Date   

Genetic cousins--caveat emptor #germany

Bob Weinberg <weinberg@...>
 

Moderator note: JewishGen also hosts a discussion group like GerSIG -
The DNA Discussion Group. "A forum for scientific questions on DNA
technology and its reliability, encompassing when and how to best
utilize DNA testing for genealogical pursuits."

GerSIG can post *** limited *** responses to the following message
but to have an extended discussion of this matter, interested parties
should subscribe to the DNA List and also post copies of responses there. MOD 1
=====================>

Jeffrey Meyerson writes in today's GerSIG post that he and his wife are
genetic cousins, that his parents are both genetic cousins to her, and
that he should search for more German roots of his Lithuanian and
Belarusian ancestors.

[In my opinion] We all should be skeptical of the utility of DNA
tests that are being sold by some DNA testing companies as useful
adjuncts to genealogical research, especially when it comes to
Ashkenazim.

For reasons that have defied clear explanation, the Ashkenazi gene
pool seems traceable to as few as 200-400 founding ancestors who
lived in the late Roman empire. As a consequence, it is said
that any two randomly chosen Ashkenazim share so many genes in
common that they seem as if they are ~4th cousins, even though their
most recent ancestor may have lived 10 or 20 or even 30 generations ago.

Moreover, I've never seen any evidence that the Lithuanian or
Belarusian gene pool is any different >from that of German Jews. Such
tests may reveal what percentage of a person's ancestry comes >from Near
Eastern versus Central European roots but more detailed connections are
unfortunately not demonstrable for us Ashkenazim.

Bob Weinberg, Brookline MA <weinberg@...>

Robert A. Weinberg,Ph.D, Member, Whitehead Institute - Professor of Biology, MIT
Director, MIT Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology


German SIG #Germany Genetic cousins--caveat emptor #germany

Bob Weinberg <weinberg@...>
 

Moderator note: JewishGen also hosts a discussion group like GerSIG -
The DNA Discussion Group. "A forum for scientific questions on DNA
technology and its reliability, encompassing when and how to best
utilize DNA testing for genealogical pursuits."

GerSIG can post *** limited *** responses to the following message
but to have an extended discussion of this matter, interested parties
should subscribe to the DNA List and also post copies of responses there. MOD 1
=====================>

Jeffrey Meyerson writes in today's GerSIG post that he and his wife are
genetic cousins, that his parents are both genetic cousins to her, and
that he should search for more German roots of his Lithuanian and
Belarusian ancestors.

[In my opinion] We all should be skeptical of the utility of DNA
tests that are being sold by some DNA testing companies as useful
adjuncts to genealogical research, especially when it comes to
Ashkenazim.

For reasons that have defied clear explanation, the Ashkenazi gene
pool seems traceable to as few as 200-400 founding ancestors who
lived in the late Roman empire. As a consequence, it is said
that any two randomly chosen Ashkenazim share so many genes in
common that they seem as if they are ~4th cousins, even though their
most recent ancestor may have lived 10 or 20 or even 30 generations ago.

Moreover, I've never seen any evidence that the Lithuanian or
Belarusian gene pool is any different >from that of German Jews. Such
tests may reveal what percentage of a person's ancestry comes >from Near
Eastern versus Central European roots but more detailed connections are
unfortunately not demonstrable for us Ashkenazim.

Bob Weinberg, Brookline MA <weinberg@...>

Robert A. Weinberg,Ph.D, Member, Whitehead Institute - Professor of Biology, MIT
Director, MIT Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology


[USA] October is Family History Month and US Archives Month and Coincides With International Jewish Genealogy Month #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

October is family history month-proclaimed in the US by Senator Orrin Hatch
(R-UT) who has had a Senate proclamation naming October family history month since
2001. See: http://tinyurl.com/m9wsrek

Original url:
http://www.hatch.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/family-history

October has also been named by the Society of American Archivists as American
Archives Month. In this link there are different celebrations with American
archives. See: http://tinyurl.com/k9ablzv
http://www2.archivists.org/initiatives/american-archives-month/american-archives-month-2013

With the US government shut down some of the programs scheduled at Federal branches
or the main branch of the National Archives may be cancelled best to check before
you go.

This year the Hebrew month of Cheshvan coincides with most of the month of
October and Cheshvan is International Jewish Genealogy Month --October 5th
to November 3rd, 2013 https://www.facebook.com/IAJGSjewishgenealogy

With all three activities converging in the month of October it is a reason
to get more active in genealogy now. About.com has ten suggestions to celebrate
Family History Month
http://genealogy.about.com/od/holidays/tp/family-history-month.htm

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen [USA] October is Family History Month and US Archives Month and Coincides With International Jewish Genealogy Month #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

October is family history month-proclaimed in the US by Senator Orrin Hatch
(R-UT) who has had a Senate proclamation naming October family history month since
2001. See: http://tinyurl.com/m9wsrek

Original url:
http://www.hatch.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/family-history

October has also been named by the Society of American Archivists as American
Archives Month. In this link there are different celebrations with American
archives. See: http://tinyurl.com/k9ablzv
http://www2.archivists.org/initiatives/american-archives-month/american-archives-month-2013

With the US government shut down some of the programs scheduled at Federal branches
or the main branch of the National Archives may be cancelled best to check before
you go.

This year the Hebrew month of Cheshvan coincides with most of the month of
October and Cheshvan is International Jewish Genealogy Month --October 5th
to November 3rd, 2013 https://www.facebook.com/IAJGSjewishgenealogy

With all three activities converging in the month of October it is a reason
to get more active in genealogy now. About.com has ten suggestions to celebrate
Family History Month
http://genealogy.about.com/od/holidays/tp/family-history-month.htm

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Last Names Used As Middle Names (continued) #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Marilyn Robinson writes:
"This week I asked the question on this venue, "Why would a man use aast name as a
middle name" and used a few examples, such as"Tobias Guttman UNTERBERGER, Mendel
Balsam UNTERBERGER". The names, and others were found in a legal notice published
in the Brooklyn Eagle in 1937 in reference to people mentioned in my great aunt,
Minnie Unterberger KAPELNER'S will---she died in 1933.

Pamela Weisberger, and similarly Mark Halperin, suggested that, "In Galicia, where
most marriages were religious only, not civil, the couple was not considered
married, their children were considered illegitimate and often they had to take
their mothers name as their surname, but kept the father's name as a middle name,
later to make it their surname." But the published legal notice was in the second
quarter of the 20th C., 1937. Would this method of name giving still have been used
by then; or would this simply have been a matter of habit, carried forward?"

Behind every name, there is a story. And rarely are they the same. Today I was
reading Randy Schoenberg's blog (http://schoenblog.com) and he explained why his
just bar-mitzvahed son, Nathan, has three names: Nathan Nachman Avraham.(You should
read his blog to find out the story why.) The lesson is that there could be
many reasons why someone would use a last name as a middle name. My cousin was
given his mother's maiden name, GREENHUT, as his middle name because my grandfather
only had daughters, his brother had no children, and there was no one else to
carry on the family name.

In the case of Galitzianers in the 20th century, many years ago I was talking on
the phone to Ruben Schmer, born in Drohobycz in 1925 and active in the Drohobycz
BOF until his passing, as he explained that his "real" name was GARTNER, but the
maternal/maiden name had been handed down as his legal name over the years due to
the Galician marriage anomaly. So, in the case where you know for certain that a
family came >from what was once Galicia, it is not unreasonable to think that to
continue the paternal name, even if the maternal one was the "legal" name based on
immigration, etc. might be carried on as a middle name.

The other consideration is that one family branch might have been wealthier..or
more socially important...than another. Returning to Randy Schoenberg again -- who
spoke on the Klimt case to the JGSLA on Sunday -- Adele Bauer-Bloch, the subject
of one of the most famous Klimt paintings, was born Adele Bauer. She married
Ferdinand Bloch. They hyphenated their name long before hyphenated names were
popular. Her sister, Therese, married Ferdinand's brother and did the same
thing -- but not right away. Adele married in 1899 but didn't add her maiden name
to their family name until 1917. She never had any children. The reasons may be
lost to history, but there it is.

In Marilyn's case, however, the reasons might be as simple as a family tradition
of adding surnames as a middle name. Or, as she writes, a matter of family
habit. (You find this type of thing very common in Danish families as well.) I'm
sure more stories will roll in, but to find out the exact reasons why, best to try
to find the descendants of the people involved. They might hold the key to finding
out the truth.

Pamela Weisberger
pweisberger@...
Santa Monica, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Last Names Used As Middle Names (continued) #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Marilyn Robinson writes:
"This week I asked the question on this venue, "Why would a man use aast name as a
middle name" and used a few examples, such as"Tobias Guttman UNTERBERGER, Mendel
Balsam UNTERBERGER". The names, and others were found in a legal notice published
in the Brooklyn Eagle in 1937 in reference to people mentioned in my great aunt,
Minnie Unterberger KAPELNER'S will---she died in 1933.

Pamela Weisberger, and similarly Mark Halperin, suggested that, "In Galicia, where
most marriages were religious only, not civil, the couple was not considered
married, their children were considered illegitimate and often they had to take
their mothers name as their surname, but kept the father's name as a middle name,
later to make it their surname." But the published legal notice was in the second
quarter of the 20th C., 1937. Would this method of name giving still have been used
by then; or would this simply have been a matter of habit, carried forward?"

Behind every name, there is a story. And rarely are they the same. Today I was
reading Randy Schoenberg's blog (http://schoenblog.com) and he explained why his
just bar-mitzvahed son, Nathan, has three names: Nathan Nachman Avraham.(You should
read his blog to find out the story why.) The lesson is that there could be
many reasons why someone would use a last name as a middle name. My cousin was
given his mother's maiden name, GREENHUT, as his middle name because my grandfather
only had daughters, his brother had no children, and there was no one else to
carry on the family name.

In the case of Galitzianers in the 20th century, many years ago I was talking on
the phone to Ruben Schmer, born in Drohobycz in 1925 and active in the Drohobycz
BOF until his passing, as he explained that his "real" name was GARTNER, but the
maternal/maiden name had been handed down as his legal name over the years due to
the Galician marriage anomaly. So, in the case where you know for certain that a
family came >from what was once Galicia, it is not unreasonable to think that to
continue the paternal name, even if the maternal one was the "legal" name based on
immigration, etc. might be carried on as a middle name.

The other consideration is that one family branch might have been wealthier..or
more socially important...than another. Returning to Randy Schoenberg again -- who
spoke on the Klimt case to the JGSLA on Sunday -- Adele Bauer-Bloch, the subject
of one of the most famous Klimt paintings, was born Adele Bauer. She married
Ferdinand Bloch. They hyphenated their name long before hyphenated names were
popular. Her sister, Therese, married Ferdinand's brother and did the same
thing -- but not right away. Adele married in 1899 but didn't add her maiden name
to their family name until 1917. She never had any children. The reasons may be
lost to history, but there it is.

In Marilyn's case, however, the reasons might be as simple as a family tradition
of adding surnames as a middle name. Or, as she writes, a matter of family
habit. (You find this type of thing very common in Danish families as well.) I'm
sure more stories will roll in, but to find out the exact reasons why, best to try
to find the descendants of the people involved. They might hold the key to finding
out the truth.

Pamela Weisberger
pweisberger@...
Santa Monica, CA


Toby Wien KARP buried in Syracuse, Poiley Tzedek section Beth El Cemetery #general

Barrie Karp
 

Seeking date & place of death of my paternal gr/gr/mother (my father's paternal
grandmother), Toby Wien KARP. (In later records, Wien was spelled Wein.)

Is there someone in Syracuse who would go to the cemetery and photograph her stone?
and send photo to me? so I can see the writing on the stone? The only information
I have is the location of her stone in Poiley Tzedek section of Beth El Cemetery.
I was told by the Birnbaum Funeral Home in Syracuse that they have a map and could
give directions for locating the stone upon request. We have no funeral home
records or death certificate for her. The Birnbaum Funeral Home told me they see
her stone on their map, but they have no other records about her. That funeral
home came into existence in 1934.

I found a photo of the Poiley Tzedek Cemetery at this link:
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pis&PIcrid=2246935&PIpi=9100239&PIMode=cemetery

Her name is variously spelled in records (Passenger, Census, Directories): Tobie,
Tobby, Toby, Tobbie, Toba, Thoda, etc. Possibly Taube. Does anyone know of an
equivalent name that does not begin with a T? No descendants are named with
initial T.

I have no records for her after a Syracuse Directory record for her spelled "Mrs.
Tobby Karp" >from 1924, living in Syracuse with sons Leo, Jacob and Elias. She was
widowed in Pennsylvania 18 Oct 1907 (husband Jacob KARP/Korp, buried in
Wilkes-Barre, PA. listed as rabbi, Darling Street Cemetery, B'nai Jacob Synagogue
(no longer exists)). A number of her children are buried in Syracuse: Leo, Elias,
Jacob, Betty Karp Weltmann (and their spouses). Only one of her children is buried
where she is buried, according to the Birnbaum Funeral Home: Leo Karp (Karp or
Korp) (1877-1964). She lived in Syracuse >from 1915. She lived in Wilkes-Barre,
PA >from arrival in US, 1900, until moving to Syracuse. I have reason to believe
she may have lived to about 1939 or even about 1952 (different hearsay). But her
name has not turned up in any searches of the various databases. I did not find
her name in the 1940 Census.

Her maiden name: WIEN (spelled WIEN in earliest records; then mis-spelled WEIN in
later records).

Funeral home informant for her son, Elias Karp (b. 1891, Tulcea or Jassy, Romania;
d. 1957, in Syracuse) listed her maiden name as "Wein." Elias Karp is buried in a
different cemetery in Syracuse and I have his funeral home records (but not his
death certificate).

Toby Karp is listed on Passenger list 1900 >from last residence, Romania (either
Jassy/Iasi, Tulcea or Bucharest). She is listed as born in Germany in the 1850s.

An elderly cousin (b. 1929) says she lived to 96, but that is inconsistent with
other findings so far. He also says he thinks she died when he was about 10.

Her maiden name, WIEN, is the name of my father's maternal grandparents: Yitzak
WIEN and Leie/Lea/Leah/Lena BERKOWITZ WIEN/WEIN. I haven't been able to trace
Yitzak WIEN at all. His wife, Lea, emigrated to NY 1902, and was widow when she
arrived Nov 1902, but several of her 9 children were born close to 1900 or 1901.

Thank you very much if you can help by getting a photo of Toby Karp's cemetery
stone for me, or by suggesting other names to try instead if Toby, or any other
suggestions.

Barrie Karp
barriekarp@...
New York City !


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Toby Wien KARP buried in Syracuse, Poiley Tzedek section Beth El Cemetery #general

Barrie Karp
 

Seeking date & place of death of my paternal gr/gr/mother (my father's paternal
grandmother), Toby Wien KARP. (In later records, Wien was spelled Wein.)

Is there someone in Syracuse who would go to the cemetery and photograph her stone?
and send photo to me? so I can see the writing on the stone? The only information
I have is the location of her stone in Poiley Tzedek section of Beth El Cemetery.
I was told by the Birnbaum Funeral Home in Syracuse that they have a map and could
give directions for locating the stone upon request. We have no funeral home
records or death certificate for her. The Birnbaum Funeral Home told me they see
her stone on their map, but they have no other records about her. That funeral
home came into existence in 1934.

I found a photo of the Poiley Tzedek Cemetery at this link:
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pis&PIcrid=2246935&PIpi=9100239&PIMode=cemetery

Her name is variously spelled in records (Passenger, Census, Directories): Tobie,
Tobby, Toby, Tobbie, Toba, Thoda, etc. Possibly Taube. Does anyone know of an
equivalent name that does not begin with a T? No descendants are named with
initial T.

I have no records for her after a Syracuse Directory record for her spelled "Mrs.
Tobby Karp" >from 1924, living in Syracuse with sons Leo, Jacob and Elias. She was
widowed in Pennsylvania 18 Oct 1907 (husband Jacob KARP/Korp, buried in
Wilkes-Barre, PA. listed as rabbi, Darling Street Cemetery, B'nai Jacob Synagogue
(no longer exists)). A number of her children are buried in Syracuse: Leo, Elias,
Jacob, Betty Karp Weltmann (and their spouses). Only one of her children is buried
where she is buried, according to the Birnbaum Funeral Home: Leo Karp (Karp or
Korp) (1877-1964). She lived in Syracuse >from 1915. She lived in Wilkes-Barre,
PA >from arrival in US, 1900, until moving to Syracuse. I have reason to believe
she may have lived to about 1939 or even about 1952 (different hearsay). But her
name has not turned up in any searches of the various databases. I did not find
her name in the 1940 Census.

Her maiden name: WIEN (spelled WIEN in earliest records; then mis-spelled WEIN in
later records).

Funeral home informant for her son, Elias Karp (b. 1891, Tulcea or Jassy, Romania;
d. 1957, in Syracuse) listed her maiden name as "Wein." Elias Karp is buried in a
different cemetery in Syracuse and I have his funeral home records (but not his
death certificate).

Toby Karp is listed on Passenger list 1900 >from last residence, Romania (either
Jassy/Iasi, Tulcea or Bucharest). She is listed as born in Germany in the 1850s.

An elderly cousin (b. 1929) says she lived to 96, but that is inconsistent with
other findings so far. He also says he thinks she died when he was about 10.

Her maiden name, WIEN, is the name of my father's maternal grandparents: Yitzak
WIEN and Leie/Lea/Leah/Lena BERKOWITZ WIEN/WEIN. I haven't been able to trace
Yitzak WIEN at all. His wife, Lea, emigrated to NY 1902, and was widow when she
arrived Nov 1902, but several of her 9 children were born close to 1900 or 1901.

Thank you very much if you can help by getting a photo of Toby Karp's cemetery
stone for me, or by suggesting other names to try instead if Toby, or any other
suggestions.

Barrie Karp
barriekarp@...
New York City !


Yizkor Book Project, September 2013 #germany

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,
Although September was chockablock with Jewish festivals and our minds and
time were generally located in other directions, we at the Yizkor Book
Project did manage to "squeeze out" quite a number of new entries and
updates, as you will see.

Hopefully, you saw the announcement a few days ago sent to the various
forums regarding the latest books that were recently published as part of
our Yizkor Books in Print Project so I won't repeat the list. If, however,
you are interested in seeing what is available and what this particular
project is all about, please go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

In recent times, we have begun the first steps in setting up Translation
Fund projects for the following books:

Gorlice, Poland - "Sefer Gorlice; ha-kehila be-vinyana u-ve-hurbana"
(Gorlice book; the Building and Destruction of the community)
Zolochiv, Ukraine - "Der Untergang fun Zloczow" (The Downfall of Zloczow)

Sometime soon these funds will appear amongst the other funds already
running at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that these funds have been set up in order to raise money to allow for
the professional translation of these books and to enable all of us to read
this unique material concerning our communities and families that were
decimated during the Holocaust. For those of you who are US citizens,
donations to these funds are also tax deductible.

Now to facts and figures for September, during this last month we have added
one new project:

- Through Forests and Pathways
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/forests/forests.html

Added in 8 new entries:

- Dragomiresti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar161.html

- Janovice nad Uhlavou, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh391.html

- Ieud, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar188.html

- Mirovice & Mirotice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh403.html

- Novoselytsya, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00368.html

- Sacel, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar171.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00382.html

- Soroca, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00372.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kishinev/kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Hrubieszow, Poland (Memorial Book of Hrubieshov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hrubieszow/Hrubieszow.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ostroh, Ukraine (Ostrog book; a memorial to the Ostrog holy community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostroh/Ostroh.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slovakia/Slovakia.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

At this time, I would like to wish all of you and your families that you can
also look forward to a very sweet year in your personal and professional lives.

All the best, Lance Ackerfeld Yizkor Book Project Manager


German SIG #Germany Yizkor Book Project, September 2013 #germany

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,
Although September was chockablock with Jewish festivals and our minds and
time were generally located in other directions, we at the Yizkor Book
Project did manage to "squeeze out" quite a number of new entries and
updates, as you will see.

Hopefully, you saw the announcement a few days ago sent to the various
forums regarding the latest books that were recently published as part of
our Yizkor Books in Print Project so I won't repeat the list. If, however,
you are interested in seeing what is available and what this particular
project is all about, please go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

In recent times, we have begun the first steps in setting up Translation
Fund projects for the following books:

Gorlice, Poland - "Sefer Gorlice; ha-kehila be-vinyana u-ve-hurbana"
(Gorlice book; the Building and Destruction of the community)
Zolochiv, Ukraine - "Der Untergang fun Zloczow" (The Downfall of Zloczow)

Sometime soon these funds will appear amongst the other funds already
running at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that these funds have been set up in order to raise money to allow for
the professional translation of these books and to enable all of us to read
this unique material concerning our communities and families that were
decimated during the Holocaust. For those of you who are US citizens,
donations to these funds are also tax deductible.

Now to facts and figures for September, during this last month we have added
one new project:

- Through Forests and Pathways
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/forests/forests.html

Added in 8 new entries:

- Dragomiresti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar161.html

- Janovice nad Uhlavou, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh391.html

- Ieud, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar188.html

- Mirovice & Mirotice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh403.html

- Novoselytsya, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00368.html

- Sacel, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar171.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00382.html

- Soroca, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00372.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kishinev/kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Hrubieszow, Poland (Memorial Book of Hrubieshov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hrubieszow/Hrubieszow.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ostroh, Ukraine (Ostrog book; a memorial to the Ostrog holy community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostroh/Ostroh.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slovakia/Slovakia.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

At this time, I would like to wish all of you and your families that you can
also look forward to a very sweet year in your personal and professional lives.

All the best, Lance Ackerfeld Yizkor Book Project Manager


Yizkor Book Project, September 2013 #general

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although September was chockablock with Jewish festivals and our minds and
time were generally located in other directions, we at the Yizkor Book
Project did manage to "squeeze out" quite a number of new entries and
updates, as you will see.

Hopefully, you saw the announcement a few days ago sent to the various
forums regarding the latest books that were recently published as part of
our Yizkor Books in Print Project so I won't repeat the list. If, however,
you are interested in seeing what is available and what this particular
project is all about, please go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

In recent times, we have begun the first steps in setting up Translation
Fund projects for the following books:

Gorlice, Poland - "Sefer Gorlice; ha-kehila be-vinyana u-ve-hurbana"
(Gorlice book; the Building and Destruction of the community)
Zolochiv, Ukraine - "Der Untergang fun Zloczow" (The Downfall of Zloczow)

Sometime soon these funds will appear amongst the other funds already
running at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that these funds have been set up in order to raise money to allow for
the professional translation of these books and to enable all of us to read
this unique material concerning our communities and families that were
decimated during the Holocaust. For those of you who are US citizens,
donations to these funds are also tax deductible.

Now to facts and figures for September, during this last month we have added
one new project:

- Through Forests and Pathways
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/forests/forests.html

Added in 8 new entries:

- Dragomiresti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar161.html

- Janovice nad Uhlavou, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh391.html

- Ieud, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar188.html

- Mirovice & Mirotice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh403.html

- Novoselytsya, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00368.html

- Sacel, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar171.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00382.html

- Soroca, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00372.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kishinev/kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Hrubieszow, Poland (Memorial Book of Hrubieshov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hrubieszow/Hrubieszow.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ostroh, Ukraine (Ostrog book; a memorial to the Ostrog holy community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostroh/Ostroh.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slovakia/Slovakia.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

At this time, I would like to wish all of you and your families that you can
also look forward to a very sweet year in your personal and professional
lives.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yizkor Book Project, September 2013 #general

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although September was chockablock with Jewish festivals and our minds and
time were generally located in other directions, we at the Yizkor Book
Project did manage to "squeeze out" quite a number of new entries and
updates, as you will see.

Hopefully, you saw the announcement a few days ago sent to the various
forums regarding the latest books that were recently published as part of
our Yizkor Books in Print Project so I won't repeat the list. If, however,
you are interested in seeing what is available and what this particular
project is all about, please go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

In recent times, we have begun the first steps in setting up Translation
Fund projects for the following books:

Gorlice, Poland - "Sefer Gorlice; ha-kehila be-vinyana u-ve-hurbana"
(Gorlice book; the Building and Destruction of the community)
Zolochiv, Ukraine - "Der Untergang fun Zloczow" (The Downfall of Zloczow)

Sometime soon these funds will appear amongst the other funds already
running at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that these funds have been set up in order to raise money to allow for
the professional translation of these books and to enable all of us to read
this unique material concerning our communities and families that were
decimated during the Holocaust. For those of you who are US citizens,
donations to these funds are also tax deductible.

Now to facts and figures for September, during this last month we have added
one new project:

- Through Forests and Pathways
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/forests/forests.html

Added in 8 new entries:

- Dragomiresti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar161.html

- Janovice nad Uhlavou, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh391.html

- Ieud, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar188.html

- Mirovice & Mirotice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh403.html

- Novoselytsya, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00368.html

- Sacel, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar171.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00382.html

- Soroca, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00372.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kishinev/kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Hrubieszow, Poland (Memorial Book of Hrubieshov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hrubieszow/Hrubieszow.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ostroh, Ukraine (Ostrog book; a memorial to the Ostrog holy community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostroh/Ostroh.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slovakia/Slovakia.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

At this time, I would like to wish all of you and your families that you can
also look forward to a very sweet year in your personal and professional
lives.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Rose GOODMAN birth record #general

Jay Gilbert
 

I have received an official copy of a birth record for Rose GOODMAN >from the
NYC Municipal Archives, and it is not the one I was searching for. If this
record is for Rose Goodman in your family, I would be happy to send it to
you. Please contact me privately.
Date of Birth- Feb. 20, 1901
Residence- 176 Orchard St.
Father's name- Moses Goodman
Father's birthplace- Romania
Father's age- 40
Father's occupation- Peddler
Mother's name- Hane (Kraz?)
Mother's birthplace- Russia
Mother's age- 35

Jay Gilbert
Hastings on Hudson, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rose GOODMAN birth record #general

Jay Gilbert
 

I have received an official copy of a birth record for Rose GOODMAN >from the
NYC Municipal Archives, and it is not the one I was searching for. If this
record is for Rose Goodman in your family, I would be happy to send it to
you. Please contact me privately.
Date of Birth- Feb. 20, 1901
Residence- 176 Orchard St.
Father's name- Moses Goodman
Father's birthplace- Romania
Father's age- 40
Father's occupation- Peddler
Mother's name- Hane (Kraz?)
Mother's birthplace- Russia
Mother's age- 35

Jay Gilbert
Hastings on Hudson, NY


Re: Last Names Used As Middle Names #galicia

Roger Lustig
 

What's "strange" or different about US middle names? They're simply further given
names, just as one finds elsewhere.

German Lutherans often use a string of three or four saints: Anna Catherina
Theresia, for instance.

Among German and Austrian Catholics a two-name saint could be placed before the
name actually used, e.g., Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus MOZART
or his son Franz Xaver Wolfgang MOZART. Both were called Wolfgang throughout their
lives.

For truly heroic strings of given names, few can beat the Spanish.

Jews, too, sometimes gave a child more than one name, and I don't just mean the
kinnui-combinations like Yehuda Leib. Aaron Simon, Abraham Calme, Abraham David
--those are the first three examples (alphabetically) >from the Upper Silesian birth
registers I've transcribed. (In all, 32 beginning with Abraham or Aaron, none of
whom have the father's given name as their 2nd name. About 10% of all the Abrahams
and Aarons.)

My mother, born in Berlin, was Hanna Ruth Loewe, and the 2nd name was in no way a
family name or even religiously significant. (Not in her family!) It was simply a
middle name--another given name.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA
research coordinator, GerSIG

Evertjan. wrote:

Marilyn Robinson wrote:
Why would a man use a last name as a middle name. I thought that a middle name
would be based on the father's first name (patronym)? Could it be the mother's
maiden name? For example,I have a few male names >from a list who possibly are
from the Krakow or Tarnow area:
Tobias Guttman Unterberger,
Naftali Hirsch Weiser Unterberger
Mendel Balsam Unterberger
Zalmen Zeger Unterberger
I would say these are not "middle names" in the [strange] US sense. These did and
do not exist in Europe...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Last Names Used As Middle Names #general

Roger Lustig
 

What's "strange" or different about US middle names? They're simply further given
names, just as one finds elsewhere.

German Lutherans often use a string of three or four saints: Anna Catherina
Theresia, for instance.

Among German and Austrian Catholics a two-name saint could be placed before the
name actually used, e.g., Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus MOZART
or his son Franz Xaver Wolfgang MOZART. Both were called Wolfgang throughout their
lives.

For truly heroic strings of given names, few can beat the Spanish.

Jews, too, sometimes gave a child more than one name, and I don't just mean the
kinnui-combinations like Yehuda Leib. Aaron Simon, Abraham Calme, Abraham David
--those are the first three examples (alphabetically) >from the Upper Silesian birth
registers I've transcribed. (In all, 32 beginning with Abraham or Aaron, none of
whom have the father's given name as their 2nd name. About 10% of all the Abrahams
and Aarons.)

My mother, born in Berlin, was Hanna Ruth Loewe, and the 2nd name was in no way a
family name or even religiously significant. (Not in her family!) It was simply a
middle name--another given name.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA
research coordinator, GerSIG

Evertjan. wrote:

Marilyn Robinson wrote:
Why would a man use a last name as a middle name. I thought that a middle name
would be based on the father's first name (patronym)? Could it be the mother's
maiden name? For example,I have a few male names >from a list who possibly are
from the Krakow or Tarnow area:
Tobias Guttman Unterberger,
Naftali Hirsch Weiser Unterberger
Mendel Balsam Unterberger
Zalmen Zeger Unterberger
I would say these are not "middle names" in the [strange] US sense. These did and
do not exist in Europe...


Name changes at Port of Phila? #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear All:
I've been looking at the manifests of the Hamburg-Amerika steamer Pisa, which
arrived at Philadelphia on 2 Mar 1912. They seem to have been filled out by whoever
did the corresponding Hamburg passenger list--very similar handwriting, very few
spelling variants--but they also contain more than the usual number of changes,
especially to names.

These are not name changes entered at the time of naturalization--they're all in
the same hand. They're not major changes: Meische and Mosche become Moische;
Chayem becomes Chaim; Pietruschka becomes Petronella; and RUBASCHKIN becomes
RUBASCHKINE. In each case the name is struck through and rewritten.

These changes occur on only two pages of the manifest: images 17-18 and 19-20 at
the pay site. Other things are also changed--a few occupations, for instance.

Now, why would this happen? Was an inexperienced inspector given these pages to
work? They don't seem to be signed off by an inspector,the way other pages or group
of pages with similar handwriting for the notes are.

Or could the ship's doctor have gotten bored? The passage >from Hamburg took an
unusually long time, >from Feb. 7/8 until Mar. 2, and there's no indication that the
ship put in at any other port during that time.

Finally: would someone >from Vitebsk have been more likely to pronounce the given
name Moshe as Moishe or Meishe? I associate the former with Polish Yiddish,
the latter with Lithuanian Yiddish; but this is certainly not my field.
(My people would have said Mausche.)

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Name changes at Port of Phila? #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear All:
I've been looking at the manifests of the Hamburg-Amerika steamer Pisa, which
arrived at Philadelphia on 2 Mar 1912. They seem to have been filled out by whoever
did the corresponding Hamburg passenger list--very similar handwriting, very few
spelling variants--but they also contain more than the usual number of changes,
especially to names.

These are not name changes entered at the time of naturalization--they're all in
the same hand. They're not major changes: Meische and Mosche become Moische;
Chayem becomes Chaim; Pietruschka becomes Petronella; and RUBASCHKIN becomes
RUBASCHKINE. In each case the name is struck through and rewritten.

These changes occur on only two pages of the manifest: images 17-18 and 19-20 at
the pay site. Other things are also changed--a few occupations, for instance.

Now, why would this happen? Was an inexperienced inspector given these pages to
work? They don't seem to be signed off by an inspector,the way other pages or group
of pages with similar handwriting for the notes are.

Or could the ship's doctor have gotten bored? The passage >from Hamburg took an
unusually long time, >from Feb. 7/8 until Mar. 2, and there's no indication that the
ship put in at any other port during that time.

Finally: would someone >from Vitebsk have been more likely to pronounce the given
name Moshe as Moishe or Meishe? I associate the former with Polish Yiddish,
the latter with Lithuanian Yiddish; but this is certainly not my field.
(My people would have said Mausche.)

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA


Re: Contact a Researcher #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Liz Miller asked:
Does anyone know how to contact Yuri Dorn? I believe that he has information on
the cemetery in Kraisk?Your help is appreciated.


Liz...try our Eastern European Researcher DataBase...its composed of references by
fellow 'genners...and i believe Yuri is one of the researchers
http://www.jewishgen.org/Infofiles/researchers.htm

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Contact a Researcher #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Liz Miller asked:
Does anyone know how to contact Yuri Dorn? I believe that he has information on
the cemetery in Kraisk?Your help is appreciated.


Liz...try our Eastern European Researcher DataBase...its composed of references by
fellow 'genners...and i believe Yuri is one of the researchers
http://www.jewishgen.org/Infofiles/researchers.htm

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm