Date   

Re: surnames on tombstones #general

Meron Lavie
 

My vote is for Meir as the surname. Aside >from the fact that Meir is a
recognized surname in Israel (q.v., Golda Meir), and Chanan is not, I have
never seen the "Family Name first Given Name last" order on any Hebrew grave
except for a military grave.

Meron LAVIE
Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Avigdor Ben-Dov [mailto:avigdorbd@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 9:31 AM

While indexing a cemetery in Israel I found the name Meir in large letters
on the headstone, but the bedstone reads Chanan Meir. In Hebrew, some names
are male or female and this can lead to confusion without reference to the
father or mother as generally given (ben or bat--son or daughter,
respectively). This is not as difficult as given names used for surnames.
Even English and American names have blurred the distinction such as Simon
Paul and Paul Simon.
Usually I find the given name on the headstone, viz. Chanele (Chana), or
Kobi (Yaakov). Is there some standard or tradition that suggests the
headstone is the given name? If not, since both Meir and Chanan could be
given names, don't I need a document such as a death certificate (if one is
available) to verify this data? What other sources might establish the true
surname?


Re: surnames on tombstones #general

tom
 

if there are rules for gravestones, they are often not followed,
because for every "rule" there seem to be an inevitable bunch of
"exceptions". not only do different communities have different
customs, but different cemeteries and sections within those
cemeteries seem to do things a little differently.

in this example, it seems reasonable to assume that CHANAN is the
surname and meir is the given name, in the absence of any other
information. (and that would be consistent with the other stones
nearby.)

but reasonable assumptions are no substitute for documents, such as
cemetery records, or death certificates. (within reason - it's
probably not feasible to "research" every stone in the entire
cemetery that you are indexing.)

....... tom klein, toronto

Avigdor Ben-Dov <avigdorbd@gmail.com> wrote:

While indexing a cemetery in Israel I found the name Meir in large
letters on the headstone, but the bedstone reads Chanan Meir. In
Hebrew, some names are male or female and this can lead to confusion
without reference to the father or mother as generally given (ben or
bat--son or daughter, respectively). This is not as difficult as given
names used for surnames. Even English and American names have blurred
the distinction such as Simon Paul and Paul Simon.
Usually I find the given name on the headstone, viz. Chanele (Chana),
or Kobi (Yaakov). Is there some standard or tradition that suggests
the headstone is the given name? If not, since both Meir and Chanan
could be given names, don't I need a document such as a death
certificate (if one is available) to verify this data? What other
sources might establish the true surname?


Re: surnames on tombstones #general

joyweave
 

Does the cemetery have an office? In the U.S., and I expect, most
countries, there is usually an office where burial files are kept either
on computer or on index cards or in a large book. Those records should
clearly spell out the full name of the person in question.

Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA

Avigdor Ben-Dov<avigdorbd@gmail.com> wrote:

While indexing a cemetery in Israel I found the name Meir in large
letters on the headstone, but the bedstone reads Chanan Meir....since
both Meir and Chanan could be given names, don't I need a document
such as a death certificate (if one is available) to verify this data?
What other sources might establish the true surname?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: surnames on tombstones #general

Meron Lavie
 

My vote is for Meir as the surname. Aside >from the fact that Meir is a
recognized surname in Israel (q.v., Golda Meir), and Chanan is not, I have
never seen the "Family Name first Given Name last" order on any Hebrew grave
except for a military grave.

Meron LAVIE
Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Avigdor Ben-Dov [mailto:avigdorbd@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 9:31 AM

While indexing a cemetery in Israel I found the name Meir in large letters
on the headstone, but the bedstone reads Chanan Meir. In Hebrew, some names
are male or female and this can lead to confusion without reference to the
father or mother as generally given (ben or bat--son or daughter,
respectively). This is not as difficult as given names used for surnames.
Even English and American names have blurred the distinction such as Simon
Paul and Paul Simon.
Usually I find the given name on the headstone, viz. Chanele (Chana), or
Kobi (Yaakov). Is there some standard or tradition that suggests the
headstone is the given name? If not, since both Meir and Chanan could be
given names, don't I need a document such as a death certificate (if one is
available) to verify this data? What other sources might establish the true
surname?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: surnames on tombstones #general

tom
 

if there are rules for gravestones, they are often not followed,
because for every "rule" there seem to be an inevitable bunch of
"exceptions". not only do different communities have different
customs, but different cemeteries and sections within those
cemeteries seem to do things a little differently.

in this example, it seems reasonable to assume that CHANAN is the
surname and meir is the given name, in the absence of any other
information. (and that would be consistent with the other stones
nearby.)

but reasonable assumptions are no substitute for documents, such as
cemetery records, or death certificates. (within reason - it's
probably not feasible to "research" every stone in the entire
cemetery that you are indexing.)

....... tom klein, toronto

Avigdor Ben-Dov <avigdorbd@gmail.com> wrote:

While indexing a cemetery in Israel I found the name Meir in large
letters on the headstone, but the bedstone reads Chanan Meir. In
Hebrew, some names are male or female and this can lead to confusion
without reference to the father or mother as generally given (ben or
bat--son or daughter, respectively). This is not as difficult as given
names used for surnames. Even English and American names have blurred
the distinction such as Simon Paul and Paul Simon.
Usually I find the given name on the headstone, viz. Chanele (Chana),
or Kobi (Yaakov). Is there some standard or tradition that suggests
the headstone is the given name? If not, since both Meir and Chanan
could be given names, don't I need a document such as a death
certificate (if one is available) to verify this data? What other
sources might establish the true surname?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: surnames on tombstones #general

joyweave
 

Does the cemetery have an office? In the U.S., and I expect, most
countries, there is usually an office where burial files are kept either
on computer or on index cards or in a large book. Those records should
clearly spell out the full name of the person in question.

Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA

Avigdor Ben-Dov<avigdorbd@gmail.com> wrote:

While indexing a cemetery in Israel I found the name Meir in large
letters on the headstone, but the bedstone reads Chanan Meir....since
both Meir and Chanan could be given names, don't I need a document
such as a death certificate (if one is available) to verify this data?
What other sources might establish the true surname?


Searching Kevin Hanit's email address Re: LAZARUS #usa

Hazel Dakers
 

Hi Kevin

I hope you are a member of this email list as I would very much like to ask
you some questions about the family of Henry and Louisa LAZARUS within the
Stern families you have transcribed.

I am trying to establish how Catherine married name NORDEN is connected to
Myer MANSFIELD and his wife Ray Rebecca LAZARUS b 1834 (sister of Bernard
Lazarus).

Would you be kind enough to contact me offlist. If any list member knows
that Kevin is not a list member but can put me in touch, I would be
grateful. Many thanks.

Hazel Dakers, London UK www.hazeldakers.co.uk

researching:
BIRNBAUM (Zgierz & Lodz, Poland), GOLD (Zgierz & Lodz, Poland), HEIMANN
(Luegde, Germany & South Africa), NORDEN (London and South Africa)


Early American SIG #USA Searching Kevin Hanit's email address Re: LAZARUS #usa

Hazel Dakers
 

Hi Kevin

I hope you are a member of this email list as I would very much like to ask
you some questions about the family of Henry and Louisa LAZARUS within the
Stern families you have transcribed.

I am trying to establish how Catherine married name NORDEN is connected to
Myer MANSFIELD and his wife Ray Rebecca LAZARUS b 1834 (sister of Bernard
Lazarus).

Would you be kind enough to contact me offlist. If any list member knows
that Kevin is not a list member but can put me in touch, I would be
grateful. Many thanks.

Hazel Dakers, London UK www.hazeldakers.co.uk

researching:
BIRNBAUM (Zgierz & Lodz, Poland), GOLD (Zgierz & Lodz, Poland), HEIMANN
(Luegde, Germany & South Africa), NORDEN (London and South Africa)


Some Nazi Era compensation claims can **still** be submitted #germany

davidlewin@...
 

If you are anything like me then you will have assumed that the
era of claiming compensation for the horrors of the 2nd World War
has long since passed.

It was therefore with great surprise that I learned recently in
the REISSNER families newsgroup that this is by no means the case.

The Claims Conference (a body representing collectively the victims
of Nazism for the purpose of making claims and distributing assets)
has an ** extensive** list of dispossessed Jews whose assets have been
- or are still being claimed - by the Claims Conference.

The Claims Conference is not to be confused with "Project HEART" who
are seeking people to register claims for losses sustained in different
countries and who maintain that they intend to "negotiate with Governments"
to reach agreements for the return of such assets.

" The Claims Conference has established a Late Applicants Fund
of 50 million to accept applications >from certain natural persons,
as described below, who are heirs of former owners of Jewish property/assets
located in the former East Germany for which the Claims Conference received
proceeds as Successor Organisation under the German Property Law 1990."

The following are links to the relevant pages on the Claims Conference website:
General overview and info: http://www.claimscon.org/?url=LAF

List of Former Owners,Properties and Assets:
http://forms.claimscon.org/LAF/LAF-Liste.pdf
(hint: you can use the search function in Adobe reader to hunt through
this long document for the family names that concern you)

Claim form download: http://forms.claimscon.org/LAF/LAF-application-Eng.pdf

David Lewin London davidlewin@btinternet.com


German SIG #Germany Some Nazi Era compensation claims can **still** be submitted #germany

davidlewin@...
 

If you are anything like me then you will have assumed that the
era of claiming compensation for the horrors of the 2nd World War
has long since passed.

It was therefore with great surprise that I learned recently in
the REISSNER families newsgroup that this is by no means the case.

The Claims Conference (a body representing collectively the victims
of Nazism for the purpose of making claims and distributing assets)
has an ** extensive** list of dispossessed Jews whose assets have been
- or are still being claimed - by the Claims Conference.

The Claims Conference is not to be confused with "Project HEART" who
are seeking people to register claims for losses sustained in different
countries and who maintain that they intend to "negotiate with Governments"
to reach agreements for the return of such assets.

" The Claims Conference has established a Late Applicants Fund
of 50 million to accept applications >from certain natural persons,
as described below, who are heirs of former owners of Jewish property/assets
located in the former East Germany for which the Claims Conference received
proceeds as Successor Organisation under the German Property Law 1990."

The following are links to the relevant pages on the Claims Conference website:
General overview and info: http://www.claimscon.org/?url=LAF

List of Former Owners,Properties and Assets:
http://forms.claimscon.org/LAF/LAF-Liste.pdf
(hint: you can use the search function in Adobe reader to hunt through
this long document for the family names that concern you)

Claim form download: http://forms.claimscon.org/LAF/LAF-application-Eng.pdf

David Lewin London davidlewin@btinternet.com


ViewMate Translation Request: 1808 Marriage #germany

jberlowitz <jberlowitz331@...>
 

Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, GerSIG and JewishGen at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dear SIGgers,
I've posted a document on ViewMate, Image 26774, of a marriage between
Salomon Froeschl and Rosel (?). Town names are Neu Kollin (Kolin or
Novy Kolin) and Beneschau (Benesov), both in Bohemia. I'd like a
transcription and translation of the German and especially full
details of the bride and her family.

If a clearer image is required, please request it privately.
Original image is >from badatelna.cz, Benesov records, Book 46,
Image 16.

Gratefully, Judith Berlowitz, Oakland, CA jberlowitz331@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany ViewMate Translation Request: 1808 Marriage #germany

jberlowitz <jberlowitz331@...>
 

Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, GerSIG and JewishGen at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dear SIGgers,
I've posted a document on ViewMate, Image 26774, of a marriage between
Salomon Froeschl and Rosel (?). Town names are Neu Kollin (Kolin or
Novy Kolin) and Beneschau (Benesov), both in Bohemia. I'd like a
transcription and translation of the German and especially full
details of the bride and her family.

If a clearer image is required, please request it privately.
Original image is >from badatelna.cz, Benesov records, Book 46,
Image 16.

Gratefully, Judith Berlowitz, Oakland, CA jberlowitz331@gmail.com


Viewmate Photo VM26795: Request help in identifying a man #hungary

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Hello H-Siggers,

I have put off posting this request because I thought I could figure
this out. But now I have to ask for help.

I've posted a photo of two men, one of which is my father,
Jindrich/Heinrich (later changed to Henri) GOLDSTEIN, and someone he
may be related to or is just a friend. The photo seems to have been
taken in Munkacs/Mukachevo in Spetember 1934. Since my father died
when I was just a teenager, there is no one I can ask to help in
dientifying the shorter man. But maybe someone will recognize him.

My father was born in Strazsky, near Kezmarok, Slovakia, and Kezmarok
was where he lived until he began working. He seems to have worked
and lived in other places such as Ostrava, Vienna, Prague, and Paris
up until WW II. I have no idea why he was in Mukachevo, unless it was
to just visit someone there or a vacation. Perhaps the unknown
individual lived there.

The photo is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26795
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,

Madeleine Isenberg
Beverly Hills, CA
madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com

RESEARCHING:
GOLDMAN in parts of Galicia such as: Nowy Targ, Wachsmund, possibly
Krakow, Poland, who migrated into Kezmarok or Straszky/Nagy Eor/Nehre,
both now in Slovakia.
Also family names of STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN, who married into the
GOLDMAN family, and also lived in Slovakia.
GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena), and Kosice, Slovakia; Tolcsva,
Hungary; Temesvar (very briefly!), Romania

Moderator: Please contact Madeleine off-list or use Viewmate to respond.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Viewmate Photo VM26795: Request help in identifying a man #hungary

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Hello H-Siggers,

I have put off posting this request because I thought I could figure
this out. But now I have to ask for help.

I've posted a photo of two men, one of which is my father,
Jindrich/Heinrich (later changed to Henri) GOLDSTEIN, and someone he
may be related to or is just a friend. The photo seems to have been
taken in Munkacs/Mukachevo in Spetember 1934. Since my father died
when I was just a teenager, there is no one I can ask to help in
dientifying the shorter man. But maybe someone will recognize him.

My father was born in Strazsky, near Kezmarok, Slovakia, and Kezmarok
was where he lived until he began working. He seems to have worked
and lived in other places such as Ostrava, Vienna, Prague, and Paris
up until WW II. I have no idea why he was in Mukachevo, unless it was
to just visit someone there or a vacation. Perhaps the unknown
individual lived there.

The photo is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26795
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,

Madeleine Isenberg
Beverly Hills, CA
madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com

RESEARCHING:
GOLDMAN in parts of Galicia such as: Nowy Targ, Wachsmund, possibly
Krakow, Poland, who migrated into Kezmarok or Straszky/Nagy Eor/Nehre,
both now in Slovakia.
Also family names of STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN, who married into the
GOLDMAN family, and also lived in Slovakia.
GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena), and Kosice, Slovakia; Tolcsva,
Hungary; Temesvar (very briefly!), Romania

Moderator: Please contact Madeleine off-list or use Viewmate to respond.


Australian WDYTYA with a Hungarian episode screening on 16 April #hungary

kolamcg@...
 

Dear Genners living in Australia,

I have just received the screening dates of the Who Do You Think You Are episode for which we worked so
hard last year:

On the trail of his ancestors, actor Don Hany journeys to the heart of Europe, to
investigate his controversial Hungarian grandfather, caught up in a Cold War
flashpoint, and uncovers a labyrinth of secrets and lies that still divide his
family.

Screening Tuesday April 16th on SBS ONE at 7:30pm

Though the family is not Jewish, it might interest you - the story shows the typical Hungarian post-war life
of so many.

Kind regards,
Andras Koltai
Budapest, Hungary


Hungary SIG #Hungary Australian WDYTYA with a Hungarian episode screening on 16 April #hungary

kolamcg@...
 

Dear Genners living in Australia,

I have just received the screening dates of the Who Do You Think You Are episode for which we worked so
hard last year:

On the trail of his ancestors, actor Don Hany journeys to the heart of Europe, to
investigate his controversial Hungarian grandfather, caught up in a Cold War
flashpoint, and uncovers a labyrinth of secrets and lies that still divide his
family.

Screening Tuesday April 16th on SBS ONE at 7:30pm

Though the family is not Jewish, it might interest you - the story shows the typical Hungarian post-war life
of so many.

Kind regards,
Andras Koltai
Budapest, Hungary


RootsTech Developer Challenge - Tammy Hepps wins for Treelines! #hungary

Pamela Weisberger
 

I would like to congratulate Jewish genealogical community member,
Tammy Hepps, for winning the grand prize at the recent RootsTech
Conference in Salt Lake City in the 2013 Developer Challenge
competition, as well as being awarded first prize in the "share"
category, for creating "Treelines," a storytelling platform for people
to write and share their family stories either using the family tree
they already have or building one as they write. The official launch
is soon, and you can sign up to be officially "invited," but you can
also take a tour of this exceptional family history program here:

https://www.treelines.com/tour/

Home page: http://www.treelines.com

Nearly 20 developers participated in the 2013 Developer Challenge by
submitting projects that demonstrated technical innovations for family
history. >from these, a panel of judges selected six finalists. The
final 3 winners were announced at RootsTech during the Keynote on
Friday, March 22.

Here's how it works: tens of millions of people around the world are
interested in family history but people need software
solutions=97whether on the desktop, online, or through mobile
delivery=97that help them engage and succeed in their efforts to
discover, preserve, and share their family history. The Challenge
invites developers to create an application or service that introduces
a compelling new concept or innovation for family history that has
practical uses for genealogists and historians.

It's pretty amazing that two years running, two "nice Jewish girls"
(as I'm sure they don't mind being referred to) snagged top prizes
against very tough competition -- last year's runner-up winner being
Gesher Galicia's own, Brooke Schreier Ganz -- who also contributes
extensively to the Hungarian SIG's projects -- for creating Leafseek:
A Genealogy Search Engine in a Box: www.leafseek.com. The Leafseek
platform is currently being used by the All Galicia Database and the
IGRA (Israel Genealogical Research Assocation) All Israel Database.
Both women worked for well over a year on these projects and we are
all the beneficiaries. (If you are curious to view the other entries
in detail, go here: http://rootstech.org/challenges/overview)

Bravo to Tammy for winning in 2013 and Brooke in 2012 and for their
continuing contributions to the world of Jewish genealogy!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary RootsTech Developer Challenge - Tammy Hepps wins for Treelines! #hungary

Pamela Weisberger
 

I would like to congratulate Jewish genealogical community member,
Tammy Hepps, for winning the grand prize at the recent RootsTech
Conference in Salt Lake City in the 2013 Developer Challenge
competition, as well as being awarded first prize in the "share"
category, for creating "Treelines," a storytelling platform for people
to write and share their family stories either using the family tree
they already have or building one as they write. The official launch
is soon, and you can sign up to be officially "invited," but you can
also take a tour of this exceptional family history program here:

https://www.treelines.com/tour/

Home page: http://www.treelines.com

Nearly 20 developers participated in the 2013 Developer Challenge by
submitting projects that demonstrated technical innovations for family
history. >from these, a panel of judges selected six finalists. The
final 3 winners were announced at RootsTech during the Keynote on
Friday, March 22.

Here's how it works: tens of millions of people around the world are
interested in family history but people need software
solutions=97whether on the desktop, online, or through mobile
delivery=97that help them engage and succeed in their efforts to
discover, preserve, and share their family history. The Challenge
invites developers to create an application or service that introduces
a compelling new concept or innovation for family history that has
practical uses for genealogists and historians.

It's pretty amazing that two years running, two "nice Jewish girls"
(as I'm sure they don't mind being referred to) snagged top prizes
against very tough competition -- last year's runner-up winner being
Gesher Galicia's own, Brooke Schreier Ganz -- who also contributes
extensively to the Hungarian SIG's projects -- for creating Leafseek:
A Genealogy Search Engine in a Box: www.leafseek.com. The Leafseek
platform is currently being used by the All Galicia Database and the
IGRA (Israel Genealogical Research Assocation) All Israel Database.
Both women worked for well over a year on these projects and we are
all the beneficiaries. (If you are curious to view the other entries
in detail, go here: http://rootstech.org/challenges/overview)

Bravo to Tammy for winning in 2013 and Brooke in 2012 and for their
continuing contributions to the world of Jewish genealogy!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


JGSGW April Meeting & Workshop - April 21, 2013 #general

Marlene Bishow
 

Jewish Genealogy Society
of Greater Washington

Sunday, April 21, 2013

Workshop & Meeting
Location: B'nai Israel Congregation, Rockville MD

JGSGW Intermediate Workshop
Time: 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Instructor: Jonina Duker

What can be learned >from the study of the Jewish tombstone (matzevah)?

This workshop will explore customs and symbols associated with Jewish
burials, including a discussion of the Hebrew calendar, as well as the
history and meaning of personal names and surnames. The workshop will also
address the basics of effective search queries in Google, as well as an
introduction to Ancestry.com and optimizing searches there.

Participation in this workshop is a benefit of membership in JGSGW.
Reservations are required; send an email to JGSGW. Class limited to 20
participants.

JGSGW Meeting
"Routes to Roots in the 'Old Country': Where are the Surviving Documents and
How to Obtain Them?"
Speaker: Miriam Weiner, President, Routes to Roots Foundation
Time: 1:00 PM Schmooze, 1:30 PM Meting & Program

This presentation will focus on the Routes to Roots Foundation website
(RTRF) at www.rtrfoundation.org including a live "tour" of various
components of the website. Our speaker, Miriam Weiner, has worked officially
with the archivists throughout Eastern Europe beginning in Poland in 1989,
then Ukraine, Moldova, Belarus and Lithuania. She has received unprecedented
cooperation >from the archives in identifying and publishing information
about surviving Jewish and civil records.

The RTRF website includes a comprehensive searchable archive database by
town name, covering document holdings relevant to Jewish life in five
countries (and portions of two others) in Central and Eastern Europe, an
image database, and multiple searchable name databases for various
localities. The website is updated regularly with new/revised archive data,
additional name databases and images as well as articles by archivists,
historians and others.

In addition, Miriam will discuss the new collaboration between RTRF and the
Center for Jewish History (CJH) in New York City. The CJH website features
its Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) which integrates the holdings of CJH's
five partners into one searchable database, as well as separate pages for
each of the five partners and a page for the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy
Institute.

The JGSGW Library will be open after the meeting (until 4:30 PM) for
Research

http://www.facebook.com/groups/JGSGW/
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/

Marlene Bishow
VP Programs
Immediate Past President


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGW April Meeting & Workshop - April 21, 2013 #general

Marlene Bishow
 

Jewish Genealogy Society
of Greater Washington

Sunday, April 21, 2013

Workshop & Meeting
Location: B'nai Israel Congregation, Rockville MD

JGSGW Intermediate Workshop
Time: 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Instructor: Jonina Duker

What can be learned >from the study of the Jewish tombstone (matzevah)?

This workshop will explore customs and symbols associated with Jewish
burials, including a discussion of the Hebrew calendar, as well as the
history and meaning of personal names and surnames. The workshop will also
address the basics of effective search queries in Google, as well as an
introduction to Ancestry.com and optimizing searches there.

Participation in this workshop is a benefit of membership in JGSGW.
Reservations are required; send an email to JGSGW. Class limited to 20
participants.

JGSGW Meeting
"Routes to Roots in the 'Old Country': Where are the Surviving Documents and
How to Obtain Them?"
Speaker: Miriam Weiner, President, Routes to Roots Foundation
Time: 1:00 PM Schmooze, 1:30 PM Meting & Program

This presentation will focus on the Routes to Roots Foundation website
(RTRF) at www.rtrfoundation.org including a live "tour" of various
components of the website. Our speaker, Miriam Weiner, has worked officially
with the archivists throughout Eastern Europe beginning in Poland in 1989,
then Ukraine, Moldova, Belarus and Lithuania. She has received unprecedented
cooperation >from the archives in identifying and publishing information
about surviving Jewish and civil records.

The RTRF website includes a comprehensive searchable archive database by
town name, covering document holdings relevant to Jewish life in five
countries (and portions of two others) in Central and Eastern Europe, an
image database, and multiple searchable name databases for various
localities. The website is updated regularly with new/revised archive data,
additional name databases and images as well as articles by archivists,
historians and others.

In addition, Miriam will discuss the new collaboration between RTRF and the
Center for Jewish History (CJH) in New York City. The CJH website features
its Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) which integrates the holdings of CJH's
five partners into one searchable database, as well as separate pages for
each of the five partners and a page for the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy
Institute.

The JGSGW Library will be open after the meeting (until 4:30 PM) for
Research

http://www.facebook.com/groups/JGSGW/
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/

Marlene Bishow
VP Programs
Immediate Past President

140521 - 140540 of 659757