, selected original documents.

Naturalization records may be obtained >from the USCIS Genealogy Program
http://www.uscis.gov/USCIS/Genealogy/genealogy%20brochure%203-09.pdf
or limited documents >from regional branches of National Archives and Records
Administration (NARA) http://www.archives.gov/research/naturalization/.

Bette Stoop Mas
Florida, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Question about filed US Naturalization papers - Women and Naturalization #general

bette_sscf <bette_sscf@...>
 

Avram Brickner in Jerusalem, Israel inquired about U.S. naturalization
papers for single and married females.

Most of Avram's questions are answered in the excellent Prologue Magazine
two-part article "Any woman who is now or may hereafter be married . . ."
Women and Naturalization, ca. 1802-1940 By Marian L. Smith at
http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1998/summer/women-and-naturalization
-1.html
http://tinyurl.com/ykhgjv [MOD]

For information about a specific person's naturalization, search Ancestry's
U.S. Federal Census Collection. The 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930 censuses list
year of immigration, naturalization status (Al=alien, Pa=first papers,
Na=naturalized) and/or year of naturalization. Ancestry's Citizenship and
Naturalization databases may contain specific index references and, if you
are lucky, selected original documents.

Naturalization records may be obtained >from the USCIS Genealogy Program
http://www.uscis.gov/USCIS/Genealogy/genealogy%20brochure%203-09.pdf
or limited documents >from regional branches of National Archives and Records
Administration (NARA) http://www.archives.gov/research/naturalization/.

Bette Stoop Mas
Florida, USA


Searching for Joseph COHN #general

David Laskin
 

Dear Genners,

I am working on my mother's family whose name was HAKOHEN or
KAGANOVICH (various spellings) in Rakov and Volozhin (presentday
Belarus). I have traced my mother's grandfather -- Avram Akiva
(Abraham Cohen in the US) and all of his siblings (Arie, Leah Golda,
Herman, Shalom Tvi) except for ONE. The one I am searching for was
named Yasef Bear Kaganovich (various spellings) in Russia and Joseph
Cohn (no "e") when he emigrated to Hoboken in 1901. On the 1910
census he is listed as living at 406 Newark Street in Hoboken with his
wife Ethel and children Herman 20, Sarah 17 and Rachel 14. Profession
is rabbi. I would love to hear >from any of Joseph's descendants -- I
can put you in touch with many many family members! Thanks.
David Laskin, Seattle, WA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for Joseph COHN #general

David Laskin
 

Dear Genners,

I am working on my mother's family whose name was HAKOHEN or
KAGANOVICH (various spellings) in Rakov and Volozhin (presentday
Belarus). I have traced my mother's grandfather -- Avram Akiva
(Abraham Cohen in the US) and all of his siblings (Arie, Leah Golda,
Herman, Shalom Tvi) except for ONE. The one I am searching for was
named Yasef Bear Kaganovich (various spellings) in Russia and Joseph
Cohn (no "e") when he emigrated to Hoboken in 1901. On the 1910
census he is listed as living at 406 Newark Street in Hoboken with his
wife Ethel and children Herman 20, Sarah 17 and Rachel 14. Profession
is rabbi. I would love to hear >from any of Joseph's descendants -- I
can put you in touch with many many family members! Thanks.
David Laskin, Seattle, WA


Re: Question about filed US Naturalization papers #general

A. E. Jordan
 

In a message dated 8/30/2011 5:20:32 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
ab_dd@... writes:
I have a question about the information contained in filed US
Naturalization
papers. Let us suppose a single female emigrated to the US around 1902, by
herself.
She then married (a US citizen) 12 years later..

The answer is basically yes or maybe to everything. It all depends Avram
on the individual person.
First off she had to be coming to someone in the USA. Was it a parent,
brother, cousin, etc? Single women especially were not admitted into the USA
without a place to go and someone that could support them.

If she came to a parent it is possible she was naturalized with her parent
especially depending if she was a minor or in the majority agewise at the
time.

When would she have filed otherwise? Impossible to tell. Because women
did not get the vote till the 1920s there was far less reason for them to
naturalize on their own. But maybe she was especially patriotic and wanted
to be a citizen. Who knows. No matter what there was a waiting period (I
think three years) before she could file after she arrived in the USA.

Depending on the time frame of the marriage she might or might not have
automatically became a citizen if she married a man who was one. The laws
changed in different time periods. Same is true if she married and the
husband later decided to naturalize. If it was a time frame when the wife would
have been included check the husband's papers because you wild find info
on his wife.

Would they be under her maiden name or married name ? Depends when she
naturalized. Once she was married she would have naturalized under her
married name but the form might have recorded her maiden name in the
information. Even if the husband was dead she likely naturalized as Mrs.xxxx as
opposed to reverting to her maiden name.

Is it possible that they were not filed until the late 30's or early 40's ?
Of course she could have felt the desire/need to naturalize at any
point. After World War II started the law said all foreign born individuals had
to register if they were not naturalized. But I suspect a lot did not.
My great grandmother's sister for example somewhere along the years started
saying she was naturalized in the 1920s some 30 years after she arrived in
the USA. I searched and searched and never found her naturalization or any
record of her or her husband ever voting. The husband had died by the
time WWII started and she seems never to have registered by then saying she
was naturalized.

Wish there was a hard and fast rule ... there is not.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Question about filed US Naturalization papers #general

A. E. Jordan
 

In a message dated 8/30/2011 5:20:32 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
ab_dd@... writes:
I have a question about the information contained in filed US
Naturalization
papers. Let us suppose a single female emigrated to the US around 1902, by
herself.
She then married (a US citizen) 12 years later..

The answer is basically yes or maybe to everything. It all depends Avram
on the individual person.
First off she had to be coming to someone in the USA. Was it a parent,
brother, cousin, etc? Single women especially were not admitted into the USA
without a place to go and someone that could support them.

If she came to a parent it is possible she was naturalized with her parent
especially depending if she was a minor or in the majority agewise at the
time.

When would she have filed otherwise? Impossible to tell. Because women
did not get the vote till the 1920s there was far less reason for them to
naturalize on their own. But maybe she was especially patriotic and wanted
to be a citizen. Who knows. No matter what there was a waiting period (I
think three years) before she could file after she arrived in the USA.

Depending on the time frame of the marriage she might or might not have
automatically became a citizen if she married a man who was one. The laws
changed in different time periods. Same is true if she married and the
husband later decided to naturalize. If it was a time frame when the wife would
have been included check the husband's papers because you wild find info
on his wife.

Would they be under her maiden name or married name ? Depends when she
naturalized. Once she was married she would have naturalized under her
married name but the form might have recorded her maiden name in the
information. Even if the husband was dead she likely naturalized as Mrs.xxxx as
opposed to reverting to her maiden name.

Is it possible that they were not filed until the late 30's or early 40's ?
Of course she could have felt the desire/need to naturalize at any
point. After World War II started the law said all foreign born individuals had
to register if they were not naturalized. But I suspect a lot did not.
My great grandmother's sister for example somewhere along the years started
saying she was naturalized in the 1920s some 30 years after she arrived in
the USA. I searched and searched and never found her naturalization or any
record of her or her husband ever voting. The husband had died by the
time WWII started and she seems never to have registered by then saying she
was naturalized.

Wish there was a hard and fast rule ... there is not.

Allan Jordan


Re: distance Rypin to Divin #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

People traveled about, for business and other reasons. When marriages were
arranged, the bride and groom didn't have to date (or live together) and get to
know each other.

The fact is that the bride and groom were likely cousins with different branches
of the family living in the two towns. I can give you a list of places where
different branches of one of my families lived, some over 100 miles >from others.

And actually, one of my cousins >from Augustow, Poland, on his naturalization
papers (both Declaration and Petition) said he was born in Marseilles, France.
How is that for distance? He was born in the 1860's around the time of the
rebellion, cholera, and famine, so I assume that the family went to France to
get away >from the trouble, then they went back to Augustow.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: distance Rypin to Divin #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

People traveled about, for business and other reasons. When marriages were
arranged, the bride and groom didn't have to date (or live together) and get to
know each other.

The fact is that the bride and groom were likely cousins with different branches
of the family living in the two towns. I can give you a list of places where
different branches of one of my families lived, some over 100 miles >from others.

And actually, one of my cousins >from Augustow, Poland, on his naturalization
papers (both Declaration and Petition) said he was born in Marseilles, France.
How is that for distance? He was born in the 1860's around the time of the
rebellion, cholera, and famine, so I assume that the family went to France to
get away >from the trouble, then they went back to Augustow.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ


Re: Can this surname be from Hungary #general

Odeda Zlotnick
 

I am answering publicly since I think the following site could be useful for
all of us:
http://www.pronunciationguide.info/

As for Mathilde's specific question: the transcription
for Hungarian http://www.pronunciationguide.info/Hungarian.html

"Cseve"
German: "Tscheve" Polish: "Czeve"
And so forth.

Odeda Zlotnick,
Jerusalem.

From: Mathilde <maticatag@...>
Shalom,

On a tombstone the surname is inscribed in Hebrew Tet-Shin-Ain-Vav-Ain.
If any one is familiar with that name that may be >from Hungary, can
she/he tell how to spell it it in Latin letters and how to pronounce
it.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Can this surname be from Hungary #general

Odeda Zlotnick
 

I am answering publicly since I think the following site could be useful for
all of us:
http://www.pronunciationguide.info/

As for Mathilde's specific question: the transcription
for Hungarian http://www.pronunciationguide.info/Hungarian.html

"Cseve"
German: "Tscheve" Polish: "Czeve"
And so forth.

Odeda Zlotnick,
Jerusalem.

From: Mathilde <maticatag@...>
Shalom,

On a tombstone the surname is inscribed in Hebrew Tet-Shin-Ain-Vav-Ain.
If any one is familiar with that name that may be >from Hungary, can
she/he tell how to spell it it in Latin letters and how to pronounce
it.


Yizkor Book Project, August 2011 #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

OK, this report I won't mention statistics or the fact that the Yizkor Book
Project team carried out 73 new books, entries and updates during August.
No, I won't mention them because what is really important is that the YB
Project is continuously on the move and the list below is certainly
testimony to this fact and the people behind the statistics are much more
important, so thank you all of you good people behind these achievements.

It's not hard to see that a remarkably large number of Lithuanian
communities have been added this month. In addition to the numerous entries
that are added regularly each month >from Pinkas Lita (Encyclopedia of Jewish
Communities: Lithuania), this month an impressive new book has been added -
"Preserving Our Litvak Heritage, Volume II", chapters of which have been
kindly donated by Josef Rosin and Joel Alpert, and the first articles of
which you'll find listed below.

I am very pleased to note that my call for html help brought about a very
positive response and that Jason Hallgarten has now joined our little team
and within a short space of time has helped add in a large number of
translations. We thank him for what he's done so far and hope he continues
ever onwards.

And more news. We are in the process of adding in the complete translation
of the Lyubcha, Belarus Yizkor Book - "Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the
Jewish community" and kudos go out to Ann Belinsky who also help translate
and is also coordinating this project. Hopefully, within the next few months
the whole book will appear online for the benefit of all.

And yet more news. The Yizkor Book in Print (YBIP) Project is slowly taking
shape and I'd like to take this opportunity to ask those coordinators who
have a completed online and project and are interested in seeing their
project in hard copy, please contact Joel Alpert or myself.

As always, I'd like to remind those who would like to see "their" community
Yizkor Book translated and online, to contact me and I will assist, as much
as possible, in seeing this dream become a reality. Other than that, if you
don't feel able to take on the coordination of such a project but would like
to support those that are going on, please go to the Yizkor Book
JewishGen-erosity page:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Perhaps you'll see that it just so happens that there is a Translation Fund
for "your" community and your financial assistance, big or small, can make
the difference in seeing the translation project go forward.

As far as the August figures go, during this last month we have added these
2 new projects:

- Bychawa, Poland (Bychawa; a memorial to the Jewish community of Bychawa,
Lubelska) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bychawa/Bychawa.html

- Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania5/lithuania5.html

Added in 48 new entries:

- Kelme, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania5/Lit5_050.html

- Krustpils, Latvia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Latvia & Estonia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_latvia/lat_00223.html

- Kupiskis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00561a.html

- Mazeikiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania5/Lit5_086.html

- Mikalina, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00370c.html

- Mikaliskis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371e.html

- Mikloment, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371b.html

- Milontza, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371c.html

- Mincia, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371d.html

- Misniunenai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00374.html

- Mizuk, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00370d.html

- Morlishuk, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00367b.html

- Morovny-Panemun, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00367c.html

- Musninkai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371f.html

- Naujazeris, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00398a.html

- Naujokai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00398b.html

- Nedinge, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00397a.html

- Neknishok, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00410d.html

- Nemajunai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00410a.html

- Nemunaitis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00407.html

- Nemunelio Radviliskis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities:
Lithuania) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00398c.html

- Nevarenai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00397c.html

- Nevieriai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00397d.html

- Niklisok, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00407b.html

- Nirak, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00407c.html

- Nociunai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00410e.html

- Onuskis (Trakai), Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities:
Lithuania) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00147.html

- Pabaiskas, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447.html

- Paberze, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00449a.html

- Pabirze, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447b.html

- Padubysis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00448.html

- Padushrave, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00448b.html

- Paezereliai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447c.html

- Paezeriai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447d.html

- Pagegiai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447e.html

- Pagiriai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00448f.html

- Pagramantis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00448c.html

- Pajevonys, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00477.html

- Pajuris, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania5/Lit5_102.html

- Palanga, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00491.html

- Raseiniai, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_230.html

- Rietavas, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_260.html

- Seda, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_274.html

- Seduva, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_285.html

- Seredzius, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_307.html

- Surviliskis, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_319.html

- Suvainiskis, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_322.html

- Svedasai, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_327.html

We have continued to update 23 of our existing projects:

- Bukowina (History of the Jews in the Bukovina)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dej, Romania (Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubno/Dubno.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Kovel', Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krynki, Poland (Memorial book of Krynki)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krynki/krynki.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Lodz, Poland (Lodzer Yiskor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lodz/lodz.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/miskolc/miskolc.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Ruscova, Romania (Memorial book of the martyrs of Ruskova and Soblas,
Marmarosh district) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ruscova/ruscova.html

- Sanok, Poland (Memorial Book of Sanok and Vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sanok/sanok.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and testimony)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Svir, Poland (Our Townlet Swir)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svir/svir.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki in flames; a memorial book to the
community of Olkenik in the Vilna district)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai/Valkininkai.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

Wishing you all the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@...


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yizkor Book Project, August 2011 #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

OK, this report I won't mention statistics or the fact that the Yizkor Book
Project team carried out 73 new books, entries and updates during August.
No, I won't mention them because what is really important is that the YB
Project is continuously on the move and the list below is certainly
testimony to this fact and the people behind the statistics are much more
important, so thank you all of you good people behind these achievements.

It's not hard to see that a remarkably large number of Lithuanian
communities have been added this month. In addition to the numerous entries
that are added regularly each month >from Pinkas Lita (Encyclopedia of Jewish
Communities: Lithuania), this month an impressive new book has been added -
"Preserving Our Litvak Heritage, Volume II", chapters of which have been
kindly donated by Josef Rosin and Joel Alpert, and the first articles of
which you'll find listed below.

I am very pleased to note that my call for html help brought about a very
positive response and that Jason Hallgarten has now joined our little team
and within a short space of time has helped add in a large number of
translations. We thank him for what he's done so far and hope he continues
ever onwards.

And more news. We are in the process of adding in the complete translation
of the Lyubcha, Belarus Yizkor Book - "Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the
Jewish community" and kudos go out to Ann Belinsky who also help translate
and is also coordinating this project. Hopefully, within the next few months
the whole book will appear online for the benefit of all.

And yet more news. The Yizkor Book in Print (YBIP) Project is slowly taking
shape and I'd like to take this opportunity to ask those coordinators who
have a completed online and project and are interested in seeing their
project in hard copy, please contact Joel Alpert or myself.

As always, I'd like to remind those who would like to see "their" community
Yizkor Book translated and online, to contact me and I will assist, as much
as possible, in seeing this dream become a reality. Other than that, if you
don't feel able to take on the coordination of such a project but would like
to support those that are going on, please go to the Yizkor Book
JewishGen-erosity page:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Perhaps you'll see that it just so happens that there is a Translation Fund
for "your" community and your financial assistance, big or small, can make
the difference in seeing the translation project go forward.

As far as the August figures go, during this last month we have added these
2 new projects:

- Bychawa, Poland (Bychawa; a memorial to the Jewish community of Bychawa,
Lubelska) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bychawa/Bychawa.html

- Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania5/lithuania5.html

Added in 48 new entries:

- Kelme, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania5/Lit5_050.html

- Krustpils, Latvia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Latvia & Estonia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_latvia/lat_00223.html

- Kupiskis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00561a.html

- Mazeikiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania5/Lit5_086.html

- Mikalina, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00370c.html

- Mikaliskis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371e.html

- Mikloment, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371b.html

- Milontza, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371c.html

- Mincia, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371d.html

- Misniunenai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00374.html

- Mizuk, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00370d.html

- Morlishuk, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00367b.html

- Morovny-Panemun, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00367c.html

- Musninkai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00371f.html

- Naujazeris, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00398a.html

- Naujokai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00398b.html

- Nedinge, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00397a.html

- Neknishok, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00410d.html

- Nemajunai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00410a.html

- Nemunaitis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00407.html

- Nemunelio Radviliskis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities:
Lithuania) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00398c.html

- Nevarenai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00397c.html

- Nevieriai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00397d.html

- Niklisok, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00407b.html

- Nirak, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00407c.html

- Nociunai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00410e.html

- Onuskis (Trakai), Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities:
Lithuania) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00147.html

- Pabaiskas, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447.html

- Paberze, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00449a.html

- Pabirze, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447b.html

- Padubysis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00448.html

- Padushrave, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00448b.html

- Paezereliai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447c.html

- Paezeriai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447d.html

- Pagegiai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00447e.html

- Pagiriai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00448f.html

- Pagramantis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00448c.html

- Pajevonys, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00477.html

- Pajuris, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania5/Lit5_102.html

- Palanga, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_lita/lit_00491.html

- Raseiniai, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_230.html

- Rietavas, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_260.html

- Seda, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_274.html

- Seduva, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_285.html

- Seredzius, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_307.html

- Surviliskis, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_319.html

- Suvainiskis, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_322.html

- Svedasai, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/Lit6_327.html

We have continued to update 23 of our existing projects:

- Bukowina (History of the Jews in the Bukovina)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dej, Romania (Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubno/Dubno.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Kovel', Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krynki, Poland (Memorial book of Krynki)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krynki/krynki.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Lodz, Poland (Lodzer Yiskor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lodz/lodz.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/miskolc/miskolc.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Ruscova, Romania (Memorial book of the martyrs of Ruskova and Soblas,
Marmarosh district) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ruscova/ruscova.html

- Sanok, Poland (Memorial Book of Sanok and Vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sanok/sanok.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and testimony)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Svir, Poland (Our Townlet Swir)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svir/svir.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki in flames; a memorial book to the
community of Olkenik in the Vilna district)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai/Valkininkai.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

Wishing you all the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@...


help with a transcription #poland

Dolores Notaro <notaro.deedee@...>
 

I teach, voluntarily , genealogy at a senior center - I have a
gentleman I am trying to help. His Grandmother arrived on June 10-1906
on the SS Umbria with children. Her name Chane Wolfowicz, children
Szuel, Reve, Sane, Mina, Meier.Took me forever to pinpoint and
convince him the "hometown" was Bialystok.

The father, Meier Wolfowicz or Wolf, immigrated 1905, (have not found
his ship as the first name keeps changing) oldest daughter Ruchel,
came alone out of Rotterdam 12 Aug 1905, (but not with her father) on
SS Statendam and son, Jankel, a few years later in 1910 >from Kovno,
why ??? and how ?? who knows ??

On the manifest for Chane, it states last residence is Yanisorels.
There is no such place and as I do volunteer indexing for family
search and look at handwriting all day long- the first letter is
definitely not a "Y" and the captain's handwriting shows another "Y" .
I have also looked at both Polish and Russian handwriting and I am
just at a loss.

Would it be possible for someone to look at the Umbria's manifest and
tell us what that city is? He is trying to pinpoint every little
detail down.

As I have ten students, I cannot seem to convince him that it might
just be an "in transit" city as the Umbria sailed out of Liverpool.
The internet is truly a wonderful thing but Yanisorels just doesn't
even exist on it!

Dolores Notaro


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland help with a transcription #poland

Dolores Notaro <notaro.deedee@...>
 

I teach, voluntarily , genealogy at a senior center - I have a
gentleman I am trying to help. His Grandmother arrived on June 10-1906
on the SS Umbria with children. Her name Chane Wolfowicz, children
Szuel, Reve, Sane, Mina, Meier.Took me forever to pinpoint and
convince him the "hometown" was Bialystok.

The father, Meier Wolfowicz or Wolf, immigrated 1905, (have not found
his ship as the first name keeps changing) oldest daughter Ruchel,
came alone out of Rotterdam 12 Aug 1905, (but not with her father) on
SS Statendam and son, Jankel, a few years later in 1910 >from Kovno,
why ??? and how ?? who knows ??

On the manifest for Chane, it states last residence is Yanisorels.
There is no such place and as I do volunteer indexing for family
search and look at handwriting all day long- the first letter is
definitely not a "Y" and the captain's handwriting shows another "Y" .
I have also looked at both Polish and Russian handwriting and I am
just at a loss.

Would it be possible for someone to look at the Umbria's manifest and
tell us what that city is? He is trying to pinpoint every little
detail down.

As I have ten students, I cannot seem to convince him that it might
just be an "in transit" city as the Umbria sailed out of Liverpool.
The internet is truly a wonderful thing but Yanisorels just doesn't
even exist on it!

Dolores Notaro


Cemetery in Ukraine (Shatava) #general

Martin Davis <dawidowicz@...>
 

Moshe Schaeffer wrote: I am planning a trip to the Ukraine soon and would
like to try and find the burial places of my maternal grandparents. They
died of Typus (I am questioning if they were even properly buried) in
Shatava in the region of Kamanetz-Podolsk around 1920 (I have to check the
actual date).

Apparently the Jewish cemetery of Shatava is close to the town/village.
There are a number of photos on Flickr of the cemetery which can be seen at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/25439940@N00/5452465657/. The photos were taken
in 1999 and the grounds look pretty overgrown; however the matzevot appear
standing, so it would be reasonable to assume that at that stage the grounds
had not been vandalised.

Moshe also asks if there would be any record of the burials within the
cemetery. I have yet to come across any extant burial records for this part
of the Ukraine and, as will be seen by the photos, this particular cemetery
does not appear to have any form of linear pattern or signage which would
enable a visitor to navigate themselves to a particular graveside. What
information there might be may well be located at the Ukraine Regional
Archive at Khmelnytskyi. Full contact details for the archive can be found
at http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kamyanets-Podilskyy/Research.htm .

Martin Davis - London (UK)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery in Ukraine (Shatava) #general

Martin Davis <dawidowicz@...>
 

Moshe Schaeffer wrote: I am planning a trip to the Ukraine soon and would
like to try and find the burial places of my maternal grandparents. They
died of Typus (I am questioning if they were even properly buried) in
Shatava in the region of Kamanetz-Podolsk around 1920 (I have to check the
actual date).

Apparently the Jewish cemetery of Shatava is close to the town/village.
There are a number of photos on Flickr of the cemetery which can be seen at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/25439940@N00/5452465657/. The photos were taken
in 1999 and the grounds look pretty overgrown; however the matzevot appear
standing, so it would be reasonable to assume that at that stage the grounds
had not been vandalised.

Moshe also asks if there would be any record of the burials within the
cemetery. I have yet to come across any extant burial records for this part
of the Ukraine and, as will be seen by the photos, this particular cemetery
does not appear to have any form of linear pattern or signage which would
enable a visitor to navigate themselves to a particular graveside. What
information there might be may well be located at the Ukraine Regional
Archive at Khmelnytskyi. Full contact details for the archive can be found
at http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kamyanets-Podilskyy/Research.htm .

Martin Davis - London (UK)

189281 - 189300 of 671871