Date   

INTRO - researching MONESAVITCH family perhaps from Germany #germany

Beryl and Gabi Otvos <berylandgabi@...>
 

Hello GerSig,
I have just joined the group and have been doing genealogy research
for 2 years. I consider myself to be a beginner in doing German Jewish
Genealogy research.
I live in a London suburb in the UK and my native language is English.
I have a reasonable grasp of French and as my husband is originally
from Hungary, translations >from that language is available to me too.
I consider myself intermediate in using a computer and my experience
in using the internet is extensive.

I have identified the names, birth years and death dates of my
grandparents and the names of my great grandfathers.
My primary research goals now are to be able to find out exactly where
my grandparents came >from and when they came to the UK.

My paternal grandmother's UK 1901 census information said
that she came >from Germany and her 1911 information said
that she came >from Poland.

My JGFF Researcher ID is 476744
The family names and ancestral towns that I have entered in the JGFF
are:
MONESAVITCH - Germany, town unknown, to UK before July,1888
MINOSAVITCH - Lomza or Plock gubernias, Poland before July,1888
BOTSTEIN - Kyyiv or Minsk via Brody to London, UK in July 1911
LANDSMAN - Brody to London, UK probably in July, 1911
BOJN - Lomza or Plock gubernias to UK before July,1888
GOLDSTEIN - Poland, possibly >from Lomza or Plock gubernias to London,
before July,1888.

Beryl Otvos, London, UK berylandgabi@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany INTRO - researching MONESAVITCH family perhaps from Germany #germany

Beryl and Gabi Otvos <berylandgabi@...>
 

Hello GerSig,
I have just joined the group and have been doing genealogy research
for 2 years. I consider myself to be a beginner in doing German Jewish
Genealogy research.
I live in a London suburb in the UK and my native language is English.
I have a reasonable grasp of French and as my husband is originally
from Hungary, translations >from that language is available to me too.
I consider myself intermediate in using a computer and my experience
in using the internet is extensive.

I have identified the names, birth years and death dates of my
grandparents and the names of my great grandfathers.
My primary research goals now are to be able to find out exactly where
my grandparents came >from and when they came to the UK.

My paternal grandmother's UK 1901 census information said
that she came >from Germany and her 1911 information said
that she came >from Poland.

My JGFF Researcher ID is 476744
The family names and ancestral towns that I have entered in the JGFF
are:
MONESAVITCH - Germany, town unknown, to UK before July,1888
MINOSAVITCH - Lomza or Plock gubernias, Poland before July,1888
BOTSTEIN - Kyyiv or Minsk via Brody to London, UK in July 1911
LANDSMAN - Brody to London, UK probably in July, 1911
BOJN - Lomza or Plock gubernias to UK before July,1888
GOLDSTEIN - Poland, possibly >from Lomza or Plock gubernias to London,
before July,1888.

Beryl Otvos, London, UK berylandgabi@gmail.com


JGS of Illinois conference reduced early bird rate ends May 15 #general

News Releases JGSI-Events <jgsi-events@...>
 

Those planning to attend The Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois' daylong
Jewish genealogy conference, Digging Deeper: Researching Our Ancestors With
Technology, on Sunday, June 9, 2013, have until May 15 to save $10 in the fee for
early registration. Also, for out-of-town attendees, the special room rate at a
nearby motel is guaranteed until May 9.

The early registration fees for the conference are $50 for JGSI and IAJGS members
and $65 for non-members paid by May 15. After May 15, the fees are $60 for members
and $75 for non-members. Members of any IAJGS-affiliated society can attend the
conference at the member rate.

For youths who plan to attend just the mini-conference, it's free; but if they want
to attend all day, its $25 for early registration and $35 for late registration.

The conference registration form can be found at
http://www.jgsi.org/Conference2013.

Attendees >from out of town are invited to stay at the Hampton Inn & Suites Chicago-
North Shore/Skokie at the special conference rate of $119/night, which includes a
complimentary hot and cold breakfast buffet, free Wi-Fi, and a free shuttle service
within three miles of the hotel. Temple Beth Israel, the Illinois Holocaust Museum
& Education Center, and Westfield Old Orchard mall are within this radius.

Rooms may be reserved at the Hampton Inn at http://bit.ly/14zseDW. The special room
rate is guaranteed until May 9.

The conference will be held at Temple Beth Israel, 3601 W. Dempster St., Skokie,
Illinois. Conference attendees will register beginning at 8:15 a.m. June 9 at
Temple Beth Israel, and the conference will be held >from 9:15 a.m. to 4:50 p.m.
Lunch and snacks will be provided.

The featured speakers will be Warren Blatt, managing director of JewishGen, the
major Jewish genealogy website; and Duff Wilson, senior product manager of Family
Tree Maker, the genealogy database software. Warren Blatt will deliver a keynote
address on advanced searching with JewishGen and will also conduct sessions on
Jewish given names and Jewish surnames.

Duff Wilson will lead two instructive Family Tree Maker sessions, one for beginners
and one for advanced users of the family tree software.

A unique aspect of this conference will be a free mini-conference for youths >from
sixth grade through high school. Two consecutive programs introducing Jewish
genealogy with beginning methodology will be held >from 1:25 to 3:40 p.m. Robin
Seidenberg and Harriet Rudnit, experienced genealogists and JGSI board members,
will be the mini-conference speakers.

Digging Deeper: Researching Our Ancestors With Technology will include
presentations on DNA, translating Polish records, the Pale of Settlement,
familysearch.org, naturalization and cemetery records, and much more.

Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Illinois conference reduced early bird rate ends May 15 #general

News Releases JGSI-Events <jgsi-events@...>
 

Those planning to attend The Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois' daylong
Jewish genealogy conference, Digging Deeper: Researching Our Ancestors With
Technology, on Sunday, June 9, 2013, have until May 15 to save $10 in the fee for
early registration. Also, for out-of-town attendees, the special room rate at a
nearby motel is guaranteed until May 9.

The early registration fees for the conference are $50 for JGSI and IAJGS members
and $65 for non-members paid by May 15. After May 15, the fees are $60 for members
and $75 for non-members. Members of any IAJGS-affiliated society can attend the
conference at the member rate.

For youths who plan to attend just the mini-conference, it's free; but if they want
to attend all day, its $25 for early registration and $35 for late registration.

The conference registration form can be found at
http://www.jgsi.org/Conference2013.

Attendees >from out of town are invited to stay at the Hampton Inn & Suites Chicago-
North Shore/Skokie at the special conference rate of $119/night, which includes a
complimentary hot and cold breakfast buffet, free Wi-Fi, and a free shuttle service
within three miles of the hotel. Temple Beth Israel, the Illinois Holocaust Museum
& Education Center, and Westfield Old Orchard mall are within this radius.

Rooms may be reserved at the Hampton Inn at http://bit.ly/14zseDW. The special room
rate is guaranteed until May 9.

The conference will be held at Temple Beth Israel, 3601 W. Dempster St., Skokie,
Illinois. Conference attendees will register beginning at 8:15 a.m. June 9 at
Temple Beth Israel, and the conference will be held >from 9:15 a.m. to 4:50 p.m.
Lunch and snacks will be provided.

The featured speakers will be Warren Blatt, managing director of JewishGen, the
major Jewish genealogy website; and Duff Wilson, senior product manager of Family
Tree Maker, the genealogy database software. Warren Blatt will deliver a keynote
address on advanced searching with JewishGen and will also conduct sessions on
Jewish given names and Jewish surnames.

Duff Wilson will lead two instructive Family Tree Maker sessions, one for beginners
and one for advanced users of the family tree software.

A unique aspect of this conference will be a free mini-conference for youths >from
sixth grade through high school. Two consecutive programs introducing Jewish
genealogy with beginning methodology will be held >from 1:25 to 3:40 p.m. Robin
Seidenberg and Harriet Rudnit, experienced genealogists and JGSI board members,
will be the mini-conference speakers.

Digging Deeper: Researching Our Ancestors With Technology will include
presentations on DNA, translating Polish records, the Pale of Settlement,
familysearch.org, naturalization and cemetery records, and much more.

Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


Re: Anyone heard of Zeichnen Street? #lodz #poland

Fritz Neubauer
 

Am 01.05.2013 16:02, schrieb Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,:

In JewishGen's Lodz Ghetto database, relatives of my grandmother's and one
other unrelated family are listed as having their original address at
Zeichnen 10, Lodz. I cannot find this street, or any name similar to it, in
the Lodz Ghetto Streets database, or in any other source of Lodz street
names, old or new, and I tried plenty. I even tried translating the word
"zeichnen" (German for to "draw" or "sign"), into Polish ("rysowania" or
"podpisania") to see if there was any street with a similar name, but there
wasn't.

Does anyone have any idea what and/or where this street was?
Dear Miriam,

the only street name that comes slightly near the "Zeichnen" street is
the Zietenstrasse in the 1939 version of the Lodz streets (Zawadzka or
Prochnika at other times). Since Zieten is the name of an ancient German
general, the Israeli transcribers of these records may have misread
Zeichnen for Zieten. There is an "i" and the "t" and the "e" could have
been misread as an "h". Just an idea.

Another way of establishing what it really says would be to look at the
original handwriting that was misread. The originals are the house lists
that have been conserved. So the best chance would be to have a look at
the hand-written version in the surviving house list for Muhl Gasse 90,
flat 1 and 2, where the KINAS and LICHTENSZTAJN families should be
listed together with their original address. They were apparently
deported with transport 3 to Chelmno in January 1942. Copies of the
house lists are in the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, the originals
are in the Lodz Museum.

Ancestry is at this point in time working on re-transcribing (= keying)
these house lists and provides a look at the original document within
the World Archives Program, but I have not seen Muhl Gasse there. Both
the Lodz Names List and the Ancestry House Lists seem to use the same
document, judging >from the identical data, identical omissions and
mistakes.

Your data should be on

Reel 236, file 1045: Register book of streets. Muhlgasse, 1940-1944

and

Reel 237, file 1046: Register book of streets. Muhl. 1940-1944.

You only need house number 90.

I hope that helps,

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Re: Anyone heard of Zeichnen Street? #lodz #poland

Fritz Neubauer
 

Am 01.05.2013 16:02, schrieb Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,:

In JewishGen's Lodz Ghetto database, relatives of my grandmother's and one
other unrelated family are listed as having their original address at
Zeichnen 10, Lodz. I cannot find this street, or any name similar to it, in
the Lodz Ghetto Streets database, or in any other source of Lodz street
names, old or new, and I tried plenty. I even tried translating the word
"zeichnen" (German for to "draw" or "sign"), into Polish ("rysowania" or
"podpisania") to see if there was any street with a similar name, but there
wasn't.

Does anyone have any idea what and/or where this street was?
Dear Miriam,

the only street name that comes slightly near the "Zeichnen" street is
the Zietenstrasse in the 1939 version of the Lodz streets (Zawadzka or
Prochnika at other times). Since Zieten is the name of an ancient German
general, the Israeli transcribers of these records may have misread
Zeichnen for Zieten. There is an "i" and the "t" and the "e" could have
been misread as an "h". Just an idea.

Another way of establishing what it really says would be to look at the
original handwriting that was misread. The originals are the house lists
that have been conserved. So the best chance would be to have a look at
the hand-written version in the surviving house list for Muhl Gasse 90,
flat 1 and 2, where the KINAS and LICHTENSZTAJN families should be
listed together with their original address. They were apparently
deported with transport 3 to Chelmno in January 1942. Copies of the
house lists are in the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, the originals
are in the Lodz Museum.

Ancestry is at this point in time working on re-transcribing (= keying)
these house lists and provides a look at the original document within
the World Archives Program, but I have not seen Muhl Gasse there. Both
the Lodz Names List and the Ancestry House Lists seem to use the same
document, judging >from the identical data, identical omissions and
mistakes.

Your data should be on

Reel 236, file 1045: Register book of streets. Muhlgasse, 1940-1944

and

Reel 237, file 1046: Register book of streets. Muhl. 1940-1944.

You only need house number 90.

I hope that helps,

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


Newark, New Jersey, Naturalization Records - Success! #general

Cyndi Norwitz
 

The last stage in my saga to get my great grandfather (Bernard FRIEDMAN)'s
naturalization records.

I had no luck at the NYC NARA archives and the New Jersey State Archives couldn't
find it either. I posted here and got a ton of great help which included finding
his ship passage records. A couple of weeks ago, I posted about various Newark, NJ
resources and how I had found his declaration of intent to naturalize in 1904 under
the odd name of Bonat Friedman (I knew it was him because it included his address,
which matched other sources).

After making that post, I took another look at the naturalization index NJ had sent
me (the surnames under F-R-D for years 1906-1920 or so). And there I saw a Bonat
Friedman for Oct, 19, 1910. Just a tad over 5 years >from when Bernard's wife and
kids arrived. I filled out a new request form, wrote a new check, sent it off to
NJ, and hoped.

Yesterday they sent me a package. And yes, it is him!

Bonat and Zire Friedman and their 5 children Celia, Louis, Joseph, James, and
Miriam. The last two were born in Newark (Miriam is my grandmother) (one more
child, Henry, was born in 1912).

The document gives birthdates for everyone but Zire and it gives Bonat's and Zire's
cities of birth as Chericoff, Russia. So that settles it; they were born in
Cherikov, Mogilev, Belarus (same place Zira and kids put as last residence on the
ship manifest). Because it only says "Russia" for the 3 oldest children, I don't
know if the family moved to Mglin, Russia/Ukraine or if Bernard's putting it as
his last residence before immigrating was a fluke. Though one might assume that if
the children were born in a different city, that would have been noted.

I was hoping this petition would be one of the ones that lists father's name (or
maybe mother's too) and give me some insight into the next generation up. Alas,
not to be. But I have some interesting leads with the witnesses. First is Abram
SHAPIRO, probably Zire's uncle they all first stayed with. Second is a Harry
FRIEDMAN. I have an occupation and address for both. That's the very first
Friedman other than this immediate family I know about.

All in all, I'm pretty thrilled.

Thanks again to everyone who offered help in making this happen. And to those who
encouraged persistence.

Cyndi Norwitz
Petaluma, CA

DEUTELBAUM, ZELENKA (Kotesova, Slovakia); KRIEGER, GOLDBERGER (Kosice, Slovakia);
DEUTELBAUM, KARPATI, GROSZMANN (Budapest); DEUTELBAUM (Cleveland; Chicago;
Pittsburgh); KARPATI (Boston); DUBIN (Chudnov, Ukraine); FRIEDMAN, SHAPIRO
(Cherikov, Mogilev, Belarus; Mglin Russia/Ukraine; Newark, NJ) ;NAIMSKY (Warsaw;
Bronx, NY); NITOWITZ, NORWITZ (Lomza, Poland; Washington DC); GOLDSTEIN (Lativa;
Baltimore); SHAVEL, SHAVELLE, SHAVIL (Kanus, Lithuania)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Newark, New Jersey, Naturalization Records - Success! #general

Cyndi Norwitz
 

The last stage in my saga to get my great grandfather (Bernard FRIEDMAN)'s
naturalization records.

I had no luck at the NYC NARA archives and the New Jersey State Archives couldn't
find it either. I posted here and got a ton of great help which included finding
his ship passage records. A couple of weeks ago, I posted about various Newark, NJ
resources and how I had found his declaration of intent to naturalize in 1904 under
the odd name of Bonat Friedman (I knew it was him because it included his address,
which matched other sources).

After making that post, I took another look at the naturalization index NJ had sent
me (the surnames under F-R-D for years 1906-1920 or so). And there I saw a Bonat
Friedman for Oct, 19, 1910. Just a tad over 5 years >from when Bernard's wife and
kids arrived. I filled out a new request form, wrote a new check, sent it off to
NJ, and hoped.

Yesterday they sent me a package. And yes, it is him!

Bonat and Zire Friedman and their 5 children Celia, Louis, Joseph, James, and
Miriam. The last two were born in Newark (Miriam is my grandmother) (one more
child, Henry, was born in 1912).

The document gives birthdates for everyone but Zire and it gives Bonat's and Zire's
cities of birth as Chericoff, Russia. So that settles it; they were born in
Cherikov, Mogilev, Belarus (same place Zira and kids put as last residence on the
ship manifest). Because it only says "Russia" for the 3 oldest children, I don't
know if the family moved to Mglin, Russia/Ukraine or if Bernard's putting it as
his last residence before immigrating was a fluke. Though one might assume that if
the children were born in a different city, that would have been noted.

I was hoping this petition would be one of the ones that lists father's name (or
maybe mother's too) and give me some insight into the next generation up. Alas,
not to be. But I have some interesting leads with the witnesses. First is Abram
SHAPIRO, probably Zire's uncle they all first stayed with. Second is a Harry
FRIEDMAN. I have an occupation and address for both. That's the very first
Friedman other than this immediate family I know about.

All in all, I'm pretty thrilled.

Thanks again to everyone who offered help in making this happen. And to those who
encouraged persistence.

Cyndi Norwitz
Petaluma, CA

DEUTELBAUM, ZELENKA (Kotesova, Slovakia); KRIEGER, GOLDBERGER (Kosice, Slovakia);
DEUTELBAUM, KARPATI, GROSZMANN (Budapest); DEUTELBAUM (Cleveland; Chicago;
Pittsburgh); KARPATI (Boston); DUBIN (Chudnov, Ukraine); FRIEDMAN, SHAPIRO
(Cherikov, Mogilev, Belarus; Mglin Russia/Ukraine; Newark, NJ) ;NAIMSKY (Warsaw;
Bronx, NY); NITOWITZ, NORWITZ (Lomza, Poland; Washington DC); GOLDSTEIN (Lativa;
Baltimore); SHAVEL, SHAVELLE, SHAVIL (Kanus, Lithuania)


Great and Grand Nieces -- Who is Who? #general

Helene Kenvin <hekenvin@...>
 

I believe (and please correct me if I am wrong) that I am the great-niece of my
grandfather's siblings. But what am I to the siblings of my great-grandfather?
Am I their great-great niece? Their grand niece? Their great-grand niece? Or
some other equally tongue-twisting honorific....

With thanks,
Helene Kenvin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Great and Grand Nieces -- Who is Who? #general

Helene Kenvin <hekenvin@...>
 

I believe (and please correct me if I am wrong) that I am the great-niece of my
grandfather's siblings. But what am I to the siblings of my great-grandfather?
Am I their great-great niece? Their grand niece? Their great-grand niece? Or
some other equally tongue-twisting honorific....

With thanks,
Helene Kenvin


Re: DSEWETIZKI - Find an uncommon surname in Russia #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Miriam--Here is a technique that works surprsingly well.
Ask someone whose native language is Russian to spell out the name for you. You can
then type it yourself on Steve Morse's website in Russian and cut and paste it.
You want to go to "Google Russia" to paste it and pull up the maximum amount of
hits in Russian. It is important to use "Google Russia" and not one that defaults
to English or a Romance Language.

There may be more than one way to spell the surname, so you may have to do it for
multiple spellings. I have found hits on my own surname using this technique.
You don't want to do it for a common name unless you have months to spend
researching each hit but for odd names it works surprisingly well. And I have
found hits on my surname I did not find elsewhere.

Best wishes,
Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA

<<Has anyone ever heard of this surname? It might be pronounced 'Jewitski.'
Thirteenyears ago I put this query on Jewishgen. I never got any replies.>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: DSEWETIZKI - Find an uncommon surname in Russia #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Miriam--Here is a technique that works surprsingly well.
Ask someone whose native language is Russian to spell out the name for you. You can
then type it yourself on Steve Morse's website in Russian and cut and paste it.
You want to go to "Google Russia" to paste it and pull up the maximum amount of
hits in Russian. It is important to use "Google Russia" and not one that defaults
to English or a Romance Language.

There may be more than one way to spell the surname, so you may have to do it for
multiple spellings. I have found hits on my own surname using this technique.
You don't want to do it for a common name unless you have months to spend
researching each hit but for odd names it works surprisingly well. And I have
found hits on my surname I did not find elsewhere.

Best wishes,
Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA

<<Has anyone ever heard of this surname? It might be pronounced 'Jewitski.'
Thirteenyears ago I put this query on Jewishgen. I never got any replies.>>


Subject: Re: New York marriage Use Morse;'s One Step "Name Ends With" #general

James
 

Old script S and L often look the same, likewise script H and N, W and M, F and T,
etc. That's why Stephen Morse allows you to use "ends with" in the name search field.

Have you tried that? And also "sounds like"?

James Castellan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Subject: Re: New York marriage Use Morse;'s One Step "Name Ends With" #general

James
 

Old script S and L often look the same, likewise script H and N, W and M, F and T,
etc. That's why Stephen Morse allows you to use "ends with" in the name search field.

Have you tried that? And also "sounds like"?

James Castellan


Re: 23 Jews #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

The Early American SIG Digest had an inquiry regarding the names of the 23 Jews
from Recife, Brazil, who first came to the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam which
became the City of New York in 1654. Since May has been designated Jewish
American Heritage Month, I thought it might be appropriate to start off the
month by mentioning this historic group of early Jews.


An interesting link about their family names is found at:
http://nychistory.blogspot.com/2010/08/return-to-establishment-of-shearith.html.
The link also refers to a number of other resources which might be of interest too.

According to the information on the link which was extracted >from Stephen
Birmingham's book "The Grandees", the Sephardic family names were:

Asser Levy
Abraham Israel De Piza (or Dias)
David Israel Faro
Mose Lumbosco
Judith (or Judica) Mercado (or De Mercado or de Mereda)
Ricke (or Rachel) Nunes

There are numerous other references to this topic which can be found online and
this is just one of them.

As I find time during the month of May, I will mention other Jews who settled in
America.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: 23 Jews #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

The Early American SIG Digest had an inquiry regarding the names of the 23 Jews
from Recife, Brazil, who first came to the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam which
became the City of New York in 1654. Since May has been designated Jewish
American Heritage Month, I thought it might be appropriate to start off the
month by mentioning this historic group of early Jews.


An interesting link about their family names is found at:
http://nychistory.blogspot.com/2010/08/return-to-establishment-of-shearith.html.
The link also refers to a number of other resources which might be of interest too.

According to the information on the link which was extracted >from Stephen
Birmingham's book "The Grandees", the Sephardic family names were:

Asser Levy
Abraham Israel De Piza (or Dias)
David Israel Faro
Mose Lumbosco
Judith (or Judica) Mercado (or De Mercado or de Mereda)
Ricke (or Rachel) Nunes

There are numerous other references to this topic which can be found online and
this is just one of them.

As I find time during the month of May, I will mention other Jews who settled in
America.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Unusual name #general

Snillop47@...
 

I have come across a man living in South Wales, known in the Census and other
sources as Harry Goldblatt. He was naturalised as a British subject in 1920 and the
entry in the London Gazette gives his name as 'Chlavney (known as Harry) Goldblatt'.
Could that be a mis-spelling of his forename? If so, what is the correct version?

Harold Pollins
Oxford, England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Unusual name #general

Snillop47@...
 

I have come across a man living in South Wales, known in the Census and other
sources as Harry Goldblatt. He was naturalised as a British subject in 1920 and the
entry in the London Gazette gives his name as 'Chlavney (known as Harry) Goldblatt'.
Could that be a mis-spelling of his forename? If so, what is the correct version?

Harold Pollins
Oxford, England


Uman #ukraine

Joshua Skarf <jskarf@...>
 

My great-grandparents, Isaac and Libby WEXELMAN, moved to Montreal in
1904 >from the Ukraine. On Isaac's Canadian naturalization papers, it
says that he is >from "Oman Province of Keiff, Russia" which I assume
means Uman.

Recently, I got a copy of the 1940 Dominion of
Canada National Registration record for Libby, and for place it lists
"Omaname" which is pretty similar to Uman. My questions is whether
anyone has an idea as to why they would have tacked on the suffix "ame".

Thanks,

Josh Skarf
researching SHKAROFSKY (Pogrebishche), Wexleman (Uman), Spivak (Tetiev)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Uman #ukraine

Joshua Skarf <jskarf@...>
 

My great-grandparents, Isaac and Libby WEXELMAN, moved to Montreal in
1904 >from the Ukraine. On Isaac's Canadian naturalization papers, it
says that he is >from "Oman Province of Keiff, Russia" which I assume
means Uman.

Recently, I got a copy of the 1940 Dominion of
Canada National Registration record for Libby, and for place it lists
"Omaname" which is pretty similar to Uman. My questions is whether
anyone has an idea as to why they would have tacked on the suffix "ame".

Thanks,

Josh Skarf
researching SHKAROFSKY (Pogrebishche), Wexleman (Uman), Spivak (Tetiev)

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