Date   

BOOK CITE and Was the 30th of January observed as a school holiday in NS Germany? #germany

zeevr@...
 

A German language book was recently published in Weimar, Germany, by
the Geschichtswerkstatt Weimar/Apolda. The Title (in translation) is
"A Jewish Family in Thueringen - The unprecedented fight of a mother
for the life of her three children".

The authors are: Kaethe Raphael, Zeev Raphael, Peter Franz and
Udo Wohlfeld.

The book is the detailed story (268 pages) of the survival of those
three children. It may include much useful information for those that
are researching the subject of the fate of "Mischlinge", i.e.,
half-Jews in, during the period of the Holocaust.

Meanwhile a debate about a side issue has developed among the authors.

The question is whether it is accurate that the 30th of January,
the day the Nazis assumed power in 1933 Germany (known as the
"Tag der nationalen Erhebung"), was observed with "schulfrei", i.e.,
as a school holiday, during the years of the 3rd Reich.
Will anybody with information on this question please contact the
undersigned?

Zeev Raphael, Haifa. JGID 24430 zeevr@technion.ac.il / zeevr@tx.technion.ac.il


German SIG #Germany BOOK CITE and Was the 30th of January observed as a school holiday in NS Germany? #germany

zeevr@...
 

A German language book was recently published in Weimar, Germany, by
the Geschichtswerkstatt Weimar/Apolda. The Title (in translation) is
"A Jewish Family in Thueringen - The unprecedented fight of a mother
for the life of her three children".

The authors are: Kaethe Raphael, Zeev Raphael, Peter Franz and
Udo Wohlfeld.

The book is the detailed story (268 pages) of the survival of those
three children. It may include much useful information for those that
are researching the subject of the fate of "Mischlinge", i.e.,
half-Jews in, during the period of the Holocaust.

Meanwhile a debate about a side issue has developed among the authors.

The question is whether it is accurate that the 30th of January,
the day the Nazis assumed power in 1933 Germany (known as the
"Tag der nationalen Erhebung"), was observed with "schulfrei", i.e.,
as a school holiday, during the years of the 3rd Reich.
Will anybody with information on this question please contact the
undersigned?

Zeev Raphael, Haifa. JGID 24430 zeevr@technion.ac.il / zeevr@tx.technion.ac.il


preserving genealogical work #general

Hanna Grossman <hannakg@...>
 

I have been doing genealogy for nearly 20 years and am now 83 years
old without an obvious inheritor of my work.

My Reunion data base covers over 5000 persons going back to 1700.

Since my family hails >from Germany the obvious place to archive this
material is Leo Baeck Institute. They tell me that they are delighted
to have my papers but have no interest in the digital data base.

The papers include dozens or hundreds of relatively insignificant
individual copies of government records ( citizenship applications,
social security application, etc) and interesting intellectual
products or historically interesting correspondence of a few of my
ancestors. Without the data base I see no way to relate these
documents to a family, nor any way to preserve all the genealogical
work I have done.

I have published a book but it covers at best a quarter of the
information which I have collected and noted in the data base.

I am perfectly happy to give Leo Baeck the individually or
historically significant documents, but need some entity willing to
archive these materials together with the data base.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Hanna Grossman, Cornwall, CT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen preserving genealogical work #general

Hanna Grossman <hannakg@...>
 

I have been doing genealogy for nearly 20 years and am now 83 years
old without an obvious inheritor of my work.

My Reunion data base covers over 5000 persons going back to 1700.

Since my family hails >from Germany the obvious place to archive this
material is Leo Baeck Institute. They tell me that they are delighted
to have my papers but have no interest in the digital data base.

The papers include dozens or hundreds of relatively insignificant
individual copies of government records ( citizenship applications,
social security application, etc) and interesting intellectual
products or historically interesting correspondence of a few of my
ancestors. Without the data base I see no way to relate these
documents to a family, nor any way to preserve all the genealogical
work I have done.

I have published a book but it covers at best a quarter of the
information which I have collected and noted in the data base.

I am perfectly happy to give Leo Baeck the individually or
historically significant documents, but need some entity willing to
archive these materials together with the data base.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Hanna Grossman, Cornwall, CT


family named SLONIM #general

Jake Jacobs
 

Searching for information about Frank SLONIM and his family.
Arrived in the US 1900-1901. Settled in Duluth, Minnesota,
Wife identified in census as Sarah, children included Sorrell
and Joseph. Birthplace listed on census as "Russia," dob 1849.

Can't find in Ellis Island records, don't know origin beyond
"Russia." We're aware there is a town called Slonim in Belarus
and that is possible, but we have no knowledge or even
suspicion that he came >from there. Found a few entries in
Duluth city directories, but they provided no new information.

Suggestions welcome! Thank you.

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen family named SLONIM #general

Jake Jacobs
 

Searching for information about Frank SLONIM and his family.
Arrived in the US 1900-1901. Settled in Duluth, Minnesota,
Wife identified in census as Sarah, children included Sorrell
and Joseph. Birthplace listed on census as "Russia," dob 1849.

Can't find in Ellis Island records, don't know origin beyond
"Russia." We're aware there is a town called Slonim in Belarus
and that is possible, but we have no knowledge or even
suspicion that he came >from there. Found a few entries in
Duluth city directories, but they provided no new information.

Suggestions welcome! Thank you.

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas


Re: Record lookup at Chambers st, NYC #general

Alan Steinfeld
 

Be advised that if you live near a Family History Center ( I believe
that "near" means within 15 miles) you cannot use this free service.

Alan Steinfeld

On Jun 3, 2014, at 10:05 AM, "Mark Howard Shapiro mhshapirose@"
<gmail.com jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

FamilySearch Photoduplication Services
(https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Photoduplication_Services)
will email you a digital copy of NYC Municipal Archives vital records
from the LDS database for free, up to 5 records per month. It takes
a few weeks, but the copies are often much clearer than you can
get at the Municipal Archives itself.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Record lookup at Chambers st, NYC #general

Alan Steinfeld
 

Be advised that if you live near a Family History Center ( I believe
that "near" means within 15 miles) you cannot use this free service.

Alan Steinfeld

On Jun 3, 2014, at 10:05 AM, "Mark Howard Shapiro mhshapirose@"
<gmail.com jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

FamilySearch Photoduplication Services
(https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Photoduplication_Services)
will email you a digital copy of NYC Municipal Archives vital records
from the LDS database for free, up to 5 records per month. It takes
a few weeks, but the copies are often much clearer than you can
get at the Municipal Archives itself.


Re: Galicia school reports, Polish evacuees, Disna student list, TSIAK Archives, Lituanian phonebook lists, etc. #general

M R <emeraldeyesm@...>
 

In response to Eli Brauner's comment, "Using the word 'Evacuation'
we should be aware that actually what happened was a miracle >from
the point of view of those Polish individuals...So it definitely
was not a forced evacuation." Thank you for adding additional
background for the reader. You should be aware that the use of the
term, "evacuation" & all of its derivations, was the direct result
of the translation of the original Polish title, as per Google
translator. ("Osoby wyewakuowane z Z.S.R.R.")
Marilyn Robinson
Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Galicia school reports, Polish evacuees, Disna student list, TSIAK Archives, Lituanian phonebook lists, etc. #general

M R <emeraldeyesm@...>
 

In response to Eli Brauner's comment, "Using the word 'Evacuation'
we should be aware that actually what happened was a miracle >from
the point of view of those Polish individuals...So it definitely
was not a forced evacuation." Thank you for adding additional
background for the reader. You should be aware that the use of the
term, "evacuation" & all of its derivations, was the direct result
of the translation of the original Polish title, as per Google
translator. ("Osoby wyewakuowane z Z.S.R.R.")
Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Re: Record lookup at Chambers st, NYC #general

Caroline Dresden <cldresden@...>
 

Hello all
Mark makes reference to the Familysearch Duplication Service. I
have tried to use this service twice, seeking copies of NYC
certificates and other records on Familysearch, but never had
any success. The first time I got a reply saying the reference I
gave was incomplete, but I had used all the references given by
Familysearch and as I had asked for several certificates the
response was unclear and unhelpful. I dont recall any response
from the second try and it says not to chase them and its
automated and they will respond in six weeks. Not in my case....

Any tips on how to achieve a successful outcome? I am particularly
seeking paperwork about a marriage in New York, USA in 1905 (>from
memory) and a marriage in Norfolk, England in about 1700. I havent
found details about the English marriage anywhere else.

Many Thanks
Caroline Dresden
Birmingham, England

DRESDEN, England, DROZDYK, Krzepice, Czestokowa, Poland, POTERSMAN,
Belchatow, Poland, HILDEBRAND, Piaceszna, Warsaw, Poland, ARONOFSKY,
Vilna, Lithuania, SILVERMAN, Galati, Romania, COHEN, Odessa, Ukraine

From: Mark Shapiro <mhshapirose@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Jun 2014 10:05:48 -0400

FamilySearch Photoduplication Services
(https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Photoduplication_Services)
will email you a digital copy of NYC Municipal Archives vital records
from the LDS database for free, up to 5 records per month. It takes
a few weeks, but the copies are often much clearer than you can
get at the Municipal Archives itself.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Record lookup at Chambers st, NYC #general

Caroline Dresden <cldresden@...>
 

Hello all
Mark makes reference to the Familysearch Duplication Service. I
have tried to use this service twice, seeking copies of NYC
certificates and other records on Familysearch, but never had
any success. The first time I got a reply saying the reference I
gave was incomplete, but I had used all the references given by
Familysearch and as I had asked for several certificates the
response was unclear and unhelpful. I dont recall any response
from the second try and it says not to chase them and its
automated and they will respond in six weeks. Not in my case....

Any tips on how to achieve a successful outcome? I am particularly
seeking paperwork about a marriage in New York, USA in 1905 (>from
memory) and a marriage in Norfolk, England in about 1700. I havent
found details about the English marriage anywhere else.

Many Thanks
Caroline Dresden
Birmingham, England

DRESDEN, England, DROZDYK, Krzepice, Czestokowa, Poland, POTERSMAN,
Belchatow, Poland, HILDEBRAND, Piaceszna, Warsaw, Poland, ARONOFSKY,
Vilna, Lithuania, SILVERMAN, Galati, Romania, COHEN, Odessa, Ukraine

From: Mark Shapiro <mhshapirose@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Jun 2014 10:05:48 -0400

FamilySearch Photoduplication Services
(https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Photoduplication_Services)
will email you a digital copy of NYC Municipal Archives vital records
from the LDS database for free, up to 5 records per month. It takes
a few weeks, but the copies are often much clearer than you can
get at the Municipal Archives itself.


Marriage in Bremen #general

Snillop47@...
 

I am researching a Jewish officer in the British Army killed in action in
1917. His headstone, erected by the Imperial (now Commonwealth) War Graves
Commission, carries a cross instead of a Magen David. It is possible to get
this changed if sufficient evidence is provided to convince the CWGC that
he was Jewish. One such piece is a marriage certificate which would state
under whose auspices the marriage was conducted and if in a synagogue would
be good evidence. In this case, while the family was British the parents
were married in 1873 in Bremen. And it is likely that the bride was not
Jewish, being born in a part of the UK where there was no Jewish community.
My question is this: is it possible to obtain a marriage certificate >from
Bremen? If anyone has any information I should be glad to have it.
Thank you.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Marriage in Bremen #general

Snillop47@...
 

I am researching a Jewish officer in the British Army killed in action in
1917. His headstone, erected by the Imperial (now Commonwealth) War Graves
Commission, carries a cross instead of a Magen David. It is possible to get
this changed if sufficient evidence is provided to convince the CWGC that
he was Jewish. One such piece is a marriage certificate which would state
under whose auspices the marriage was conducted and if in a synagogue would
be good evidence. In this case, while the family was British the parents
were married in 1873 in Bremen. And it is likely that the bride was not
Jewish, being born in a part of the UK where there was no Jewish community.
My question is this: is it possible to obtain a marriage certificate >from
Bremen? If anyone has any information I should be glad to have it.
Thank you.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


Matching faces in two different photos #general

Mel Comisarow
 

On
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Colonies_of_Ukraine/Schlac-Molot-Rock.html
[or http://tinyurl.com/mqfhyzf --Mod.]
I have posted two photos, a wedding party photo >from 1910 and a
birthday party photo >from 1919. All faces in the birthday photo
are identified. This web page also has a key that identifies many
people in the wedding photo. The 100-year-old birthday girl is
easily recognized as the bride's grandmother in the wedding photo.
Other people >from the birthday photo are certainly in the wedding
photo, but are unidentified. Can anyone skilled at "face matching"
please take a look at these photos to see if some unknowns in the
wedding photo can be matched to their counterparts in the birthday
photo. I can supply higher resolution photos and a key with known
faces blanked out, leaving only non-blanked faces to be matched,
for anyone who wants to attempt face matching. Thanks.

Mel Comisarow
Vancouver BC
melcom4@gmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Posting these photos on ViewMate would add the
interactive function of the ViewMate response form. Please reply
privately to Mel Comisarow.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Matching faces in two different photos #general

Mel Comisarow
 

On
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Colonies_of_Ukraine/Schlac-Molot-Rock.html
[or http://tinyurl.com/mqfhyzf --Mod.]
I have posted two photos, a wedding party photo >from 1910 and a
birthday party photo >from 1919. All faces in the birthday photo
are identified. This web page also has a key that identifies many
people in the wedding photo. The 100-year-old birthday girl is
easily recognized as the bride's grandmother in the wedding photo.
Other people >from the birthday photo are certainly in the wedding
photo, but are unidentified. Can anyone skilled at "face matching"
please take a look at these photos to see if some unknowns in the
wedding photo can be matched to their counterparts in the birthday
photo. I can supply higher resolution photos and a key with known
faces blanked out, leaving only non-blanked faces to be matched,
for anyone who wants to attempt face matching. Thanks.

Mel Comisarow
Vancouver BC
melcom4@gmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Posting these photos on ViewMate would add the
interactive function of the ViewMate response form. Please reply
privately to Mel Comisarow.


Re: JewishGen FamilyFinder Etiquette Question #general

Meron Lavie
 

Hi Lesley,

Thanks for your response. Too clarify the degree of lack of cooperation on
her side, she was not even willing to give me her father's middle name (I
had the initial already)...

Actually, you have brought to my attention ethical/academic issues which I
had never considered before. Since the relatives whom I've contacted all
wanted all the information they gave published so that we could be found by
other long-lost-relatives, I never really gave a thought of annotating
records with their source. I suppose I should attend to this.

Regards,

Meron LAVIE

-----Original Message-----

Meron Lavie wrote about finding a 3rd cousin through the Jewishgen Family
Finder, responding to her request for information on his family branch by
sharing a lengthy genealogy report and photos of hundreds of family members,
and then having her refuse to share information when he asked about her
branch. He wrote, "Am I the only one here who assumes that if someone has
listed themselves in the FamilyFinder that there is a tacit assumption that
the information should flow in both directions?"

I have had similar experiences and am sorry to hear when other researchers
have had them, too. In Meron's case, he provided a massive amount of
material in response to her request for information, she responded by
withholding information about her branch, and I can understand why he is
frustrated. We don't know her particular reasons, but it's possible that she
was overwhelmed by the magnitude of information he provided and felt she
couldn't reciprocate in kind. Or perhaps she didn't have much information to
share.

In many years of doing family history research, I've had a great time
connecting with others, but have become more cautious about providing a lot
of information or my research results after being "burned" a few times,
especially by people who took documents and photos I provided, claimed them
as their own, and didn't share information in kind. This is why I don't yet
have a family tree on Ancestry or any other website. I've also made many
good friends by exchanging information, and my own research has benefited
from what others have provided. If at some point I put my tree on Ancestry,
I'll make it private but searchable, so I can still connect with other
researchers, but can assess their interest first. Here's why.

I now try to get a sense of how my new contact might reciprocate or use what
I provide before I send much information. One way to do this is to provide a
small amount of information and see how the other person responds before
sending more. I also let my contact know that if they provide information to
me, I follow ethical standards such as those listed on the website of the
National Genealogical Society at
http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/standards_for_sharing_information, and I cite
the sources for all material I get >from others following Elizabeth Shown
Mill's book, "Evidence Explained." I give them the link to
www.evidenceexplained.com and mention how useful the site is if they're not
familiar with it. This lets others know about my research ethics, and most
people appreciate these tips if they didn't know about them already. If
someone provided information, but asked me not to share it, I wouldn't
unless they later gave their permission.

I haven't been able to find anything on the Jewishgen website about basic
genealogical research practices, including ethical standards. If someone
knows if any are posted, perhaps they can share the link on this list. If
none are posted, it would help those who use the site understand
expectations and have a place within Jewishgen to refer other researchers.
One place to add such help would be the introduction to the Jewishgen Family
Finder.

Lesley K. Cafarelli
Minneapolis, MN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: JewishGen FamilyFinder Etiquette Question #general

Meron Lavie
 

Hi Lesley,

Thanks for your response. Too clarify the degree of lack of cooperation on
her side, she was not even willing to give me her father's middle name (I
had the initial already)...

Actually, you have brought to my attention ethical/academic issues which I
had never considered before. Since the relatives whom I've contacted all
wanted all the information they gave published so that we could be found by
other long-lost-relatives, I never really gave a thought of annotating
records with their source. I suppose I should attend to this.

Regards,

Meron LAVIE

-----Original Message-----

Meron Lavie wrote about finding a 3rd cousin through the Jewishgen Family
Finder, responding to her request for information on his family branch by
sharing a lengthy genealogy report and photos of hundreds of family members,
and then having her refuse to share information when he asked about her
branch. He wrote, "Am I the only one here who assumes that if someone has
listed themselves in the FamilyFinder that there is a tacit assumption that
the information should flow in both directions?"

I have had similar experiences and am sorry to hear when other researchers
have had them, too. In Meron's case, he provided a massive amount of
material in response to her request for information, she responded by
withholding information about her branch, and I can understand why he is
frustrated. We don't know her particular reasons, but it's possible that she
was overwhelmed by the magnitude of information he provided and felt she
couldn't reciprocate in kind. Or perhaps she didn't have much information to
share.

In many years of doing family history research, I've had a great time
connecting with others, but have become more cautious about providing a lot
of information or my research results after being "burned" a few times,
especially by people who took documents and photos I provided, claimed them
as their own, and didn't share information in kind. This is why I don't yet
have a family tree on Ancestry or any other website. I've also made many
good friends by exchanging information, and my own research has benefited
from what others have provided. If at some point I put my tree on Ancestry,
I'll make it private but searchable, so I can still connect with other
researchers, but can assess their interest first. Here's why.

I now try to get a sense of how my new contact might reciprocate or use what
I provide before I send much information. One way to do this is to provide a
small amount of information and see how the other person responds before
sending more. I also let my contact know that if they provide information to
me, I follow ethical standards such as those listed on the website of the
National Genealogical Society at
http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/standards_for_sharing_information, and I cite
the sources for all material I get >from others following Elizabeth Shown
Mill's book, "Evidence Explained." I give them the link to
www.evidenceexplained.com and mention how useful the site is if they're not
familiar with it. This lets others know about my research ethics, and most
people appreciate these tips if they didn't know about them already. If
someone provided information, but asked me not to share it, I wouldn't
unless they later gave their permission.

I haven't been able to find anything on the Jewishgen website about basic
genealogical research practices, including ethical standards. If someone
knows if any are posted, perhaps they can share the link on this list. If
none are posted, it would help those who use the site understand
expectations and have a place within Jewishgen to refer other researchers.
One place to add such help would be the introduction to the Jewishgen Family
Finder.

Lesley K. Cafarelli
Minneapolis, MN


Yizkor Book Project, May 2014 #germany

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I am both excited and pleased to see that during May, a number of Yizkor
Book projects came all that closer to completion. Some of these are just a
hairsbreadth away >from seeing this lofty goal and I imagine that in the next
couple of our monthly reports, we'll have the pleasure of announcing the
fact that they are completely translated and online. Still, with that,
whilst some of the projects are so close to their end, they still require
some additional funds to carry out this work. So if you have a Yizkor Book
project for which you have aspirations of seeing its translation in its
entirety, we invite you to visit our list of Translation Funds at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
to donate however much you are able to help this dream become a reality.

Of course, quite a few of the books that have been completely translated
have come out in hard copies and during this last month, two new books
joined their ranks:

Brest, Belarus - Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora
Grajewo, Poland - Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book

These are now available for purchase and you can see the full range of books
printed through our Yizkor Books in Print Project at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Apart >from the books that are close to completion, we do have a number of
books for which we have the whole translation and these are also being
converted to web format and also hope to announce the joyous fact that they
are completely online in coming months.

Now to facts and figures for May.
During this last month we have added in 3 new projects:

- Goniadz, Poland (In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz1/goniadz1.html

- Satu Mare, Romania (Jews of the Szatmar District)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satu_Mare1/Satu_Mare1.html

- Ustilug, Ukraine (The growth and destruction of the community of Uscilug)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ustilug/Ustilug.html

Added in 6 new entries:

- Daugavpils, Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/lat262.html

- Jindrichuv Hradec, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh447.html

- Riga, Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/lat243.html

- Trebon, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh698.html

- Vlasim, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh699.html

- Vodnany, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh699a.html

We have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dzyatlava, Belarus (A memorial to the Jewish community of Zetel)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyatlava/Dzyatlava.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice; The birth and the destruction of
a Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Indura, Belarus (Amdur, my hometown)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/indura/indura.html

- Lanivtsi, Ukraine (Lanowce: Memorial Book of the Martyrs of Lanowce Who
Perished During the Holocaust)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lanovtsy/Lanovtsy.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Michow, Poland (Memorial book to the martyrs of Michow who perished in the
Holocaust) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michow/Michow.html

- Monastyrys'ka, Ukraine (Monasterzyska: a Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monastyriska/Monastyriska.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Rokiskis, Lithuania (Yizkor book of Rakishok and environs)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rokiskis/rokiskis.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Szczebrzeszyn, Poland (The Book of Memory to the Jewish Community of
Shebreshin) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczebrzeszyn/Szczebrzeszyn.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

- Zofyuvka, Ukraine (The tree and the roots; the history of T.L (Sofyovka
and Ignatovka)) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zofyuvka/Zofyuvka.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online. Wishing you all a Happy Shavuot and/or Shavuot Sameach,

Lance Ackerfeld, Yizkor Book Project Manager lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Yizkor Book Project, May 2014 #germany

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I am both excited and pleased to see that during May, a number of Yizkor
Book projects came all that closer to completion. Some of these are just a
hairsbreadth away >from seeing this lofty goal and I imagine that in the next
couple of our monthly reports, we'll have the pleasure of announcing the
fact that they are completely translated and online. Still, with that,
whilst some of the projects are so close to their end, they still require
some additional funds to carry out this work. So if you have a Yizkor Book
project for which you have aspirations of seeing its translation in its
entirety, we invite you to visit our list of Translation Funds at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
to donate however much you are able to help this dream become a reality.

Of course, quite a few of the books that have been completely translated
have come out in hard copies and during this last month, two new books
joined their ranks:

Brest, Belarus - Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora
Grajewo, Poland - Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book

These are now available for purchase and you can see the full range of books
printed through our Yizkor Books in Print Project at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Apart >from the books that are close to completion, we do have a number of
books for which we have the whole translation and these are also being
converted to web format and also hope to announce the joyous fact that they
are completely online in coming months.

Now to facts and figures for May.
During this last month we have added in 3 new projects:

- Goniadz, Poland (In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz1/goniadz1.html

- Satu Mare, Romania (Jews of the Szatmar District)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satu_Mare1/Satu_Mare1.html

- Ustilug, Ukraine (The growth and destruction of the community of Uscilug)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ustilug/Ustilug.html

Added in 6 new entries:

- Daugavpils, Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/lat262.html

- Jindrichuv Hradec, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh447.html

- Riga, Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/lat243.html

- Trebon, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh698.html

- Vlasim, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh699.html

- Vodnany, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh699a.html

We have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dzyatlava, Belarus (A memorial to the Jewish community of Zetel)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyatlava/Dzyatlava.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice; The birth and the destruction of
a Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Indura, Belarus (Amdur, my hometown)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/indura/indura.html

- Lanivtsi, Ukraine (Lanowce: Memorial Book of the Martyrs of Lanowce Who
Perished During the Holocaust)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lanovtsy/Lanovtsy.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Michow, Poland (Memorial book to the martyrs of Michow who perished in the
Holocaust) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michow/Michow.html

- Monastyrys'ka, Ukraine (Monasterzyska: a Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monastyriska/Monastyriska.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Rokiskis, Lithuania (Yizkor book of Rakishok and environs)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rokiskis/rokiskis.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Szczebrzeszyn, Poland (The Book of Memory to the Jewish Community of
Shebreshin) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczebrzeszyn/Szczebrzeszyn.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

- Zofyuvka, Ukraine (The tree and the roots; the history of T.L (Sofyovka
and Ignatovka)) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zofyuvka/Zofyuvka.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online. Wishing you all a Happy Shavuot and/or Shavuot Sameach,

Lance Ackerfeld, Yizkor Book Project Manager lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com

120561 - 120580 of 668858