Date   

Visiting Kolbuszowa, nearby Przedborz, Hucisko to research EMMER, BRAND, SPIELMAN #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Ronald Aronson writes:

"I'm traveling with my wife, daughter, and granddaughter next month to
the town of Kolbuszowa and the nearby villages of Przedborz
(coordinates 5011 2146) and Hucisko (coordinates 5011 2145). We plan
to visit the remaining Jewish sites in Kolbuszowa. I expect to visit the
archive in Rzeszow and one in Przemysl to look for records. We've never
done a trip like this before, and don't speak or read Polish, so we'd be
happy to hear your advice and suggestions."

Two recommendations are:

Consult the cadastral map of Kolbuszowa available in the Gesher Galicia
map room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/kolbuszowa-1850/

You might want to print up a large scale (architectural size) version of
this map (at least of the center of town so house numbers are readable)
and bring it with you as you walk the streets of the town. Having done
this myself on shtetl visits, I know that it can be the catalyst for the
townspeople assisting you and commenting on places... people and the
history of a town. A map needs no translation, it's visual language
universal. Also consider that most townspeople have never seen a map
like this.

from the description:
"Land parcels and houses are all clearly numbered. Although the town
is small, with very few masonry buildings, the map shows a
well-developed market square, a large reservoir, and an elaborate
parkland with water features on a large family estate. The size of the
Jewish cemetery southwest of the town center attests to the
significance of the Jewish community here and in surrounding villages;
the town was also a seat for the area's Catholic community, with a
large All Saints church and a cemetery north of the town center."

You might also want to bring older images of the town >from postcards
or stills >from the 1930s film available >from the Spielberg film archives
at the UHSMM with you as well. A picture is worth...well you know.
Finding the oldest residents of the town to tell their stories can be
enlightening, despite the tortured history of these shtetls.

Gesher Galicia currently has a Galician Archival Records Project (GARP)
for Kolbuszowa in the works, which means we will be inventorying a
variety of town records, including landowner and school documents,
which are an added component to vital records. It's difficult in a short
archival visit to start going through record books like this, but with the
proper notice it can be done. You might consider creating GARP projects
for the other, smaller, towns and some advance work could be done
before your visit that would provide you with information on which
records exist in the various archives for your towns (not just your
surnames) which could benefit all researchers >from these towns. There
is value for covering an entire town, instead of just the names you know
about, as relationships emerge as research continues and you find other
names related to your own through marriage. Information on the GARP
projects is here: http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/garp/

If you have specific questions on any of this you can write to me privately.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...


Gesher Galicia on Facebook #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Dear Galitzianers:

Were you aware that Gesher Galicia has a Facebook page?

We report on website updates and news >from the international
community of Galician researchers, historians, filmmakers and writers...
so you should check it out and "like" us if you haven't already. We'd like
to see our numbers grow on Facebook, and, best of all -- it's free!

Go to: https://www.facebook.com/GesherGalicia

And make sure to click the "like" box if you haven't already. We are up
to the nice round number of 800 at this writing, but I'd love to get to
1,000... or more.

You can also comment, ask questions, post, and add your own Galician
news and photos, so it's another excellent way to network within the
global Galician genealogical community.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...


Lopuzka Mala Cadastral Map #galicia

Tammy
 

I was pleasantly surprised to find the Lopuzka Mala Cadastral map on
the All Galicia Database. Can someone please explain to me how to find
possible ancestors using this resource?

Thank you,

Tammy Weingarten
Searching: SILBERMAN, SCHIFFMAN - Kanczuga


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Visiting Kolbuszowa, nearby Przedborz, Hucisko to research EMMER, BRAND, SPIELMAN #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Ronald Aronson writes:

"I'm traveling with my wife, daughter, and granddaughter next month to
the town of Kolbuszowa and the nearby villages of Przedborz
(coordinates 5011 2146) and Hucisko (coordinates 5011 2145). We plan
to visit the remaining Jewish sites in Kolbuszowa. I expect to visit the
archive in Rzeszow and one in Przemysl to look for records. We've never
done a trip like this before, and don't speak or read Polish, so we'd be
happy to hear your advice and suggestions."

Two recommendations are:

Consult the cadastral map of Kolbuszowa available in the Gesher Galicia
map room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/kolbuszowa-1850/

You might want to print up a large scale (architectural size) version of
this map (at least of the center of town so house numbers are readable)
and bring it with you as you walk the streets of the town. Having done
this myself on shtetl visits, I know that it can be the catalyst for the
townspeople assisting you and commenting on places... people and the
history of a town. A map needs no translation, it's visual language
universal. Also consider that most townspeople have never seen a map
like this.

from the description:
"Land parcels and houses are all clearly numbered. Although the town
is small, with very few masonry buildings, the map shows a
well-developed market square, a large reservoir, and an elaborate
parkland with water features on a large family estate. The size of the
Jewish cemetery southwest of the town center attests to the
significance of the Jewish community here and in surrounding villages;
the town was also a seat for the area's Catholic community, with a
large All Saints church and a cemetery north of the town center."

You might also want to bring older images of the town >from postcards
or stills >from the 1930s film available >from the Spielberg film archives
at the UHSMM with you as well. A picture is worth...well you know.
Finding the oldest residents of the town to tell their stories can be
enlightening, despite the tortured history of these shtetls.

Gesher Galicia currently has a Galician Archival Records Project (GARP)
for Kolbuszowa in the works, which means we will be inventorying a
variety of town records, including landowner and school documents,
which are an added component to vital records. It's difficult in a short
archival visit to start going through record books like this, but with the
proper notice it can be done. You might consider creating GARP projects
for the other, smaller, towns and some advance work could be done
before your visit that would provide you with information on which
records exist in the various archives for your towns (not just your
surnames) which could benefit all researchers >from these towns. There
is value for covering an entire town, instead of just the names you know
about, as relationships emerge as research continues and you find other
names related to your own through marriage. Information on the GARP
projects is here: http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/garp/

If you have specific questions on any of this you can write to me privately.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Gesher Galicia on Facebook #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Dear Galitzianers:

Were you aware that Gesher Galicia has a Facebook page?

We report on website updates and news >from the international
community of Galician researchers, historians, filmmakers and writers...
so you should check it out and "like" us if you haven't already. We'd like
to see our numbers grow on Facebook, and, best of all -- it's free!

Go to: https://www.facebook.com/GesherGalicia

And make sure to click the "like" box if you haven't already. We are up
to the nice round number of 800 at this writing, but I'd love to get to
1,000... or more.

You can also comment, ask questions, post, and add your own Galician
news and photos, so it's another excellent way to network within the
global Galician genealogical community.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Lopuzka Mala Cadastral Map #galicia

Tammy
 

I was pleasantly surprised to find the Lopuzka Mala Cadastral map on
the All Galicia Database. Can someone please explain to me how to find
possible ancestors using this resource?

Thank you,

Tammy Weingarten
Searching: SILBERMAN, SCHIFFMAN - Kanczuga


Family Tree Maker 2007 #general

Merv & Naomi Barnett
 

I have a disc of the above software that is no longer required. If
this is of use to anyone I'd be very happy to send it free of charge.
If you are in Australia or New Zealand there are accompanying discs of
various Registers applicable to this part of the world I can include
too.

Please contact me offlist.

Naomi Barnett
Melbourne Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family Tree Maker 2007 #general

Merv & Naomi Barnett
 

I have a disc of the above software that is no longer required. If
this is of use to anyone I'd be very happy to send it free of charge.
If you are in Australia or New Zealand there are accompanying discs of
various Registers applicable to this part of the world I can include
too.

Please contact me offlist.

Naomi Barnett
Melbourne Australia


Frankfurter Allgemeine #germany

Eva Lawrence
 

Can anyone advise me how to look at online copies of the _Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung_ for the second half of 1887, to find an obituary of my
ggggrandfather, Anselm UNGER / UNGAR, who died in August of that year?
Many thanks

Eva Lawrence, St Albans, UK. eva.lawrence@...


German SIG #Germany Frankfurter Allgemeine #germany

Eva Lawrence
 

Can anyone advise me how to look at online copies of the _Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung_ for the second half of 1887, to find an obituary of my
ggggrandfather, Anselm UNGER / UNGAR, who died in August of that year?
Many thanks

Eva Lawrence, St Albans, UK. eva.lawrence@...


Draft Avoidance #lithuania

Wendy Freebourne <art@...>
 

Hello Researchers

I've just been looking at lists of draft avoiders in Lithuania in 1915.
I see that a great uncle (aged 60) and his 4 sons (aged 20s and 30s)
managed to avoid the draft.

Can anyone tell me how Jewish men managed to do this?

Many thanks

Wendy Freebourne
art@...
Researching: BRENER, INDIKH, RUBINSHTEIN, KAPLAN, Pakruojis


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Draft Avoidance #lithuania

Wendy Freebourne <art@...>
 

Hello Researchers

I've just been looking at lists of draft avoiders in Lithuania in 1915.
I see that a great uncle (aged 60) and his 4 sons (aged 20s and 30s)
managed to avoid the draft.

Can anyone tell me how Jewish men managed to do this?

Many thanks

Wendy Freebourne
art@...
Researching: BRENER, INDIKH, RUBINSHTEIN, KAPLAN, Pakruojis


Re: Pronounciation: "stein" #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dave:

Tell your friend that all of these names were originally in Germanic
languages - generally German or Yiddish. Funny things happen to
pronunciations when spelling (or, in the case of Yiddish,
transliteration for reading as German) is retained even in the
environment of a different language.

In modern German the 'ei' combination has the vowel sound you get in
"fine." The 'ie' combination has the sound you get in "seen."

Of course, both vowels and consonants change >from dialect to dialect and
also shift over time. Yiddish having evolved >from an earlier form of
German, the vowels don't exactly correspond even if the Yiddish word is
recognizably the same as the one in modern German. In some regions, the
sound in Yiddish that corresponds to the 'ei' of 'stein' sounds closer
to the one in 'brain'.

German has its dialects too. Up north (Low German) the 'st' at the
beginning of a syllable is pronounced as we have it in English: the
initial sound in 'stop.' Elsewhere (and in standard school German) it's
pronounced 'sht.'

The 'sht' pronunciation is evident in the transliteration of Jewish
names into languages other than German. In Polish, what we'd write as
STEIN is SZTAJN. Pronounce that Polish-style and it sounds like
"shtine." And >from Russian - well, think of the author Gary SHTEYNGART.

Accordingly, the "original" pronunciation of 'stein' is always (more or
less) 'shtine.'

The 'steen' version comes >from English-speaking people reading the
letters as though they'd always been in English. Which is why many
immigrants changed the spelling of their name when they got to a country
with a different language - to keep the sound, which mattered more to them.

But others were more interested in keeping the spelling...

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 8/23/2014 12:10 PM, David Mayer Rafky dave15851585@... wrote:
A gentile friend pointed out that some names ending in "stein" are
pronounced "stine" while others are pronounced "steen." What can
I tell him?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pronounciation: "stein" #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dave:

Tell your friend that all of these names were originally in Germanic
languages - generally German or Yiddish. Funny things happen to
pronunciations when spelling (or, in the case of Yiddish,
transliteration for reading as German) is retained even in the
environment of a different language.

In modern German the 'ei' combination has the vowel sound you get in
"fine." The 'ie' combination has the sound you get in "seen."

Of course, both vowels and consonants change >from dialect to dialect and
also shift over time. Yiddish having evolved >from an earlier form of
German, the vowels don't exactly correspond even if the Yiddish word is
recognizably the same as the one in modern German. In some regions, the
sound in Yiddish that corresponds to the 'ei' of 'stein' sounds closer
to the one in 'brain'.

German has its dialects too. Up north (Low German) the 'st' at the
beginning of a syllable is pronounced as we have it in English: the
initial sound in 'stop.' Elsewhere (and in standard school German) it's
pronounced 'sht.'

The 'sht' pronunciation is evident in the transliteration of Jewish
names into languages other than German. In Polish, what we'd write as
STEIN is SZTAJN. Pronounce that Polish-style and it sounds like
"shtine." And >from Russian - well, think of the author Gary SHTEYNGART.

Accordingly, the "original" pronunciation of 'stein' is always (more or
less) 'shtine.'

The 'steen' version comes >from English-speaking people reading the
letters as though they'd always been in English. Which is why many
immigrants changed the spelling of their name when they got to a country
with a different language - to keep the sound, which mattered more to them.

But others were more interested in keeping the spelling...

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 8/23/2014 12:10 PM, David Mayer Rafky dave15851585@... wrote:
A gentile friend pointed out that some names ending in "stein" are
pronounced "stine" while others are pronounced "steen." What can
I tell him?


Re: Pronounciation: "stein" #general

Sue Martin
 

The correct German pronunciation is 'shtine'.

Obviously, the American pronunciation is 's' rather than 'sh'.
'Stine' is definitely correct. I've also heard people say 'steen,'
but to my mind that's incorrect, or at least a mutation of the
correct/original pronunciation.

Sue Martin

- Original Message -
From: David Rafky
Sent: Saturday, August 23, 2014 12:10pm
Subject: Pronounciation: "stein"

A gentile friend pointed out that some names ending in "stein" are
pronounced "stine" while others are pronounced "steen." What can
I tell him?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Pronounciation: "stein" #general

Sue Martin
 

The correct German pronunciation is 'shtine'.

Obviously, the American pronunciation is 's' rather than 'sh'.
'Stine' is definitely correct. I've also heard people say 'steen,'
but to my mind that's incorrect, or at least a mutation of the
correct/original pronunciation.

Sue Martin

- Original Message -
From: David Rafky
Sent: Saturday, August 23, 2014 12:10pm
Subject: Pronounciation: "stein"

A gentile friend pointed out that some names ending in "stein" are
pronounced "stine" while others are pronounced "steen." What can
I tell him?


Researching PARADIES family in Prussia/Germany #germany

Jack L. Paradise <jlparadise@...>
 

Hello GerSig,

I just joined the group. My wife is an experienced genealogist. I
lean on her expertise. She has done extensive research over the years
trying to trace the PARADIES family line.

This is our initial connection with JewishGen.org. I live in Utah in
the United States. My native language is English. I also know Portuguese.
Although I do not speak German, I have a son who does.

I consider myself intermediate in using a computer. My experience in
using the Internet is intermediate. I have identified the names and
birth and death dates of my grandparents and my great grandparents.

My primary research goal now is to trace the PARADIES family line
beyond my great grandfather, John PARADIES (changed to Paradise), who
emigrated to the United States >from Prussia within a year or two of
1865. Perhaps he was Itzig PARADIES of Belgard, Preussen, who came
from Hamburg on the Teutonia, arriving in New York on June 2, 1865.
We do not know for sure. We have not found a John or Johan PARADIES
on a passenger list around 1865.

John PARADIES was born in Prussia on December 18, 1847. In all of the
documents we have found, he has not identified a place of birth (other
than Prussia or Germany). We do not know the names of his parents.
We believe his father may have been an officer in the Prussian army.
Although John is the name recorded on all US records we have, his
likely given name at birth would have been Johan -- or perhaps a
totally different name.

I have recently done DNA testing which indicates I have a high
likelihood of Ashkenazi Levite genes through the PARADIES lineage.

My JGFF Researcher ID number is 646900.

Jack Paradise, Cottonwood Heights, Utah JLParadise@...

Moderator Note - WELCOME to GerSIG and thanks for your good INTRO
message. We sent YOU an INTRO letter too. It urged you to search
the GerSIG archives for the family names and towns of special interest
to you. GerSIG has a long time member with your rather unusual family
name. Check her GerSIG messages and think about writing to her.
Good luck - GerSIG Moderator


German SIG #Germany Researching PARADIES family in Prussia/Germany #germany

Jack L. Paradise <jlparadise@...>
 

Hello GerSig,

I just joined the group. My wife is an experienced genealogist. I
lean on her expertise. She has done extensive research over the years
trying to trace the PARADIES family line.

This is our initial connection with JewishGen.org. I live in Utah in
the United States. My native language is English. I also know Portuguese.
Although I do not speak German, I have a son who does.

I consider myself intermediate in using a computer. My experience in
using the Internet is intermediate. I have identified the names and
birth and death dates of my grandparents and my great grandparents.

My primary research goal now is to trace the PARADIES family line
beyond my great grandfather, John PARADIES (changed to Paradise), who
emigrated to the United States >from Prussia within a year or two of
1865. Perhaps he was Itzig PARADIES of Belgard, Preussen, who came
from Hamburg on the Teutonia, arriving in New York on June 2, 1865.
We do not know for sure. We have not found a John or Johan PARADIES
on a passenger list around 1865.

John PARADIES was born in Prussia on December 18, 1847. In all of the
documents we have found, he has not identified a place of birth (other
than Prussia or Germany). We do not know the names of his parents.
We believe his father may have been an officer in the Prussian army.
Although John is the name recorded on all US records we have, his
likely given name at birth would have been Johan -- or perhaps a
totally different name.

I have recently done DNA testing which indicates I have a high
likelihood of Ashkenazi Levite genes through the PARADIES lineage.

My JGFF Researcher ID number is 646900.

Jack Paradise, Cottonwood Heights, Utah JLParadise@...

Moderator Note - WELCOME to GerSIG and thanks for your good INTRO
message. We sent YOU an INTRO letter too. It urged you to search
the GerSIG archives for the family names and towns of special interest
to you. GerSIG has a long time member with your rather unusual family
name. Check her GerSIG messages and think about writing to her.
Good luck - GerSIG Moderator


A new and fantastic resource for researchers #hungary

tom.venetia@...
 

Friends,
Recently I stumbled into a fantastic site: cintoriny.sk
http://www.cintoriny.sk/src/index.php?lan=en
You will find there a search engine for hundreds of cemeteries in Slovakia
(not only Jewish), returning a wealth of data about interred people,
including photos of graves.
In most cases one will also find a detailed map of the graves' layout,
numbering and alleys.
Furthermore, the search allows truncated words/names, such as "vene" for
Venetianer which of course returns all Venetianers but also other surnames
starting with "vene."
The site can be accessed in five languages: Slovak, Czech, Hungarian,
English and German.
The search mechanism ignores accented characters but finds and lists them.
So, for instance, "Muller" returns all Mu:llers. Janos will return Ja'nos,
etc.
This place is still in development and growing every day.
Sadly, Kosice is missing, but the explanation may be that this city has two
huge cemeteries so it is taking some time to have all graves
survayes/photographed/recorded.
Definitively worth of a visit :-)
Regards
Tom


Hungary SIG #Hungary A new and fantastic resource for researchers #hungary

tom.venetia@...
 

Friends,
Recently I stumbled into a fantastic site: cintoriny.sk
http://www.cintoriny.sk/src/index.php?lan=en
You will find there a search engine for hundreds of cemeteries in Slovakia
(not only Jewish), returning a wealth of data about interred people,
including photos of graves.
In most cases one will also find a detailed map of the graves' layout,
numbering and alleys.
Furthermore, the search allows truncated words/names, such as "vene" for
Venetianer which of course returns all Venetianers but also other surnames
starting with "vene."
The site can be accessed in five languages: Slovak, Czech, Hungarian,
English and German.
The search mechanism ignores accented characters but finds and lists them.
So, for instance, "Muller" returns all Mu:llers. Janos will return Ja'nos,
etc.
This place is still in development and growing every day.
Sadly, Kosice is missing, but the explanation may be that this city has two
huge cemeteries so it is taking some time to have all graves
survayes/photographed/recorded.
Definitively worth of a visit :-)
Regards
Tom

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