Date   

query on Polish law re children of unmarried parents #poland

Helen Gardner
 

Hi everyone.

With immense thanks to Tomasz Jerzy Nowak, I now have a translation of the
marriage of my great grandparents Szlama Ajzengold and Ruchla Laja Rakower
on 26 October 1862. It turns out that the bride and groom already had two
children born out of wedlock, and the transcript says:

Snip
... Also, the spouses declared that, through the actual act of matrimony,
in accordance with Article two hundred and ninety-one of the Civil Code
of the Kingdom of Poland guaranteeing {children born out of wedlock} the
rights and status equal to that of children lawfully born, they recognized
their both daughters, that is to say, Chaia Sura who had been born here
in Warsaw on the sixteenth day of June of last year, and Udla, who had
been born in Warsaw on the thirteenth day of July of the current year,
both of whom had been mutually begotten by them during their
pre-conjugal relationship, as their own daughters....

<< Snip >>

Although I have found many references to the Polish Civil Code, I have not
been able to find any reference to article 291 as it was in 19th Century
Poland. A friend told me that as long as there was no conflict with Polish
law, Jewish law was recognised as valid, and that this would be an example
of Jewish law on the status of the children being accepted by Polish law.

If that is correct, I would imagine that article 291 covered the acceptance
of Jewish (or other?) law under approved circumstances, rather than any
reference to children born out of wedlock, and that for non-Jewish children
born out of wedlock the provision of rights and status equal to that of
children lawfully born would not apply.

I would be very grateful if someone could amplify this for me, and, if
possible, tell me what article 291 actually said. Direct replies to me
at helen@thegardners.com.au are fine.

Regards
Helen Gardner


JRI Poland #Poland query on Polish law re children of unmarried parents #poland

Helen Gardner
 

Hi everyone.

With immense thanks to Tomasz Jerzy Nowak, I now have a translation of the
marriage of my great grandparents Szlama Ajzengold and Ruchla Laja Rakower
on 26 October 1862. It turns out that the bride and groom already had two
children born out of wedlock, and the transcript says:

Snip
... Also, the spouses declared that, through the actual act of matrimony,
in accordance with Article two hundred and ninety-one of the Civil Code
of the Kingdom of Poland guaranteeing {children born out of wedlock} the
rights and status equal to that of children lawfully born, they recognized
their both daughters, that is to say, Chaia Sura who had been born here
in Warsaw on the sixteenth day of June of last year, and Udla, who had
been born in Warsaw on the thirteenth day of July of the current year,
both of whom had been mutually begotten by them during their
pre-conjugal relationship, as their own daughters....

<< Snip >>

Although I have found many references to the Polish Civil Code, I have not
been able to find any reference to article 291 as it was in 19th Century
Poland. A friend told me that as long as there was no conflict with Polish
law, Jewish law was recognised as valid, and that this would be an example
of Jewish law on the status of the children being accepted by Polish law.

If that is correct, I would imagine that article 291 covered the acceptance
of Jewish (or other?) law under approved circumstances, rather than any
reference to children born out of wedlock, and that for non-Jewish children
born out of wedlock the provision of rights and status equal to that of
children lawfully born would not apply.

I would be very grateful if someone could amplify this for me, and, if
possible, tell me what article 291 actually said. Direct replies to me
at helen@thegardners.com.au are fine.

Regards
Helen Gardner


Missing Revision List #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

<< From: "David Ellis" <djemkitso@verizon.net>
The All Lithuania Database has entries for my gg-gf and his family >from the
1834 Revision List (census) in the town of Butrimonys.

His entry contains: Iaker SIROTA, son of Abram, age 28.
The Comment field says "12 years old - 1818 additional revision".

I checked the 1816 Revision List, and my SIROTA ancestors are not present
there.The 1818 Additional Revision is not online. Last year, I worked
with the archivist at the Lithuanian State Historical Archive in
Vilnius, and she told me that this volume is not to be found in their
archive.

Is there any other way to obtain the earlier census information for my
family? >>

I can say, without hesitation, the 1818 RL for Butrimonys (Trakai
District) no longer exists. If it did exist, Litvak SIG would have had it
translated some years ago. Since your ancestors are included in the
1834 RL, but not in the 1816 RL indicates they lived elsewhere prior
to 1834.

Another possibility is, they were registered in Butrimonys, in 1834, but
actually lived elsewhere. If you contribute $100, to Litvak SIG, designated
for the Trakai District, you will gain access to the Trakai DRG web site.
You can then check out the records for other towns in the district. Many
times, researchers find records by looking at the entire list, or census
records, they were unable to find by doing a surname search in the Litvak
SIG ALD. Spelling differences in the name is one reason for this.

The Trakai web site includes Butrimonys vital records going back to 1860.
You may find records of your ancestors in those later years.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Missing Revision List #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

<< From: "David Ellis" <djemkitso@verizon.net>
The All Lithuania Database has entries for my gg-gf and his family >from the
1834 Revision List (census) in the town of Butrimonys.

His entry contains: Iaker SIROTA, son of Abram, age 28.
The Comment field says "12 years old - 1818 additional revision".

I checked the 1816 Revision List, and my SIROTA ancestors are not present
there.The 1818 Additional Revision is not online. Last year, I worked
with the archivist at the Lithuanian State Historical Archive in
Vilnius, and she told me that this volume is not to be found in their
archive.

Is there any other way to obtain the earlier census information for my
family? >>

I can say, without hesitation, the 1818 RL for Butrimonys (Trakai
District) no longer exists. If it did exist, Litvak SIG would have had it
translated some years ago. Since your ancestors are included in the
1834 RL, but not in the 1816 RL indicates they lived elsewhere prior
to 1834.

Another possibility is, they were registered in Butrimonys, in 1834, but
actually lived elsewhere. If you contribute $100, to Litvak SIG, designated
for the Trakai District, you will gain access to the Trakai DRG web site.
You can then check out the records for other towns in the district. Many
times, researchers find records by looking at the entire list, or census
records, they were unable to find by doing a surname search in the Litvak
SIG ALD. Spelling differences in the name is one reason for this.

The Trakai web site includes Butrimonys vital records going back to 1860.
You may find records of your ancestors in those later years.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Jonava records #lithuania

salinger@...
 

A Kaunas DRG member has made a contribution to have the following
lists translated.

Jonava (Kaunas) rol 1862 - KRA/I-66/4/543A

Jonava (Kaunas) rol 1867 - KRA/I-61/2/3676

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1870 - KRA/I-61/2/4203

Jonava (Kaunas) candle taxpayers 1860 - KRA/I-61/2/2630,2631

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1850 - KRA/I-61/2/1453, 1487

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1849 - KRA/I-61/2/1330

While the contribution is welcome, and very important, I am
afraid it will not be enough to get all of the lists translated.
My hope is, others will also make a contribution so all of the
lists can be translated in their entirety.

To contribute, go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and scroll
down to District Research. Select Kaunas. In the NOTES block,
key in Jonava.

Ralph Salinger
Coordinator Kaunas DRG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Jonava records #lithuania

salinger@...
 

A Kaunas DRG member has made a contribution to have the following
lists translated.

Jonava (Kaunas) rol 1862 - KRA/I-66/4/543A

Jonava (Kaunas) rol 1867 - KRA/I-61/2/3676

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1870 - KRA/I-61/2/4203

Jonava (Kaunas) candle taxpayers 1860 - KRA/I-61/2/2630,2631

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1850 - KRA/I-61/2/1453, 1487

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1849 - KRA/I-61/2/1330

While the contribution is welcome, and very important, I am
afraid it will not be enough to get all of the lists translated.
My hope is, others will also make a contribution so all of the
lists can be translated in their entirety.

To contribute, go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and scroll
down to District Research. Select Kaunas. In the NOTES block,
key in Jonava.

Ralph Salinger
Coordinator Kaunas DRG


France and US Agree to Compensate Holocaust survivors and Family Members Deported by SNCF During Nazi Occupation #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The French and United States announced a $60 million fund to
compensate holocaust survivors and family members for those deported
by France's state rail company, SNCF during the Nazi occupation.
The fund will be financed by the French government and managed by
the United States. According to the Washington Post, the United
States is waiving its administrative fee for administration. It
will be about $100,000 for each survivor and tens of thousands for
spouses of those who died in the camps or since World War ll.
Amounts for heirs of camp survivors who have since died are to be
determined on the basis of the number of years those survivors lived
after their liberation. Eligible claimants can choose annuities
rather than lump sums.

French legislators still have to approve the agreement.

The agreement includes the US government to work to end lawsuits and
other compensation in US Courts against SNCF. SNCF is bidding for
high-rail and other contracts in the US-which can be very lucrative
for SNCF. One such contract could be worth $6 billion for light
rail in Maryland. State legislators in a number of states have tried
to punish SNCF for Holocaust-era actions.

SNCF transported 76,000 French Jews to Nazi concentration camps.
While SBNC expressed regret they say they had no control over the
operations during Nazi occupation.

The French government has paid $6 billion in reparations but only
to French citizens and some deportees. The new agreement will help
compensate US, Canadian, Israeli and some others not eligible for
the other French reparations. The French have other international
accords with Poland, Belgium, Britain and Czech Republic over
compensation for deportation of victims.

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, AP and Jewish Genner for sharing this
story by the Associated Press. See: http://tinyurl.com/k5u9p3a
Original url:
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/4b9f8f6e94e647dea8183b5486154ee8/france-agrees-compensate-holocaust-deportees

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen France and US Agree to Compensate Holocaust survivors and Family Members Deported by SNCF During Nazi Occupation #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The French and United States announced a $60 million fund to
compensate holocaust survivors and family members for those deported
by France's state rail company, SNCF during the Nazi occupation.
The fund will be financed by the French government and managed by
the United States. According to the Washington Post, the United
States is waiving its administrative fee for administration. It
will be about $100,000 for each survivor and tens of thousands for
spouses of those who died in the camps or since World War ll.
Amounts for heirs of camp survivors who have since died are to be
determined on the basis of the number of years those survivors lived
after their liberation. Eligible claimants can choose annuities
rather than lump sums.

French legislators still have to approve the agreement.

The agreement includes the US government to work to end lawsuits and
other compensation in US Courts against SNCF. SNCF is bidding for
high-rail and other contracts in the US-which can be very lucrative
for SNCF. One such contract could be worth $6 billion for light
rail in Maryland. State legislators in a number of states have tried
to punish SNCF for Holocaust-era actions.

SNCF transported 76,000 French Jews to Nazi concentration camps.
While SBNC expressed regret they say they had no control over the
operations during Nazi occupation.

The French government has paid $6 billion in reparations but only
to French citizens and some deportees. The new agreement will help
compensate US, Canadian, Israeli and some others not eligible for
the other French reparations. The French have other international
accords with Poland, Belgium, Britain and Czech Republic over
compensation for deportation of victims.

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, AP and Jewish Genner for sharing this
story by the Associated Press. See: http://tinyurl.com/k5u9p3a
Original url:
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/4b9f8f6e94e647dea8183b5486154ee8/france-agrees-compensate-holocaust-deportees

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Deadline nears for IAJGS Conference proposal submissions #france

bounce-2880787-772957@...
 

Have you been considering submitting a proposal for the The International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) annual conference in
Jerusalem 6-10 July 2015? This is a reminder that the deadline for
submission of proposals approaches quickly. The deadline is 7 December
2014, no later than 11:59 EST.

All proposals must be submitted using the Conference website
(www.iajgs2015.org)

IAJGS welcomes submissions for lecture, workshop, and panel proposals (see
formats below) for the 35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy.

We seek proposals relevant to the interests of all genealogists
researching Jewish ancestors. If you have a proposal that does not
specifically fit one of the listed categories please feel free to submit
that proposal as well. The specific conference theme is the impact of
WWII on the Jewish people and their lives throughout the world. Again,
anything relevant to the interests of those researching Jewish ancestors
is welcome regardless of the relation of the topic to WWII.

As the conference will take place a few weeks before celebrating the 70th
anniversary of the end of World War II, we plan to focus on the impact of
the War on the Jewish people and their lives across the world;
WWII-related topics include, for example:
* Jewish life in Europe and beyond
* Jewish soldiers in the military
* Resources for military documentation
* The Holocaust
* Emigration and Immigration
* Unique archival repositories

Other unique focus areas include, but are not limited to:
* Resources for researching in Israel (including in pre-State Israel aka
Palestine)
* Technology, tools and techniques
* Academic studies which might assist the Jewish genealogy community
* Jewish genealogy for the younger generation

In addition, we welcome proposals for such Jewish genealogy topics as:
* Resources for researching Sephardic genealogy
* Researching Rabbinic lineages
* Jewish genealogy for beginners
* Country and region-specific research
* Onomastics

Proposal formats:
* Lectures - 45 minutes, including time for questions;
* Workshops - 105 minutes each in the computer lab. Workshops will be
opened upon a minimum number of registrants.
* Panel discussions - 105 minutes. The panel, focusing on a high-level,
broad subject, will include up to five speakers on a given topic, will be
led by a chairperson and will be summarized by a facilitator (all
participants should be named in the proposal). A typical panel will
include time for each speaker, a few minutes for the facilitator, and 20
minutes for an open discussion.

Any one prospective speaker may submit up to five proposals in either
English or Hebrew. A maximum of three proposals per speaker will be
accepted. Individual speakers with at least one accepted proposal receive
a partial registration fee waiver.

All proposals must be submitted using the Conference website
(www.iajgs2015.org); e-mail submittals will NOT be accepted.

Proposals must include the following information (required via the
submission form):
* Full name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number of
presenter(s)(If a panel proposal, details for each panelist are required)
* Brief biographical sketch - (up to 50 words)
* Summary of recent presentation experience (up to 150 words)
* Title of presentation (up to 15 words)
* Presentation type (lecture, workshop, or panel)
* Brief description of the presentation (up to 150 words)
* Audience skill level (beginner, intermediate, advanced or all)
* Preferred language of delivery (English, Hebrew, French)

Submissions Deadline is 7 December 2014, no later than 11:59 EST.
Notification of acceptance will be sent out by 15 February 2015.
Supplemental material for handouts will be requested following acceptance.
Contact the Program Committee at program@iajgs2015.org with any questions
or comments.

Michael Goldstein, Chairman
35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Chairman@iajgs2015.org
http://www.iajgs2015.org


French SIG #France Deadline nears for IAJGS Conference proposal submissions #france

bounce-2880787-772957@...
 

Have you been considering submitting a proposal for the The International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) annual conference in
Jerusalem 6-10 July 2015? This is a reminder that the deadline for
submission of proposals approaches quickly. The deadline is 7 December
2014, no later than 11:59 EST.

All proposals must be submitted using the Conference website
(www.iajgs2015.org)

IAJGS welcomes submissions for lecture, workshop, and panel proposals (see
formats below) for the 35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy.

We seek proposals relevant to the interests of all genealogists
researching Jewish ancestors. If you have a proposal that does not
specifically fit one of the listed categories please feel free to submit
that proposal as well. The specific conference theme is the impact of
WWII on the Jewish people and their lives throughout the world. Again,
anything relevant to the interests of those researching Jewish ancestors
is welcome regardless of the relation of the topic to WWII.

As the conference will take place a few weeks before celebrating the 70th
anniversary of the end of World War II, we plan to focus on the impact of
the War on the Jewish people and their lives across the world;
WWII-related topics include, for example:
* Jewish life in Europe and beyond
* Jewish soldiers in the military
* Resources for military documentation
* The Holocaust
* Emigration and Immigration
* Unique archival repositories

Other unique focus areas include, but are not limited to:
* Resources for researching in Israel (including in pre-State Israel aka
Palestine)
* Technology, tools and techniques
* Academic studies which might assist the Jewish genealogy community
* Jewish genealogy for the younger generation

In addition, we welcome proposals for such Jewish genealogy topics as:
* Resources for researching Sephardic genealogy
* Researching Rabbinic lineages
* Jewish genealogy for beginners
* Country and region-specific research
* Onomastics

Proposal formats:
* Lectures - 45 minutes, including time for questions;
* Workshops - 105 minutes each in the computer lab. Workshops will be
opened upon a minimum number of registrants.
* Panel discussions - 105 minutes. The panel, focusing on a high-level,
broad subject, will include up to five speakers on a given topic, will be
led by a chairperson and will be summarized by a facilitator (all
participants should be named in the proposal). A typical panel will
include time for each speaker, a few minutes for the facilitator, and 20
minutes for an open discussion.

Any one prospective speaker may submit up to five proposals in either
English or Hebrew. A maximum of three proposals per speaker will be
accepted. Individual speakers with at least one accepted proposal receive
a partial registration fee waiver.

All proposals must be submitted using the Conference website
(www.iajgs2015.org); e-mail submittals will NOT be accepted.

Proposals must include the following information (required via the
submission form):
* Full name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number of
presenter(s)(If a panel proposal, details for each panelist are required)
* Brief biographical sketch - (up to 50 words)
* Summary of recent presentation experience (up to 150 words)
* Title of presentation (up to 15 words)
* Presentation type (lecture, workshop, or panel)
* Brief description of the presentation (up to 150 words)
* Audience skill level (beginner, intermediate, advanced or all)
* Preferred language of delivery (English, Hebrew, French)

Submissions Deadline is 7 December 2014, no later than 11:59 EST.
Notification of acceptance will be sent out by 15 February 2015.
Supplemental material for handouts will be requested following acceptance.
Contact the Program Committee at program@iajgs2015.org with any questions
or comments.

Michael Goldstein, Chairman
35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Chairman@iajgs2015.org
http://www.iajgs2015.org


Jewish Genealogy SIG of Collier & Lee Co., FL #general

Arthur Sissman
 

Hi,
The Jewish Genealogy SIG of Collier & Lee Co., FL will meet
Tuesday 12/9/14 at 11 am at Jewish Federation of Collier Co
office at 2500 Vanderbilt Rd, Naples FL

The agenda will be items of interest to the members attending.

All are welcome!

If you are planning on coming, please email Arthur Sissman at
genresearch13@yahoo.com

Thanks!

Arthur Sissman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogy SIG of Collier & Lee Co., FL #general

Arthur Sissman
 

Hi,
The Jewish Genealogy SIG of Collier & Lee Co., FL will meet
Tuesday 12/9/14 at 11 am at Jewish Federation of Collier Co
office at 2500 Vanderbilt Rd, Naples FL

The agenda will be items of interest to the members attending.

All are welcome!

If you are planning on coming, please email Arthur Sissman at
genresearch13@yahoo.com

Thanks!

Arthur Sissman


Phoenix (Arizona) Jewish Genealogy Group meeting, Sunday, 7 December 2014 #general

Emily Garber
 

This coming Sunday the Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group will hold its
December meeting at Congregation Or Tzion, 9096 E. Bahia Drive,
Scottsdale, 1-3 pm.

Bill Adler has agreed to give us a presentation called "Preserve Your
Family Heritage and Leave More than a Headstone."

The Premise: We have passed our genes along to the next generation,
why shouldn't we pass our life stories, their heritage, along as well?

Bill Adler was a child during WWII and matured during the Mid-Century
Modern era of the 1950s. He was born and raised in a small town in
Appalachia. What makes his story somewhat unusual was he was a Jewish
kid learning about life, along with his three younger brothers, in the
hills of West Virginia.

In his book ("Confessions of a Jewish Hillbily"), Bill shared with his
children and grandchildren his first 17 years growing up in West
Virginia. The book contains over 100 personal stories, including
Stories He Never Told His Mother. His stories are probably not unlike
stories of your growing up years. Written in a candid and often
humorous vein, he tells it like it was, at least as he remembers.

Adler proposes to his audience a simple suggestion on how, when they
return home, they can begin preserving their family heritage.

We will follow Bill's talk with a mentoring session.

Emily Garber
Chair
Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Phoenix (Arizona) Jewish Genealogy Group meeting, Sunday, 7 December 2014 #general

Emily Garber
 

This coming Sunday the Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group will hold its
December meeting at Congregation Or Tzion, 9096 E. Bahia Drive,
Scottsdale, 1-3 pm.

Bill Adler has agreed to give us a presentation called "Preserve Your
Family Heritage and Leave More than a Headstone."

The Premise: We have passed our genes along to the next generation,
why shouldn't we pass our life stories, their heritage, along as well?

Bill Adler was a child during WWII and matured during the Mid-Century
Modern era of the 1950s. He was born and raised in a small town in
Appalachia. What makes his story somewhat unusual was he was a Jewish
kid learning about life, along with his three younger brothers, in the
hills of West Virginia.

In his book ("Confessions of a Jewish Hillbily"), Bill shared with his
children and grandchildren his first 17 years growing up in West
Virginia. The book contains over 100 personal stories, including
Stories He Never Told His Mother. His stories are probably not unlike
stories of your growing up years. Written in a candid and often
humorous vein, he tells it like it was, at least as he remembers.

Adler proposes to his audience a simple suggestion on how, when they
return home, they can begin preserving their family heritage.

We will follow Bill's talk with a mentoring session.

Emily Garber
Chair
Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group


Galician migration records #galicia

Susan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Several people have recently posted inquiries about whether there were
records of people moving to Galicia >from elsewhere. There probably
were such civil records since there is evidence that people had identity
documents and had to register with the authorities when they moved.
There are documents pertaining to permission for temporary residence
for visits and hospitalizations among the community records for
Lemberg in the FamilySearch database. Lemberg and Krakow were cities
where Jews could not live without specific permission. Permission
required a certain status and income until Emancipation ended that
restriction in 1869. Jews could live in suburbs ringing the cities but not
within the cities. To my knowledge, this situation did not exist in other
cities within Galicia.

Other types of records pertaining to in-migration and internal
residential changes were maintained by the Judische Kultus Gemeinder
(Kahal), the regional legal entities governing the Jewish community
throughout Galicia. Registration was mandated for every Jew. Changing
registration was not automatic when Jews wanted to move to another
district.... they could move but had to get permission to officially
change the district of registration. The issue was one of tax revenue.
Losing population meant that tax revenue would be lost to another
district and it was tax revenue that supported the Jewish administrative
structure, buildings and activities within the district. When Jewish adults
were in good financial standing, they were eligible to vote in elections
for the 12 people who represented them. When Jews arrived >from other
countries, they had to register as members of a district. I feel sure that
there were annual registration lists for tax and voting purposes that
tracked all of this. Some of the lists have surfaced in recent years. For
one of my towns, there is an 1890 list and then nothing until the late
1920s and 1930s. The records would have been maintained in the
headquarters for the Kahal in each district and subdistrict town/city.

I believe that the Nazis and their Polish allies probably used such
records to identify Jews. Also, many official synagogues and Kahal
administrative offices were destroyed during WWI and WWII and the
fighting between Poles and Ukrainians after each of those wars.
Perhaps over time, more registration lists will come to light but it
seems increasingly unlikely. I know that, in Rzeszow, a Pole was
entrusted with the Jewish community records. He stored them in his
house. After his death, his son maintained the collection. In the early
1980s, the son tried to sell the material to visiting Jews for a small
fortune. Nothing happened because the small number of Jews with
Rzeszow roots who were involved in Jewish genealogy at that time
could not raise the money. Perhaps this kind of thing happened
elsewhere, though with the passage of so much time, it seems unlikely
that material is still hidden.

Suzan Wynne, author
The Galitzianers: The Jews of Galicia: 1772-1918


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Galician migration records #galicia

Susan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Several people have recently posted inquiries about whether there were
records of people moving to Galicia >from elsewhere. There probably
were such civil records since there is evidence that people had identity
documents and had to register with the authorities when they moved.
There are documents pertaining to permission for temporary residence
for visits and hospitalizations among the community records for
Lemberg in the FamilySearch database. Lemberg and Krakow were cities
where Jews could not live without specific permission. Permission
required a certain status and income until Emancipation ended that
restriction in 1869. Jews could live in suburbs ringing the cities but not
within the cities. To my knowledge, this situation did not exist in other
cities within Galicia.

Other types of records pertaining to in-migration and internal
residential changes were maintained by the Judische Kultus Gemeinder
(Kahal), the regional legal entities governing the Jewish community
throughout Galicia. Registration was mandated for every Jew. Changing
registration was not automatic when Jews wanted to move to another
district.... they could move but had to get permission to officially
change the district of registration. The issue was one of tax revenue.
Losing population meant that tax revenue would be lost to another
district and it was tax revenue that supported the Jewish administrative
structure, buildings and activities within the district. When Jewish adults
were in good financial standing, they were eligible to vote in elections
for the 12 people who represented them. When Jews arrived >from other
countries, they had to register as members of a district. I feel sure that
there were annual registration lists for tax and voting purposes that
tracked all of this. Some of the lists have surfaced in recent years. For
one of my towns, there is an 1890 list and then nothing until the late
1920s and 1930s. The records would have been maintained in the
headquarters for the Kahal in each district and subdistrict town/city.

I believe that the Nazis and their Polish allies probably used such
records to identify Jews. Also, many official synagogues and Kahal
administrative offices were destroyed during WWI and WWII and the
fighting between Poles and Ukrainians after each of those wars.
Perhaps over time, more registration lists will come to light but it
seems increasingly unlikely. I know that, in Rzeszow, a Pole was
entrusted with the Jewish community records. He stored them in his
house. After his death, his son maintained the collection. In the early
1980s, the son tried to sell the material to visiting Jews for a small
fortune. Nothing happened because the small number of Jews with
Rzeszow roots who were involved in Jewish genealogy at that time
could not raise the money. Perhaps this kind of thing happened
elsewhere, though with the passage of so much time, it seems unlikely
that material is still hidden.

Suzan Wynne, author
The Galitzianers: The Jews of Galicia: 1772-1918


Re: food and memoirs #bessarabia

Inna Vayner <innanes@...>
 

Patricia's inquiry about food and responses to it brought up an
interesting discussion in our Bessarabian Facebook group and evoked
childhood memories of the group members. Here are some of the dishes
that were mentioned in the post: mititei , chifteli/tefteli, stuffed
pepers, vinete, eggplant salad "ikra", kasha varnishkis, and obviously
mamaliga. It's interesting that along with the food memories came up
food for the soul - music. This will be a topic four our next
discussion.

Inna Vayner

Link to the Bessarabian/Moldavian Jewish Roots group -
https://www.facebook.com/groups/Bessarabian.Moldavian.Jewishroots/


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Re: food and memoirs #bessarabia

Inna Vayner <innanes@...>
 

Patricia's inquiry about food and responses to it brought up an
interesting discussion in our Bessarabian Facebook group and evoked
childhood memories of the group members. Here are some of the dishes
that were mentioned in the post: mititei , chifteli/tefteli, stuffed
pepers, vinete, eggplant salad "ikra", kasha varnishkis, and obviously
mamaliga. It's interesting that along with the food memories came up
food for the soul - music. This will be a topic four our next
discussion.

Inna Vayner

Link to the Bessarabian/Moldavian Jewish Roots group -
https://www.facebook.com/groups/Bessarabian.Moldavian.Jewishroots/


Lithuania to Start Using the Euro on January 1, 2015 #lithuania

Jan Meisels Allen
 

According to a press release by the European Union released December 5,
2014, Lithuania will adopt the Euro as of January 1, 2015. Lithuania will be
the 19th European Union member country to adopt the Euro.

Lithuania has been preparing for this change over to the Euro since mid-July
when the EU Finance Ministers took the formal decision that they met the
criteria for adopting the Euro.

See: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_AGENDA-14-2362_en.htm

Also the website of the Lithuanian government on the adoption of the Euro.
http://euras.lt/en/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This currency change will not affect LitvakSIG's
records acquisition/translation >from archives in Lithuania.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Lithuania to Start Using the Euro on January 1, 2015 #lithuania

Jan Meisels Allen
 

According to a press release by the European Union released December 5,
2014, Lithuania will adopt the Euro as of January 1, 2015. Lithuania will be
the 19th European Union member country to adopt the Euro.

Lithuania has been preparing for this change over to the Euro since mid-July
when the EU Finance Ministers took the formal decision that they met the
criteria for adopting the Euro.

See: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_AGENDA-14-2362_en.htm

Also the website of the Lithuanian government on the adoption of the Euro.
http://euras.lt/en/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This currency change will not affect LitvakSIG's
records acquisition/translation >from archives in Lithuania.

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