Date   

Question about use of German in Polish documents #poland

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

I recently received a number of documents about my family >from the Polish
State Archives in Lodz, and was surprised to see that a number of them -
from the population register of 1918-1920 - are printed in both German and
Polish. I knew that before World War I central Poland (which includes the
Lodz area) was under Russian control, and I have many documents in Russian
from the late 19th century and first decade of the 20th century. I also
knew that after WWI, Poland regained its independence and I have documents
in Polish >from the 1920s and 1930s.

But what was happening during WWI and shortly afterward? Was there a period
of German control? Or was German perhaps used in Poland as a kind of
international language in a period of shifting control? I have tried to
find information about this, but haven't succeeded and would welcome an
informed response.

Note that it is the printed parts of the documents that are in both German
and Polish; the handwritten details that have been filled out are just in
Polish.

Thanking you,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana.


JRI Poland #Poland Question about use of German in Polish documents #poland

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

I recently received a number of documents about my family >from the Polish
State Archives in Lodz, and was surprised to see that a number of them -
from the population register of 1918-1920 - are printed in both German and
Polish. I knew that before World War I central Poland (which includes the
Lodz area) was under Russian control, and I have many documents in Russian
from the late 19th century and first decade of the 20th century. I also
knew that after WWI, Poland regained its independence and I have documents
in Polish >from the 1920s and 1930s.

But what was happening during WWI and shortly afterward? Was there a period
of German control? Or was German perhaps used in Poland as a kind of
international language in a period of shifting control? I have tried to
find information about this, but haven't succeeded and would welcome an
informed response.

Note that it is the printed parts of the documents that are in both German
and Polish; the handwritten details that have been filled out are just in
Polish.

Thanking you,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana.


Found Help in San Luis Obispo, California #lithuania

Yael & Barry <ydriver@...>
 

Dear Fellow Litvaks,

Thank you all for responding to my quest.

I believe I am now on the way to locating the person I have been
searching for.

You have been all very helpful.

Yael Driver, London England


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Found Help in San Luis Obispo, California #lithuania

Yael & Barry <ydriver@...>
 

Dear Fellow Litvaks,

Thank you all for responding to my quest.

I believe I am now on the way to locating the person I have been
searching for.

You have been all very helpful.

Yael Driver, London England


LitvakSIG Elections 2014 #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

Elections ballots were sent out on the 15th of July. If you are a
dues-paying member of LitvakSIG and have not received your ballot
via e-mail, please let me know privately.

Please cast your vote !

Carol Hoffman, Chair, Election Committee
saftacarol@gmail.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania LitvakSIG Elections 2014 #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

Elections ballots were sent out on the 15th of July. If you are a
dues-paying member of LitvakSIG and have not received your ballot
via e-mail, please let me know privately.

Please cast your vote !

Carol Hoffman, Chair, Election Committee
saftacarol@gmail.com


Re: Hertz Romania/Ukraine #romania

Jack Miller <jmiller@...>
 

My grandfather Asher COOPER emigrated >from Hertz (hartz, Hartza etc)
Romania in the 1890s. I am unable to find any trace of him. Should I be
looking in Romanian or Ukrainian sources? What might Cooper have been in
the old country. Cupfer?

He met my grandmother in New York. She described herself as Austrian (from
Melnitsa) and he said he was Romanian. Both are in the Ukraine today and
were in virtual spitting distance of each other in the old country. This
caused a lot of confusion in the family as they hadn't looked at the maps.

Dr. Jack M.Miller
Special Advisor on Buildings & Space
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry
Brock University
St. Catharines, ON, L2S3A1









Romania SIG #Romania Re: Hertz Romania/Ukraine #romania

Jack Miller <jmiller@...>
 

My grandfather Asher COOPER emigrated >from Hertz (hartz, Hartza etc)
Romania in the 1890s. I am unable to find any trace of him. Should I be
looking in Romanian or Ukrainian sources? What might Cooper have been in
the old country. Cupfer?

He met my grandmother in New York. She described herself as Austrian (from
Melnitsa) and he said he was Romanian. Both are in the Ukraine today and
were in virtual spitting distance of each other in the old country. This
caused a lot of confusion in the family as they hadn't looked at the maps.

Dr. Jack M.Miller
Special Advisor on Buildings & Space
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry
Brock University
St. Catharines, ON, L2S3A1









Re: Yiddish or Hebrew Name #general

Chuck Weinstein <cmw521@...>
 

Bendet is a Germanic or Yiddish form of Benedict, a Latin name meaning
"blessed". In Hebrew, this would have been Baruch, although people did not
always secularize their Hebrew name exactly. I have a number of Baruchs in
my tree, secularized to Benjamin. I have no idea how that came to be. I am
sure that for many families, the opposite also occurred.

Chuck Weinstein
Bellport, NY
Cmw521@earthlink.net

Original message:

From: "Sharon Korn" <s.r.korn@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 19:56:48 -0700

"An ancestor's name has been listed on various documents as Beni, Bendet,
Berel, and Benjamin. He never left "Russia," so Benjamin is an
Americanization.

"Apparently the name Benjamin was unknown to his children in their youth. I
believe this because his son in the U.S. named his first child Benjamin, for
his wife's deceased grandfather, but the birth certificate shows that the
name was changed fairly soon. The logical reason for the change is that the
son was told that his father was named Benjamin, and it was unacceptable
among Ashkenazim to give a child the name of a living ancestor.

"I understand that Berel is a Yiddish name and Benyamin is a Hebrew name.
Beni appears to be a nickname for either Bendet or Benyamin. What sort of
name is Bendet? Is it Yiddish, Hebrew, or a short form of Benyamin?"


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish or Hebrew Name #general

Chuck Weinstein <cmw521@...>
 

Bendet is a Germanic or Yiddish form of Benedict, a Latin name meaning
"blessed". In Hebrew, this would have been Baruch, although people did not
always secularize their Hebrew name exactly. I have a number of Baruchs in
my tree, secularized to Benjamin. I have no idea how that came to be. I am
sure that for many families, the opposite also occurred.

Chuck Weinstein
Bellport, NY
Cmw521@earthlink.net

Original message:

From: "Sharon Korn" <s.r.korn@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 19:56:48 -0700

"An ancestor's name has been listed on various documents as Beni, Bendet,
Berel, and Benjamin. He never left "Russia," so Benjamin is an
Americanization.

"Apparently the name Benjamin was unknown to his children in their youth. I
believe this because his son in the U.S. named his first child Benjamin, for
his wife's deceased grandfather, but the birth certificate shows that the
name was changed fairly soon. The logical reason for the change is that the
son was told that his father was named Benjamin, and it was unacceptable
among Ashkenazim to give a child the name of a living ancestor.

"I understand that Berel is a Yiddish name and Benyamin is a Hebrew name.
Beni appears to be a nickname for either Bendet or Benyamin. What sort of
name is Bendet? Is it Yiddish, Hebrew, or a short form of Benyamin?"


Request translation German death record to English #general

Barrie Karp
 

Hello, JG,
Please can anyone translate to English, the German in this burial record?
especially this part:

"Comments: Occupation: PrivatierTomb: No Urm: No Killed in Bombing:
Comments: am Wege"

re Isaac Wien's father, our 2nd great grandfather:

JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR) about Joachim Heinrich Wien

Name: Joachim Heinrich Wien
Age at Death: 76
Burial Date: 16 Feb 1890
Burial Plot: Section: T1 Group: 005b Row: 36 Grave: 61
Burial Place: Vienna, Austria
Comments: Occupation: PrivatierTomb: No Urm: No Killed in Bombing:
Comments: am Wege
Other Comments: Tor I
Cemetery: Wiener Zentralfriedhof
Cemetery Address: XI. Simmeringer Hauptstrasse 234
Cemetery Burials: 79833
Cemetery Comments: Old Jewish cemetery in Vienna with graves from
1880-1938. Data compiled by Mag. Walter Pagle

Thank you very much.

Sincerely,

Barrie Karp
barriekarp@gmail.com
Barrie Karp, Ph.D., Philosophy
NYC !

KARP; WIEN; BERKOWITZ; TUCHFELD, (Romania (Iasi, Tulcea, etc.), Ukraine,
Galicia, Lviv, Stryj, Stanislawow, Austria, Hungary, Vienna);WEISS (Cohain);
GREENBAUM, BERKOWITZ, FUCHS/Fox, KLEIN, GOTTLIEB [?]; ROSENFELD, ENGEL,
LOVENRIN (Hungary: Munkacs/Mukacheve, Kovago-Eors; Ukraine, Austria, Germany,
Vienna). NYC all; Wilkes-Barre, PA; Syracuse, NY; Scranton, PA; Cleveland, OH;
Los Angeles, CA; Rochester, NY; Broward, FL; NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Request translation German death record to English #general

Barrie Karp
 

Hello, JG,
Please can anyone translate to English, the German in this burial record?
especially this part:

"Comments: Occupation: PrivatierTomb: No Urm: No Killed in Bombing:
Comments: am Wege"

re Isaac Wien's father, our 2nd great grandfather:

JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR) about Joachim Heinrich Wien

Name: Joachim Heinrich Wien
Age at Death: 76
Burial Date: 16 Feb 1890
Burial Plot: Section: T1 Group: 005b Row: 36 Grave: 61
Burial Place: Vienna, Austria
Comments: Occupation: PrivatierTomb: No Urm: No Killed in Bombing:
Comments: am Wege
Other Comments: Tor I
Cemetery: Wiener Zentralfriedhof
Cemetery Address: XI. Simmeringer Hauptstrasse 234
Cemetery Burials: 79833
Cemetery Comments: Old Jewish cemetery in Vienna with graves from
1880-1938. Data compiled by Mag. Walter Pagle

Thank you very much.

Sincerely,

Barrie Karp
barriekarp@gmail.com
Barrie Karp, Ph.D., Philosophy
NYC !

KARP; WIEN; BERKOWITZ; TUCHFELD, (Romania (Iasi, Tulcea, etc.), Ukraine,
Galicia, Lviv, Stryj, Stanislawow, Austria, Hungary, Vienna);WEISS (Cohain);
GREENBAUM, BERKOWITZ, FUCHS/Fox, KLEIN, GOTTLIEB [?]; ROSENFELD, ENGEL,
LOVENRIN (Hungary: Munkacs/Mukacheve, Kovago-Eors; Ukraine, Austria, Germany,
Vienna). NYC all; Wilkes-Barre, PA; Syracuse, NY; Scranton, PA; Cleveland, OH;
Los Angeles, CA; Rochester, NY; Broward, FL; NJ


Re: Fish Suppers #general

Shulamit
 

This is what I remember was the custom in my surroundings. I am quite sure
that Jews living near the sea had different habits.

In Europe, especially in land bound countries, fish was not readily available
and people usually ate fish rarely. And when so, mainly freshwater fish or
fish preserved by pickling, salting or smoking. It was custom in land bound
countries because of the quick deterioration of fish not to eat fish during
the summer months, in "Monaten ohne R" (months without R). However, because
of the Catholics' need for alternatives to meat on Fridays, fish dealers came
to the market with fresh fish on Fridays. Jewish housewives certainly also
took advantage to be able to buy good fresh fish. This might be the reason
why Jews often had fish on Erev Shabbat.

The recipe for "Peterli Fisch" (fish, mainly carp, cooked with a lot of
parsley) >from the Alsace. This is fish cooked on Friday and often served cold
with the gelled sauce for Shabbat lunch. The German Jews offered something
similar. The German Jews instead of using parsley cooked the fish "sweet and
sour" with raisins, sugar and vinegar and also served it often cold and
gelled for Shabbat lunch.

Shulamit Spain, Scotland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Fish Suppers #general

Shulamit
 

This is what I remember was the custom in my surroundings. I am quite sure
that Jews living near the sea had different habits.

In Europe, especially in land bound countries, fish was not readily available
and people usually ate fish rarely. And when so, mainly freshwater fish or
fish preserved by pickling, salting or smoking. It was custom in land bound
countries because of the quick deterioration of fish not to eat fish during
the summer months, in "Monaten ohne R" (months without R). However, because
of the Catholics' need for alternatives to meat on Fridays, fish dealers came
to the market with fresh fish on Fridays. Jewish housewives certainly also
took advantage to be able to buy good fresh fish. This might be the reason
why Jews often had fish on Erev Shabbat.

The recipe for "Peterli Fisch" (fish, mainly carp, cooked with a lot of
parsley) >from the Alsace. This is fish cooked on Friday and often served cold
with the gelled sauce for Shabbat lunch. The German Jews offered something
similar. The German Jews instead of using parsley cooked the fish "sweet and
sour" with raisins, sugar and vinegar and also served it often cold and
gelled for Shabbat lunch.

Shulamit Spain, Scotland


ViewMate translation request - Russian? #general

Tommy Abrams
 

I've posted several vital records in what I believe to be Russian, for which
I need translation. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34706
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34707
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34708
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34709

Please reply in the form provided in ViewMate.

Thank you for any assistance.

Tommy Abrams
tommya2010@yahoo.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian? #general

Tommy Abrams
 

I've posted several vital records in what I believe to be Russian, for which
I need translation. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34706
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34707
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34708
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34709

Please reply in the form provided in ViewMate.

Thank you for any assistance.

Tommy Abrams
tommya2010@yahoo.com


Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Program: "Looking Outside the BMD Box for Your Mother and Aunts" #general

events@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois will present Israeli
genealogist Rose Feldman, who will speak about "Looking Outside the BMD
Box for Your Mother and Aunts: A Case Study Based on Eretz Israel" at
6:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 23, 2014, in the Mary Radmacher Meeting Room
of the Skokie Public Library, 5215 Oakton St., Skokie, Ill.

She will explain how to go beyond birth, marriage and death records to
research female ancestors and other relatives. Feldman, who grew up in
the West Rogers Park neighborhood of Chicago and has been living in
Israel for 50 years, will share information on how women's community
activities, occupations and political involvement can lead to
genealogical data. She will also explain how awareness of naming
patterns in Israel can be an important research skill.

Among the resources she will discuss are the online databases provided
by the Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) and the Israel
Genealogical Society (IGS) as well as government documents and
publications.

Rose Feldman is in charge of developing new databases for the Israel
Genealogy Research Association and will be developing resources for the
2015 IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem.

She has lectured at nine IAJGS conferences starting in 2003, at various
annual seminars of the Israel Genealogical Society, branch meetings of
IGRA and IGS, at the Israeli Association for Archives and Information
workshop, and in the last two years at the genealogy workshop of the
Central Zionist Archives. She is one of the three coordinators of the
Montefiore Censuses Project and has four KehilaLinks sites on JewishGen
for Ruzhany and Kossowo, Belarus; Mscibow, Belarus; Litin, Ukraine; and
Kalinovka, Ukraine.

In social media, Feldman is known on Twitter as jewdatagengirl. She also
manages IGRA's Twitter feed and Facebook page.

She has published articles in Roots-Key, Sharsheret Hadorot, Avotaynu,
Shemot and on the IGRA website. In 2009 she received the Yakir Award of
the Israel Genealogical Society.

For more information about the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois,
visit http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.

For more information about Rose Feldman, see her personal website at
http://www.tau.ac.il/~rosef/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Program: "Looking Outside the BMD Box for Your Mother and Aunts" #general

events@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois will present Israeli
genealogist Rose Feldman, who will speak about "Looking Outside the BMD
Box for Your Mother and Aunts: A Case Study Based on Eretz Israel" at
6:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 23, 2014, in the Mary Radmacher Meeting Room
of the Skokie Public Library, 5215 Oakton St., Skokie, Ill.

She will explain how to go beyond birth, marriage and death records to
research female ancestors and other relatives. Feldman, who grew up in
the West Rogers Park neighborhood of Chicago and has been living in
Israel for 50 years, will share information on how women's community
activities, occupations and political involvement can lead to
genealogical data. She will also explain how awareness of naming
patterns in Israel can be an important research skill.

Among the resources she will discuss are the online databases provided
by the Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) and the Israel
Genealogical Society (IGS) as well as government documents and
publications.

Rose Feldman is in charge of developing new databases for the Israel
Genealogy Research Association and will be developing resources for the
2015 IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem.

She has lectured at nine IAJGS conferences starting in 2003, at various
annual seminars of the Israel Genealogical Society, branch meetings of
IGRA and IGS, at the Israeli Association for Archives and Information
workshop, and in the last two years at the genealogy workshop of the
Central Zionist Archives. She is one of the three coordinators of the
Montefiore Censuses Project and has four KehilaLinks sites on JewishGen
for Ruzhany and Kossowo, Belarus; Mscibow, Belarus; Litin, Ukraine; and
Kalinovka, Ukraine.

In social media, Feldman is known on Twitter as jewdatagengirl. She also
manages IGRA's Twitter feed and Facebook page.

She has published articles in Roots-Key, Sharsheret Hadorot, Avotaynu,
Shemot and on the IGRA website. In 2009 she received the Yakir Award of
the Israel Genealogical Society.

For more information about the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois,
visit http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.

For more information about Rose Feldman, see her personal website at
http://www.tau.ac.il/~rosef/


ViewMate request: Identify Dresden building(s) #germany

jberlowitz <jberlowitz331@...>
 

Dear SIGgers,
I have posted a photo on ViewMate, at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34779.
It was taken in Dresden in 1929 and I would like to know if anyone
can identify the building behind the couple. Please use the form
provided on ViewMate for your responses. I'll be very appreciative.

Judith Berlowitz, Oakland, California


German SIG #Germany ViewMate request: Identify Dresden building(s) #germany

jberlowitz <jberlowitz331@...>
 

Dear SIGgers,
I have posted a photo on ViewMate, at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34779.
It was taken in Dresden in 1929 and I would like to know if anyone
can identify the building behind the couple. Please use the form
provided on ViewMate for your responses. I'll be very appreciative.

Judith Berlowitz, Oakland, California

111081 - 111100 of 661957