Date   

Salman Levinsohn #general

Edwin Parks
 

Good Afternoon everybody

I am back seeking some hints to help me finish off my research on
Salman Levinsohn ( also known as Zalman Levison), who served with the
British Army's Palestinian Pioneer Corps. He was captured by the
Germans in 1941 and liberated >from Stalag VIIa in 1945. I have a copy
of his British Army record but I need help on some other issues.

1. He was born on 31 January 1904 in the city of Vienna. Has anybody
any experience of trying to get a similar birth certificate? And how
did they do it?

2. He served in the Austrian Army >from 1927 to 1928. Has anybody any
experience of trying to get an Austrian Army record of service? And
how?

3. Finally he was employed by MGM in Rumania before escaping to
Palestine. There is a suggestion that he was held in a "concentration
camp" before escaping - is there anyway of checking on that?

Eddie Parks


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Salman Levinsohn #general

Edwin Parks
 

Good Afternoon everybody

I am back seeking some hints to help me finish off my research on
Salman Levinsohn ( also known as Zalman Levison), who served with the
British Army's Palestinian Pioneer Corps. He was captured by the
Germans in 1941 and liberated >from Stalag VIIa in 1945. I have a copy
of his British Army record but I need help on some other issues.

1. He was born on 31 January 1904 in the city of Vienna. Has anybody
any experience of trying to get a similar birth certificate? And how
did they do it?

2. He served in the Austrian Army >from 1927 to 1928. Has anybody any
experience of trying to get an Austrian Army record of service? And
how?

3. Finally he was employed by MGM in Rumania before escaping to
Palestine. There is a suggestion that he was held in a "concentration
camp" before escaping - is there anyway of checking on that?

Eddie Parks


query on Polish law re children of unmarried parents #general

Helen Gardner
 

Dear Genners,

With immense thanks to Tomasz Jerzy Nowak, I now have a translation
of the marriage of my great grandparents Szlama Ajzengold and Ruchla
Laja Rakower on 26 October 1862. It turns out that the bride and
groom already had two children born out of wedlock, and the transcript
says:

Snip
... Also, the spouses declared that, through the actual act of
matrimony, in accordance with Article two hundred and ninety-one of
the Civil Code of the Kingdom of Poland guaranteeing {children born
out of wedlock} the rights and status equal to that of children
lawfully born, they recognized their both daughters, that is to say,
Chaia Sura who had been born here in Warsaw on the sixteenth day of
June of last year, and Udla, who had been born in Warsaw on the
thirteenth day of July of the current year, both of whom had been
mutually begotten by them during their pre-conjugal relationship, as
their own daughters....
Snip

Although I have found many references to the Polish Civil Code, I
have not been able to find any reference to article 291 as it was in
19th Century Poland. A friend told me that as long as there was no
conflict with Polish law, Jewish law was recognised as valid, and
that this would be an example of Jewish law on the status of the
children being accepted by Polish law.

If that is correct, I would imagine that article 291 covered the
acceptance of Jewish (or other?) law under approved circumstances,
rather than any reference to children born out of wedlock, and that
for non-Jewish children born out of wedlock the provision of rights
and status equal to that of children lawfully born would not apply.

I would be very grateful if someone could amplify this for me, and,
if possible, tell me what article 291 actually said. Direct replies
to me at helen@thegardners.com.au are fine, unless the moderator
thinks this is likely to be of interest to others on the list.

Regards
Helen Gardner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen query on Polish law re children of unmarried parents #general

Helen Gardner
 

Dear Genners,

With immense thanks to Tomasz Jerzy Nowak, I now have a translation
of the marriage of my great grandparents Szlama Ajzengold and Ruchla
Laja Rakower on 26 October 1862. It turns out that the bride and
groom already had two children born out of wedlock, and the transcript
says:

Snip
... Also, the spouses declared that, through the actual act of
matrimony, in accordance with Article two hundred and ninety-one of
the Civil Code of the Kingdom of Poland guaranteeing {children born
out of wedlock} the rights and status equal to that of children
lawfully born, they recognized their both daughters, that is to say,
Chaia Sura who had been born here in Warsaw on the sixteenth day of
June of last year, and Udla, who had been born in Warsaw on the
thirteenth day of July of the current year, both of whom had been
mutually begotten by them during their pre-conjugal relationship, as
their own daughters....
Snip

Although I have found many references to the Polish Civil Code, I
have not been able to find any reference to article 291 as it was in
19th Century Poland. A friend told me that as long as there was no
conflict with Polish law, Jewish law was recognised as valid, and
that this would be an example of Jewish law on the status of the
children being accepted by Polish law.

If that is correct, I would imagine that article 291 covered the
acceptance of Jewish (or other?) law under approved circumstances,
rather than any reference to children born out of wedlock, and that
for non-Jewish children born out of wedlock the provision of rights
and status equal to that of children lawfully born would not apply.

I would be very grateful if someone could amplify this for me, and,
if possible, tell me what article 291 actually said. Direct replies
to me at helen@thegardners.com.au are fine, unless the moderator
thinks this is likely to be of interest to others on the list.

Regards
Helen Gardner


Re: Missing Revision List #lithuania

David Ellis
 

Howard,

Thank you for your response.

In my opinion, the "1818 Additional Revision" entries in the comments to the
1834 Revision List seems to indicate that my SIROTA ancestors were living in
Butrimonys in 1818, and they were registered in a supplemental census after
not being recorded in the 1816 revision list.

It's clear that the 1818 Additional Revision List has not been found in the
Vilnius archives. It may simply not exist there, although perhaps it has
been misplaced and waiting for someone to rediscover it. Could this list
have been moved somewhere other than the Vilnius archives?

I am a qualified contributor to the Trakai District Research Group, and I
have access to the DRG web site on Shutterfly. I have gone over the records
on that site, including vital records >from Butrimonys, but they don't go
back far enough for me to learn more about the ancestry of my gg-gf Iaker
SIROTA's wives Elka and Sorka or Iaker's father Abram. Suggestions as to
how I might continue my research would be appreciated.

/ David /

------
David J Ellis
7 Hampton Road
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@verizon.net

-----Original Message-----
From: HOMARGOL@aol.com [mailto:HOMARGOL@aol.com]
Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2014 6:27 PM
To: Litvaksig@lyris.jewishgen.org
Cc: djemkitso@verizon.net; amygenealogy@outlook.com; jrbaston@aol.com
Subject: Missing Revision List

<From: "David Ellis" <djemkitso@verizon.net> The All Lithuania Database has
entries for my gg-gf and his family >from the
1834 Revision List (census) in the town of Butrimonys.

His entry contains: Iaker SIROTA, son of Abram, age 28.
The Comment field says "12 years old - 1818 additional revision".

I checked the 1816 Revision List, and my SIROTA ancestors are not present
there.The 1818 Additional Revision is not online. Last year, I worked with
the archivist at the Lithuanian State Historical Archive in Vilnius, and
she told me that this volume is not to be found in their archive.

Is there any other way to obtain the earlier census information for my
family?>

I can say, without hesitation, the 1818 RL for Butrimonys (Trakai
District) no longer exists. If it did exist, Litvak SIG would have had it
translated some years ago. Since your ancestors are included in the 1834
RL, but not in the 1816 RL indicates they lived elsewhere prior to 1834.

Another possibility is, they were registered in Butrimonys, in 1834, but
actually lived elsewhere. If you contribute $100, to Litvak SIG, designated
for the Trakai District, you will gain access to the Trakai DRG web site.
You can then check out the records for other towns in the district. Many
times, researchers find records by looking at the entire list, or census
records, they were unable to find by doing a surname search in the Litvak
SIG ALD. Spelling differences in the name is one reason for this.

The Trakai web site includes Butrimonys vital records going back to 1860.
You may find records of your ancestors in those later years.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Missing Revision List #lithuania

David Ellis
 

Howard,

Thank you for your response.

In my opinion, the "1818 Additional Revision" entries in the comments to the
1834 Revision List seems to indicate that my SIROTA ancestors were living in
Butrimonys in 1818, and they were registered in a supplemental census after
not being recorded in the 1816 revision list.

It's clear that the 1818 Additional Revision List has not been found in the
Vilnius archives. It may simply not exist there, although perhaps it has
been misplaced and waiting for someone to rediscover it. Could this list
have been moved somewhere other than the Vilnius archives?

I am a qualified contributor to the Trakai District Research Group, and I
have access to the DRG web site on Shutterfly. I have gone over the records
on that site, including vital records >from Butrimonys, but they don't go
back far enough for me to learn more about the ancestry of my gg-gf Iaker
SIROTA's wives Elka and Sorka or Iaker's father Abram. Suggestions as to
how I might continue my research would be appreciated.

/ David /

------
David J Ellis
7 Hampton Road
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@verizon.net

-----Original Message-----
From: HOMARGOL@aol.com [mailto:HOMARGOL@aol.com]
Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2014 6:27 PM
To: Litvaksig@lyris.jewishgen.org
Cc: djemkitso@verizon.net; amygenealogy@outlook.com; jrbaston@aol.com
Subject: Missing Revision List

<From: "David Ellis" <djemkitso@verizon.net> The All Lithuania Database has
entries for my gg-gf and his family >from the
1834 Revision List (census) in the town of Butrimonys.

His entry contains: Iaker SIROTA, son of Abram, age 28.
The Comment field says "12 years old - 1818 additional revision".

I checked the 1816 Revision List, and my SIROTA ancestors are not present
there.The 1818 Additional Revision is not online. Last year, I worked with
the archivist at the Lithuanian State Historical Archive in Vilnius, and
she told me that this volume is not to be found in their archive.

Is there any other way to obtain the earlier census information for my
family?>

I can say, without hesitation, the 1818 RL for Butrimonys (Trakai
District) no longer exists. If it did exist, Litvak SIG would have had it
translated some years ago. Since your ancestors are included in the 1834
RL, but not in the 1816 RL indicates they lived elsewhere prior to 1834.

Another possibility is, they were registered in Butrimonys, in 1834, but
actually lived elsewhere. If you contribute $100, to Litvak SIG, designated
for the Trakai District, you will gain access to the Trakai DRG web site.
You can then check out the records for other towns in the district. Many
times, researchers find records by looking at the entire list, or census
records, they were unable to find by doing a surname search in the Litvak
SIG ALD. Spelling differences in the name is one reason for this.

The Trakai web site includes Butrimonys vital records going back to 1860.
You may find records of your ancestors in those later years.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Searching: VERETYNSKY, Belarus #belarus

allay99665@...
 

Good day. I am a member (#563538) of JewishGen.

My name is Patrick Vezetinski. I live in Seattle Washington USA. I am trying to
find any information about my Grandfather who entered the US through New York. I
found him listed on a ship's manifest (arrived Apr 7, 1912) as Witaly Weretinsky.
He listed his father's name as Joesiph Weretinsky living in Wesely Ugol, Russia
and he considered himself as Polish. His last name changed a couple of times...
Victor Vertinski, Vetold Veretinski and ultimatly Vetold Vezetinski. I see he had
a possible relative living with him in Cliffside, New Jersey, USA named Pjotr
Weretinsky in 1917, who arrived in 1913 and listed his home as Lichaczewitz Russia. >

I have heard Both Vesely Ugol and Lukashevichi, are now within the borders of
Belarus - not far >from Minsk - once part of Poland.

I can not find the name VERETYNSKY on JewishGen, but there were two people of
this name registered in Minsk on the 1907 Dumas viters list - so this would confirm
that this is the area my family came from.
If you can steer me in a direction for beginning my search I would appreciate it.

Much thanks in advance
Patrick Vezetinski
MODERATOR NOTE: General information may be posted to the list. Please reply
privately with family information


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching: VERETYNSKY, Belarus #belarus

allay99665@...
 

Good day. I am a member (#563538) of JewishGen.

My name is Patrick Vezetinski. I live in Seattle Washington USA. I am trying to
find any information about my Grandfather who entered the US through New York. I
found him listed on a ship's manifest (arrived Apr 7, 1912) as Witaly Weretinsky.
He listed his father's name as Joesiph Weretinsky living in Wesely Ugol, Russia
and he considered himself as Polish. His last name changed a couple of times...
Victor Vertinski, Vetold Veretinski and ultimatly Vetold Vezetinski. I see he had
a possible relative living with him in Cliffside, New Jersey, USA named Pjotr
Weretinsky in 1917, who arrived in 1913 and listed his home as Lichaczewitz Russia. >

I have heard Both Vesely Ugol and Lukashevichi, are now within the borders of
Belarus - not far >from Minsk - once part of Poland.

I can not find the name VERETYNSKY on JewishGen, but there were two people of
this name registered in Minsk on the 1907 Dumas viters list - so this would confirm
that this is the area my family came from.
If you can steer me in a direction for beginning my search I would appreciate it.

Much thanks in advance
Patrick Vezetinski
MODERATOR NOTE: General information may be posted to the list. Please reply
privately with family information


Issue 120 of Genealo-J is published #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 120, Winter 2014 has just been published.

Bernard Lyon-Caen completes (see issue 119) his study of several
interconnected Jewish families famous in the fields of furniture,
advertisement and radio namely Chouchan, Levitan, Bleustein and others.
Among the furniture dealers, Levitan and Galerie Barbes were the most
famous ones. In 2011, Publicis, founded by Marcel Bleustein-Blanchet
(1906-1996) in 1926 was named, the third largest marketing group
worldwide by revenue. Other families are also described in this paper,
namely the Gross and Marcus families

A friend asked Pascal Faustini help to extend his family history. His
ancestor Eva Usiglio died in 1824 in Reggio Emilia in the Italian
province of Emilia-Romagna. Faustini quickly found Eva's birth in
Modena, in the same province. The Jewish archives of Modena are so rich
in all kinds of documents that he was able to reach 1614. Where was the
family before? They came >from Florence (Tuscany) and previously >from
several other places in the same province, under the names of Uzielli
/Uziel/Usigli. Other members of the family are found in Rome and Venice.
It is clear that they have been expelled >from Spain in 1492 : quite a
large number of Usillo/Usiello/Husillo are found in the 13th, 14th, and
15th centuries in Aragon and Castille. Faustini claims that the original
name was Uziel and make the hypothesis that the family came >from Toledo
and previously maybe >from Southern France.

Georges Bizet is the famous composer of the Carmen Opera. He married
Genevieve Halevy but died very young six years later. Genevieve then
married Emile Straus, a successful lawyer. She is well known in France
under the name of Madame Straus: she was active during the Dreyfus
Affair and is a model for some characters in Proust's works. But who
was Emile Straus? Anne-Marie Fribourg was able to find his parents and
siblings. His father Abraham Straus is supposed to be born ca. 1804 in
Obermoschel, a German city of the present Land of Rhineland-Palatinate
and he spent some years in London. According to some documents, he was
related to an American Straus family; including Jesse Isidor Straus,
American ambassador to France. Jesse was the son of a couple deceased
in the sinking of the Titanic and the great-grandson of Isaac Straus
born ca. 1788 in Niederkirchen, also in Rhineland-Palatinate.

A short paper by Mathilde Tagger deals with the Arieh family, a very
rich Sephardic family of Wien and Bulgaria, who was nicknamed "The
Rothschild of Orient" because of their wealth and generosity. Tagger
discusses the origin of this surname Arieh. It means lion in Hebrew, and
the Jewish name Leon/Lehon and so on is well documented in the
pre-expulsion years in Spain. It shows that the family came >from the
Spanish city of Leon. This seems the likeliest explanation.

Georges Graner (Paris-France)


Issue 120 of Genealo-J is published #sephardic

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 120, Winter 2014 has just been published.

Bernard Lyon-Caen completes (see issue 119) his study of several
interconnected Jewish families famous in the fields of furniture,
advertisement and radio namely Chouchan, Levitan, Bleustein and others.
Among the furniture dealers, Levitan and Galerie Barbes were the most
famous ones. In 2011, Publicis, founded by Marcel Bleustein-Blanchet
(1906-1996) in 1926 was named, the third largest marketing group
worldwide by revenue. Other families are also described in this paper,
namely the Gross and Marcus families

A friend asked Pascal Faustini help to extend his family history. His
ancestor Eva Usiglio died in 1824 in Reggio Emilia in the Italian
province of Emilia-Romagna. Faustini quickly found Eva's birth in
Modena, in the same province. The Jewish archives of Modena are so rich
in all kinds of documents that he was able to reach 1614. Where was the
family before? They came >from Florence (Tuscany) and previously >from
several other places in the same province, under the names of Uzielli
/Uziel/Usigli. Other members of the family are found in Rome and Venice.
It is clear that they have been expelled >from Spain in 1492 : quite a
large number of Usillo/Usiello/Husillo are found in the 13th, 14th, and
15th centuries in Aragon and Castille. Faustini claims that the original
name was Uziel and make the hypothesis that the family came >from Toledo
and previously maybe >from Southern France.

Georges Bizet is the famous composer of the Carmen Opera. He married
Genevieve Halevy but died very young six years later. Genevieve then
married Emile Straus, a successful lawyer. She is well known in France
under the name of Madame Straus: she was active during the Dreyfus
Affair and is a model for some characters in Proust's works. But who
was Emile Straus? Anne-Marie Fribourg was able to find his parents and
siblings. His father Abraham Straus is supposed to be born ca. 1804 in
Obermoschel, a German city of the present Land of Rhineland-Palatinate
and he spent some years in London. According to some documents, he was
related to an American Straus family; including Jesse Isidor Straus,
American ambassador to France. Jesse was the son of a couple deceased
in the sinking of the Titanic and the great-grandson of Isaac Straus
born ca. 1788 in Niederkirchen, also in Rhineland-Palatinate.

A short paper by Mathilde Tagger deals with the Arieh family, a very
rich Sephardic family of Wien and Bulgaria, who was nicknamed "The
Rothschild of Orient" because of their wealth and generosity. Tagger
discusses the origin of this surname Arieh. It means lion in Hebrew, and
the Jewish name Leon/Lehon and so on is well documented in the
pre-expulsion years in Spain. It shows that the family came >from the
Spanish city of Leon. This seems the likeliest explanation.

Georges Graner (Paris-France)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Issue 120 of Genealo-J is published #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 120, Winter 2014 has just been published.

Bernard Lyon-Caen completes (see issue 119) his study of several
interconnected Jewish families famous in the fields of furniture,
advertisement and radio namely Chouchan, Levitan, Bleustein and others.
Among the furniture dealers, Levitan and Galerie Barbes were the most
famous ones. In 2011, Publicis, founded by Marcel Bleustein-Blanchet
(1906-1996) in 1926 was named, the third largest marketing group
worldwide by revenue. Other families are also described in this paper,
namely the Gross and Marcus families

A friend asked Pascal Faustini help to extend his family history. His
ancestor Eva Usiglio died in 1824 in Reggio Emilia in the Italian
province of Emilia-Romagna. Faustini quickly found Eva's birth in
Modena, in the same province. The Jewish archives of Modena are so rich
in all kinds of documents that he was able to reach 1614. Where was the
family before? They came >from Florence (Tuscany) and previously >from
several other places in the same province, under the names of Uzielli
/Uziel/Usigli. Other members of the family are found in Rome and Venice.
It is clear that they have been expelled >from Spain in 1492 : quite a
large number of Usillo/Usiello/Husillo are found in the 13th, 14th, and
15th centuries in Aragon and Castille. Faustini claims that the original
name was Uziel and make the hypothesis that the family came >from Toledo
and previously maybe >from Southern France.

Georges Bizet is the famous composer of the Carmen Opera. He married
Genevieve Halevy but died very young six years later. Genevieve then
married Emile Straus, a successful lawyer. She is well known in France
under the name of Madame Straus: she was active during the Dreyfus
Affair and is a model for some characters in Proust's works. But who
was Emile Straus? Anne-Marie Fribourg was able to find his parents and
siblings. His father Abraham Straus is supposed to be born ca. 1804 in
Obermoschel, a German city of the present Land of Rhineland-Palatinate
and he spent some years in London. According to some documents, he was
related to an American Straus family; including Jesse Isidor Straus,
American ambassador to France. Jesse was the son of a couple deceased
in the sinking of the Titanic and the great-grandson of Isaac Straus
born ca. 1788 in Niederkirchen, also in Rhineland-Palatinate.

A short paper by Mathilde Tagger deals with the Arieh family, a very
rich Sephardic family of Wien and Bulgaria, who was nicknamed "The
Rothschild of Orient" because of their wealth and generosity. Tagger
discusses the origin of this surname Arieh. It means lion in Hebrew, and
the Jewish name Leon/Lehon and so on is well documented in the
pre-expulsion years in Spain. It shows that the family came >from the
Spanish city of Leon. This seems the likeliest explanation.

Georges Graner (Paris-France)


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Issue 120 of Genealo-J is published #sephardic

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 120, Winter 2014 has just been published.

Bernard Lyon-Caen completes (see issue 119) his study of several
interconnected Jewish families famous in the fields of furniture,
advertisement and radio namely Chouchan, Levitan, Bleustein and others.
Among the furniture dealers, Levitan and Galerie Barbes were the most
famous ones. In 2011, Publicis, founded by Marcel Bleustein-Blanchet
(1906-1996) in 1926 was named, the third largest marketing group
worldwide by revenue. Other families are also described in this paper,
namely the Gross and Marcus families

A friend asked Pascal Faustini help to extend his family history. His
ancestor Eva Usiglio died in 1824 in Reggio Emilia in the Italian
province of Emilia-Romagna. Faustini quickly found Eva's birth in
Modena, in the same province. The Jewish archives of Modena are so rich
in all kinds of documents that he was able to reach 1614. Where was the
family before? They came >from Florence (Tuscany) and previously >from
several other places in the same province, under the names of Uzielli
/Uziel/Usigli. Other members of the family are found in Rome and Venice.
It is clear that they have been expelled >from Spain in 1492 : quite a
large number of Usillo/Usiello/Husillo are found in the 13th, 14th, and
15th centuries in Aragon and Castille. Faustini claims that the original
name was Uziel and make the hypothesis that the family came >from Toledo
and previously maybe >from Southern France.

Georges Bizet is the famous composer of the Carmen Opera. He married
Genevieve Halevy but died very young six years later. Genevieve then
married Emile Straus, a successful lawyer. She is well known in France
under the name of Madame Straus: she was active during the Dreyfus
Affair and is a model for some characters in Proust's works. But who
was Emile Straus? Anne-Marie Fribourg was able to find his parents and
siblings. His father Abraham Straus is supposed to be born ca. 1804 in
Obermoschel, a German city of the present Land of Rhineland-Palatinate
and he spent some years in London. According to some documents, he was
related to an American Straus family; including Jesse Isidor Straus,
American ambassador to France. Jesse was the son of a couple deceased
in the sinking of the Titanic and the great-grandson of Isaac Straus
born ca. 1788 in Niederkirchen, also in Rhineland-Palatinate.

A short paper by Mathilde Tagger deals with the Arieh family, a very
rich Sephardic family of Wien and Bulgaria, who was nicknamed "The
Rothschild of Orient" because of their wealth and generosity. Tagger
discusses the origin of this surname Arieh. It means lion in Hebrew, and
the Jewish name Leon/Lehon and so on is well documented in the
pre-expulsion years in Spain. It shows that the family came >from the
Spanish city of Leon. This seems the likeliest explanation.

Georges Graner (Paris-France)


query on Polish law re children of unmarried parents #poland

Helen Gardner
 

Hi everyone.

With immense thanks to Tomasz Jerzy Nowak, I now have a translation of the
marriage of my great grandparents Szlama Ajzengold and Ruchla Laja Rakower
on 26 October 1862. It turns out that the bride and groom already had two
children born out of wedlock, and the transcript says:

Snip
... Also, the spouses declared that, through the actual act of matrimony,
in accordance with Article two hundred and ninety-one of the Civil Code
of the Kingdom of Poland guaranteeing {children born out of wedlock} the
rights and status equal to that of children lawfully born, they recognized
their both daughters, that is to say, Chaia Sura who had been born here
in Warsaw on the sixteenth day of June of last year, and Udla, who had
been born in Warsaw on the thirteenth day of July of the current year,
both of whom had been mutually begotten by them during their
pre-conjugal relationship, as their own daughters....

<< Snip >>

Although I have found many references to the Polish Civil Code, I have not
been able to find any reference to article 291 as it was in 19th Century
Poland. A friend told me that as long as there was no conflict with Polish
law, Jewish law was recognised as valid, and that this would be an example
of Jewish law on the status of the children being accepted by Polish law.

If that is correct, I would imagine that article 291 covered the acceptance
of Jewish (or other?) law under approved circumstances, rather than any
reference to children born out of wedlock, and that for non-Jewish children
born out of wedlock the provision of rights and status equal to that of
children lawfully born would not apply.

I would be very grateful if someone could amplify this for me, and, if
possible, tell me what article 291 actually said. Direct replies to me
at helen@thegardners.com.au are fine.

Regards
Helen Gardner


JRI Poland #Poland query on Polish law re children of unmarried parents #poland

Helen Gardner
 

Hi everyone.

With immense thanks to Tomasz Jerzy Nowak, I now have a translation of the
marriage of my great grandparents Szlama Ajzengold and Ruchla Laja Rakower
on 26 October 1862. It turns out that the bride and groom already had two
children born out of wedlock, and the transcript says:

Snip
... Also, the spouses declared that, through the actual act of matrimony,
in accordance with Article two hundred and ninety-one of the Civil Code
of the Kingdom of Poland guaranteeing {children born out of wedlock} the
rights and status equal to that of children lawfully born, they recognized
their both daughters, that is to say, Chaia Sura who had been born here
in Warsaw on the sixteenth day of June of last year, and Udla, who had
been born in Warsaw on the thirteenth day of July of the current year,
both of whom had been mutually begotten by them during their
pre-conjugal relationship, as their own daughters....

<< Snip >>

Although I have found many references to the Polish Civil Code, I have not
been able to find any reference to article 291 as it was in 19th Century
Poland. A friend told me that as long as there was no conflict with Polish
law, Jewish law was recognised as valid, and that this would be an example
of Jewish law on the status of the children being accepted by Polish law.

If that is correct, I would imagine that article 291 covered the acceptance
of Jewish (or other?) law under approved circumstances, rather than any
reference to children born out of wedlock, and that for non-Jewish children
born out of wedlock the provision of rights and status equal to that of
children lawfully born would not apply.

I would be very grateful if someone could amplify this for me, and, if
possible, tell me what article 291 actually said. Direct replies to me
at helen@thegardners.com.au are fine.

Regards
Helen Gardner


Missing Revision List #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

<< From: "David Ellis" <djemkitso@verizon.net>
The All Lithuania Database has entries for my gg-gf and his family >from the
1834 Revision List (census) in the town of Butrimonys.

His entry contains: Iaker SIROTA, son of Abram, age 28.
The Comment field says "12 years old - 1818 additional revision".

I checked the 1816 Revision List, and my SIROTA ancestors are not present
there.The 1818 Additional Revision is not online. Last year, I worked
with the archivist at the Lithuanian State Historical Archive in
Vilnius, and she told me that this volume is not to be found in their
archive.

Is there any other way to obtain the earlier census information for my
family? >>

I can say, without hesitation, the 1818 RL for Butrimonys (Trakai
District) no longer exists. If it did exist, Litvak SIG would have had it
translated some years ago. Since your ancestors are included in the
1834 RL, but not in the 1816 RL indicates they lived elsewhere prior
to 1834.

Another possibility is, they were registered in Butrimonys, in 1834, but
actually lived elsewhere. If you contribute $100, to Litvak SIG, designated
for the Trakai District, you will gain access to the Trakai DRG web site.
You can then check out the records for other towns in the district. Many
times, researchers find records by looking at the entire list, or census
records, they were unable to find by doing a surname search in the Litvak
SIG ALD. Spelling differences in the name is one reason for this.

The Trakai web site includes Butrimonys vital records going back to 1860.
You may find records of your ancestors in those later years.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Missing Revision List #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

<< From: "David Ellis" <djemkitso@verizon.net>
The All Lithuania Database has entries for my gg-gf and his family >from the
1834 Revision List (census) in the town of Butrimonys.

His entry contains: Iaker SIROTA, son of Abram, age 28.
The Comment field says "12 years old - 1818 additional revision".

I checked the 1816 Revision List, and my SIROTA ancestors are not present
there.The 1818 Additional Revision is not online. Last year, I worked
with the archivist at the Lithuanian State Historical Archive in
Vilnius, and she told me that this volume is not to be found in their
archive.

Is there any other way to obtain the earlier census information for my
family? >>

I can say, without hesitation, the 1818 RL for Butrimonys (Trakai
District) no longer exists. If it did exist, Litvak SIG would have had it
translated some years ago. Since your ancestors are included in the
1834 RL, but not in the 1816 RL indicates they lived elsewhere prior
to 1834.

Another possibility is, they were registered in Butrimonys, in 1834, but
actually lived elsewhere. If you contribute $100, to Litvak SIG, designated
for the Trakai District, you will gain access to the Trakai DRG web site.
You can then check out the records for other towns in the district. Many
times, researchers find records by looking at the entire list, or census
records, they were unable to find by doing a surname search in the Litvak
SIG ALD. Spelling differences in the name is one reason for this.

The Trakai web site includes Butrimonys vital records going back to 1860.
You may find records of your ancestors in those later years.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Jonava records #lithuania

salinger@...
 

A Kaunas DRG member has made a contribution to have the following
lists translated.

Jonava (Kaunas) rol 1862 - KRA/I-66/4/543A

Jonava (Kaunas) rol 1867 - KRA/I-61/2/3676

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1870 - KRA/I-61/2/4203

Jonava (Kaunas) candle taxpayers 1860 - KRA/I-61/2/2630,2631

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1850 - KRA/I-61/2/1453, 1487

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1849 - KRA/I-61/2/1330

While the contribution is welcome, and very important, I am
afraid it will not be enough to get all of the lists translated.
My hope is, others will also make a contribution so all of the
lists can be translated in their entirety.

To contribute, go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and scroll
down to District Research. Select Kaunas. In the NOTES block,
key in Jonava.

Ralph Salinger
Coordinator Kaunas DRG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Jonava records #lithuania

salinger@...
 

A Kaunas DRG member has made a contribution to have the following
lists translated.

Jonava (Kaunas) rol 1862 - KRA/I-66/4/543A

Jonava (Kaunas) rol 1867 - KRA/I-61/2/3676

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1870 - KRA/I-61/2/4203

Jonava (Kaunas) candle taxpayers 1860 - KRA/I-61/2/2630,2631

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1850 - KRA/I-61/2/1453, 1487

Jonava (Kaunas) taxpayers 1849 - KRA/I-61/2/1330

While the contribution is welcome, and very important, I am
afraid it will not be enough to get all of the lists translated.
My hope is, others will also make a contribution so all of the
lists can be translated in their entirety.

To contribute, go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and scroll
down to District Research. Select Kaunas. In the NOTES block,
key in Jonava.

Ralph Salinger
Coordinator Kaunas DRG


France and US Agree to Compensate Holocaust survivors and Family Members Deported by SNCF During Nazi Occupation #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The French and United States announced a $60 million fund to
compensate holocaust survivors and family members for those deported
by France's state rail company, SNCF during the Nazi occupation.
The fund will be financed by the French government and managed by
the United States. According to the Washington Post, the United
States is waiving its administrative fee for administration. It
will be about $100,000 for each survivor and tens of thousands for
spouses of those who died in the camps or since World War ll.
Amounts for heirs of camp survivors who have since died are to be
determined on the basis of the number of years those survivors lived
after their liberation. Eligible claimants can choose annuities
rather than lump sums.

French legislators still have to approve the agreement.

The agreement includes the US government to work to end lawsuits and
other compensation in US Courts against SNCF. SNCF is bidding for
high-rail and other contracts in the US-which can be very lucrative
for SNCF. One such contract could be worth $6 billion for light
rail in Maryland. State legislators in a number of states have tried
to punish SNCF for Holocaust-era actions.

SNCF transported 76,000 French Jews to Nazi concentration camps.
While SBNC expressed regret they say they had no control over the
operations during Nazi occupation.

The French government has paid $6 billion in reparations but only
to French citizens and some deportees. The new agreement will help
compensate US, Canadian, Israeli and some others not eligible for
the other French reparations. The French have other international
accords with Poland, Belgium, Britain and Czech Republic over
compensation for deportation of victims.

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, AP and Jewish Genner for sharing this
story by the Associated Press. See: http://tinyurl.com/k5u9p3a
Original url:
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/4b9f8f6e94e647dea8183b5486154ee8/france-agrees-compensate-holocaust-deportees

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen France and US Agree to Compensate Holocaust survivors and Family Members Deported by SNCF During Nazi Occupation #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The French and United States announced a $60 million fund to
compensate holocaust survivors and family members for those deported
by France's state rail company, SNCF during the Nazi occupation.
The fund will be financed by the French government and managed by
the United States. According to the Washington Post, the United
States is waiving its administrative fee for administration. It
will be about $100,000 for each survivor and tens of thousands for
spouses of those who died in the camps or since World War ll.
Amounts for heirs of camp survivors who have since died are to be
determined on the basis of the number of years those survivors lived
after their liberation. Eligible claimants can choose annuities
rather than lump sums.

French legislators still have to approve the agreement.

The agreement includes the US government to work to end lawsuits and
other compensation in US Courts against SNCF. SNCF is bidding for
high-rail and other contracts in the US-which can be very lucrative
for SNCF. One such contract could be worth $6 billion for light
rail in Maryland. State legislators in a number of states have tried
to punish SNCF for Holocaust-era actions.

SNCF transported 76,000 French Jews to Nazi concentration camps.
While SBNC expressed regret they say they had no control over the
operations during Nazi occupation.

The French government has paid $6 billion in reparations but only
to French citizens and some deportees. The new agreement will help
compensate US, Canadian, Israeli and some others not eligible for
the other French reparations. The French have other international
accords with Poland, Belgium, Britain and Czech Republic over
compensation for deportation of victims.

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, AP and Jewish Genner for sharing this
story by the Associated Press. See: http://tinyurl.com/k5u9p3a
Original url:
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/4b9f8f6e94e647dea8183b5486154ee8/france-agrees-compensate-holocaust-deportees

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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