Date   

Georgia Naturalizations #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

As I have mentioned in a prior posting about Alabama Naturalizations on
Ancestry.com, these southern naturalizations are a tremendous help in locating
information on immigrant Jews. In the Georgia Naturalizations, I happened
upon a very interesting record which is a wonderful example of how Jewish
families can be dispersed to a number of far-flung places.
On September 27, 1865, Leizeris Krygeris, was born in Vabalninkas, Lithuania,
and on March 19, 1935, he arrived in America on the SS Majestic. He then
settled in Georgia and his five children are listed as follows: AElex Kruger,
living in Fitzgerald, Georgia, Abe Kruger, living in Fitzgerald, Georgia,
Morris Kruger, living in Johannesburg, South Africa, David S. Kruger,
living in Live Oak, Florida, Israel H. Kruger, living in Ra'anana, Israel.
One can look further, and find according to the "South African Jewry 1976-1977"
Year Book that Morris Kruger is listed there. He is the child of Lazar and
Pesia Kruger, served in the Lithuanian Army in 1921, and came to South Africa
in 1922. He married Ida Bloch in 1922 and had two sons. He was the Chairman
of the Vabolnik Countrymen. One can also find more about his brothers and
their families too. The William Bremen Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum in
Atlanta, Georgia,has much about the Kruger family including a wonderful
family photograph of Leizeris and his sons.

In another example, one sees how it was not only the husbands who came to America
alone, but some wives did this as well. One finds a record for Rachel Lena Klein
(no maiden name), who had been married to Hyman David Klein and had a son
Solomon Isaac Klein, all born in Taurage, Lithuania. Evidently, the husband
remained in Lithuania whilst the wife and child came to America and settled
in Georgia in 1920. One wonders if the husband later survived the Holocaust.
An interesting record shows that immigrants came to America to landsleit who
had chosen to settle in well-known enclaves. In regard to Isidor Yankel Kremer,
who was born in Pushalot, Lithuania, it appeared >from the record that he
married in Jacksonville, Florida, to a Fannie (maiden name not mentioned),
who was >from Romania, before he settled in Albany, Georgia. Many immigrants
from the small Lithuanian shtetl of Pushalot found a home in Jacksonville and,
so too, it was with Mr. Kremer who made that connection along with a number of
his Kremer relatives.

There are many other examples >from not only Lithuania, but other countries as
well which are worth investigating. All have their special little twists and
turns in the history of that particular family. In addition, be sure and look
at all of the southern states such as Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky,
South Carolina and others, whose naturalizations are now online as one never
knows where one will find a family member.

Ann Rabinowitz annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Georgia Naturalizations #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

As I have mentioned in a prior posting about Alabama Naturalizations on
Ancestry.com, these southern naturalizations are a tremendous help in locating
information on immigrant Jews. In the Georgia Naturalizations, I happened
upon a very interesting record which is a wonderful example of how Jewish
families can be dispersed to a number of far-flung places.
On September 27, 1865, Leizeris Krygeris, was born in Vabalninkas, Lithuania,
and on March 19, 1935, he arrived in America on the SS Majestic. He then
settled in Georgia and his five children are listed as follows: AElex Kruger,
living in Fitzgerald, Georgia, Abe Kruger, living in Fitzgerald, Georgia,
Morris Kruger, living in Johannesburg, South Africa, David S. Kruger,
living in Live Oak, Florida, Israel H. Kruger, living in Ra'anana, Israel.
One can look further, and find according to the "South African Jewry 1976-1977"
Year Book that Morris Kruger is listed there. He is the child of Lazar and
Pesia Kruger, served in the Lithuanian Army in 1921, and came to South Africa
in 1922. He married Ida Bloch in 1922 and had two sons. He was the Chairman
of the Vabolnik Countrymen. One can also find more about his brothers and
their families too. The William Bremen Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum in
Atlanta, Georgia,has much about the Kruger family including a wonderful
family photograph of Leizeris and his sons.

In another example, one sees how it was not only the husbands who came to America
alone, but some wives did this as well. One finds a record for Rachel Lena Klein
(no maiden name), who had been married to Hyman David Klein and had a son
Solomon Isaac Klein, all born in Taurage, Lithuania. Evidently, the husband
remained in Lithuania whilst the wife and child came to America and settled
in Georgia in 1920. One wonders if the husband later survived the Holocaust.
An interesting record shows that immigrants came to America to landsleit who
had chosen to settle in well-known enclaves. In regard to Isidor Yankel Kremer,
who was born in Pushalot, Lithuania, it appeared >from the record that he
married in Jacksonville, Florida, to a Fannie (maiden name not mentioned),
who was >from Romania, before he settled in Albany, Georgia. Many immigrants
from the small Lithuanian shtetl of Pushalot found a home in Jacksonville and,
so too, it was with Mr. Kremer who made that connection along with a number of
his Kremer relatives.

There are many other examples >from not only Lithuania, but other countries as
well which are worth investigating. All have their special little twists and
turns in the history of that particular family. In addition, be sure and look
at all of the southern states such as Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky,
South Carolina and others, whose naturalizations are now online as one never
knows where one will find a family member.

Ann Rabinowitz annrab@bellsouth.net


lookup at Kings County (Brooklyn) Surrogate's Court #general

Renee Steinig
 

Does anyone out there have plans to be at Kings County Surrogate's
Court in Brooklyn (2 Johnson St.)?

If so, I'd appreciate a look in the index there for several names. If
records are on file for any of the people, I'll go to Brooklyn to see
them. I'd just like to avoid traveling 75 miles round-trip only to
discover that none of these folks had wills or other records.

If you can help, please write me for details.

Thanks.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills (Long Island), NY
genmaven@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen lookup at Kings County (Brooklyn) Surrogate's Court #general

Renee Steinig
 

Does anyone out there have plans to be at Kings County Surrogate's
Court in Brooklyn (2 Johnson St.)?

If so, I'd appreciate a look in the index there for several names. If
records are on file for any of the people, I'll go to Brooklyn to see
them. I'd just like to avoid traveling 75 miles round-trip only to
discover that none of these folks had wills or other records.

If you can help, please write me for details.

Thanks.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills (Long Island), NY
genmaven@gmail.com


Looking for Hommon Russia #general

Bruce Katkin <bkatkin@...>
 

I am wondering what Hommon, Russia before WW1 is called today, or if it even
exists any more.

Researching: Goodman/Guttman, Bukovina, Lachs/Lax in
Bukovina and Galacia, Katkin and Levinson: Minsk,Slutsk, Belarus; Vilnius,
Lithuania; Ekaterinoslav(Dnipropetrovsk), Ukraine
Bruce Katkin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for Hommon Russia #general

Bruce Katkin <bkatkin@...>
 

I am wondering what Hommon, Russia before WW1 is called today, or if it even
exists any more.

Researching: Goodman/Guttman, Bukovina, Lachs/Lax in
Bukovina and Galacia, Katkin and Levinson: Minsk,Slutsk, Belarus; Vilnius,
Lithuania; Ekaterinoslav(Dnipropetrovsk), Ukraine
Bruce Katkin


Re: finding enumeration districts: NY #general

A. E. Jordan
 

In a message dated 6/17/2013 9:45:16 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
wendygris@gmail.com writes:
What I need to do is
figure out probable EDs for the 1905, 1915, and 1925 censuses.



There is a one step tool that will get you into the neighborhood for the AD
and ED that you can access at _www.stephenmorse.org_
(http://www.stephenmorse.org) . However my experience with it is that it
may only get you to the general area and you may have to keep searching
beyond the ED it supplies.

At the library in Manhattan there exists the street index on microfilmed
index cards that has each individual address and the 1905, 1915 AD/ED
for the individual address. There are even page numbers where to find the
address within the census. It is fool proof and even shows when an address did
not exist. Ask if the NY State Library or the LDS has a copy of this
microfilm. It may only exist at the Manhattan research room in the Public
Library building at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue.

At the same building there are also maps -- some in the genealogy room and
some in the Map Room -- that show AD/ED for the state census records. If
you think you are going to have to do the map route suggestion is to take
along a current street map that shows the cross streets for the address you
are looking for. It helps if you know what part of the City to be looking
at in the maps.

Also in the case of Newark, New Jersey for example the Census district maps
for the State Census are on line and you can search them out and do the
research >from home.

Also at the NY Public Library you will find the complete 1890 Police
Census. They have the locator book to find addresses and they have
the complete microfilm of the 1890 Police Census.

Finally don't forget that Ancestry and FamilySearch.org are now loading the
NY State Census. So you might want to start your search on line because
it could save a lot of look up time and microfilm work.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: finding enumeration districts: NY #general

A. E. Jordan
 

In a message dated 6/17/2013 9:45:16 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
wendygris@gmail.com writes:
What I need to do is
figure out probable EDs for the 1905, 1915, and 1925 censuses.



There is a one step tool that will get you into the neighborhood for the AD
and ED that you can access at _www.stephenmorse.org_
(http://www.stephenmorse.org) . However my experience with it is that it
may only get you to the general area and you may have to keep searching
beyond the ED it supplies.

At the library in Manhattan there exists the street index on microfilmed
index cards that has each individual address and the 1905, 1915 AD/ED
for the individual address. There are even page numbers where to find the
address within the census. It is fool proof and even shows when an address did
not exist. Ask if the NY State Library or the LDS has a copy of this
microfilm. It may only exist at the Manhattan research room in the Public
Library building at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue.

At the same building there are also maps -- some in the genealogy room and
some in the Map Room -- that show AD/ED for the state census records. If
you think you are going to have to do the map route suggestion is to take
along a current street map that shows the cross streets for the address you
are looking for. It helps if you know what part of the City to be looking
at in the maps.

Also in the case of Newark, New Jersey for example the Census district maps
for the State Census are on line and you can search them out and do the
research >from home.

Also at the NY Public Library you will find the complete 1890 Police
Census. They have the locator book to find addresses and they have
the complete microfilm of the 1890 Police Census.

Finally don't forget that Ancestry and FamilySearch.org are now loading the
NY State Census. So you might want to start your search on line because
it could save a lot of look up time and microfilm work.

Allan Jordan


Re: finding enumeration districts: NY #general

Jenny Brown
 

A great resource is Steve Morse's page at stevemorse.org. On this web
site, he has a Unified Census ED finder:
http://stevemorse.org/census/unified.html. You can use that to put in
addresses and find the EDs. While it doesn't have the EDs for the
5-years, I would imagine if you found the EDs for 1910, 1920, and 1930
they would also work for 5s.

If you have a paid subscription to Ancestry.com, you can search the New
York censuses for those years >from your home.

Good luck!
Jenny Brown
Arlington, MA

Researching: Latvia: KOPOLOVITZ, DOROGOI
Poland/Lithuania: BRENNHOLZ, GURVICH
Odesa, Ukraine: BRASLOWSKY, KRASNOTEIN
Kobryin, Belarus: LEDER
Kupel, Ukraine: SOFER


Wendy Griswold <wendygris@gmail.com> =
wrote:
snip....I would like to look at the 1905, 1915, 1925
censuses (is there a word for those off-year state censuses?).
snip...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: finding enumeration districts: NY #general

Jenny Brown
 

A great resource is Steve Morse's page at stevemorse.org. On this web
site, he has a Unified Census ED finder:
http://stevemorse.org/census/unified.html. You can use that to put in
addresses and find the EDs. While it doesn't have the EDs for the
5-years, I would imagine if you found the EDs for 1910, 1920, and 1930
they would also work for 5s.

If you have a paid subscription to Ancestry.com, you can search the New
York censuses for those years >from your home.

Good luck!
Jenny Brown
Arlington, MA

Researching: Latvia: KOPOLOVITZ, DOROGOI
Poland/Lithuania: BRENNHOLZ, GURVICH
Odesa, Ukraine: BRASLOWSKY, KRASNOTEIN
Kobryin, Belarus: LEDER
Kupel, Ukraine: SOFER


Wendy Griswold <wendygris@gmail.com> =
wrote:
snip....I would like to look at the 1905, 1915, 1925
censuses (is there a word for those off-year state censuses?).
snip...


Article on Jewish DNA testing #general

Stuart Ungar
 

An article on Jewish DNA testing and how it led to me meeting a long
lost "cousin" was just featured in the Louisville Courier-Journal
newspaper. Interesting for those contemplating taking this next step in
genealogical research. Here is the link:

http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20130616/PRIME04/306160016/DNA-testing-reveals-connections-past-each-other?nclick_check=1

( MOD: http://tinyurl.com/k8fllqh )

- Stuart UNGAR
stuartungar@me.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Article on Jewish DNA testing #general

Stuart Ungar
 

An article on Jewish DNA testing and how it led to me meeting a long
lost "cousin" was just featured in the Louisville Courier-Journal
newspaper. Interesting for those contemplating taking this next step in
genealogical research. Here is the link:

http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20130616/PRIME04/306160016/DNA-testing-reveals-connections-past-each-other?nclick_check=1

( MOD: http://tinyurl.com/k8fllqh )

- Stuart UNGAR
stuartungar@me.com


Find people in Brooklyn in 1940's #germany

Hanna Grossman <hannakg@...>
 

I am tracking a family of cousins Gustav COHEN b. 1877, NY and his wife
Berta ESSINGER b. 1879 Brooklyn and their sons.

Gus and Berta are in 1940 census at 763 Eastern Parkway, don't show in
IGG death index. Their son Irmin or Irwin E. b. 1908 in Brooklyn may be
listed in SSDI in 9/1977. No marriage for him found in any NY boro
(i.e. the Irwin marriages listed are not he)

Their son Arnold (or Bertram) b. 1912/1914 was living with parents in
1940, and entered Army in 1942, single. I see no record of marriage or
death for him.

The 1930 census says Gustav veteran of Spanish American war; how can I
use that to find his death? Any other ideas?

Hanna Grossman, Cornwall CT hannakg@optonline.net


German SIG #Germany Find people in Brooklyn in 1940's #germany

Hanna Grossman <hannakg@...>
 

I am tracking a family of cousins Gustav COHEN b. 1877, NY and his wife
Berta ESSINGER b. 1879 Brooklyn and their sons.

Gus and Berta are in 1940 census at 763 Eastern Parkway, don't show in
IGG death index. Their son Irmin or Irwin E. b. 1908 in Brooklyn may be
listed in SSDI in 9/1977. No marriage for him found in any NY boro
(i.e. the Irwin marriages listed are not he)

Their son Arnold (or Bertram) b. 1912/1914 was living with parents in
1940, and entered Army in 1942, single. I see no record of marriage or
death for him.

The 1930 census says Gustav veteran of Spanish American war; how can I
use that to find his death? Any other ideas?

Hanna Grossman, Cornwall CT hannakg@optonline.net


Surnames #ukraine

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Hi all - I've been doing research on my Ukrainian ancestors, and I only
recently become aware that the surnames that they used in the Ukraine,
where also surnames that were used by non-Jews. I discovered this, when I
found matches for those surnames, in familysearch.org, in a databse of a
Ukrainian Church Book (1840-1845). Was this common? How did Ukrainian
Jews get their surnames?

Also, my relatives came >from Uman and Talne. Are there any good
books/bios, about what life was like for Jews in the Ukraine, in the late
1880s? Thanks.

Mark London
Natick, MA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Surnames #ukraine

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Hi all - I've been doing research on my Ukrainian ancestors, and I only
recently become aware that the surnames that they used in the Ukraine,
where also surnames that were used by non-Jews. I discovered this, when I
found matches for those surnames, in familysearch.org, in a databse of a
Ukrainian Church Book (1840-1845). Was this common? How did Ukrainian
Jews get their surnames?

Also, my relatives came >from Uman and Talne. Are there any good
books/bios, about what life was like for Jews in the Ukraine, in the late
1880s? Thanks.

Mark London
Natick, MA


Soviet Exile - Vignettes of Life in the Worker's Paradise #galicia

Norbert Weinberg <norofra@...>
 

This latest posting describes life in the Soviet Union during World
War II. My father, Rabbi Dr. Wilhelm Weinberg, and uncle, Dr.
Benjamin Weinberg, natives of Galicia, had succeeded in escaping
the Nazis >from Austria as Czech citizens and found refuge, first near
Stalingrad, and then in Frunze (Bishkek, Kyrghiz).

Rabbi Dr. Norbert Weinberg
email: norofra@sbcglobal.net

The Courage of the Spirit: The story of Europe's Jewry
in the 20th Century >from family accounts and documents
www.courageofspirit.com

Researching Family Records of WEINBERG (Dolyna/Ukraine,
Vienna/Austria, Frankfurt AM, Germany), ZARWANITZER
(Dolyna/Ukraine), IGER (Lviv, Podwolochisk/Ukraine), GOTTDENKER
(Lviv, Bolekhiv/Ukraine).


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Soviet Exile - Vignettes of Life in the Worker's Paradise #galicia

Norbert Weinberg <norofra@...>
 

This latest posting describes life in the Soviet Union during World
War II. My father, Rabbi Dr. Wilhelm Weinberg, and uncle, Dr.
Benjamin Weinberg, natives of Galicia, had succeeded in escaping
the Nazis >from Austria as Czech citizens and found refuge, first near
Stalingrad, and then in Frunze (Bishkek, Kyrghiz).

Rabbi Dr. Norbert Weinberg
email: norofra@sbcglobal.net

The Courage of the Spirit: The story of Europe's Jewry
in the 20th Century >from family accounts and documents
www.courageofspirit.com

Researching Family Records of WEINBERG (Dolyna/Ukraine,
Vienna/Austria, Frankfurt AM, Germany), ZARWANITZER
(Dolyna/Ukraine), IGER (Lviv, Podwolochisk/Ukraine), GOTTDENKER
(Lviv, Bolekhiv/Ukraine).


Christine Usdin Passes Away #general

Eli Rabinowitz
 

I have read on Facebook with sadness that Christine Usdin has passed away.
Christine performed many mitzvahs by translating thousands of records
from Cyrillic and thereby reconnecting so many of us with our roots.
RIP Christine.

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Christine Usdin Passes Away #general

Eli Rabinowitz
 

I have read on Facebook with sadness that Christine Usdin has passed away.
Christine performed many mitzvahs by translating thousands of records
from Cyrillic and thereby reconnecting so many of us with our roots.
RIP Christine.

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia

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