Date   

How to deal with gaps in one's tree #general

David Schreiber
 

Hi! Over the years I have found several people or families that I am
quite sure are related to mine due to their obscure names and the small
shtetls >from which they came. I would like to add these people to my
tree, but I don't as yet know how many degrees of separation there are
between them and my more immediate family members. I have been
corresponding recently with a cousin whose greatgrandfather is probably
either a brother or a first cousin of my maternal grandfather, but I
have not located the documents that would tell me exactly where our
connection occurs.

What I would like to know >from other JewishGen members is, do you
attach these people to your tree through some temporary undefined
branches, do you just set up separate trees for them until such time as
you have more information, or do you just wait until you have more
information before you do anything at all with them? Any suggestions
about how to handle these scenarios would be most helpful. Thanks.

David Schreiber
Melbourne, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How to deal with gaps in one's tree #general

David Schreiber
 

Hi! Over the years I have found several people or families that I am
quite sure are related to mine due to their obscure names and the small
shtetls >from which they came. I would like to add these people to my
tree, but I don't as yet know how many degrees of separation there are
between them and my more immediate family members. I have been
corresponding recently with a cousin whose greatgrandfather is probably
either a brother or a first cousin of my maternal grandfather, but I
have not located the documents that would tell me exactly where our
connection occurs.

What I would like to know >from other JewishGen members is, do you
attach these people to your tree through some temporary undefined
branches, do you just set up separate trees for them until such time as
you have more information, or do you just wait until you have more
information before you do anything at all with them? Any suggestions
about how to handle these scenarios would be most helpful. Thanks.

David Schreiber
Melbourne, FL


Gostynin Yizkor Book Project #general

Jessie Klein
 

My grandfather, Julius(Juda) Bagno was >from Gostynin, Poland. Through
my research, I discovered that several chapters and the necrology of
the Yizkor book have been translated by JewishGen. You can view these
at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gostynin/gostynin.html

I am interested in having the remainder of the book translated, and I
will be coordinating the translation project. If your family was from
Gostynin or any of the surrounding towns, you may find the translation
to be of value for your research. Please consider supporting this
project through
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Thank you,
Jessie Klein

Gostynin Yizkor Book Project Coordinator
kleinj414@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Gostynin Yizkor Book Project #general

Jessie Klein
 

My grandfather, Julius(Juda) Bagno was >from Gostynin, Poland. Through
my research, I discovered that several chapters and the necrology of
the Yizkor book have been translated by JewishGen. You can view these
at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gostynin/gostynin.html

I am interested in having the remainder of the book translated, and I
will be coordinating the translation project. If your family was from
Gostynin or any of the surrounding towns, you may find the translation
to be of value for your research. Please consider supporting this
project through
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Thank you,
Jessie Klein

Gostynin Yizkor Book Project Coordinator
kleinj414@gmail.com


"Tarbut" Gymnasium of Grodno (Belarus), an Exhibition #general

Arnon Hershkovitz
 

Hello, Dear Colleague Genners.

I'd like to share with you a fascinating story of one of our Israeli
colleague who a few years ago took upon herself the perpetuation of
her father's Shtetl, Lunna (Belarus), and has been passionately
exploring new ways of doing so ever since. The ShtetLinks website for
Lunna was only the first station in that journey,
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/lunna.

About four years ago, Ruth Marcus was looking at her father's
photographs and found a group-photo of students who had graduated in
1930 >from the "Tarbut" Gymnasium in Grodno. She immediately recognized
her father, Yitzchak ELIASHBERG, in that photo and was curious to know
who were his classmates and teachers and what happened to them
afterwards.

She posted that photograph on several Internet websites and asked
people to get in contact with her if they also recognized one of their
parents. As a result, she received exciting responses >from people from
all over the world. They sent her interesting materials related to the
"Tarbut" Gymnasium in Grodno.

Determined to present the history of this important Jewish institute,
Ruth made it to have an exhibition about the "Tarbut" Gymnasium
presented at the Yanka Kupala State University of Grodno, Faculty of
History and Sociology (exhibition opened 10/10/2012). During the
opening ceremony, there were talks by Edmund Yarmusik, Dean of the
Department of History and Sociology; by Sergei Pivovarchik, Head of
the Department of Archaeology and Ethnology; and by Ruth. Three
musicians played Jewish music and "Hatikvah".

Ruth says that it was a very exciting moment to sing "Hatikvah" at the
University of Grodno when in front of her eyes she saw the pictures of
her father, his classmates and teachers of the "Tarbut" Gymnasium.

The exhibition opening was reported on the university wepage,
including some photos, http://www.grsu.by (in Russian). Ruth can be
contacted directly by email, ....

Yours,
Arnon Hershkovitz
arnon.hershkovitz@gmail.com
Israeli Family Roots Forum Leader

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Arnon for Ruth Marcus's e-mail.
JewishGen privacy policy does not permit us to post third-party
personal contact information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Tarbut" Gymnasium of Grodno (Belarus), an Exhibition #general

Arnon Hershkovitz
 

Hello, Dear Colleague Genners.

I'd like to share with you a fascinating story of one of our Israeli
colleague who a few years ago took upon herself the perpetuation of
her father's Shtetl, Lunna (Belarus), and has been passionately
exploring new ways of doing so ever since. The ShtetLinks website for
Lunna was only the first station in that journey,
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/lunna.

About four years ago, Ruth Marcus was looking at her father's
photographs and found a group-photo of students who had graduated in
1930 >from the "Tarbut" Gymnasium in Grodno. She immediately recognized
her father, Yitzchak ELIASHBERG, in that photo and was curious to know
who were his classmates and teachers and what happened to them
afterwards.

She posted that photograph on several Internet websites and asked
people to get in contact with her if they also recognized one of their
parents. As a result, she received exciting responses >from people from
all over the world. They sent her interesting materials related to the
"Tarbut" Gymnasium in Grodno.

Determined to present the history of this important Jewish institute,
Ruth made it to have an exhibition about the "Tarbut" Gymnasium
presented at the Yanka Kupala State University of Grodno, Faculty of
History and Sociology (exhibition opened 10/10/2012). During the
opening ceremony, there were talks by Edmund Yarmusik, Dean of the
Department of History and Sociology; by Sergei Pivovarchik, Head of
the Department of Archaeology and Ethnology; and by Ruth. Three
musicians played Jewish music and "Hatikvah".

Ruth says that it was a very exciting moment to sing "Hatikvah" at the
University of Grodno when in front of her eyes she saw the pictures of
her father, his classmates and teachers of the "Tarbut" Gymnasium.

The exhibition opening was reported on the university wepage,
including some photos, http://www.grsu.by (in Russian). Ruth can be
contacted directly by email, ....

Yours,
Arnon Hershkovitz
arnon.hershkovitz@gmail.com
Israeli Family Roots Forum Leader

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Arnon for Ruth Marcus's e-mail.
JewishGen privacy policy does not permit us to post third-party
personal contact information.


Krakow censuses of 1910, 1900 online #galicia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

The Krakow Census of 1910 and part of the Krakow Census of 1900 are
now viewable online for free, with (handwritten) name indices, thanks to
the Malopolska Digital Library and the Polish State Archive in Krakow. To
learn how to find people using the indices, please see
http://genealogyindexer.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=3073

Direct links to the collections of census images:
http://mbc.malopolska.pl/dlibra/publication?id=74941&tab=3 (1910),
http://mbc.malopolska.pl/dlibra/publication?id=72489&tab=3 (1900).
(For the 1890 instructions released previously, see
http://genealogyindexer.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=3017.)

I do not know if/when the missing parts of the 1900 census will be
posted online.

Please share here or in the instructions thread at genealogyindexer.org
any information about the censuses that might be of general interest,
especially solutions to any problems you encounter. I regret that I am
unable to explore the censuses in more detail or offer individual
assistance at this time.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Krakow censuses of 1910, 1900 online #galicia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

The Krakow Census of 1910 and part of the Krakow Census of 1900 are
now viewable online for free, with (handwritten) name indices, thanks to
the Malopolska Digital Library and the Polish State Archive in Krakow. To
learn how to find people using the indices, please see
http://genealogyindexer.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=3073

Direct links to the collections of census images:
http://mbc.malopolska.pl/dlibra/publication?id=74941&tab=3 (1910),
http://mbc.malopolska.pl/dlibra/publication?id=72489&tab=3 (1900).
(For the 1890 instructions released previously, see
http://genealogyindexer.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=3017.)

I do not know if/when the missing parts of the 1900 census will be
posted online.

Please share here or in the instructions thread at genealogyindexer.org
any information about the censuses that might be of general interest,
especially solutions to any problems you encounter. I regret that I am
unable to explore the censuses in more detail or offer individual
assistance at this time.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Re: Essen Taigs #general

hfpjc
 

Essen taig, in fact, has an entirely different dimension to it. Back then,
it was customary for parents to send their children to study Torah in
renowned yeshivas very far >from home. Due to the poverty, these yeshivas
couldn't provide food for their pupils. Therefore, a system called essen
taig (literal translation: Eating days) was devised. Every boy would receive
an address of a local family with whom he would eat supper one night of the
week. Each day, he would go to a different family in that shtetl, who would
share of their meager food with the boy. No specific material was taught
then, aside of, perhaps, the boy repeating the lessons learnt that day in
yeshiva, as a token of appreciation for the food he received.

Rifky Gelbman
Brooklyn, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Essen Taigs #general

hfpjc
 

Essen taig, in fact, has an entirely different dimension to it. Back then,
it was customary for parents to send their children to study Torah in
renowned yeshivas very far >from home. Due to the poverty, these yeshivas
couldn't provide food for their pupils. Therefore, a system called essen
taig (literal translation: Eating days) was devised. Every boy would receive
an address of a local family with whom he would eat supper one night of the
week. Each day, he would go to a different family in that shtetl, who would
share of their meager food with the boy. No specific material was taught
then, aside of, perhaps, the boy repeating the lessons learnt that day in
yeshiva, as a token of appreciation for the food he received.

Rifky Gelbman
Brooklyn, New York


Re: Essen Taigs #general

Gordimer, A <gordimera@...>
 

"Essen teg" usually referred to a community arrangement between the
local yeshiva and laypeople in the community, whereby the yeshiva
students ate their meals at the laypeople's homes. Laypeople who
could afford to host yeshiva students for meals on a regular basis
participated in this program, and it was common in yeshivos
throughout Lita (the former greater Lithuania, where most of the
yeshivos were located).

One of the many innovations of the yeshiva in Telshe, Lithuania, was
that it refused to have an essen teg program, as it felt that such a
program detracted >from the dignity of Torah students, having to be
fed by others on a constant basis. The Telshe yeshiva, which had
extenstive outside funding unavailableto most yeshivos, provided
elaborate dormitory and dining facilities for its student body -
something not always available to most yeshiva students in poverty-
stricken Lithuania.

Avrohom Gordimer
New York, NY
___
From: George Rothstein
Sent: 11/10/2012 10:02 PM
My grandfather (1882 - 1963) received both secular training as a
pharmacist's assistance and religious training to become a shachet in
Berezhano, Minsk. He arrived in the US in 1904 and was licensed as a
shachet, probably in New York. He worked as a shachet in western
Massachusetts for more than 20 years.

My understanding is that he attended a community=run school called an
essen taig which met on a rotating basis at various neighbors' houses and
that included a lunch provided by the householder.

Does anyone know who taught at these essen taigs and what was taught
there? Would there likely by any surviving records? Would there be any
record of his license as a shachet in New York?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Essen Taigs #general

Gordimer, A <gordimera@...>
 

"Essen teg" usually referred to a community arrangement between the
local yeshiva and laypeople in the community, whereby the yeshiva
students ate their meals at the laypeople's homes. Laypeople who
could afford to host yeshiva students for meals on a regular basis
participated in this program, and it was common in yeshivos
throughout Lita (the former greater Lithuania, where most of the
yeshivos were located).

One of the many innovations of the yeshiva in Telshe, Lithuania, was
that it refused to have an essen teg program, as it felt that such a
program detracted >from the dignity of Torah students, having to be
fed by others on a constant basis. The Telshe yeshiva, which had
extenstive outside funding unavailableto most yeshivos, provided
elaborate dormitory and dining facilities for its student body -
something not always available to most yeshiva students in poverty-
stricken Lithuania.

Avrohom Gordimer
New York, NY
___
From: George Rothstein
Sent: 11/10/2012 10:02 PM
My grandfather (1882 - 1963) received both secular training as a
pharmacist's assistance and religious training to become a shachet in
Berezhano, Minsk. He arrived in the US in 1904 and was licensed as a
shachet, probably in New York. He worked as a shachet in western
Massachusetts for more than 20 years.

My understanding is that he attended a community=run school called an
essen taig which met on a rotating basis at various neighbors' houses and
that included a lunch provided by the householder.

Does anyone know who taught at these essen taigs and what was taught
there? Would there likely by any surviving records? Would there be any
record of his license as a shachet in New York?


More about concentration camp pictures #general

Ruth Frank <rhdfrank@...>
 

I first would like to thank everyone for their suggestions as to
what to do with the pictures. I should have given more information.
The pictures are >from Camp Gusen. I also have copies of an account
written by the person who must have taken the pictures. In his
account he mentions a testimonies by Franz Ziereis who was the
commander-in-chief of Lager Mauthausen and other camps. These are
all copies as I guess the pictures are.

On Nov 11, 2012, at 6:15 PM, Ruth Frank wrote:

I have a question about pictures I found while going through my mother's
papers. In her papers were pictures of a concentration camp and the
crematorium. These are gruesome pictures. I know I can not dispose of
them but what do I do with them.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More about concentration camp pictures #general

Ruth Frank <rhdfrank@...>
 

I first would like to thank everyone for their suggestions as to
what to do with the pictures. I should have given more information.
The pictures are >from Camp Gusen. I also have copies of an account
written by the person who must have taken the pictures. In his
account he mentions a testimonies by Franz Ziereis who was the
commander-in-chief of Lager Mauthausen and other camps. These are
all copies as I guess the pictures are.

On Nov 11, 2012, at 6:15 PM, Ruth Frank wrote:

I have a question about pictures I found while going through my mother's
papers. In her papers were pictures of a concentration camp and the
crematorium. These are gruesome pictures. I know I can not dispose of
them but what do I do with them.


Re: Concentration camp photographs #general

Lewis, Megan
 

Hello Ruth,

I think you have a set of the liberation photographs taken by the U.S.
Army Signal Corps that were widely distributed to U.S. soldiers.

For more information about these photographs as well as examples,
please see the USHMM online article about them at
http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10006237.

I'm sending this to the list in case the moderators feel it would be
of general interest.

Best wishes,

Megan Lewis
reference librarian
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
mlewis@ushmm.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Concentration camp photographs #general

Lewis, Megan
 

Hello Ruth,

I think you have a set of the liberation photographs taken by the U.S.
Army Signal Corps that were widely distributed to U.S. soldiers.

For more information about these photographs as well as examples,
please see the USHMM online article about them at
http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10006237.

I'm sending this to the list in case the moderators feel it would be
of general interest.

Best wishes,

Megan Lewis
reference librarian
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
mlewis@ushmm.org


Ledgers of the Mukhtarim at IGS website #general

Lea Haber Gedalia <leahgedalia53@...>
 

Dear Friends
Delighted to announce that
Ledgers of the Mukhtarim in Rehovot in now in IGS website :
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/153/6582.asp

Lea Haber Gedalia, IGS Chairperson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ledgers of the Mukhtarim at IGS website #general

Lea Haber Gedalia <leahgedalia53@...>
 

Dear Friends
Delighted to announce that
Ledgers of the Mukhtarim in Rehovot in now in IGS website :
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/153/6582.asp

Lea Haber Gedalia, IGS Chairperson


Re: powerful new searches available for Shoah Foundation survivor testimonies #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

Thanks to Renee Steinig for her posting on the new capabilities of the Shoah
Foundation database. I learned several new things when searching:

1. Not all testimonies are available online. Quite a number must be accessed
on-site in 36 institutions in 10 countries. I was surprised that there were
only three locations in Florida for accessing the testimonies and none of them
on the east coast where the majority of Jews live. In addition, some of the
testimonies are not indexed yet and, I assume, they will be in the future when
money is available to do the work.

2. The testimonies are available in data and video segments which may or may
not be on-line. There are photographs too which can be viewed on-line in a
slide show format, but unfortunately they are not identified.

3. The biographical profile is very helpful as it usually gives the date and
place of birth.

4. The search can be done by town which is quite helpful for those who know
that their families came >from a certain place, but do not know their names or
for KehilaLinks coordinators who wish to find all of the testimonies for their
particular towns. Variant spellings should be tried or use of the first few
letters of the name of the town. For instance, I looked for Kupiskis and then
Kupis and was able to find four individuals, one of whom hid in Kupiskis which I
had not heard about previously. When looking for Rokiskis, I tried Rakis and
Rokis and found six individuals. One of the interviews, for Abraham Resnick,
was for someone I knew and it was available on-line in English.

5. One of the things which I noticed was not asked was the maiden name of the
female relatives such as mothers and grandmothers. For genealogists this is an
important fact to know.

It is well-worth looking through the database and should be quite helpful to
many researching those who were living during the Holocaust era.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: powerful new searches available for Shoah Foundation survivor testimonies #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

Thanks to Renee Steinig for her posting on the new capabilities of the Shoah
Foundation database. I learned several new things when searching:

1. Not all testimonies are available online. Quite a number must be accessed
on-site in 36 institutions in 10 countries. I was surprised that there were
only three locations in Florida for accessing the testimonies and none of them
on the east coast where the majority of Jews live. In addition, some of the
testimonies are not indexed yet and, I assume, they will be in the future when
money is available to do the work.

2. The testimonies are available in data and video segments which may or may
not be on-line. There are photographs too which can be viewed on-line in a
slide show format, but unfortunately they are not identified.

3. The biographical profile is very helpful as it usually gives the date and
place of birth.

4. The search can be done by town which is quite helpful for those who know
that their families came >from a certain place, but do not know their names or
for KehilaLinks coordinators who wish to find all of the testimonies for their
particular towns. Variant spellings should be tried or use of the first few
letters of the name of the town. For instance, I looked for Kupiskis and then
Kupis and was able to find four individuals, one of whom hid in Kupiskis which I
had not heard about previously. When looking for Rokiskis, I tried Rakis and
Rokis and found six individuals. One of the interviews, for Abraham Resnick,
was for someone I knew and it was available on-line in English.

5. One of the things which I noticed was not asked was the maiden name of the
female relatives such as mothers and grandmothers. For genealogists this is an
important fact to know.

It is well-worth looking through the database and should be quite helpful to
many researching those who were living during the Holocaust era.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net

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