Date   

Re: Money Matters #austria-czech

pgbakos@...
 

I have read most of the postings and am a bit disturbed about a few things:

1. Whose money are we speaking about? Certainly I have paid nothing and have no idea
where this money comes from. It is certainly not mine.
2. This is hardly a membership organization in the classic sense. We elect no one
but have a "moderator" chosen >from our ranks who has the unenviable task of maintaining
the site and keeping things flowing in a positive way.
3. There are two important projects being discussed but in the end I would submit
it is up to Jewish Gen to spend the money as they see fit. If they give the responsibility
of making this decision to Randy so be it. I cannot think of anyone else who has the good
judgement and best interest of our SIG to make any decisions.
4. The above aside the idea of 23 constituting a quorum for an ad hoc organization
which has no by-laws and 1300 quasi members is a bit absurd and befitting a group which
counts Kafka as a cousin to many.

Peter Bakos Saint-Crespin France
PODWINEC KAFKA and others


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech RE: Money Matters #austria-czech

pgbakos@...
 

I have read most of the postings and am a bit disturbed about a few things:

1. Whose money are we speaking about? Certainly I have paid nothing and have no idea
where this money comes from. It is certainly not mine.
2. This is hardly a membership organization in the classic sense. We elect no one
but have a "moderator" chosen >from our ranks who has the unenviable task of maintaining
the site and keeping things flowing in a positive way.
3. There are two important projects being discussed but in the end I would submit
it is up to Jewish Gen to spend the money as they see fit. If they give the responsibility
of making this decision to Randy so be it. I cannot think of anyone else who has the good
judgement and best interest of our SIG to make any decisions.
4. The above aside the idea of 23 constituting a quorum for an ad hoc organization
which has no by-laws and 1300 quasi members is a bit absurd and befitting a group which
counts Kafka as a cousin to many.

Peter Bakos Saint-Crespin France
PODWINEC KAFKA and others


German - English translation #austria-czech

Robert Fraser
 

Hello fellow Genners -

I am seeking a translation of a document >from German to
English. The document is question is the Will of my
great-grandfather Moritz NOWAK and was written sometime in
the late nineteenth century. It is undated and it is
probably one of several revised Wills.

Fortunately, it was at some point typed out and covers nine
pages of fairly widely-spaced typescript, with an estimated
wordage of 1800 words.

It contains valuable family information, some of which I
have already figured out, leading to all sorts of wonderful
discoveries (and a trip to Czech republic). But I'm sure
there is much more there that my meagre German skills aren't
up to.

As it's a fairly long document in German 'legalese', I don't
expect the translation to be done for free. Offers please?

Please respond privately. Please only offer if you are
comfortable reading 'official' German and able to provide a
fairly good translation. Please also advise your suggested
translation fee. I can pay by PayPal, $US cheque or pound
sterling cheque.

I look forward to hearing >from volunteers.

Robert Fraser
Perth, Western Australia


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech German - English translation #austria-czech

Robert Fraser
 

Hello fellow Genners -

I am seeking a translation of a document >from German to
English. The document is question is the Will of my
great-grandfather Moritz NOWAK and was written sometime in
the late nineteenth century. It is undated and it is
probably one of several revised Wills.

Fortunately, it was at some point typed out and covers nine
pages of fairly widely-spaced typescript, with an estimated
wordage of 1800 words.

It contains valuable family information, some of which I
have already figured out, leading to all sorts of wonderful
discoveries (and a trip to Czech republic). But I'm sure
there is much more there that my meagre German skills aren't
up to.

As it's a fairly long document in German 'legalese', I don't
expect the translation to be done for free. Offers please?

Please respond privately. Please only offer if you are
comfortable reading 'official' German and able to provide a
fairly good translation. Please also advise your suggested
translation fee. I can pay by PayPal, $US cheque or pound
sterling cheque.

I look forward to hearing >from volunteers.

Robert Fraser
Perth, Western Australia


Re: Further re identifying Paris street corner #france

Palekaiko
 

I forgot to mention, the hotel in the background has been positively
identified by the hotel as Amarante Champs-Elysees, 19 rue Vernet
http://www.amarantechampselysees.com/ .

Thanks again to all.

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


French SIG #France RE: Further re identifying Paris street corner #france

Palekaiko
 

I forgot to mention, the hotel in the background has been positively
identified by the hotel as Amarante Champs-Elysees, 19 rue Vernet
http://www.amarantechampselysees.com/ .

Thanks again to all.

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


Re: Indentifying Paris street corner #france

Palekaiko
 

I had requested identification of a street corner in Paris where a
photo was taken in 1972. The response has been overwhelming. And
more importantly, all the responders are offering the same answer.
Great.

Thanks to everyone.

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


French SIG #France RE: Indentifying Paris street corner #france

Palekaiko
 

I had requested identification of a street corner in Paris where a
photo was taken in 1972. The response has been overwhelming. And
more importantly, all the responders are offering the same answer.
Great.

Thanks to everyone.

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


Re: GURY, Berlin 1852 marriage #germany

Irene Newhouse
 

Thank you everyone! He's really named GURY - one correspondent looked him up
for me in the online Berlin directories. I wish I'd had that brilliant idea!

It's also useful for looking up a Berlin resident's illegible occupation.
And he did resign >from the Lutheran church, which is not saying quite the
same thing as converting to Judaism.

Irene Newhouse, Kihei HI USA einew137@yahoo.com


German SIG #Germany re: GURY, Berlin 1852 marriage #germany

Irene Newhouse
 

Thank you everyone! He's really named GURY - one correspondent looked him up
for me in the online Berlin directories. I wish I'd had that brilliant idea!

It's also useful for looking up a Berlin resident's illegible occupation.
And he did resign >from the Lutheran church, which is not saying quite the
same thing as converting to Judaism.

Irene Newhouse, Kihei HI USA einew137@yahoo.com


(USA) Maine Genealogy Researcher Card and Status of Accessing Records Under 2011 Law #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Earlier this year I reported on this forum about a new law--PL 58 of the
laws of 2011-- that made changes to accessing Maine vital records.
PL 58 changed the who may obtain and when after the event someone may
access vital records >from last year's law, PL 601. Maine Governor LePage
placed a moratorium on all regulations earlier in the year. PL 58 becomes
effective September 28, 2011.

For the state and local clerks to be able to responsibly address how to
reply to requests for records, the state regulatory department issued a
procedural document and matrix of how accessing records will be followed.
The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Data
Research and Vital Statistics (ODRVS) will not post the new information
on their site until it is effective September 28, 2011. When this
information is posted I will advise on this forum as to the link .

Under the new law, genealogists may obtain non-certified vital records and
not wait the required 75 years >from date of birth, 50 years >from the date of
marriage, registration of domestic partnerships or fetal deaths, or 25 years
from the date of death if they obtain an ODRVS researcher card. This card
currently costs $50 and is good for one year. This charge is in addition to
any charge for a vital record. To obtain the form for the researcher card go
to: http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/boh/phs/odrvs/vital-records/index.shtml and
scroll down to genealogical research application. The form will also be
updated on September 28, 2011, to reflect the provisions of new law.
The application form states: " In order to receive a Maine CDC
issued researcher card, an applicant must be a member of an established
genealogical society, provide proof of membership, provide positive proof of
identity, and submit the required fee ($50) along with this application. "

I corresponded with the Maine Rule Making Coordinator as how someone proves
they are a member of an established genealogical society. I was advised
that if the person does not have a membership card >from their genealogy
society, ODRVS will accept a letter on genealogy society letterhead
stating the person is a member in good standing .Furthermore, ODRVS will
not accept membership to ancestry.com or rootsweb.com as proof of a
genealogical society.

If you don't belong to a genealogy society look at the IAJGS website for
the list of 70 member societies http://www.iajgs.org/members/members.html
and join a society!

Certified copies of "closed" vital records (those which are less than the
75-50-or 25 year waiting period) may be obtained by those with a "direct and
legitimate interest" defined as the person of the record, that person's
spouse, registered domestic partner, descendant, parent or guardian,
grandparent, sibling, stepparent, stepchild, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew,
mother-in-law or father-in-law; that person's personal representative or
that person's duly designated attorney or agent;or attorney for an
agent/genealogists designated by that person or by a court.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (USA) Maine Genealogy Researcher Card and Status of Accessing Records Under 2011 Law #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Earlier this year I reported on this forum about a new law--PL 58 of the
laws of 2011-- that made changes to accessing Maine vital records.
PL 58 changed the who may obtain and when after the event someone may
access vital records >from last year's law, PL 601. Maine Governor LePage
placed a moratorium on all regulations earlier in the year. PL 58 becomes
effective September 28, 2011.

For the state and local clerks to be able to responsibly address how to
reply to requests for records, the state regulatory department issued a
procedural document and matrix of how accessing records will be followed.
The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Data
Research and Vital Statistics (ODRVS) will not post the new information
on their site until it is effective September 28, 2011. When this
information is posted I will advise on this forum as to the link .

Under the new law, genealogists may obtain non-certified vital records and
not wait the required 75 years >from date of birth, 50 years >from the date of
marriage, registration of domestic partnerships or fetal deaths, or 25 years
from the date of death if they obtain an ODRVS researcher card. This card
currently costs $50 and is good for one year. This charge is in addition to
any charge for a vital record. To obtain the form for the researcher card go
to: http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/boh/phs/odrvs/vital-records/index.shtml and
scroll down to genealogical research application. The form will also be
updated on September 28, 2011, to reflect the provisions of new law.
The application form states: " In order to receive a Maine CDC
issued researcher card, an applicant must be a member of an established
genealogical society, provide proof of membership, provide positive proof of
identity, and submit the required fee ($50) along with this application. "

I corresponded with the Maine Rule Making Coordinator as how someone proves
they are a member of an established genealogical society. I was advised
that if the person does not have a membership card >from their genealogy
society, ODRVS will accept a letter on genealogy society letterhead
stating the person is a member in good standing .Furthermore, ODRVS will
not accept membership to ancestry.com or rootsweb.com as proof of a
genealogical society.

If you don't belong to a genealogy society look at the IAJGS website for
the list of 70 member societies http://www.iajgs.org/members/members.html
and join a society!

Certified copies of "closed" vital records (those which are less than the
75-50-or 25 year waiting period) may be obtained by those with a "direct and
legitimate interest" defined as the person of the record, that person's
spouse, registered domestic partner, descendant, parent or guardian,
grandparent, sibling, stepparent, stepchild, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew,
mother-in-law or father-in-law; that person's personal representative or
that person's duly designated attorney or agent;or attorney for an
agent/genealogists designated by that person or by a court.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Searching for Dorothy/Dora Kokoshky/Randzman/Dubin #general

Puffins@...
 

A little background:

Dorothy Kokoshky, born in New York May 1892, married Alexander Randzman
from Warsaw. They had two children, Beatrice and Arthur.
Alexander died in the 1930's, and Dorothy married William E Dubin...no
more kids. William Dubin died in 1948 and his obituary reads: "father of
Beatrice and Arthur, darling grandfather of Gerald, Virginia, Neil, and Allen".

We found out that Beatrice Randzman married Jessie Kirsh and in 1930 they
had one child: Jerry (=Gerald >from the obituary). Jerry married Lillian
Schlaggs, etc...

We found where Alex Randzman is buried, William Dubin, Arthur Rand (changed
his last name). DOROTHY, however, is nowhere to be found! She is not
buried with her parents at Mt Zion in NY, or with her two husbands at Riverside
Cemetery in NJ. We don't even know *when* she died.

So that's the mystery!

Thanks so much in advance for any help in locating Dorothy.

Donna Eschen
California
puffins@aol.com

P.S. We have already contacted anyone we know who is still alive that would
have known Dorothy. No one knows what happened to her.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for Dorothy/Dora Kokoshky/Randzman/Dubin #general

Puffins@...
 

A little background:

Dorothy Kokoshky, born in New York May 1892, married Alexander Randzman
from Warsaw. They had two children, Beatrice and Arthur.
Alexander died in the 1930's, and Dorothy married William E Dubin...no
more kids. William Dubin died in 1948 and his obituary reads: "father of
Beatrice and Arthur, darling grandfather of Gerald, Virginia, Neil, and Allen".

We found out that Beatrice Randzman married Jessie Kirsh and in 1930 they
had one child: Jerry (=Gerald >from the obituary). Jerry married Lillian
Schlaggs, etc...

We found where Alex Randzman is buried, William Dubin, Arthur Rand (changed
his last name). DOROTHY, however, is nowhere to be found! She is not
buried with her parents at Mt Zion in NY, or with her two husbands at Riverside
Cemetery in NJ. We don't even know *when* she died.

So that's the mystery!

Thanks so much in advance for any help in locating Dorothy.

Donna Eschen
California
puffins@aol.com

P.S. We have already contacted anyone we know who is still alive that would
have known Dorothy. No one knows what happened to her.


City of Cincinnati Ohio Birth and Death Records now online #general

Jenny Schwartzberg
 

Dear All,

I just came across this article which describes the new online database
of birth and death records for the city of Cincinnati, Ohio >from 1865 to
1912. If you have family who were there in that period, go explore that
database.
http://www.libraries.uc.edu/liblog/2011/08/31/historical-city-of-cincinnati-birth-and-death-records-now-available-online/
[or http://tinyurl.com/3cu86e2 --Mod.]
The link to the database is in the article.

Yours,
Jenny Schwartzberg
The Newberry Library
Chicago, IL
schwartzbergj@newberry.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen City of Cincinnati Ohio Birth and Death Records now online #general

Jenny Schwartzberg
 

Dear All,

I just came across this article which describes the new online database
of birth and death records for the city of Cincinnati, Ohio >from 1865 to
1912. If you have family who were there in that period, go explore that
database.
http://www.libraries.uc.edu/liblog/2011/08/31/historical-city-of-cincinnati-birth-and-death-records-now-available-online/
[or http://tinyurl.com/3cu86e2 --Mod.]
The link to the database is in the article.

Yours,
Jenny Schwartzberg
The Newberry Library
Chicago, IL
schwartzbergj@newberry.org


Re: Question about filed US Naturalization papers - correction #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

I'm glad that some of you read these messages very carefully.
Sally Bruckheimer pointed out another error that I made. I re-read
the law at
http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-45104/0-0-0-47804.html,
and it specified that only married women (not all women) were ineligible
for naturalization in the U.S. on their own before 1922.

In case you read this page, "coverture" basically means that a married
women's rights are her husband's rights. Nowadays married women can even
vote, work outside of their own home, and - my gosh - even wear pants.
(Well, at least they can in the U.S.) It's amazing that the unquestioned
customs, including those affecting our own genealogies, in almost the entire
world 100 years ago are now considered old-fashioned, or even primitive and
backward, by a good portion of the world, yet they are still practiced in
other parts.

Ira

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Question about filed US Naturalization papers - correction #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

I'm glad that some of you read these messages very carefully.
Sally Bruckheimer pointed out another error that I made. I re-read
the law at
http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-45104/0-0-0-47804.html,
and it specified that only married women (not all women) were ineligible
for naturalization in the U.S. on their own before 1922.

In case you read this page, "coverture" basically means that a married
women's rights are her husband's rights. Nowadays married women can even
vote, work outside of their own home, and - my gosh - even wear pants.
(Well, at least they can in the U.S.) It's amazing that the unquestioned
customs, including those affecting our own genealogies, in almost the entire
world 100 years ago are now considered old-fashioned, or even primitive and
backward, by a good portion of the world, yet they are still practiced in
other parts.

Ira

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Re: Question about filed US Naturalization papers #general

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Actually women could apply for citizenship on their own before the change
in the law in 1922. I think it was very rare for them to do so, but it
was possible - I had a cousin, born in 1890 in Augustow, Russian Poland
(according to her delayed birth record) who applied for citizenship on
her own. I am guessing that she needed to be a citizen to go to law
school, either that or she just got the idea >from school. She was a
lawyer and later a judge for many years.

Most women were not professionally minded at the turn of the 20th century.
Women were usually home bodies who weren't educated much and were taught
to obey their fathers and husbands, taking care of homes and children, so
they wouldn't usually think about becoming naturalized on their own. But
that does not mean it wasn't legal for a woman to become a citizen.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ

"The U.S. law that made a woman who was not a citizen on the basis of her
husband's American citizenship was in effect only until 1922. Basically,
they automatically got their husband's citizenship status - and they could
even lose citizenship if they married a non-American! Before that, I don't
think that women were even eligible to become citizens on their own, so
there won't be any papers."


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Question about filed US Naturalization papers #general

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Actually women could apply for citizenship on their own before the change
in the law in 1922. I think it was very rare for them to do so, but it
was possible - I had a cousin, born in 1890 in Augustow, Russian Poland
(according to her delayed birth record) who applied for citizenship on
her own. I am guessing that she needed to be a citizen to go to law
school, either that or she just got the idea >from school. She was a
lawyer and later a judge for many years.

Most women were not professionally minded at the turn of the 20th century.
Women were usually home bodies who weren't educated much and were taught
to obey their fathers and husbands, taking care of homes and children, so
they wouldn't usually think about becoming naturalized on their own. But
that does not mean it wasn't legal for a woman to become a citizen.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ

"The U.S. law that made a woman who was not a citizen on the basis of her
husband's American citizenship was in effect only until 1922. Basically,
they automatically got their husband's citizenship status - and they could
even lose citizenship if they married a non-American! Before that, I don't
think that women were even eligible to become citizens on their own, so
there won't be any papers."

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