Date   

IAJGS Award to KehilaLinks ... how about the hundreds of volunteers? #ukraine

rondoctor@...
 

Dear Ukraine SIG Friends,

At last week's annual conference of the International Association of
Jewish Genealogical Societies, IAJGS presented an award to JewishGen's
KehilaLinks Project for making an "outstanding contribution to Jewish
genealogy". That award is well deserved.

To all the messages of Congratulations, I would add a huge Thank You to
the hundreds of volunteers who have made KehilaLinks successful. I
especially thank Ukraine SIG's volunteers. You have created 149
KehilaLinks webpages in the past two years, up >from only 47 when we
started revitalizing our SIG. This is an astounding accomplishment,
albeit unrecognized by JewishGen's leadership. And, I especially
appreciate the extraordinary work of Richie Baum, Ukraine SIG's
KehilaLinks Development Manager. He singlehandedly has created and
helped other volunteers create more than 40 KehilaLinks websites for
Ukraine SIG towns in the past year. Ukraine SIG's 196 KehilaLinks
websites represent almost one-third of the total on JewishGenand
contributed greatly to the award by IAJGS. This is due to the
tireless efforts of Ukraine SIG's volunteers

So to all our volunteers, on behalf of the Ukraine SIG Board of
Directors, I thank you. Perhaps next year JewishGen will give you the
recognition you deserve for revitalizing Ukraine SIG.

Ron

--
Ron Doctor (rddpdx@gmail.com)
Immediate Past Coordinator, Ukraine Special Interest Group
where Jewish genealogy is personal

Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
an activity of the Kremenets District Research Group
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets
Portland, Oregon USA

Researching DOCTOR (DIOKHTER), VARER, AVERBAKH, KORENFELD ... all >from Kremenets, Oleksinets, Yampol, Vishnevets
and KAZDOY (KOSODOY), DUBINSKI, DUBOWSKY ... all >from Kiev, Uman, Odessa


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine IAJGS Award to KehilaLinks ... how about the hundreds of volunteers? #ukraine

rondoctor@...
 

Dear Ukraine SIG Friends,

At last week's annual conference of the International Association of
Jewish Genealogical Societies, IAJGS presented an award to JewishGen's
KehilaLinks Project for making an "outstanding contribution to Jewish
genealogy". That award is well deserved.

To all the messages of Congratulations, I would add a huge Thank You to
the hundreds of volunteers who have made KehilaLinks successful. I
especially thank Ukraine SIG's volunteers. You have created 149
KehilaLinks webpages in the past two years, up >from only 47 when we
started revitalizing our SIG. This is an astounding accomplishment,
albeit unrecognized by JewishGen's leadership. And, I especially
appreciate the extraordinary work of Richie Baum, Ukraine SIG's
KehilaLinks Development Manager. He singlehandedly has created and
helped other volunteers create more than 40 KehilaLinks websites for
Ukraine SIG towns in the past year. Ukraine SIG's 196 KehilaLinks
websites represent almost one-third of the total on JewishGenand
contributed greatly to the award by IAJGS. This is due to the
tireless efforts of Ukraine SIG's volunteers

So to all our volunteers, on behalf of the Ukraine SIG Board of
Directors, I thank you. Perhaps next year JewishGen will give you the
recognition you deserve for revitalizing Ukraine SIG.

Ron

--
Ron Doctor (rddpdx@gmail.com)
Immediate Past Coordinator, Ukraine Special Interest Group
where Jewish genealogy is personal

Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
an activity of the Kremenets District Research Group
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets
Portland, Oregon USA

Researching DOCTOR (DIOKHTER), VARER, AVERBAKH, KORENFELD ... all >from Kremenets, Oleksinets, Yampol, Vishnevets
and KAZDOY (KOSODOY), DUBINSKI, DUBOWSKY ... all >from Kiev, Uman, Odessa


Re: Zinger/Singer Eisen Family in Philadelphia #ukraine

Renee Steinig
 

Cheryl Cash-Linietsky <shoshanarahel@yahoo.com> wrote about her
grandfather, who arrived in the US as Klaum Zinger, was naturalized as
Karl Singer, and was also known as Clement Eisen. According to his
arrival record he was born in "Ealtsaw, Russia"; his Petition for
Naturalization saws "Jaltouskow, Russia." He was married in "Ocnitis,
Rumania" to Leah Singer, daughter of Rav Israel and Chasie Singer, and
settled in Philadelphia. Cheryl also mentioned that the Singers were
from Kamenetz-Podolsk and speculated that they may have relocated to
nearby Romania due to the Russian Revolution. They had five sons,
whose descendants Cheryl would like to find.

- The arrival record also mentions last place of residence --
"Sekoran, Romania" -- and Zinko, Ukraine, home to "uncle A.
Lachterlamm." It also includes a Philadelphia street address for
"brother Abram Zinger." Abraham can be found at that address on the
1920 census, listed with his wife Anna and two children. By 1930,
there were four more children. The family is also listed in 1940, as
Sanger. Also living with Abraham in 1920: younger brother Jacob
Singer. Both reportedly came to the US in 1913. Jacob may be the Jack
Singer listed with wife Clara in 1930 and (with children too) in 1940;
like Abraham, he was a paperhanger.

- Karl Singer's Declaration of Intention offers yet another spelling
of his birth place: "Voltishkow." (Get to the Declaration by clicking
the left arrow under his Petition on Ancestry.)

- Abraham Singer's naturalization is on Ancestry. It states that he
came to the US in Oct. 1913 on the SS Olympic. It includes birth dates
for the four oldest children, which could help find them. Town
mentioned on his naturalization declaration and petition, which are
also on Ancestry: Zinkow/Zinkowitz -- probably the same place as Zinko
on Klaum's manifest. Abraham's manifest (indexed on Ancestry as
Abraham Amger) also mentions "father Serul Singer, Winkowitz, Podolsk
Gub., Russia" and birth place "Sinkow."

from the JewishGen Communities Database <
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp >, these are probably
the family's towns:

Jaltouskow >> Yaltushkov, Ukraine
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1059339

Winkowitz >> Vinkovtsy, Ukraine
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1058294

Zinkow/Zinko/Sinkow >> Zinkov, Ukraine
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1060918

Ocnitis >> Ocnita, Moldova
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-2277029

Sekoran >> Sokyryany, Moldova
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1054565

Yaltushkov, Vinkovtsy, and Zinkov are near one another in the area
that was once the Russian province of Podolia and they are all less
than 50 miles >from Ocnita and Sokyryany, which were formerly in
Bessarabia. They are also not far >from Kamyanets Podilskyy.

All five towns were in Russia before World War I. Between the wars,
Ocnita and Sokyryany were in Romania, the others in Ukraine SSR.

Cheryl: The JewishGen Family Finder < http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/ >
lists someone who's researching Singer >from Zinkov. I suggest that you
contact him and also enter your own names and towns there.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills, New York, USA
genmaven@gmail.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: It is much easier to follow a post like this if all SURNAMES are capitalized.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Zinger/Singer Eisen Family in Philadelphia #ukraine

Renee Steinig
 

Cheryl Cash-Linietsky <shoshanarahel@yahoo.com> wrote about her
grandfather, who arrived in the US as Klaum Zinger, was naturalized as
Karl Singer, and was also known as Clement Eisen. According to his
arrival record he was born in "Ealtsaw, Russia"; his Petition for
Naturalization saws "Jaltouskow, Russia." He was married in "Ocnitis,
Rumania" to Leah Singer, daughter of Rav Israel and Chasie Singer, and
settled in Philadelphia. Cheryl also mentioned that the Singers were
from Kamenetz-Podolsk and speculated that they may have relocated to
nearby Romania due to the Russian Revolution. They had five sons,
whose descendants Cheryl would like to find.

- The arrival record also mentions last place of residence --
"Sekoran, Romania" -- and Zinko, Ukraine, home to "uncle A.
Lachterlamm." It also includes a Philadelphia street address for
"brother Abram Zinger." Abraham can be found at that address on the
1920 census, listed with his wife Anna and two children. By 1930,
there were four more children. The family is also listed in 1940, as
Sanger. Also living with Abraham in 1920: younger brother Jacob
Singer. Both reportedly came to the US in 1913. Jacob may be the Jack
Singer listed with wife Clara in 1930 and (with children too) in 1940;
like Abraham, he was a paperhanger.

- Karl Singer's Declaration of Intention offers yet another spelling
of his birth place: "Voltishkow." (Get to the Declaration by clicking
the left arrow under his Petition on Ancestry.)

- Abraham Singer's naturalization is on Ancestry. It states that he
came to the US in Oct. 1913 on the SS Olympic. It includes birth dates
for the four oldest children, which could help find them. Town
mentioned on his naturalization declaration and petition, which are
also on Ancestry: Zinkow/Zinkowitz -- probably the same place as Zinko
on Klaum's manifest. Abraham's manifest (indexed on Ancestry as
Abraham Amger) also mentions "father Serul Singer, Winkowitz, Podolsk
Gub., Russia" and birth place "Sinkow."

from the JewishGen Communities Database <
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp >, these are probably
the family's towns:

Jaltouskow >> Yaltushkov, Ukraine
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1059339

Winkowitz >> Vinkovtsy, Ukraine
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1058294

Zinkow/Zinko/Sinkow >> Zinkov, Ukraine
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1060918

Ocnitis >> Ocnita, Moldova
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-2277029

Sekoran >> Sokyryany, Moldova
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1054565

Yaltushkov, Vinkovtsy, and Zinkov are near one another in the area
that was once the Russian province of Podolia and they are all less
than 50 miles >from Ocnita and Sokyryany, which were formerly in
Bessarabia. They are also not far >from Kamyanets Podilskyy.

All five towns were in Russia before World War I. Between the wars,
Ocnita and Sokyryany were in Romania, the others in Ukraine SSR.

Cheryl: The JewishGen Family Finder < http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/ >
lists someone who's researching Singer >from Zinkov. I suggest that you
contact him and also enter your own names and towns there.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills, New York, USA
genmaven@gmail.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: It is much easier to follow a post like this if all SURNAMES are capitalized.


Subscribing to Jewish genealogy blogs #ukraine

Emily Garber
 

Recently this forum posted a message >from me about my blog post
regarding Jewish genealogy bloggers who attended (and wrote about) the
IAJGS Conference.
http://extrayad.blogspot.com/2013/08/time-for-blogging-iajgs-2013-in-boston.html

Several readers told me that they'd not previously known about these
bloggers. The ones I've listed are but a few of the Jewish genealogy
bloggers. To see a more full list, go to Geneabloggers.com . Click on
the "Genealogy Blog Roll" tab and then put the word Jewish in the
search box. As of this morning, there are 36 Jewish genealogy blogs
listed.

Additionally, some people enjoyed some of the blogs I listed so much
that they have decided to subscribe to some of them via email. Most
blogs feature an RSS feed tab on the blog page that allows one to
subscribe that way.

Another alternative, particularly if one wishes to subscribe to
several blogs and doesn't want to be overwhelmed with emails, is to
use an aggregator program. Aggregators collect updates of blogs to
which one has decided to subscribe. One enters the URLs for the blogs
one wishes to follow. To view selected blogs, click on the aggregator
program and view whichever blog posts are of interest. One may look at
just post titles or just a few paragraphs. Most aggregators have
features one can select to customize one's viewing/reading experience.

I am currently using Feedly.com . To see summaries of that and others,
go to Lifehacker, which did a review of several options this past
June. http://lifehacker.com/google-reader-is-shutting-down-here-are-the-best-alter-5990456

I find genealogy blogs, whether Jewish or not, a great educational
tool. There are several star bloggers out there who are both good
writers and excellent genealogists. One can learn quite a bit.

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ
http://www.extrayd.blogspot.com
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/yurovshchina/index.html


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Subscribing to Jewish genealogy blogs #ukraine

Emily Garber
 

Recently this forum posted a message >from me about my blog post
regarding Jewish genealogy bloggers who attended (and wrote about) the
IAJGS Conference.
http://extrayad.blogspot.com/2013/08/time-for-blogging-iajgs-2013-in-boston.html

Several readers told me that they'd not previously known about these
bloggers. The ones I've listed are but a few of the Jewish genealogy
bloggers. To see a more full list, go to Geneabloggers.com . Click on
the "Genealogy Blog Roll" tab and then put the word Jewish in the
search box. As of this morning, there are 36 Jewish genealogy blogs
listed.

Additionally, some people enjoyed some of the blogs I listed so much
that they have decided to subscribe to some of them via email. Most
blogs feature an RSS feed tab on the blog page that allows one to
subscribe that way.

Another alternative, particularly if one wishes to subscribe to
several blogs and doesn't want to be overwhelmed with emails, is to
use an aggregator program. Aggregators collect updates of blogs to
which one has decided to subscribe. One enters the URLs for the blogs
one wishes to follow. To view selected blogs, click on the aggregator
program and view whichever blog posts are of interest. One may look at
just post titles or just a few paragraphs. Most aggregators have
features one can select to customize one's viewing/reading experience.

I am currently using Feedly.com . To see summaries of that and others,
go to Lifehacker, which did a review of several options this past
June. http://lifehacker.com/google-reader-is-shutting-down-here-are-the-best-alter-5990456

I find genealogy blogs, whether Jewish or not, a great educational
tool. There are several star bloggers out there who are both good
writers and excellent genealogists. One can learn quite a bit.

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ
http://www.extrayd.blogspot.com
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/yurovshchina/index.html


Re: Searching for a town "Yeczest" that was formerly in Austria, Poland, or Romania #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Max Preston posted:
My great grandmother was born in a town that was written on a
naturalization form as "Yeczest." The form says that Yeczest was
formerly in Austria, but at the time (in 1939) was in Poland. Her
obituary, however, says she was born in Romania.To the extent this
helps: I know that my great grandfather was born in Zastavna (now in
Ukraine, just north of Chernivtsi), and that he
married my great grandmother in Raudauti (now in Romania, whose
Yiddish name is Radevitz).
Can anyone help me identify Yeczest?

Max...here's what i did...i posited that the town was near
Raudauti...so i found the coordinates for Raudauti...4651/2555. Then i
went to JewishGen's radius search and asked for towns sounding like
Yeczest, then towns containing "zest" and asked for the distance from
Raudauti...
The closest is found was Idzesti, Izhevtsy, Yizhivtsi populated place
48°02' N 25°40' E Ukraine 17.6 miles NW of 47°51' N 25°55' E (Raudauti)

Hope that helps
happy hunting!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re:Searching for a town "Yeczest" that was formerly in Austria, Poland, or Romania #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Max Preston posted:
My great grandmother was born in a town that was written on a
naturalization form as "Yeczest." The form says that Yeczest was
formerly in Austria, but at the time (in 1939) was in Poland. Her
obituary, however, says she was born in Romania.To the extent this
helps: I know that my great grandfather was born in Zastavna (now in
Ukraine, just north of Chernivtsi), and that he
married my great grandmother in Raudauti (now in Romania, whose
Yiddish name is Radevitz).
Can anyone help me identify Yeczest?

Max...here's what i did...i posited that the town was near
Raudauti...so i found the coordinates for Raudauti...4651/2555. Then i
went to JewishGen's radius search and asked for towns sounding like
Yeczest, then towns containing "zest" and asked for the distance from
Raudauti...
The closest is found was Idzesti, Izhevtsy, Yizhivtsi populated place
48°02' N 25°40' E Ukraine 17.6 miles NW of 47°51' N 25°55' E (Raudauti)

Hope that helps
happy hunting!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm


ViewMate Translation Request - Hebrew #general

Jake Jacobs
 

I've posted on ViewMate my g'g'g'grandfather's headstone, which is
in Mad, Hungary. Having trouble translating much of it. We know his
name was Asher Zelig Planer, and he died in 1888. If you can add
anything to this translation, I'd be most grateful. it is image no.
VM28542, posted at
www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM28542 .
Thank you!

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation Request - Hebrew #general

Jake Jacobs
 

I've posted on ViewMate my g'g'g'grandfather's headstone, which is
in Mad, Hungary. Having trouble translating much of it. We know his
name was Asher Zelig Planer, and he died in 1888. If you can add
anything to this translation, I'd be most grateful. it is image no.
VM28542, posted at
www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM28542 .
Thank you!

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


SCHNEID in Solotwina, JUNG in Delatyn #general

arthur siegel
 

Hello,

I'm looking for anyone with information about either the SCHNEID
family >from Solotwina in Ukraine, or the JUNG family >from Delatyn. My
great-great-grandmother, Taube Zauderer (nee Schneid) was from
Solotwina before moving to Porohy after she was married (this would
have been in the late 1880s I believe). She was connected to the Jung
family >from Delatyn somehow (her daughter Ryfke listed a Fischel Jung
from Delatyn as her cousin), but I am not clear about this. I have
noticed on the JRI-Poland database that there had been a Fischel and
Taube Jung >from the Nadworna area (they must have been born in the
early 19th century), and they had a daughter Ryfke. These are all
names in this branch of the family (Taube had children named Fischel
and Ryfke -- and her Ryfke was born only 2 years after Ryfke Jung
died), so there may be some connection.

At any rate, if anybody has possible relatives >from this area and
would be willing to share information, I would greatly appreciate it.
Thank you in advance!

Arthur Siegel
Albany, NY

searching: SCHNEID; ZAUDERER; JUNG; KALMUS; KORNBLUTH; TROPPER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SCHNEID in Solotwina, JUNG in Delatyn #general

arthur siegel
 

Hello,

I'm looking for anyone with information about either the SCHNEID
family >from Solotwina in Ukraine, or the JUNG family >from Delatyn. My
great-great-grandmother, Taube Zauderer (nee Schneid) was from
Solotwina before moving to Porohy after she was married (this would
have been in the late 1880s I believe). She was connected to the Jung
family >from Delatyn somehow (her daughter Ryfke listed a Fischel Jung
from Delatyn as her cousin), but I am not clear about this. I have
noticed on the JRI-Poland database that there had been a Fischel and
Taube Jung >from the Nadworna area (they must have been born in the
early 19th century), and they had a daughter Ryfke. These are all
names in this branch of the family (Taube had children named Fischel
and Ryfke -- and her Ryfke was born only 2 years after Ryfke Jung
died), so there may be some connection.

At any rate, if anybody has possible relatives >from this area and
would be willing to share information, I would greatly appreciate it.
Thank you in advance!

Arthur Siegel
Albany, NY

searching: SCHNEID; ZAUDERER; JUNG; KALMUS; KORNBLUTH; TROPPER


Re: Zagare, Lithuania - professions #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

Information about professions can be found posted in the JewishGen
Digest Archives as this topic has been discussed a number of times
in the past.

Wherever a family had to be supported, a woman played her part in
that activity and played it well. It was not unusual at all for
women to have professions in Lithuania, particularly as merchants
whilst their husbands performed their religious duties or studies.
Women can be found to hold concessions for the sale of certain
products such as butter, candles, salt, particularly rabbinical
wives as that assisted in providing additional income for their
family.

In addition, many were found in the medical professions such as
dentists, pharmacists, nurses and doctors. This can be seen in the
records of the major hospitals in Lithuania and in the medical
directories which exist. However, a number of women graduated with
degrees in the professions, but did not practice once they married
and became mothers. They were also herbalists as one of my relatives
was who provided treatments for the local population in the absence
of a pharmacist or doctor in the community before she left for America.

Education was another area where women became certified and taught in
the many emerging schools and institutions throughout Lithuania. They
also served in banks and other financial institutions.

Women also worked at home-based professions such as piece-goods,
tailoring, knitting, baking, and crafts, as well as in factories which
were in the large as well as small cities. They were proficient in the
running of the many inns, restaurants, hotels, bars and other such
areas which were found throughout Lithuania and certainly were cooks,
waitresses, barmaids, and maids in this industry.

In regard to the profession of "hairdresser", which was mentioned, this
probably refers to a horse hairdresser not a human hairdresser.

I could name many more professions, but suffice it to say, women were
an integral part of the workforce, especially into the 20th Century,
although probably not an equally or well-paid part of it.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Zagare, Lithuania - professions #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

Information about professions can be found posted in the JewishGen
Digest Archives as this topic has been discussed a number of times
in the past.

Wherever a family had to be supported, a woman played her part in
that activity and played it well. It was not unusual at all for
women to have professions in Lithuania, particularly as merchants
whilst their husbands performed their religious duties or studies.
Women can be found to hold concessions for the sale of certain
products such as butter, candles, salt, particularly rabbinical
wives as that assisted in providing additional income for their
family.

In addition, many were found in the medical professions such as
dentists, pharmacists, nurses and doctors. This can be seen in the
records of the major hospitals in Lithuania and in the medical
directories which exist. However, a number of women graduated with
degrees in the professions, but did not practice once they married
and became mothers. They were also herbalists as one of my relatives
was who provided treatments for the local population in the absence
of a pharmacist or doctor in the community before she left for America.

Education was another area where women became certified and taught in
the many emerging schools and institutions throughout Lithuania. They
also served in banks and other financial institutions.

Women also worked at home-based professions such as piece-goods,
tailoring, knitting, baking, and crafts, as well as in factories which
were in the large as well as small cities. They were proficient in the
running of the many inns, restaurants, hotels, bars and other such
areas which were found throughout Lithuania and certainly were cooks,
waitresses, barmaids, and maids in this industry.

In regard to the profession of "hairdresser", which was mentioned, this
probably refers to a horse hairdresser not a human hairdresser.

I could name many more professions, but suffice it to say, women were
an integral part of the workforce, especially into the 20th Century,
although probably not an equally or well-paid part of it.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


demand of informations on the Netze area #general

Joachim Salinger
 

Hello, my name is Joachim SALINGER, i'm 35 years old, french and my
grand-father, Bernhard SALINGER, is born in Laskownica, nearby Szubin,
in Poland.

He was a German Jew, born in november 1902, as all his family >from
this area. His father was born in a little village called Liepe (now
Lipa, on the road between Nowy Dwor and Swoboda). I know that persons
of my family has also lived in Niekosken (now Niekursko), in Deutsch-
Krone (now Walcz), in Schönlanke (now Trzcianka), in Wronke (now
Wronki), and probably in other nearby locations.

I'll be in this area for 2 to 4 days around 20th August, and i would
ask you if there is a possibility to have some informations about the
jewish remains (cemeteries, synagogs, jewish district) in this area
(Netze Kreis or Notec area).

I would like also ask you about the possibility to consult archives
and records of birth, marriage and death in thoses town and villages.
Where are they, who i need to contact, what approaches should I do
upstream?

Finally, i'll be also very thankfull if you can give me some contacts
of people which can help me there : Guide, Historians, jew's
specialist, this kind of thing.

If you think you can help me directly, don't hesitate to contact me
and i'll give you more specific informations. Anyway, thanks for
having took the time to read me !
___
Joachim SALINGER
Paris, France - sjojo1@gmail.com
JewishGen ID : 364076


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen demand of informations on the Netze area #general

Joachim Salinger
 

Hello, my name is Joachim SALINGER, i'm 35 years old, french and my
grand-father, Bernhard SALINGER, is born in Laskownica, nearby Szubin,
in Poland.

He was a German Jew, born in november 1902, as all his family >from
this area. His father was born in a little village called Liepe (now
Lipa, on the road between Nowy Dwor and Swoboda). I know that persons
of my family has also lived in Niekosken (now Niekursko), in Deutsch-
Krone (now Walcz), in Schönlanke (now Trzcianka), in Wronke (now
Wronki), and probably in other nearby locations.

I'll be in this area for 2 to 4 days around 20th August, and i would
ask you if there is a possibility to have some informations about the
jewish remains (cemeteries, synagogs, jewish district) in this area
(Netze Kreis or Notec area).

I would like also ask you about the possibility to consult archives
and records of birth, marriage and death in thoses town and villages.
Where are they, who i need to contact, what approaches should I do
upstream?

Finally, i'll be also very thankfull if you can give me some contacts
of people which can help me there : Guide, Historians, jew's
specialist, this kind of thing.

If you think you can help me directly, don't hesitate to contact me
and i'll give you more specific informations. Anyway, thanks for
having took the time to read me !
___
Joachim SALINGER
Paris, France - sjojo1@gmail.com
JewishGen ID : 364076


Re: Returning Russian passports? #general

cecilia <myths@...>
 

Joy Weaver wrote:
[...]
The researcher told me that people who emigrated were required to return
their passports via the Russian Embassy in their new country of
residence and that this was such a passport.

Can anyone tell me more about that process?
Would it mean that the immigrant had become a citizen
of his new country (in this case the U.S.)? Would it mean that
the passport was returned when it expired? Was this even true?
I was told, many years later, by a British diplomat who had been
based in Washington DC in the 1950s that, at that time, when a
British citizen became a citizen of the USA he had to swear to
renounce all other citizenships and hand over the British passport to
the USA officials. (It was some years later that the requirement for
USA citizens to have single loyalty was eased.)

What then happened to the British passport was that it was handed on
to the British consulate. Very occasionally a new USA citizen,
realising that the UK had no problem with dual nationality, would go
to the British Consulate a few days later, and pick up the British
passport, but most did not.

(It would not, I think, >from what an ex-pat American told me in the
1950s about something else, have been a good idea for the new USA
citizen to use the British passport or in any other way behave as a
British citizen, as that would have lost the USA citizenship - if the
USA authorities spotted such behaviour, of course.)

Cecilia Nyleve.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Returning Russian passports? #general

cecilia <myths@...>
 

Joy Weaver wrote:
[...]
The researcher told me that people who emigrated were required to return
their passports via the Russian Embassy in their new country of
residence and that this was such a passport.

Can anyone tell me more about that process?
Would it mean that the immigrant had become a citizen
of his new country (in this case the U.S.)? Would it mean that
the passport was returned when it expired? Was this even true?
I was told, many years later, by a British diplomat who had been
based in Washington DC in the 1950s that, at that time, when a
British citizen became a citizen of the USA he had to swear to
renounce all other citizenships and hand over the British passport to
the USA officials. (It was some years later that the requirement for
USA citizens to have single loyalty was eased.)

What then happened to the British passport was that it was handed on
to the British consulate. Very occasionally a new USA citizen,
realising that the UK had no problem with dual nationality, would go
to the British Consulate a few days later, and pick up the British
passport, but most did not.

(It would not, I think, >from what an ex-pat American told me in the
1950s about something else, have been a good idea for the new USA
citizen to use the British passport or in any other way behave as a
British citizen, as that would have lost the USA citizenship - if the
USA authorities spotted such behaviour, of course.)

Cecilia Nyleve.


Tallya cemetery tombstones #general

Carol Karp
 

I have photos of many of the tombstones in the Jewish cemetery in
Tallya Hungary. All of these tombstones are in Hebrew which I
cannot read. If anyone has family >from Tallya please contact me.
If anyone is willing to translate these tombstones I would scan
and email them.
Many of the old stones have disintegrated but I have photos of
many that are intact.

Carol Karp
Tucson Arizona

Searching GROSZ, FRIDMAN, MOSKOVITZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tallya cemetery tombstones #general

Carol Karp
 

I have photos of many of the tombstones in the Jewish cemetery in
Tallya Hungary. All of these tombstones are in Hebrew which I
cannot read. If anyone has family >from Tallya please contact me.
If anyone is willing to translate these tombstones I would scan
and email them.
Many of the old stones have disintegrated but I have photos of
many that are intact.

Carol Karp
Tucson Arizona

Searching GROSZ, FRIDMAN, MOSKOVITZ

133781 - 133800 of 662057