Date   

German translator recommendation needed #germany

E Feinstein
 

I have a Der Stuermer Article >from 1936 about a SIMONS relative from
Rheydt, Germany that I needed assistance in obtaining a complete
translation.

I tried using Google translate but too many words did not translate.
Can someone recommend a (professional) translator? Please let me know.

Eric Feinstein, Clifton, New Jersey ericfeinstein@...

Moderator Note: http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/


German SIG #Germany German translator recommendation needed #germany

E Feinstein
 

I have a Der Stuermer Article >from 1936 about a SIMONS relative from
Rheydt, Germany that I needed assistance in obtaining a complete
translation.

I tried using Google translate but too many words did not translate.
Can someone recommend a (professional) translator? Please let me know.

Eric Feinstein, Clifton, New Jersey ericfeinstein@...

Moderator Note: http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/


Family match help and DNA - COHEN #general

Scott Ehrlich <scott@...>
 

I have DNA tested with the majors - 23andme, ancestry, and
familytreedna. I have found familytreedna the most useful and helpful
and inviting for matches to communicate and connected with each other.

I have taken the Autosomal test with all three, and added the Y-DNA to
familytreedna.com.

My mother, Margery Cohen, Ehrlich, has also tested with FamilyTreeDNA.
She and I have autosomal results, and she is awaiting her mtDNA
results >from FamilyTreeDNA. Her gedmatch.com ID is F327640.

I am now trying to find connections to my COHEN line somehow. My mom
is a COHEN/NEWMAN and she and I are working hand-in-hand, and she has
tested.

But I want to isolate the COHEN line for some answers and currently
have no other people I can reach out to on the COHEN side who will
test.

If you have tested with any of the majors, please see if we are a match.

I am also on gedmatch.com - F316712.

Thanks.

Scott Ehrlich
scott@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond to Scott privately. Further
discussion about DNA issues should occur on JewishGen's DNA Testing mailing list: http://www.jewishgen.org/ListManager/members_add.asp


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family match help and DNA - COHEN #general

Scott Ehrlich <scott@...>
 

I have DNA tested with the majors - 23andme, ancestry, and
familytreedna. I have found familytreedna the most useful and helpful
and inviting for matches to communicate and connected with each other.

I have taken the Autosomal test with all three, and added the Y-DNA to
familytreedna.com.

My mother, Margery Cohen, Ehrlich, has also tested with FamilyTreeDNA.
She and I have autosomal results, and she is awaiting her mtDNA
results >from FamilyTreeDNA. Her gedmatch.com ID is F327640.

I am now trying to find connections to my COHEN line somehow. My mom
is a COHEN/NEWMAN and she and I are working hand-in-hand, and she has
tested.

But I want to isolate the COHEN line for some answers and currently
have no other people I can reach out to on the COHEN side who will
test.

If you have tested with any of the majors, please see if we are a match.

I am also on gedmatch.com - F316712.

Thanks.

Scott Ehrlich
scott@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond to Scott privately. Further
discussion about DNA issues should occur on JewishGen's DNA Testing mailing list: http://www.jewishgen.org/ListManager/members_add.asp


Re: Searching for my Grandfather's birth records #general

A. E. Jordan
 

From: Scott Ehrlich <scott@...>
Any other ideas of where his birth may have been recorded, outside of
census records which are not official for this purpose and are only 10
years at a time?
This is a common problem in New York City too. They estimate a quarter
or more of all births went unrecorded in the early 1900s/late 1800s.

Besides the obvious using alternate spellings and widening the search
parameters the next thing is to look for delayed reporting. At least
in New York we have files of people who later in life filed for birth
certificates. They are separate files >from the original birth records
and show up with a letter S or D in the indexes. Most common was for
school or the military or a passport they filed for a copy of the birth
certificate.

Checking any military records is a good place to see he person recorded
their birth date or their Social Security application. I do not know
when Social Security started but in modern days you need to show your
birth certificate to file for Social Security. Now I think babies
actually get there number when they are born.

Passport applications would be another good place to look for a person
swearing to their details of birth. Of course that is only if they
traveled overseas and got a passport.

Otherwise it is very possible for a person to go about their life
without ever needing to prove the details of their birth.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Searching for my Grandfather's birth records #general

A. E. Jordan
 

From: Scott Ehrlich <scott@...>
Any other ideas of where his birth may have been recorded, outside of
census records which are not official for this purpose and are only 10
years at a time?
This is a common problem in New York City too. They estimate a quarter
or more of all births went unrecorded in the early 1900s/late 1800s.

Besides the obvious using alternate spellings and widening the search
parameters the next thing is to look for delayed reporting. At least
in New York we have files of people who later in life filed for birth
certificates. They are separate files >from the original birth records
and show up with a letter S or D in the indexes. Most common was for
school or the military or a passport they filed for a copy of the birth
certificate.

Checking any military records is a good place to see he person recorded
their birth date or their Social Security application. I do not know
when Social Security started but in modern days you need to show your
birth certificate to file for Social Security. Now I think babies
actually get there number when they are born.

Passport applications would be another good place to look for a person
swearing to their details of birth. Of course that is only if they
traveled overseas and got a passport.

Otherwise it is very possible for a person to go about their life
without ever needing to prove the details of their birth.

Allan Jordan


Re: Family names #galicia

davestra@ymail.com <davestra@...>
 

The topic of Jewish given names is really complicated. I'm far >from an expert
on it, but several of the names you have listed are called couplets. Dov Ber
is a couplet, since both words represent a bear (the animal). Tzvi Hersh is
another couplet, with both names standing for a deer.

I don't know if this will help you and have lost your original post but I've
sometimes found that naturalization papers (especially the Declaration of
Intention), if filed in 1906 or later, often show both the person's name upon
arrival (Yiddish name) and the American name that they adopted later.

Dave Strausfeld

"Fran Cohen" <fransc1969@...> wrote:
I have the papers >from relatives that show the four sons of Dov Ber listed
as: Moshe Leib - Baruch Vidgor - Chaim Mordche - Tzvi Hersh

I am trying to put the English equivalent to the names that I know them as ...
MODERATOR NOTE: A worthy topic (and one that has been discussed before in this
forum). For a full discussion of "Jewish Given Names," see Warren Blatt's
slide presentation in the JewishGen InfoFiles:
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/GivenNames/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Family names #general

davestra@ymail.com <davestra@...>
 

The topic of Jewish given names is really complicated. I'm far >from an expert
on it, but several of the names you have listed are called couplets. Dov Ber
is a couplet, since both words represent a bear (the animal). Tzvi Hersh is
another couplet, with both names standing for a deer.

I don't know if this will help you and have lost your original post but I've
sometimes found that naturalization papers (especially the Declaration of
Intention), if filed in 1906 or later, often show both the person's name upon
arrival (Yiddish name) and the American name that they adopted later.

Dave Strausfeld

"Fran Cohen" <fransc1969@...> wrote:
I have the papers >from relatives that show the four sons of Dov Ber listed
as: Moshe Leib - Baruch Vidgor - Chaim Mordche - Tzvi Hersh

I am trying to put the English equivalent to the names that I know them as ...
MODERATOR NOTE: A worthy topic (and one that has been discussed before in this
forum). For a full discussion of "Jewish Given Names," see Warren Blatt's
slide presentation in the JewishGen InfoFiles:
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/GivenNames/


US-Born Women Who Married "Foreigners" Lost Their Citizenship--Senate Resolution Apologizes For 1907 Law #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Some of us may have similar stories in our genealogy-of American-born women
who lost their US citizenship when they married a foreigner. In 1907 the US
Congress passed the Expatriation Act which removed citizenship >from women
born in the US if they married a "foreigner". This left the woman without
citizenship and without a country. The law was passed over anxiety over the
growing number of immigrants to the US.

With the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution giving women the
right to vote, which was ratified in 1920, another law was passed in 1922
which allowed most women who married foreigners to be US citizens. This did
not cover s-born women who married mend ineligible for US citizenship-such
as Chinese immigrants.,

That restriction was later repealed. A resolution introduced by Senators
Franken (D-MN) and Johnson (R-WI) on March 27
( http://beta.congress.gov/113/bills/sres402/BILLS-113sres402is.pdf ) and
currently before the Senate Judiciary Committee, apologizes for the 1907
Expatriation Act. To read more see the Los Angeles Times article at :
http://tinyurl.com/l5hpt4t
Original url:
http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-apology-20140420,0,5493306.story#axzz2zSDuuEUl

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen US-Born Women Who Married "Foreigners" Lost Their Citizenship--Senate Resolution Apologizes For 1907 Law #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Some of us may have similar stories in our genealogy-of American-born women
who lost their US citizenship when they married a foreigner. In 1907 the US
Congress passed the Expatriation Act which removed citizenship >from women
born in the US if they married a "foreigner". This left the woman without
citizenship and without a country. The law was passed over anxiety over the
growing number of immigrants to the US.

With the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution giving women the
right to vote, which was ratified in 1920, another law was passed in 1922
which allowed most women who married foreigners to be US citizens. This did
not cover s-born women who married mend ineligible for US citizenship-such
as Chinese immigrants.,

That restriction was later repealed. A resolution introduced by Senators
Franken (D-MN) and Johnson (R-WI) on March 27
( http://beta.congress.gov/113/bills/sres402/BILLS-113sres402is.pdf ) and
currently before the Senate Judiciary Committee, apologizes for the 1907
Expatriation Act. To read more see the Los Angeles Times article at :
http://tinyurl.com/l5hpt4t
Original url:
http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-apology-20140420,0,5493306.story#axzz2zSDuuEUl

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Tracing identity - Israel COHEN, Malden, Massachusetts #general

Scott Ehrlich <scott@...>
 

If my great grandfather, Israel COHEN, who ultimately purchased the
home they lived in, 9 Linwood Street, Malden, MA, 1920 or so to at
least 1930, and presuming he also paid taxes, what would be the best
resource(s) to try and track down the money trail to learn more about
his identity beyond the Declaration and other original US citizenship
forms I have?

He does not seem to have a social security death index.

Thank you.

Scott Ehrlich


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tracing identity - Israel COHEN, Malden, Massachusetts #general

Scott Ehrlich <scott@...>
 

If my great grandfather, Israel COHEN, who ultimately purchased the
home they lived in, 9 Linwood Street, Malden, MA, 1920 or so to at
least 1930, and presuming he also paid taxes, what would be the best
resource(s) to try and track down the money trail to learn more about
his identity beyond the Declaration and other original US citizenship
forms I have?

He does not seem to have a social security death index.

Thank you.

Scott Ehrlich


Family Names / Tombstone pictures #general

Fran Cohen <fransc1969@...>
 

I want to take a moment to thank everyone that responded to my posting on my
family names. I couldn't believe how many people >from all over the world
responded!

I have found that both Abraham Isaac and Jacob BOSS are buried in Atlanta GA
USA. Jacob is buried in Greenwood Cemetery and Abraham Isaac is buried in
Oakland Cemetery.

Is it possible that anyone that lives in the area and has the time, can you
take a trip to the cemeteries and take pictures of their tombstones for me.
I would be happy to do any cemetery searches for you in return on Long
Island NY. Hopefully the tombstones will have their Hebrew names on them.
Please email me and I will provide the exact locations of the graves.

Thank you again for all your help.

Fran Boss Cohen
Researching: BOSS, BUZE, BUZ, BUZAS

- snip -
I have the papers >from relatives that show the four sons of Dov Ber listed
as: Moshe Leib - Baruch Vidgor - Chaim Mordche - Tzvi Hersh

I am trying to put the English equivalent to the names that I know them as
but I do not know who is who with the Hebrew names. I know for sure that
Tzvi Hersh was Harry Boss, he was my great grandfather. His brother Moshe
Leib, did not come to the U.S. I have to research this further. His other
two brothers are known in the U.S. as Jacob Boss and Abraham Isaac Boss.
Can you please let me know which of the remaining Hebrew names belong to
Jacob and Abraham? I have searched on JewishGen "Jewish Given Names" but I
still cannot figure this out.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family Names / Tombstone pictures #general

Fran Cohen <fransc1969@...>
 

I want to take a moment to thank everyone that responded to my posting on my
family names. I couldn't believe how many people >from all over the world
responded!

I have found that both Abraham Isaac and Jacob BOSS are buried in Atlanta GA
USA. Jacob is buried in Greenwood Cemetery and Abraham Isaac is buried in
Oakland Cemetery.

Is it possible that anyone that lives in the area and has the time, can you
take a trip to the cemeteries and take pictures of their tombstones for me.
I would be happy to do any cemetery searches for you in return on Long
Island NY. Hopefully the tombstones will have their Hebrew names on them.
Please email me and I will provide the exact locations of the graves.

Thank you again for all your help.

Fran Boss Cohen
Researching: BOSS, BUZE, BUZ, BUZAS

- snip -
I have the papers >from relatives that show the four sons of Dov Ber listed
as: Moshe Leib - Baruch Vidgor - Chaim Mordche - Tzvi Hersh

I am trying to put the English equivalent to the names that I know them as
but I do not know who is who with the Hebrew names. I know for sure that
Tzvi Hersh was Harry Boss, he was my great grandfather. His brother Moshe
Leib, did not come to the U.S. I have to research this further. His other
two brothers are known in the U.S. as Jacob Boss and Abraham Isaac Boss.
Can you please let me know which of the remaining Hebrew names belong to
Jacob and Abraham? I have searched on JewishGen "Jewish Given Names" but I
still cannot figure this out.


Re: Family Names #general

Vivian Kahn <viviankahn@...>
 

Vigdor and Avigdor is a version of the name Victor and very common among
males in my family. My great-great-grandfather, grandfather, brother, and
a cousin were al given the Hebrew name Avigdor Avraham and the secular name
Viktor in Hungary and Victor in the US.

Vivian Kahn
Oakland, California

On Apr 19, 2014, Smadar Belkind Gerson <smadarmx@...>

Fran,
Vigdor is short for Avigdor, so my guess that might related more
to Abraham as they start with the same letter. That would leave Jacob
for Chaim Mordche. I would look at their gravestones to see if their
Hebrew names are mentioned. That might help you figure out who was who.
Smadar Belkind-Gerson
Newton, Ma

"Fran Cohen" <fransc1969@...> wrote:
I have the papers >from relatives that show the four sons of DOV BER
listed as: MOSHE LEIB - BARUCH VIDGOR -CHAIM MORDCHE -TZVI HERSH
I am trying to put the English equivalent to the names that I know
them as
snip............


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Family Names #general

Vivian Kahn <viviankahn@...>
 

Vigdor and Avigdor is a version of the name Victor and very common among
males in my family. My great-great-grandfather, grandfather, brother, and
a cousin were al given the Hebrew name Avigdor Avraham and the secular name
Viktor in Hungary and Victor in the US.

Vivian Kahn
Oakland, California

On Apr 19, 2014, Smadar Belkind Gerson <smadarmx@...>

Fran,
Vigdor is short for Avigdor, so my guess that might related more
to Abraham as they start with the same letter. That would leave Jacob
for Chaim Mordche. I would look at their gravestones to see if their
Hebrew names are mentioned. That might help you figure out who was who.
Smadar Belkind-Gerson
Newton, Ma

"Fran Cohen" <fransc1969@...> wrote:
I have the papers >from relatives that show the four sons of DOV BER
listed as: MOSHE LEIB - BARUCH VIDGOR -CHAIM MORDCHE -TZVI HERSH
I am trying to put the English equivalent to the names that I know
them as
snip............


Re: Use of Jewish vs. secular birthdays (was: Gesher Galicia's Update . . .) #galicia

Stephen Weinstein
 

JRI-Poland originally indexed the date that an event was recorded, so
that the user could find the record, and required the user to obtain
the record >from LDS microfilm or the Polish State Archives to
determine the date of the event. However, many users did not bother
to obtain the records, and just used the information on JRI-Poland,
thereby confusing the date of recording with the date of the event.
JRI-Poland now tries to include both dates in newly indexed records,
but has not added the event date to all the records that were indexed
earlier.

In the records on the website of the Latvian archives >from when Latvia
was still part of Russia, both the date of birth and the date of
circumcision are shown for males. However, the date of circumcision
is sometimes misidentified as date of baptism if the records appear on
a form that was not designed for Jews. There is one column which has
date of birth (for all religions and genders). There is another column
which has date of circumcision for male Jews, has date of baptism for
gentiles (both genders), and is blank for female Jews. Records >from
some parts of Poland also follow this format.

Most, but not all, of these records use the Julian calendar, which is 12
days different >from our calendar for events >from March 1800 to
February 1900 (13 days for March 1900 to present and 11 days for
March 1700 to February 1800). The best way to verify what calendar is
being used is to find a record that gives both secular and Hebrew
calendar dates and use Steve Morse's tool to convert them to see
which secular calendar would correspond to the Hebrew calendar date.

Also, either the modern practice of having secular dates begin and
end at midnight was not yet in effect or the traditional practice of
having Hebrew calendar dates begin and end at sundown (or nightfall)
was not followed correctly. The dates >from the two calendars seem to
be consistent with all events happening in the daytime; the one-day
offset expected in events happening during the first half of the night
is noticeably absent.

Records >from Galicia typically appear in Napoleonic format.
Napoleonic format records are written in paragraphs in the local
language (except that some records >from the Jewish community in
Montreal, Canada, were written in English, even though Montreal's
language is French). This tends to lead to more errors of
interpretation than the Russian columnar format.

Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, CA, USA
stephenweinstein@...

On Sunday, April 20, 2014 8:47 AM, Shlomo Katz
<shlomodkatz@...> wrote:

... I believe that when records record a baby's birthdate, they are
actually recording the day the father showed up to register the birth...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Use of Jewish vs. secular birthdays (was: Gesher Galicia's Update . . .) #galicia

Stephen Weinstein
 

JRI-Poland originally indexed the date that an event was recorded, so
that the user could find the record, and required the user to obtain
the record >from LDS microfilm or the Polish State Archives to
determine the date of the event. However, many users did not bother
to obtain the records, and just used the information on JRI-Poland,
thereby confusing the date of recording with the date of the event.
JRI-Poland now tries to include both dates in newly indexed records,
but has not added the event date to all the records that were indexed
earlier.

In the records on the website of the Latvian archives >from when Latvia
was still part of Russia, both the date of birth and the date of
circumcision are shown for males. However, the date of circumcision
is sometimes misidentified as date of baptism if the records appear on
a form that was not designed for Jews. There is one column which has
date of birth (for all religions and genders). There is another column
which has date of circumcision for male Jews, has date of baptism for
gentiles (both genders), and is blank for female Jews. Records >from
some parts of Poland also follow this format.

Most, but not all, of these records use the Julian calendar, which is 12
days different >from our calendar for events >from March 1800 to
February 1900 (13 days for March 1900 to present and 11 days for
March 1700 to February 1800). The best way to verify what calendar is
being used is to find a record that gives both secular and Hebrew
calendar dates and use Steve Morse's tool to convert them to see
which secular calendar would correspond to the Hebrew calendar date.

Also, either the modern practice of having secular dates begin and
end at midnight was not yet in effect or the traditional practice of
having Hebrew calendar dates begin and end at sundown (or nightfall)
was not followed correctly. The dates >from the two calendars seem to
be consistent with all events happening in the daytime; the one-day
offset expected in events happening during the first half of the night
is noticeably absent.

Records >from Galicia typically appear in Napoleonic format.
Napoleonic format records are written in paragraphs in the local
language (except that some records >from the Jewish community in
Montreal, Canada, were written in English, even though Montreal's
language is French). This tends to lead to more errors of
interpretation than the Russian columnar format.

Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, CA, USA
stephenweinstein@...

On Sunday, April 20, 2014 8:47 AM, Shlomo Katz
<shlomodkatz@...> wrote:

... I believe that when records record a baby's birthdate, they are
actually recording the day the father showed up to register the birth...


Re: Gesher Galicia's Update: Bukaczowce birth records and cadastral map #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Joyaa Antares writes:

"What an exciting update to the Galicia Database! Gratitude to all
involved.

Several questions arise:

1. Birth dates (for example 1840-1865, e.g. Bukaczowce). Are these in
the current Gregorian calendar or the previous Julian calendar? With
Latvian records of this era an adjustment of 12-13 days is necessary
to convert >from Julian to Gregorian; is the same required for Galician
records?

2. House numbers are given in the Birth records. My interest is with
three families in house "18" in Bukaczowce. Is it reasonable to assume
that this is the same "18" as depicted in the map
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/bukachivtsi-bukaczowce-1848/ -
where number '18' is literally just above the last 'C' of Bukaczowce?

3. Finally, regarding the map, is it reasonable to assume that the
large square in which the town name is written is simply a big market
square...?"

Glad you are excited about these new indexes. So are we!

Regarding dates: Galician records don't have the same issues as Polish
records when it comes to Julian versus Gregorian calendar, since --
with a few exceptions -- historical Galicia was not occupied by Russia
the way Poland was. Consequently, the dates in these records should
be considered Gregorian. But that brings up another issue...a short
digression...

I had a conversation just the other day with Ann Harris (a Gesher Galicia
board member) who told me that her sister in Israel celebrates her
birthday based on the Hebrew/Jewish calendar, not the secular one. This
made me wonder about hundreds of years ago... how our ancestors
identified and recalled their birth dates, death or marriage dates.

Most children in the shtetl would recall that they were born "the day
before Passover" or another "two days after Purim." Consequently, they
easily might have celebrated birthdays using the Hebrew calendar...at
least while growing up (i.e. Pesach is coming, your birthday is soon!)
and ignoring Gregorian calendar dates. If this is so, that might explain
the confusion when asked about a birth or death date when emigrating.
It might have been "approximate" based on recollections of when it
occurred in the Jewish calendar. They might not have had the offfical
records we can now access, hence the confusion sometimes.

If anyone has heard stories along those lines please share them.

As for the house numbers provided in birth records, this usually reflects
where the birth took place so it is possible a child might have been born
in a house other than where they lived. In most cases, however, it will
lead you to the family's home. The map of Bukaczowce in the GG map
room shows house numbers. As Jay Osborn describes it:

"Partial feldskizze (field sketch) of the center of Bukaczowce
(Bukachivtsi), >from 1848. This initial survey sketch of the town is
without scale, and the relative position of town features is only roughly
approximate. However, this sketch shows house and numbers with
some names, the central market square, a dam and reservoir, a church
and monastery, plus Jewish property and a cemetery. All available map
sheets with numbered buildings were acquired."

So yes, Joyaa, the house you've identified is, indeed, house #18. It had
a prominent position on the market square. Below the square is the
"Juden G." or "Juden Gemeinde," which appears to be a smaller square
that contains buildings of the Jewish community.

GG has a later map (>from 1853) that we have not yet put online, where
more buildings have sprouted up, and the market square is labeled:
"Bukaczowce gimina israelicka rynek," and the Jewish square clearly
shows a synagogue building surrounded by slightly smaller houses. It
also looks like a new house has been built to the left of #18, which
is #162, but the lot to the right of #18 is still vacant.

I'm happy to report that GG has recently acquired a list of school
children >from Bukaczowce >from the 1920s which Linda Cantor is
indexing and this should be available to our members soon after we're
done proofreading. Taking a quick look, I can see a Hinde David, whose
son, Leib is listed with the birthdate 15 August 1916.

Keep in mind that anyone who donates $50 or more to the GARP
(Galician Archival Records Project) for Bukaczowce will received all Excel
files and passwords to view the original documents and maps that we
have. All indexes, however, are eventually uploaded to the All Galicia
Database for free searching.

Hope this helps!

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...


Re: Gesher Galicia's Update to the All Galicia Databse #galicia

Israel P
 

Good news.

It would be really nice if this database had an option to search by "Entries
added/changed since," like JRI-Poland, JGFF and some of the other SIGs.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem

On 19 Apr 2014 at 0:04, Gesher Galicia SIG digest wrote:

Gesher Galicia announces the following 18 new record sets added this
spring to the All Galicia Database at:

http://search.geshergalicia.org.

Note that many of these cover 20th century vital records up to 1942,
an important addition to Holocaust-era research:

124881 - 124900 of 669901