Date   

Re: Berlin marriage certificate 1928-34 #germany

markus@...
 

Dear Ms Grossman, You wrote:

> My uncle Alfred ROSEFELD married sometime between 1928 and 1934. He
> died in 1934.

Older civil registration registers (that means marriages up to 1930)
from the Neuk=F6lln district are now at the Landesarchiv Berlin, see
http://www.landesarchiv-berlin.de/lab-neu/03_10.htm
resp.
http://www.landesarchiv-berlin.de/lab-neu/pic/03/_10/altstandsaemter.pdf

In the pdf-file, there should be something starting with "P" in the
second column, then you will be able to use the registers in the
Landesarchiv. If there is no "P", than you have to turn to the archive
sections of the different civil registration offices.

So I attempted to reach the Neukoelln Standesamt. It's official site
says only persons whose certificate it is, ancestors or descendants are
entitled to get a certificate on-line, that proof is required
That would apply for marriages less than 80 years old (1931--2011).

and that personnel shortage will make it take a long time.
That's true everywhere in Berlin! But on September 18th we'll have the
chance to change the gouvernment!

Yours Sincerely, Markus Roehling Berlin, Germany markus@...


German SIG #Germany Re: Berlin marriage certificate 1928-34 #germany

markus@...
 

Dear Ms Grossman, You wrote:

> My uncle Alfred ROSEFELD married sometime between 1928 and 1934. He
> died in 1934.

Older civil registration registers (that means marriages up to 1930)
from the Neuk=F6lln district are now at the Landesarchiv Berlin, see
http://www.landesarchiv-berlin.de/lab-neu/03_10.htm
resp.
http://www.landesarchiv-berlin.de/lab-neu/pic/03/_10/altstandsaemter.pdf

In the pdf-file, there should be something starting with "P" in the
second column, then you will be able to use the registers in the
Landesarchiv. If there is no "P", than you have to turn to the archive
sections of the different civil registration offices.

So I attempted to reach the Neukoelln Standesamt. It's official site
says only persons whose certificate it is, ancestors or descendants are
entitled to get a certificate on-line, that proof is required
That would apply for marriages less than 80 years old (1931--2011).

and that personnel shortage will make it take a long time.
That's true everywhere in Berlin! But on September 18th we'll have the
chance to change the gouvernment!

Yours Sincerely, Markus Roehling Berlin, Germany markus@...


Re: Berlin marriage certificate 1928-34 [ROSENFELD] #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

My comment:

In some cases the medical doctoral theses are still available in German
university libraries and can be ordered through InterLibrary loan. At
that time these theses usually also contained a short biography in the
back. For instance, there is a medical thesis about skin diseases
published in 1935 in Halle/Saale, which suggests that the doctorate was
received in Halle University. It usually took time for the publication
and I do not know whether it would still be published after the author's death.

Die Granulomerkrankungen an Zähnen und ihre Beziehungen zu Hautkrankheiten
by Rosenfeld, Alfered Karl

published in Halle by Ostdt. Dr. & Verl. Anst., 1935 30 pages

Let me know if you think it is worthwhile ordering it
with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, normally in North Germany, but in NYC now

My uncle Alfred ROSEFELD married sometime between 1928 and 1934. He
died in 1934.
I basically would like to know when and where he was married, but more
where his bride came from, or her parents' names
as she seems to have disappeared after he committed suicide in 1934.

Also, he had completed medical school; can I find out at which
University, etc.?


German SIG #Germany Re: Berlin marriage certificate 1928-34 [ROSENFELD] #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

My comment:

In some cases the medical doctoral theses are still available in German
university libraries and can be ordered through InterLibrary loan. At
that time these theses usually also contained a short biography in the
back. For instance, there is a medical thesis about skin diseases
published in 1935 in Halle/Saale, which suggests that the doctorate was
received in Halle University. It usually took time for the publication
and I do not know whether it would still be published after the author's death.

Die Granulomerkrankungen an Zähnen und ihre Beziehungen zu Hautkrankheiten
by Rosenfeld, Alfered Karl

published in Halle by Ostdt. Dr. & Verl. Anst., 1935 30 pages

Let me know if you think it is worthwhile ordering it
with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, normally in North Germany, but in NYC now

My uncle Alfred ROSEFELD married sometime between 1928 and 1934. He
died in 1934.
I basically would like to know when and where he was married, but more
where his bride came from, or her parents' names
as she seems to have disappeared after he committed suicide in 1934.

Also, he had completed medical school; can I find out at which
University, etc.?


Re: Lviv House Number 383 2/4 #galicia

Morton Rumberg
 

I too, was told that the fraction indicated the floor. Still,
there is a problem: why have I never seen 1/4 or 4/4 -
especially at a hospital? With all the deaths at the same
location, surely some patients were on the upper floor,
assuming administrative offices were on the first floor.

Also, why did none (or rarely any) of the other addresses
throughout Lviv have deaths on 1/4 or 4/4?

Since the reason provided says the city was divided into
quarters is it possible that the 383 hospital was located at
the exact center?

There must be a more inclusive reason.

Mort
Gold River, CA

Stephen Weinstein <stephenweinstein@...> wrote:

Maybe they were not separate hospitals in separate quarters of the
city. Maybe they are all the same, big hospital.

It was previously suggested that 383 2/4 means 2nd floor of a 4-story
building at 383 and 383 3/4 means 3rd floor of that building. So the
deaths would be in the same building. Nothing odd about a hospital
being four floors and having deaths on more than one of them.

Or, maybe they are two buildings of the same hospital. Adjacent
buildings would have consecutive numbers. It would make sense for a
large hospital to have buildings with the same integer and consecutive
fractions.
Morton Rumberg <mortrumberg1@...> wrote:

I am part of the transcription team. I've also recorded 383 3/4
in addition to 383 2/4. There are so many deaths at both
addresses I can only assume they are hospitals. But my concern
is why would both hospitals, if that's what they are, have the
same address if they are located in separate quarters of the city?
Ellen Korpi <korpi@...> wrote:

I am getting the impression that House Number 383 2/4 might have
been a hospital since there seem to be many deaths listed there in the
new data base. Has anyone else noticed this same pattern? Does
anyone have some substantiation of this?


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Lviv House Number 383 2/4 #galicia

Morton Rumberg
 

I too, was told that the fraction indicated the floor. Still,
there is a problem: why have I never seen 1/4 or 4/4 -
especially at a hospital? With all the deaths at the same
location, surely some patients were on the upper floor,
assuming administrative offices were on the first floor.

Also, why did none (or rarely any) of the other addresses
throughout Lviv have deaths on 1/4 or 4/4?

Since the reason provided says the city was divided into
quarters is it possible that the 383 hospital was located at
the exact center?

There must be a more inclusive reason.

Mort
Gold River, CA

Stephen Weinstein <stephenweinstein@...> wrote:

Maybe they were not separate hospitals in separate quarters of the
city. Maybe they are all the same, big hospital.

It was previously suggested that 383 2/4 means 2nd floor of a 4-story
building at 383 and 383 3/4 means 3rd floor of that building. So the
deaths would be in the same building. Nothing odd about a hospital
being four floors and having deaths on more than one of them.

Or, maybe they are two buildings of the same hospital. Adjacent
buildings would have consecutive numbers. It would make sense for a
large hospital to have buildings with the same integer and consecutive
fractions.
Morton Rumberg <mortrumberg1@...> wrote:

I am part of the transcription team. I've also recorded 383 3/4
in addition to 383 2/4. There are so many deaths at both
addresses I can only assume they are hospitals. But my concern
is why would both hospitals, if that's what they are, have the
same address if they are located in separate quarters of the city?
Ellen Korpi <korpi@...> wrote:

I am getting the impression that House Number 383 2/4 might have
been a hospital since there seem to be many deaths listed there in the
new data base. Has anyone else noticed this same pattern? Does
anyone have some substantiation of this?


Looking for GRUNWALDS from Bekes, nearby areas in Hungary #hungary

Jake Jacobs
 

Am interested in finding information on GRUNWALDS >from Bekes area of Hungary. My g'uncle Imre LASZLO
('Laci") Havas married Iren(""Pircsi") GRUNWALD around 1943 in Bekes. Pircsi was an orphan and my g'parents
did not have more information about her parents. She was born about 1910. She survived the camps (I believe
Bergen-Belsen), but died shortly afterwards in a hospital in Sweden. Her husband Laci disappeared in the
Hungarian Labor Service.
Would appreciate any information.

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas

Moderator: Have you checked the JewishGen Hungary database http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/? It includes several references to GRUNVALD/GRUNWALD >from Bekes.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Looking for GRUNWALDS from Bekes, nearby areas in Hungary #hungary

Jake Jacobs
 

Am interested in finding information on GRUNWALDS >from Bekes area of Hungary. My g'uncle Imre LASZLO
('Laci") Havas married Iren(""Pircsi") GRUNWALD around 1943 in Bekes. Pircsi was an orphan and my g'parents
did not have more information about her parents. She was born about 1910. She survived the camps (I believe
Bergen-Belsen), but died shortly afterwards in a hospital in Sweden. Her husband Laci disappeared in the
Hungarian Labor Service.
Would appreciate any information.

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas

Moderator: Have you checked the JewishGen Hungary database http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/? It includes several references to GRUNVALD/GRUNWALD >from Bekes.


Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay September Meeting #general

Sally Israel
 

Preservation and Storage of Photos and Digital Images

Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay

Sunday, September 11, 2011

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay will meet on Sunday
September 11th at 2:00 P.M. at Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services, 14041
Icot Blvd., Clearwater, Florida. The meeting program will feature Gregg
Hickman of Lake Shore Camera Exchange in Palm Harbor, who will speak on
the preservation, restoration and storage of photographs and documents

Gregg Hickman has been involved in photography since 1963. He is a
trained photographer who did freelance photography for more than 20
years with local, national and international publications. Gregg ran
the photo department for the FBI at the Tampa field office before
becoming a Clearwater Police officer where he was able to apply his
photo skills at numerous crime scenes and surveillances. Gregg
founded Lake Shore Camera Exchange in 1984, and he is continuing his
life long involvement in the photographic industry and in his community
through membership and activities with many related organizations.

Gregg will be covering some basics on: what prints are made up of, why
prints deteriorate (both color and black & white), expected longevity of
different forms of image capturing media, what medias to use to store
your images and the future of that media, the difference in media cards,
some scanning basics, digital image organization in your computer, and
image restoration examples.

A pre-program social with refreshments and library access
begins at 1:30 PM, and the featured program starts at 2:00 PM. For
information on the organization or directions to the meeting call Sally
Israel at 727-343-1652.

--
Sally U. Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay September Meeting #general

Sally Israel
 

Preservation and Storage of Photos and Digital Images

Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay

Sunday, September 11, 2011

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay will meet on Sunday
September 11th at 2:00 P.M. at Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services, 14041
Icot Blvd., Clearwater, Florida. The meeting program will feature Gregg
Hickman of Lake Shore Camera Exchange in Palm Harbor, who will speak on
the preservation, restoration and storage of photographs and documents

Gregg Hickman has been involved in photography since 1963. He is a
trained photographer who did freelance photography for more than 20
years with local, national and international publications. Gregg ran
the photo department for the FBI at the Tampa field office before
becoming a Clearwater Police officer where he was able to apply his
photo skills at numerous crime scenes and surveillances. Gregg
founded Lake Shore Camera Exchange in 1984, and he is continuing his
life long involvement in the photographic industry and in his community
through membership and activities with many related organizations.

Gregg will be covering some basics on: what prints are made up of, why
prints deteriorate (both color and black & white), expected longevity of
different forms of image capturing media, what medias to use to store
your images and the future of that media, the difference in media cards,
some scanning basics, digital image organization in your computer, and
image restoration examples.

A pre-program social with refreshments and library access
begins at 1:30 PM, and the featured program starts at 2:00 PM. For
information on the organization or directions to the meeting call Sally
Israel at 727-343-1652.

--
Sally U. Israel


(USA) Closing of Pittsfield MA National Archives Branch #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Previously reported on this forum last spring was due to budget cuts, the
National Archives would be closing the Pittsfield, MA branch. The final day
is September 16, 2011. http://www.archives.gov/northeast/pittsfield/

The over 71,000 rolls of microfilm (census records, passenger logs, etc) are
being transferred to the Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield's Public Library
See: http://tinyurl.com/3etlhkb
original url:
http://pittsfieldlibrary.wordpress.com/2011/04/08/athenaeum-will-receive-genealogical-microfilm/

The Waltham, MA National Archives regional branch remains open.
http://www.archives.gov/northeast/boston/

Thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society's The Weekly
Genealogist for information included in this posting.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (USA) Closing of Pittsfield MA National Archives Branch #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Previously reported on this forum last spring was due to budget cuts, the
National Archives would be closing the Pittsfield, MA branch. The final day
is September 16, 2011. http://www.archives.gov/northeast/pittsfield/

The over 71,000 rolls of microfilm (census records, passenger logs, etc) are
being transferred to the Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield's Public Library
See: http://tinyurl.com/3etlhkb
original url:
http://pittsfieldlibrary.wordpress.com/2011/04/08/athenaeum-will-receive-genealogical-microfilm/

The Waltham, MA National Archives regional branch remains open.
http://www.archives.gov/northeast/boston/

Thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society's The Weekly
Genealogist for information included in this posting.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Question about filed US Naturalization papers - Women and Naturalization #general

bette_sscf <bette_sscf@...>
 

Avram Brickner in Jerusalem, Israel inquired about U.S. naturalization
papers for single and married females.

Most of Avram's questions are answered in the excellent Prologue Magazine
two-part article "Any woman who is now or may hereafter be married . . ."
Women and Naturalization, ca. 1802-1940 By Marian L. Smith at
http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1998/summer/women-and-naturalization
-1.html
http://tinyurl.com/ykhgjv [MOD]

For information about a specific person's naturalization, search Ancestry's
U.S. Federal Census Collection. The 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930 censuses list
year of immigration, naturalization status (Al=alien, Pa=first papers,
Na=naturalized) and/or year of naturalization. Ancestry's Citizenship and
Naturalization databases may contain specific index references and, if you
are lucky, selected original documents.

Naturalization records may be obtained >from the USCIS Genealogy Program
http://www.uscis.gov/USCIS/Genealogy/genealogy%20brochure%203-09.pdf
or limited documents >from regional branches of National Archives and Records
Administration (NARA) http://www.archives.gov/research/naturalization/.

Bette Stoop Mas
Florida, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Question about filed US Naturalization papers - Women and Naturalization #general

bette_sscf <bette_sscf@...>
 

Avram Brickner in Jerusalem, Israel inquired about U.S. naturalization
papers for single and married females.

Most of Avram's questions are answered in the excellent Prologue Magazine
two-part article "Any woman who is now or may hereafter be married . . ."
Women and Naturalization, ca. 1802-1940 By Marian L. Smith at
http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1998/summer/women-and-naturalization
-1.html
http://tinyurl.com/ykhgjv [MOD]

For information about a specific person's naturalization, search Ancestry's
U.S. Federal Census Collection. The 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930 censuses list
year of immigration, naturalization status (Al=alien, Pa=first papers,
Na=naturalized) and/or year of naturalization. Ancestry's Citizenship and
Naturalization databases may contain specific index references and, if you
are lucky, selected original documents.

Naturalization records may be obtained >from the USCIS Genealogy Program
http://www.uscis.gov/USCIS/Genealogy/genealogy%20brochure%203-09.pdf
or limited documents >from regional branches of National Archives and Records
Administration (NARA) http://www.archives.gov/research/naturalization/.

Bette Stoop Mas
Florida, USA


Searching for Joseph COHN #general

David Laskin
 

Dear Genners,

I am working on my mother's family whose name was HAKOHEN or
KAGANOVICH (various spellings) in Rakov and Volozhin (presentday
Belarus). I have traced my mother's grandfather -- Avram Akiva
(Abraham Cohen in the US) and all of his siblings (Arie, Leah Golda,
Herman, Shalom Tvi) except for ONE. The one I am searching for was
named Yasef Bear Kaganovich (various spellings) in Russia and Joseph
Cohn (no "e") when he emigrated to Hoboken in 1901. On the 1910
census he is listed as living at 406 Newark Street in Hoboken with his
wife Ethel and children Herman 20, Sarah 17 and Rachel 14. Profession
is rabbi. I would love to hear >from any of Joseph's descendants -- I
can put you in touch with many many family members! Thanks.
David Laskin, Seattle, WA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for Joseph COHN #general

David Laskin
 

Dear Genners,

I am working on my mother's family whose name was HAKOHEN or
KAGANOVICH (various spellings) in Rakov and Volozhin (presentday
Belarus). I have traced my mother's grandfather -- Avram Akiva
(Abraham Cohen in the US) and all of his siblings (Arie, Leah Golda,
Herman, Shalom Tvi) except for ONE. The one I am searching for was
named Yasef Bear Kaganovich (various spellings) in Russia and Joseph
Cohn (no "e") when he emigrated to Hoboken in 1901. On the 1910
census he is listed as living at 406 Newark Street in Hoboken with his
wife Ethel and children Herman 20, Sarah 17 and Rachel 14. Profession
is rabbi. I would love to hear >from any of Joseph's descendants -- I
can put you in touch with many many family members! Thanks.
David Laskin, Seattle, WA


Re: Question about filed US Naturalization papers #general

A. E. Jordan
 

In a message dated 8/30/2011 5:20:32 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
ab_dd@... writes:
I have a question about the information contained in filed US
Naturalization
papers. Let us suppose a single female emigrated to the US around 1902, by
herself.
She then married (a US citizen) 12 years later..

The answer is basically yes or maybe to everything. It all depends Avram
on the individual person.
First off she had to be coming to someone in the USA. Was it a parent,
brother, cousin, etc? Single women especially were not admitted into the USA
without a place to go and someone that could support them.

If she came to a parent it is possible she was naturalized with her parent
especially depending if she was a minor or in the majority agewise at the
time.

When would she have filed otherwise? Impossible to tell. Because women
did not get the vote till the 1920s there was far less reason for them to
naturalize on their own. But maybe she was especially patriotic and wanted
to be a citizen. Who knows. No matter what there was a waiting period (I
think three years) before she could file after she arrived in the USA.

Depending on the time frame of the marriage she might or might not have
automatically became a citizen if she married a man who was one. The laws
changed in different time periods. Same is true if she married and the
husband later decided to naturalize. If it was a time frame when the wife would
have been included check the husband's papers because you wild find info
on his wife.

Would they be under her maiden name or married name ? Depends when she
naturalized. Once she was married she would have naturalized under her
married name but the form might have recorded her maiden name in the
information. Even if the husband was dead she likely naturalized as Mrs.xxxx as
opposed to reverting to her maiden name.

Is it possible that they were not filed until the late 30's or early 40's ?
Of course she could have felt the desire/need to naturalize at any
point. After World War II started the law said all foreign born individuals had
to register if they were not naturalized. But I suspect a lot did not.
My great grandmother's sister for example somewhere along the years started
saying she was naturalized in the 1920s some 30 years after she arrived in
the USA. I searched and searched and never found her naturalization or any
record of her or her husband ever voting. The husband had died by the
time WWII started and she seems never to have registered by then saying she
was naturalized.

Wish there was a hard and fast rule ... there is not.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Question about filed US Naturalization papers #general

A. E. Jordan
 

In a message dated 8/30/2011 5:20:32 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
ab_dd@... writes:
I have a question about the information contained in filed US
Naturalization
papers. Let us suppose a single female emigrated to the US around 1902, by
herself.
She then married (a US citizen) 12 years later..

The answer is basically yes or maybe to everything. It all depends Avram
on the individual person.
First off she had to be coming to someone in the USA. Was it a parent,
brother, cousin, etc? Single women especially were not admitted into the USA
without a place to go and someone that could support them.

If she came to a parent it is possible she was naturalized with her parent
especially depending if she was a minor or in the majority agewise at the
time.

When would she have filed otherwise? Impossible to tell. Because women
did not get the vote till the 1920s there was far less reason for them to
naturalize on their own. But maybe she was especially patriotic and wanted
to be a citizen. Who knows. No matter what there was a waiting period (I
think three years) before she could file after she arrived in the USA.

Depending on the time frame of the marriage she might or might not have
automatically became a citizen if she married a man who was one. The laws
changed in different time periods. Same is true if she married and the
husband later decided to naturalize. If it was a time frame when the wife would
have been included check the husband's papers because you wild find info
on his wife.

Would they be under her maiden name or married name ? Depends when she
naturalized. Once she was married she would have naturalized under her
married name but the form might have recorded her maiden name in the
information. Even if the husband was dead she likely naturalized as Mrs.xxxx as
opposed to reverting to her maiden name.

Is it possible that they were not filed until the late 30's or early 40's ?
Of course she could have felt the desire/need to naturalize at any
point. After World War II started the law said all foreign born individuals had
to register if they were not naturalized. But I suspect a lot did not.
My great grandmother's sister for example somewhere along the years started
saying she was naturalized in the 1920s some 30 years after she arrived in
the USA. I searched and searched and never found her naturalization or any
record of her or her husband ever voting. The husband had died by the
time WWII started and she seems never to have registered by then saying she
was naturalized.

Wish there was a hard and fast rule ... there is not.

Allan Jordan


Re: distance Rypin to Divin #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

People traveled about, for business and other reasons. When marriages were
arranged, the bride and groom didn't have to date (or live together) and get to
know each other.

The fact is that the bride and groom were likely cousins with different branches
of the family living in the two towns. I can give you a list of places where
different branches of one of my families lived, some over 100 miles >from others.

And actually, one of my cousins >from Augustow, Poland, on his naturalization
papers (both Declaration and Petition) said he was born in Marseilles, France.
How is that for distance? He was born in the 1860's around the time of the
rebellion, cholera, and famine, so I assume that the family went to France to
get away >from the trouble, then they went back to Augustow.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: distance Rypin to Divin #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

People traveled about, for business and other reasons. When marriages were
arranged, the bride and groom didn't have to date (or live together) and get to
know each other.

The fact is that the bride and groom were likely cousins with different branches
of the family living in the two towns. I can give you a list of places where
different branches of one of my families lived, some over 100 miles >from others.

And actually, one of my cousins >from Augustow, Poland, on his naturalization
papers (both Declaration and Petition) said he was born in Marseilles, France.
How is that for distance? He was born in the 1860's around the time of the
rebellion, cholera, and famine, so I assume that the family went to France to
get away >from the trouble, then they went back to Augustow.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ

188041 - 188060 of 670639