Date   

KANELA Inmate at DP Arzberger-Heim Camp Wien 1948 #austria-czech

avelara.can@...
 

Dear Colleagues,

Yesterday I've received a report >from ITS Bad Arolsen, Deutschland.

My late father Adrian CANELLA (Adriann KANELA as ITS records) born in
Bucuresti 1915, was inmate at DP Arzberger-Heim Camp Wien up to 14
January 1948.

Then he migrated to Brazil and the rest it is my biography.

But I can not trace my father's previous living >from born in Romania
to DP Arzberger-Heim times.

Anyone has informations about Arzberger-Heim DP Camp? Links to photos,
whatsoever...

Thank you for your attention.

Artur (Marcovici) Canella Avelar,
Brazil


Inmates at DP Arzberger-Heim Camp Wien 1948 #austria-czech

avelara.can@...
 

Dear Colleagues,

Yesterday I've received a report >from ITS Internationaler Suchdienst
Bad Arolsen, Deutschland.

My late father Adrian CANELLA (Adriann KANELA as ITS records) born in
Bucuresti 1915, was inmate at DP Arzberger-Heim Camp Wien up to 14
January 1948.

Then he migrated to Brazil and the rest is my biography.

But I can not trace my father's Adrian CANELLA previous living from
born in Romania
to DP Arzberger-Heim times.

Anyone has informations about Arzberger-Heim DP Camp? Links to photos,
whatsoever...

Thank you for your attention.

Artur (Marcovici) Canella Avelar,
Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Fax 00 55 31 33322881


Time to get your genealogical projects organized? #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

JewishGen Education is offering a two week course "Getting Organized",
with 10 easy lessons on files and folders, handling your media files,
getting ready to publish and more. This course is open 24/7 on the
JewishGen Forum. Here you can download the lessons and work on the
exercises at your own speed.

Tuition for this first class is $18. In 2014 this course will become
part of a series of two week courses and at that time the fee will be
waived if you qualify for JewishGen's Value Added Services.

Registration is open at < www.jewishgen.org/education >.

For questions, please email JewishGen-education@...

Phyllis Kramer
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech KANELA Inmate at DP Arzberger-Heim Camp Wien 1948 #austria-czech

avelara.can@...
 

Dear Colleagues,

Yesterday I've received a report >from ITS Bad Arolsen, Deutschland.

My late father Adrian CANELLA (Adriann KANELA as ITS records) born in
Bucuresti 1915, was inmate at DP Arzberger-Heim Camp Wien up to 14
January 1948.

Then he migrated to Brazil and the rest it is my biography.

But I can not trace my father's previous living >from born in Romania
to DP Arzberger-Heim times.

Anyone has informations about Arzberger-Heim DP Camp? Links to photos,
whatsoever...

Thank you for your attention.

Artur (Marcovici) Canella Avelar,
Brazil


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Inmates at DP Arzberger-Heim Camp Wien 1948 #austria-czech

avelara.can@...
 

Dear Colleagues,

Yesterday I've received a report >from ITS Internationaler Suchdienst
Bad Arolsen, Deutschland.

My late father Adrian CANELLA (Adriann KANELA as ITS records) born in
Bucuresti 1915, was inmate at DP Arzberger-Heim Camp Wien up to 14
January 1948.

Then he migrated to Brazil and the rest is my biography.

But I can not trace my father's Adrian CANELLA previous living from
born in Romania
to DP Arzberger-Heim times.

Anyone has informations about Arzberger-Heim DP Camp? Links to photos,
whatsoever...

Thank you for your attention.

Artur (Marcovici) Canella Avelar,
Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Fax 00 55 31 33322881


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Time to get your genealogical projects organized? #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

JewishGen Education is offering a two week course "Getting Organized",
with 10 easy lessons on files and folders, handling your media files,
getting ready to publish and more. This course is open 24/7 on the
JewishGen Forum. Here you can download the lessons and work on the
exercises at your own speed.

Tuition for this first class is $18. In 2014 this course will become
part of a series of two week courses and at that time the fee will be
waived if you qualify for JewishGen's Value Added Services.

Registration is open at < www.jewishgen.org/education >.

For questions, please email JewishGen-education@...

Phyllis Kramer
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm


Time to get your genealogical projects organized? #unitedkingdom

Phyllis Kramer
 

JewishGen Education is offering a two week course "Getting Organized",
with 10 easy lessons on files and folders, handling your media files,
getting ready to publish and more. This course is open 24/7 on the
JewishGen Forum. Here you can download the lessons and work on the
exercises at your own speed.

Tuition for this first class is $18. In 2014 this course will become
part of a series of two week courses and at that time the fee will be
waived if you qualify for JewishGen's Value Added Services.

Registration is open at < www.jewishgen.org/education >.

For questions, please email JewishGen-education@...

Phyllis Kramer
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Time to get your genealogical projects organized? #unitedkingdom

Phyllis Kramer
 

JewishGen Education is offering a two week course "Getting Organized",
with 10 easy lessons on files and folders, handling your media files,
getting ready to publish and more. This course is open 24/7 on the
JewishGen Forum. Here you can download the lessons and work on the
exercises at your own speed.

Tuition for this first class is $18. In 2014 this course will become
part of a series of two week courses and at that time the fee will be
waived if you qualify for JewishGen's Value Added Services.

Registration is open at < www.jewishgen.org/education >.

For questions, please email JewishGen-education@...

Phyllis Kramer
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm


Yizkor Book Project, September 2013 #unitedkingdom

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although September was chockablock with Jewish festivals and our minds and
time were generally located in other directions, we at the Yizkor Book
Project did manage to "squeeze out" quite a number of new entries and
updates, as you will see.

Hopefully, you saw the announcement a few days ago sent to the various
forums regarding the latest books that were recently published as part of
our Yizkor Books in Print Project so I won't repeat the list. If, however,
you are interested in seeing what is available and what this particular
project is all about, please go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

In recent times, we have begun the first steps in setting up Translation
Fund projects for the following books:

Gorlice, Poland - "Sefer Gorlice; ha-kehila be-vinyana u-ve-hurbana"
(Gorlice book; the Building and Destruction of the community)
Zolochiv, Ukraine - "Der Untergang fun Zloczow" (The Downfall of Zloczow)

Sometime soon these funds will appear amongst the other funds already
running at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that these funds have been set up in order to raise money to allow for
the professional translation of these books and to enable all of us to read
this unique material concerning our communities and families that were
decimated during the Holocaust. For those of you who are US citizens,
donations to these funds are also tax deductible.

Now to facts and figures for September, during this last month we have added
one new project:

- Through Forests and Pathways
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/forests/forests.html

Added in 8 new entries:

- Dragomiresti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar161.html

- Janovice nad Uhlavou, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh391.html

- Ieud, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar188.html

- Mirovice & Mirotice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh403.html

- Novoselytsya, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00368.html

- Sacel, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar171.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00382.html

- Soroca, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00372.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kishinev/kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Hrubieszow, Poland (Memorial Book of Hrubieshov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hrubieszow/Hrubieszow.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ostroh, Ukraine (Ostrog book; a memorial to the Ostrog holy community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostroh/Ostroh.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slovakia/Slovakia.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

At this time, I would like to wish all of you and your families that you can
also look forward to a very sweet year in your personal and professional
lives.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Yizkor Book Project, September 2013 #unitedkingdom

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although September was chockablock with Jewish festivals and our minds and
time were generally located in other directions, we at the Yizkor Book
Project did manage to "squeeze out" quite a number of new entries and
updates, as you will see.

Hopefully, you saw the announcement a few days ago sent to the various
forums regarding the latest books that were recently published as part of
our Yizkor Books in Print Project so I won't repeat the list. If, however,
you are interested in seeing what is available and what this particular
project is all about, please go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

In recent times, we have begun the first steps in setting up Translation
Fund projects for the following books:

Gorlice, Poland - "Sefer Gorlice; ha-kehila be-vinyana u-ve-hurbana"
(Gorlice book; the Building and Destruction of the community)
Zolochiv, Ukraine - "Der Untergang fun Zloczow" (The Downfall of Zloczow)

Sometime soon these funds will appear amongst the other funds already
running at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that these funds have been set up in order to raise money to allow for
the professional translation of these books and to enable all of us to read
this unique material concerning our communities and families that were
decimated during the Holocaust. For those of you who are US citizens,
donations to these funds are also tax deductible.

Now to facts and figures for September, during this last month we have added
one new project:

- Through Forests and Pathways
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/forests/forests.html

Added in 8 new entries:

- Dragomiresti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar161.html

- Janovice nad Uhlavou, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh391.html

- Ieud, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar188.html

- Mirovice & Mirotice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh403.html

- Novoselytsya, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00368.html

- Sacel, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar171.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00382.html

- Soroca, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00372.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kishinev/kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Hrubieszow, Poland (Memorial Book of Hrubieshov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hrubieszow/Hrubieszow.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ostroh, Ukraine (Ostrog book; a memorial to the Ostrog holy community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostroh/Ostroh.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slovakia/Slovakia.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

At this time, I would like to wish all of you and your families that you can
also look forward to a very sweet year in your personal and professional
lives.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Revision Lists for Starokonstantinov district, Volhynia in the Zhitomir Archives #ukraine

Steve Stein <steinsteve@...>
 

Volhynians,

This is an inquiry, specifically to researchers who may have ventured into
the Zhitomir (Zhytomyr) State Archive, either personally or via a hired
researcher, and are interested in the revision list records of the pre-WWI
Starokonstantinov district. According to the Ukraine SIG maps,
Starokonstantinov was the southernmost district of Volhynia guberniya,
bordering on Podolia guberniya and the Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia,
as well as other districts within Volhynia, and has a handful of towns where
Jews lived - Starokonstantinov, Volochisk, Kupel, Bazaliya, Teofipol,
Kulchiny, Kuzmin, Krasilov, Ozhigovetsy. See
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/GEO_province.asp?id=9, click on the
district map.

According to the Routes to Roots Foundation database, there is a set of
Revision List files (Fond/Opis/Delo record groups) for the towns in this
district in the Zhitomir archives. The list of files I have culled and
correlated >from RTR is shown below, the Fond/Opis/Delo numbers may be found
in the RTR database. Each town is represented in the RTR database in at
least one of these files, some more than one. Some entries show revision
years without a corresponding file number. As I could not find such records
in RTR for towns bordering this district showing revision list records with
the same Fond/Opis/Delo, such as Yampol, Sosnivka, Belozerka, Lakhovtsy, and
Antoniny, I infer that the revision lists were probably taken and possibly
archived by pre-WWI district.

My understanding is that the Zhitomir archive is somewhat problematic in
terms of access, openness, and ability to locate specific items, based on
what I have read on the SIG discussion group archives and heard >from folks
who have been there, which is why I am sending out this inquiry. There has
been no specific posting about Starokonstantinov revision lists on the
JewishGen or Ukraine SIG discussion groups. I suspect that what may actually
be found in any one of these files may cover somewhat more than what is
listed, but it is difficult to know.

I am looking for information >from anyone who has specific knowledge of the
actual inventory of the revision list files listed below in Zhitomir, above
and beyond what is shown in the RTR database. Or, if you have the name of
someone who has that knowledge. Please do not refer me back to the database,
or other general information about these towns, this request is specifically
concerning the revision lists. What I hope to learn might include actual
entry counts, towns that are included in other towns, and other such
information ("metadata" in today's parlance). This information would be
necessary in order to pursue research opportunities on this set of records,
especially for the smaller towns such as Kupel (my ancestral town) and
Bazaliya.

1816 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Teofipol, Kulchiny, Ozhigovetsy
1834 - 2 Files for Starokonstantinov, Volochisk and possibly Bazaliya,
Teofipol, Kulchiny, Ozhigovetsy
1835 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov
1839 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Kupel, Bazaliya, Teofipol, Krasilov,
Kulchiny, Kuzmin, Volochisk, Ozhigovetsy
1842 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov
1850 - 2 Files for Krasilov, Starokonstantinov and possibly Kupel, Bazaliya,
Teofipol, Kulchiny, Kuzmin, Volochisk
1857 - 1 File for Teofipol
1858 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Kupel, Bazaliya, Teofipol, Krasilov,
Kulchiny, Kuzmin, Volochisk, Ozhigovetsy
1862 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Bazaliya, Krasilov, Kulchiny
1865 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Bazaliya, Krasilov

Thanks,

Steve Stein
Highland Park, NJ


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Revision Lists for Starokonstantinov district, Volhynia in the Zhitomir Archives #ukraine

Steve Stein <steinsteve@...>
 

Volhynians,

This is an inquiry, specifically to researchers who may have ventured into
the Zhitomir (Zhytomyr) State Archive, either personally or via a hired
researcher, and are interested in the revision list records of the pre-WWI
Starokonstantinov district. According to the Ukraine SIG maps,
Starokonstantinov was the southernmost district of Volhynia guberniya,
bordering on Podolia guberniya and the Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia,
as well as other districts within Volhynia, and has a handful of towns where
Jews lived - Starokonstantinov, Volochisk, Kupel, Bazaliya, Teofipol,
Kulchiny, Kuzmin, Krasilov, Ozhigovetsy. See
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/GEO_province.asp?id=9, click on the
district map.

According to the Routes to Roots Foundation database, there is a set of
Revision List files (Fond/Opis/Delo record groups) for the towns in this
district in the Zhitomir archives. The list of files I have culled and
correlated >from RTR is shown below, the Fond/Opis/Delo numbers may be found
in the RTR database. Each town is represented in the RTR database in at
least one of these files, some more than one. Some entries show revision
years without a corresponding file number. As I could not find such records
in RTR for towns bordering this district showing revision list records with
the same Fond/Opis/Delo, such as Yampol, Sosnivka, Belozerka, Lakhovtsy, and
Antoniny, I infer that the revision lists were probably taken and possibly
archived by pre-WWI district.

My understanding is that the Zhitomir archive is somewhat problematic in
terms of access, openness, and ability to locate specific items, based on
what I have read on the SIG discussion group archives and heard >from folks
who have been there, which is why I am sending out this inquiry. There has
been no specific posting about Starokonstantinov revision lists on the
JewishGen or Ukraine SIG discussion groups. I suspect that what may actually
be found in any one of these files may cover somewhat more than what is
listed, but it is difficult to know.

I am looking for information >from anyone who has specific knowledge of the
actual inventory of the revision list files listed below in Zhitomir, above
and beyond what is shown in the RTR database. Or, if you have the name of
someone who has that knowledge. Please do not refer me back to the database,
or other general information about these towns, this request is specifically
concerning the revision lists. What I hope to learn might include actual
entry counts, towns that are included in other towns, and other such
information ("metadata" in today's parlance). This information would be
necessary in order to pursue research opportunities on this set of records,
especially for the smaller towns such as Kupel (my ancestral town) and
Bazaliya.

1816 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Teofipol, Kulchiny, Ozhigovetsy
1834 - 2 Files for Starokonstantinov, Volochisk and possibly Bazaliya,
Teofipol, Kulchiny, Ozhigovetsy
1835 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov
1839 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Kupel, Bazaliya, Teofipol, Krasilov,
Kulchiny, Kuzmin, Volochisk, Ozhigovetsy
1842 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov
1850 - 2 Files for Krasilov, Starokonstantinov and possibly Kupel, Bazaliya,
Teofipol, Kulchiny, Kuzmin, Volochisk
1857 - 1 File for Teofipol
1858 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Kupel, Bazaliya, Teofipol, Krasilov,
Kulchiny, Kuzmin, Volochisk, Ozhigovetsy
1862 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Bazaliya, Krasilov, Kulchiny
1865 - 1 File for Starokonstantinov, Bazaliya, Krasilov

Thanks,

Steve Stein
Highland Park, NJ


JGS of Greater Orlando Presents: "Finding Your Family on the Web," October 8, 2013 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

Finding Your Family on the Web?
Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando Program

ORLANDO, FL, October 3, 2013 ? Join the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Greater Orlando (JGSGO) in celebration of International Jewish Genealogy Month,
for a program featuring our own digital genealogy expert, Tom Hirsch,
Finding Your Family on the Web?.

The Internet is probably the best tool ever for genealogy. It allows you to
access billions of webpages all over the globe by using your home computer.
The Internet can help you find lots of material that you could not find
otherwise. Tom Hirsch, will use his 20 years of genealogy experience, and
his journalistic skills to show you how you can find relatives that you did
not know existed and how to use the enormous connectivity of the worldwide
web to share your family tree and link you to other people researching the
same ancestors.

Tom will show you a variety of websites, demonstrate some genealogy databases,
capture official records, search for information, use translation tools, and
find educational materials to help you be a better genealogist, and to work
more effectively and efficiently. In addition to demonstrating numerous
websites for you to use in your family history work, Tom will provide
important information on how to protect your computer and the critical
information that you have spent so much time and effort to find.

At the meeting, you will receive a list of some of the most useful websites
for your research. After seeing Tom's presentation, you can immediately use
these tools to advance your work. Tour the Internet with Tom as he shares his
knowledge of the worldwide web and computers to help you capture and share
your family history.

Tom Hirsch is a veteran in the broadcast industry and News Assignment Editor at
WESH, Channel 2. Tom is also VP Membership of the JGSGO and an avid
genealogist with 20 years of research experience. Tom quickly learned that
his investigative news gathering abilities and skill in doing great stories
for radio and TV found another important use in compiling his family history.
Tom has collected much of his genealogy by using the vast resources on the
Internet. Tom is the author of Tom's List, a compilation of more than 300
links to useful websites to aid in Jewish genealogy research. For more
information on how to obtain Tom's List, contact jgsgo.membership@... .

DATE: Tuesday, October 8, 2013
TIME: 7:00pm - 9:00pm
ADMISSION: Open to the public. $5.00 for non-members. Free for members.
LOCATION: Jewish Community Center of Greater Orlando Roth JCC
Maitland Campus, Senior Lounge, 851 N. Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751.

About the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) is a not for profit
organization dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and
research tools with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.
Anyone may join JGSGO. Annual dues are $25 for an individual and $30 for a
family. For more information visit our blog at www.jgsgo.blogspot.com , 'like'
us atwww.facebook.com/jgsgreaterorlando or call us at 407-494-4230.


Contact Information:
Marlis Humphrey
JGSGO VP Programs & Publicity
jgsgo.programs@...

Respectfully submitted by,
Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida
Publicity Chairperson for Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Orlando


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Greater Orlando Presents: "Finding Your Family on the Web," October 8, 2013 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

Finding Your Family on the Web?
Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando Program

ORLANDO, FL, October 3, 2013 ? Join the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Greater Orlando (JGSGO) in celebration of International Jewish Genealogy Month,
for a program featuring our own digital genealogy expert, Tom Hirsch,
Finding Your Family on the Web?.

The Internet is probably the best tool ever for genealogy. It allows you to
access billions of webpages all over the globe by using your home computer.
The Internet can help you find lots of material that you could not find
otherwise. Tom Hirsch, will use his 20 years of genealogy experience, and
his journalistic skills to show you how you can find relatives that you did
not know existed and how to use the enormous connectivity of the worldwide
web to share your family tree and link you to other people researching the
same ancestors.

Tom will show you a variety of websites, demonstrate some genealogy databases,
capture official records, search for information, use translation tools, and
find educational materials to help you be a better genealogist, and to work
more effectively and efficiently. In addition to demonstrating numerous
websites for you to use in your family history work, Tom will provide
important information on how to protect your computer and the critical
information that you have spent so much time and effort to find.

At the meeting, you will receive a list of some of the most useful websites
for your research. After seeing Tom's presentation, you can immediately use
these tools to advance your work. Tour the Internet with Tom as he shares his
knowledge of the worldwide web and computers to help you capture and share
your family history.

Tom Hirsch is a veteran in the broadcast industry and News Assignment Editor at
WESH, Channel 2. Tom is also VP Membership of the JGSGO and an avid
genealogist with 20 years of research experience. Tom quickly learned that
his investigative news gathering abilities and skill in doing great stories
for radio and TV found another important use in compiling his family history.
Tom has collected much of his genealogy by using the vast resources on the
Internet. Tom is the author of Tom's List, a compilation of more than 300
links to useful websites to aid in Jewish genealogy research. For more
information on how to obtain Tom's List, contact jgsgo.membership@... .

DATE: Tuesday, October 8, 2013
TIME: 7:00pm - 9:00pm
ADMISSION: Open to the public. $5.00 for non-members. Free for members.
LOCATION: Jewish Community Center of Greater Orlando Roth JCC
Maitland Campus, Senior Lounge, 851 N. Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751.

About the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) is a not for profit
organization dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and
research tools with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.
Anyone may join JGSGO. Annual dues are $25 for an individual and $30 for a
family. For more information visit our blog at www.jgsgo.blogspot.com , 'like'
us atwww.facebook.com/jgsgreaterorlando or call us at 407-494-4230.


Contact Information:
Marlis Humphrey
JGSGO VP Programs & Publicity
jgsgo.programs@...

Respectfully submitted by,
Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida
Publicity Chairperson for Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Orlando


JGS of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) Presents: "Who Do You Think You Are Bubala?" October 22, 2013 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

"Who Do You Think You Are, Bubala?
An Introduction to Jewish Genealogy Webinar

ORLANDO, FL, September 20, 2013. Join the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) in celebration of International Jewish Genealogy
Month, for a free webinar that is certain to kick-start your family tree research.

Have you heard,
"They never talked about it"
"What kind of a name is Tauntie Saucie (i.e. Aunt Sosia)?", or
"All the records were destroyed"?

With some know how and persistence, you can find your Jewish ancestors!
Join us for an 'Introduction to Jewish Genealogy' webinar. We will cover:
4 steps to getting started
Records you might find & where to find them
Available resources, tools, and help

We will show you key documents to help put that family tree together and
go further into the past: census; birth, death, and marriage certificates;
city directories, cemetery records and obituaries, social security records,
draft and military records, naturalization papers, ships passenger lists,
tax records, pages of testimony, liberation records and more.

Nothing is more exciting than discovering a new cousin, an unknown
ancestor, or the real name of the shtetl where they once lived. Learn
how to begin that journey of discovery with Jewish Genealogical Society
of Greater Orlando experts.

Webinar presenter, Marlis Glaser Humphrey, is Vice President of Programs
and Publicity for the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando
(JGSGO), Publications and Technology Outreach Committee Chairs for the
Florida State Genealogical Society (FSGS), President of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS), Co-Chair for the IAJGS
Boston 2013 Conference, and a member of the IAJGS Membership Development
Committee responsible for the Southeastern U.S. Region. She has successfully
discovered all her ancestral shtetls.
Marlis holds a B.A. in Russian and an M.S. in Management of Technology.
You can reach Marlis at jgsgo.programs@....

DATE: Tuesday, October 22, 2013
TIME: 7:00pm - 8:30pm
COST: There is no cost to attend. You must pre-register. Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar Seat Now:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/966295286

About the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) is a not for
profit organization dedicated to sharing genealogical information,
techniques and research tools with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy
and family history. Anyone may join JGSGO. Annual dues are $25 for an
individual and $30 for a family. For more information visit our blog at
www.jgsgo.blogspot.com , 'like' us at
www.facebook.com/jgsgreaterorlando or call us at 407-494-4230.


Contact Information:
Marlis Humphrey
JGSGO VP Programs & Publicity
jgsgo.programs@...

Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida
JGSGO Publicity Chairperson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) Presents: "Who Do You Think You Are Bubala?" October 22, 2013 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

"Who Do You Think You Are, Bubala?
An Introduction to Jewish Genealogy Webinar

ORLANDO, FL, September 20, 2013. Join the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) in celebration of International Jewish Genealogy
Month, for a free webinar that is certain to kick-start your family tree research.

Have you heard,
"They never talked about it"
"What kind of a name is Tauntie Saucie (i.e. Aunt Sosia)?", or
"All the records were destroyed"?

With some know how and persistence, you can find your Jewish ancestors!
Join us for an 'Introduction to Jewish Genealogy' webinar. We will cover:
4 steps to getting started
Records you might find & where to find them
Available resources, tools, and help

We will show you key documents to help put that family tree together and
go further into the past: census; birth, death, and marriage certificates;
city directories, cemetery records and obituaries, social security records,
draft and military records, naturalization papers, ships passenger lists,
tax records, pages of testimony, liberation records and more.

Nothing is more exciting than discovering a new cousin, an unknown
ancestor, or the real name of the shtetl where they once lived. Learn
how to begin that journey of discovery with Jewish Genealogical Society
of Greater Orlando experts.

Webinar presenter, Marlis Glaser Humphrey, is Vice President of Programs
and Publicity for the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando
(JGSGO), Publications and Technology Outreach Committee Chairs for the
Florida State Genealogical Society (FSGS), President of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS), Co-Chair for the IAJGS
Boston 2013 Conference, and a member of the IAJGS Membership Development
Committee responsible for the Southeastern U.S. Region. She has successfully
discovered all her ancestral shtetls.
Marlis holds a B.A. in Russian and an M.S. in Management of Technology.
You can reach Marlis at jgsgo.programs@....

DATE: Tuesday, October 22, 2013
TIME: 7:00pm - 8:30pm
COST: There is no cost to attend. You must pre-register. Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar Seat Now:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/966295286

About the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) is a not for
profit organization dedicated to sharing genealogical information,
techniques and research tools with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy
and family history. Anyone may join JGSGO. Annual dues are $25 for an
individual and $30 for a family. For more information visit our blog at
www.jgsgo.blogspot.com , 'like' us at
www.facebook.com/jgsgreaterorlando or call us at 407-494-4230.


Contact Information:
Marlis Humphrey
JGSGO VP Programs & Publicity
jgsgo.programs@...

Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida
JGSGO Publicity Chairperson


Harry DINKIN research follow up #general

Michael Chauss <mchauss@...>
 

Thanks to some very helpful tips, I have begun to unravel, and perhaps further
complicate, my research into my ancestors' connection to Harry Dinkin.

I previously posted that both my maternal great grandmother, Jennie
Davidowitz (Davidson), and my maternal great grandfather, Israel Noah
Lifshitz (Noah Lewin), listed Harry Dinkin as the cousin they were joining
in the U.S. on their passenger manifest entries. Jennie arrived >from Klintsy
in September 1904, and Noah arrived >from Vetka in October 1904. Both of
them listed Harry Dinkin's residence as 175 Madison Street. (Unfortunately
the 1905 New York Census did not shed any light on residents at that address
at that time). Jennie's mother was Chasha Dinkin.

Further research on Harry Dinkin has led me to the following immigrants
from the same regions with links to him:
On the 13 June 1911 Prinz Adalbert passenger list (arriving in Philadelphia)
Schlajme Soskin and Dwojre Soskin list Harry Dinkin of Chicago as their
brother-in-law. Schlajme lists his place of birth as Gomel, and Dwojre
lists her place of birth as Babuzl [sic]. The father, Chaim Soskin, was
listed as residing in Gomel.

Chaja Mucka Zogorin, on the manifest for the S.S. Main, arriving December
1912 in Baltimore, lists Harry Dinkin of Chicago as her uncle. She
indicates she was >from Vetka, and that her mother Sore Zogorin was still
residing in Vetka.

On 22 November 1910, Fivye Fidelman arrived in New York aboard the S.S.
Kroonland. She was also >from Gomel, and her mother Chaje Fidelman was
residing there at that time. She indicated that she was going to join her
uncle, Harry Dinkin, in Chicago. Interestingly, a Celia Fidelman married
Harry Dinkin in Chicago in September 1911.

I would appreciate any insight anyone could offer. I am not sure whether
these relationships are stretched for purposes of immigration, or if there
is some connection that I cannot piece together among the Davidowitz,
Lifshitz, Soskin, Zogorin and Fidelman families...

Michael Chauss
Saint Paul, Minnesota


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Harry DINKIN research follow up #general

Michael Chauss <mchauss@...>
 

Thanks to some very helpful tips, I have begun to unravel, and perhaps further
complicate, my research into my ancestors' connection to Harry Dinkin.

I previously posted that both my maternal great grandmother, Jennie
Davidowitz (Davidson), and my maternal great grandfather, Israel Noah
Lifshitz (Noah Lewin), listed Harry Dinkin as the cousin they were joining
in the U.S. on their passenger manifest entries. Jennie arrived >from Klintsy
in September 1904, and Noah arrived >from Vetka in October 1904. Both of
them listed Harry Dinkin's residence as 175 Madison Street. (Unfortunately
the 1905 New York Census did not shed any light on residents at that address
at that time). Jennie's mother was Chasha Dinkin.

Further research on Harry Dinkin has led me to the following immigrants
from the same regions with links to him:
On the 13 June 1911 Prinz Adalbert passenger list (arriving in Philadelphia)
Schlajme Soskin and Dwojre Soskin list Harry Dinkin of Chicago as their
brother-in-law. Schlajme lists his place of birth as Gomel, and Dwojre
lists her place of birth as Babuzl [sic]. The father, Chaim Soskin, was
listed as residing in Gomel.

Chaja Mucka Zogorin, on the manifest for the S.S. Main, arriving December
1912 in Baltimore, lists Harry Dinkin of Chicago as her uncle. She
indicates she was >from Vetka, and that her mother Sore Zogorin was still
residing in Vetka.

On 22 November 1910, Fivye Fidelman arrived in New York aboard the S.S.
Kroonland. She was also >from Gomel, and her mother Chaje Fidelman was
residing there at that time. She indicated that she was going to join her
uncle, Harry Dinkin, in Chicago. Interestingly, a Celia Fidelman married
Harry Dinkin in Chicago in September 1911.

I would appreciate any insight anyone could offer. I am not sure whether
these relationships are stretched for purposes of immigration, or if there
is some connection that I cannot piece together among the Davidowitz,
Lifshitz, Soskin, Zogorin and Fidelman families...

Michael Chauss
Saint Paul, Minnesota


Re: What Can I Do With Old, Unidentified Family Photographs? #general

Erika Herzog
 

I agree wholeheartedly with the consensus that you shouldn't throw them out.

In answer to your question on advice on what to do:

I have been working on digitizing my family's photos for a while now,
I have found having the pictures in a digital format (i.e., online)
has been a very positive experience.

So if you can, I would recommend scanning the photos and putting them
onto a free Flickr account*, noting in the descriptions any pertinent
information you might have (i.e., dates, who took photo, locations,
surnames, etc.).

If you do this, I recommend setting a Creative Commons license on the
photos (http://www.flickr.com/account/prefs/license/) -- that way the
photos can be shared as you specify.... >from very restrictive use to
complete free re-use. Creative Commons licensing
(http://creativecommons.org/choose/) makes it really easy to allow for
sharing.

Photos on Flickr are also very friendly to Google search engine
optimization, so any metadata / details you add to the photos will
make them very discoverable to a huge online audience. Photos on
Flickr can also be used on Wikipedia, so if there are
location-specific towns that would be a great way to expand Wikipedia
entries of our shtetls to include photos.

It might be possible that some institutions or archives might accept
your photos and maybe digitize them for you; however, it's very easy
to scan photos nowadays (and putting them in an institution or archive
would not make them as accessible as they would be online). I think
many drugstores in the U.S. that have photo services will scan your
photos for a fee.

Depending on how many there are, I would be happy to scan them for you
and put them online. Feel free to contact me at my yahoo email address
off list.

This would be a great group project for us JewishGenners, to create an
online repository of orphan images like this. I would be very
interested in participating.

I always wonder what happens to all of our photos as we age. I worry!
I love photographs -- and really there's nothing like a physical
photograph. But maybe if the photo is digitized at least it would live
on in perpetuity in that form? I wish the Internet Archive
(http://archive.org/) provided this for photos.

*I am not affiliated with Flickr, JewishGen, Internet Archive -- these
organizations are mentioned in answer to advice of the original
poster, and as a possible open data solution for fellow JewishGen
genealogists encountering this common issue.

Erika
erika_herzog@... (my main email address)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What Can I Do With Old, Unidentified Family Photographs? #general

Erika Herzog
 

I agree wholeheartedly with the consensus that you shouldn't throw them out.

In answer to your question on advice on what to do:

I have been working on digitizing my family's photos for a while now,
I have found having the pictures in a digital format (i.e., online)
has been a very positive experience.

So if you can, I would recommend scanning the photos and putting them
onto a free Flickr account*, noting in the descriptions any pertinent
information you might have (i.e., dates, who took photo, locations,
surnames, etc.).

If you do this, I recommend setting a Creative Commons license on the
photos (http://www.flickr.com/account/prefs/license/) -- that way the
photos can be shared as you specify.... >from very restrictive use to
complete free re-use. Creative Commons licensing
(http://creativecommons.org/choose/) makes it really easy to allow for
sharing.

Photos on Flickr are also very friendly to Google search engine
optimization, so any metadata / details you add to the photos will
make them very discoverable to a huge online audience. Photos on
Flickr can also be used on Wikipedia, so if there are
location-specific towns that would be a great way to expand Wikipedia
entries of our shtetls to include photos.

It might be possible that some institutions or archives might accept
your photos and maybe digitize them for you; however, it's very easy
to scan photos nowadays (and putting them in an institution or archive
would not make them as accessible as they would be online). I think
many drugstores in the U.S. that have photo services will scan your
photos for a fee.

Depending on how many there are, I would be happy to scan them for you
and put them online. Feel free to contact me at my yahoo email address
off list.

This would be a great group project for us JewishGenners, to create an
online repository of orphan images like this. I would be very
interested in participating.

I always wonder what happens to all of our photos as we age. I worry!
I love photographs -- and really there's nothing like a physical
photograph. But maybe if the photo is digitized at least it would live
on in perpetuity in that form? I wish the Internet Archive
(http://archive.org/) provided this for photos.

*I am not affiliated with Flickr, JewishGen, Internet Archive -- these
organizations are mentioned in answer to advice of the original
poster, and as a possible open data solution for fellow JewishGen
genealogists encountering this common issue.

Erika
erika_herzog@... (my main email address)

138301 - 138320 of 669809