Date   

JewishGen Education 2015 #galicia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We are delighted to offer 'genners four courses in the first quarter
of 2015.

1. Research Your Roots on JewishGen Jan 1-29
2. Beginning Jewish Genealogy in the U.S. Jan 16-Feb 10
3. Complex Genealogical Research in the U.S. March 2-30

These 3 courses focus on your immigrant ancestors and include
online text lessons and our unique FORUM, our personal mentoring
program, where students are encouraged to post one branch, set
goals for their research and work interactively with the instructor to
research that branch.

Consider the beginning course for organization and basic research
skills (census, vital records, manifests) then move on to the
Complex U.S. course (which covers naturalization, military and
governmental records, and local archival research).

The third course, Research Your Roots, begins with an Introduction
to Jewish History, Culture and Naming Patterns, moves into Finding
your Shtetl, explores the JewishGen Researcher and Country
Databases, Jewish Records Indexing (JRI-P), and includes practical
hints on translation, finding a researcher and other advanced topics.
This course creates a bridge between the American Family data and
those left behind in Europe, between records available on JewishGen
and related sites and hiring a researcher. If you are an experienced
researcher, familiar with everything JewishGen has to offer, and/or
have already found your family in European databases, this course
would be too elementary. (Consider the next Independent Study
class).

4. Basic 1: Search Strategies for Genealogy Jan 2-16
This two week class emphasizes efficient use of the Internet for
genealogy. The class is taught in a forum setting open 24/7 with
daily tasks and assignments that should take no more than an hour
a day. Each lesson includes illustrative quick search problems using
Google. This class is free to Value Added members of JewishGen
who have donated $100 to the General Fund in the last 12 months.

We strongly encourage you to look at the course details, instructor's
credentials and student requirements (time, fee, prerequisites) on
www.jewishgen.org/education. Course Registration opens two or
three weeks before the course start date. If, after reviewing the
education page, you have some questions, please email
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org.

and thanks for "listening"
Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education,
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
www.JewishGen.org/education


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia JewishGen Education 2015 #galicia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We are delighted to offer 'genners four courses in the first quarter
of 2015.

1. Research Your Roots on JewishGen Jan 1-29
2. Beginning Jewish Genealogy in the U.S. Jan 16-Feb 10
3. Complex Genealogical Research in the U.S. March 2-30

These 3 courses focus on your immigrant ancestors and include
online text lessons and our unique FORUM, our personal mentoring
program, where students are encouraged to post one branch, set
goals for their research and work interactively with the instructor to
research that branch.

Consider the beginning course for organization and basic research
skills (census, vital records, manifests) then move on to the
Complex U.S. course (which covers naturalization, military and
governmental records, and local archival research).

The third course, Research Your Roots, begins with an Introduction
to Jewish History, Culture and Naming Patterns, moves into Finding
your Shtetl, explores the JewishGen Researcher and Country
Databases, Jewish Records Indexing (JRI-P), and includes practical
hints on translation, finding a researcher and other advanced topics.
This course creates a bridge between the American Family data and
those left behind in Europe, between records available on JewishGen
and related sites and hiring a researcher. If you are an experienced
researcher, familiar with everything JewishGen has to offer, and/or
have already found your family in European databases, this course
would be too elementary. (Consider the next Independent Study
class).

4. Basic 1: Search Strategies for Genealogy Jan 2-16
This two week class emphasizes efficient use of the Internet for
genealogy. The class is taught in a forum setting open 24/7 with
daily tasks and assignments that should take no more than an hour
a day. Each lesson includes illustrative quick search problems using
Google. This class is free to Value Added members of JewishGen
who have donated $100 to the General Fund in the last 12 months.

We strongly encourage you to look at the course details, instructor's
credentials and student requirements (time, fee, prerequisites) on
www.jewishgen.org/education. Course Registration opens two or
three weeks before the course start date. If, after reviewing the
education page, you have some questions, please email
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org.

and thanks for "listening"
Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education,
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
www.JewishGen.org/education


Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Program on Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015 - "How I Do Genealogy: Starting Research and Beginning to Gather Information" #general

events@...
 

"How I Do Genealogy: Starting Research and Beginning to Gather
Information" is the topic of a presentation by Barry Finkel,
corresponding secretary of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois,
planned for the Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015, JGSI meeting.
The program will begin at 2 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Rd.,
Northbrook, Ill. The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open
at 12:30 p.m. to accommodate members who want to use or borrow genealogy
library materials, get help with genealogy websites or ask genealogical
questions before the main program begins. For more information, visit
http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.
Barry Finkel, an experienced genealogist, will describe how he organizes
family tree data, including the outline format he uses when gathering
information. He will briefly describe the family tree database software
that he and one of his brothers use to store and display their family
tree. The presenter will also briefly mention some of the sources he
uses in his research and will discuss some of the data files he keeps to
aid in his research. In addition, he will describe the various kinds of
Windows-compatible family tree software he uses as well as family tree
charts.
Finkel has a bachelor of science degree in mathematics and a master of
science degree in computer science, both >from the University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign. He worked for more than 36 years in the computer
center at Argonne National Laboratory, and in his retirement has devoted
more time to working on genealogy.
He started doing genealogy in the mid-1960s, stopped for a time, and
resumed in 1991. At that time, his brother in Kentucky decided to put
their family genealogy into a computer. His brother designed the
database, entered the data >from Barry's hand-drawn trees, and their
genealogy began expanding by leaps-and-bounds.

Submitted by:
Sandra Schon Kiferbaum
JGSI Vice President Publicity


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Program on Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015 - "How I Do Genealogy: Starting Research and Beginning to Gather Information" #general

events@...
 

"How I Do Genealogy: Starting Research and Beginning to Gather
Information" is the topic of a presentation by Barry Finkel,
corresponding secretary of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois,
planned for the Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015, JGSI meeting.
The program will begin at 2 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Rd.,
Northbrook, Ill. The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open
at 12:30 p.m. to accommodate members who want to use or borrow genealogy
library materials, get help with genealogy websites or ask genealogical
questions before the main program begins. For more information, visit
http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.
Barry Finkel, an experienced genealogist, will describe how he organizes
family tree data, including the outline format he uses when gathering
information. He will briefly describe the family tree database software
that he and one of his brothers use to store and display their family
tree. The presenter will also briefly mention some of the sources he
uses in his research and will discuss some of the data files he keeps to
aid in his research. In addition, he will describe the various kinds of
Windows-compatible family tree software he uses as well as family tree
charts.
Finkel has a bachelor of science degree in mathematics and a master of
science degree in computer science, both >from the University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign. He worked for more than 36 years in the computer
center at Argonne National Laboratory, and in his retirement has devoted
more time to working on genealogy.
He started doing genealogy in the mid-1960s, stopped for a time, and
resumed in 1991. At that time, his brother in Kentucky decided to put
their family genealogy into a computer. His brother designed the
database, entered the data >from Barry's hand-drawn trees, and their
genealogy began expanding by leaps-and-bounds.

Submitted by:
Sandra Schon Kiferbaum
JGSI Vice President Publicity


JGS of Georgia - Dec 21, 2014 Meeting at The Breman Museum in Atlanta #general

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

Please join us on Sunday,December 21at 2 p.m. at The Breman Jewish
Heritage Museum, Atlanta, GA, as the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Georgia hosts Cassio Tolpolar, a Brazil filmmaker who documented his
family's journey back to its Jewish roots in Moldova in search of a
long lost grave. Mr. Tolpolar will screen his film, Mamaliga Blues,
and hold a Q&A session afterwards.

The film trailer can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQHS2c9-f9M

The program is free for members of The Breman and included in admission
for guests. Seating will be first-come, first-serve basis. Tickets will
be available at the door on the day of the event, or you may and fill
out the form:
http://thebreman.org/Events/Mamaliga-Blues-A-Family-Road-Movie-Into-The-Past
to reserve your spot today.

Peggy Freedman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Georgia - Dec 21, 2014 Meeting at The Breman Museum in Atlanta #general

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

Please join us on Sunday,December 21at 2 p.m. at The Breman Jewish
Heritage Museum, Atlanta, GA, as the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Georgia hosts Cassio Tolpolar, a Brazil filmmaker who documented his
family's journey back to its Jewish roots in Moldova in search of a
long lost grave. Mr. Tolpolar will screen his film, Mamaliga Blues,
and hold a Q&A session afterwards.

The film trailer can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQHS2c9-f9M

The program is free for members of The Breman and included in admission
for guests. Seating will be first-come, first-serve basis. Tickets will
be available at the door on the day of the event, or you may and fill
out the form:
http://thebreman.org/Events/Mamaliga-Blues-A-Family-Road-Movie-Into-The-Past
to reserve your spot today.

Peggy Freedman


Re: City Directory Question #general

Susan&David
 

David

bds. means boards, i.e., lives at.
Rem means removed, i.e., moved to.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

David Mayer Rafky dave15851585@yahoo.com wrote:

I am almost certain the "David Sizen" I found in the New Haven
1905 City Directory is my mother's father, David Season who was a
jeweler. He is listed the directory as "Sizen David Jeweler, bds,
663 Howard Avenue." Question: What does bds" mean?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: City Directory Question #general

Susan&David
 

David

bds. means boards, i.e., lives at.
Rem means removed, i.e., moved to.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

David Mayer Rafky dave15851585@yahoo.com wrote:

I am almost certain the "David Sizen" I found in the New Haven
1905 City Directory is my mother's father, David Season who was a
jeweler. He is listed the directory as "Sizen David Jeweler, bds,
663 Howard Avenue." Question: What does bds" mean?


Searching for Tsarevcons of Orgeyev and Paris, survivors of the Holocaust #bessarabia

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

Extending my research into branches of the extended SPIWAK/SCHOCHETMAN family, I am now
searching for members of the TZAREVKAN branch who moved >from ORGEYEV to PARIS and survived
the Holocaust. I am wondering if anyone out there lives in Paris or environs and could check phone
books for me to locate the survivors or their near kin? Or suggest other ways to find them?

Background: Chava SPIWAK married David TZAREVKAN (both of ORGEYEV, Bessarabia). They
changed their last name to COHEN. David's father was Yitzak, who lived in Orgeyev and TELENESTI.
Yitzak?s brother, Zeilig Tzarevkan, and his wife Rivke ZIPSTEIN (born in Orgeyev in 1874), moved
to Paris. Rivke, her son Leiba (born in OBODOVKA in 1897) and daughter-in-law Chana KRAVETZ
(born in KIEV in 1902), together with relatives, Marcus Tzarevcan and his son Charles, were all taken
from Paris to Drancy between 1941 and 1943 and killed in Auschwitz.
A little girl named Mireille Tzarivkan survived. Chava and David?s granddaughter found her
photograph on the USHMM?s web page, ?Do You Remember Me?? for orphans of the Holocaust.

Recently, in a box of Chava?s photos and letters, her granddaughter found a photograph of other
Tsaravcons who survived the Holocaust. The photograph looks to be >from the 1970s or so. The
people in the photo were identified as Raphael, Alan, and Dennis Tsaravcon, with these
addresses in Paris:

Alan Tsaravcon
2 Rue Leon Delagrange
75015 Paris

and

Dennis and Danielle Tsaravcon
30 Rue Jacques Baudry 75015
Paris

I would like to find Raphael, Alan, Dennis, and Danielle or their children, one of whom could be
Mireille. I am also searching for Mireille, who would be in her 70s now.

If anyone could help me in any way, I?d be very grateful.

Thank you,

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related
names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of
Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN
of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay,
and Paris becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa, Philadelphia, and New York City. KALIK
of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva or Capresti.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Searching for Tsarevcons of Orgeyev and Paris, survivors of the Holocaust #bessarabia

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

Extending my research into branches of the extended SPIWAK/SCHOCHETMAN family, I am now
searching for members of the TZAREVKAN branch who moved >from ORGEYEV to PARIS and survived
the Holocaust. I am wondering if anyone out there lives in Paris or environs and could check phone
books for me to locate the survivors or their near kin? Or suggest other ways to find them?

Background: Chava SPIWAK married David TZAREVKAN (both of ORGEYEV, Bessarabia). They
changed their last name to COHEN. David's father was Yitzak, who lived in Orgeyev and TELENESTI.
Yitzak?s brother, Zeilig Tzarevkan, and his wife Rivke ZIPSTEIN (born in Orgeyev in 1874), moved
to Paris. Rivke, her son Leiba (born in OBODOVKA in 1897) and daughter-in-law Chana KRAVETZ
(born in KIEV in 1902), together with relatives, Marcus Tzarevcan and his son Charles, were all taken
from Paris to Drancy between 1941 and 1943 and killed in Auschwitz.
A little girl named Mireille Tzarivkan survived. Chava and David?s granddaughter found her
photograph on the USHMM?s web page, ?Do You Remember Me?? for orphans of the Holocaust.

Recently, in a box of Chava?s photos and letters, her granddaughter found a photograph of other
Tsaravcons who survived the Holocaust. The photograph looks to be >from the 1970s or so. The
people in the photo were identified as Raphael, Alan, and Dennis Tsaravcon, with these
addresses in Paris:

Alan Tsaravcon
2 Rue Leon Delagrange
75015 Paris

and

Dennis and Danielle Tsaravcon
30 Rue Jacques Baudry 75015
Paris

I would like to find Raphael, Alan, Dennis, and Danielle or their children, one of whom could be
Mireille. I am also searching for Mireille, who would be in her 70s now.

If anyone could help me in any way, I?d be very grateful.

Thank you,

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related
names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of
Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN
of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay,
and Paris becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa, Philadelphia, and New York City. KALIK
of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva or Capresti.


Re: Process to apply for a 1900 death certificate for Munich (Upper Bavaria) Germany #germany

markus@...
 

Am 12.12.2014 15:41, schrieb Laurence Harris laurenceharris@btinternet.com:

Please could someone advise which is the correct archive/office
to apply to, together with the postal address, email address, and
website details if known.
Dear Mr Harris,
The town archive is the correct institution:

http://www.muenchen.de/rathaus/Stadtverwaltung/Direktorium/Stadtarchiv.html
e-mail: stadtarchiv@muenchen.de
postal address: Winzererstr. 68, 80797 München

Also, if anyone has any knowledge of the fee that will be charged,
possible payment methods, and typical turn-around time then this
would also be useful information for me.
The Munich archive usually needs several weeks to respond, the fees is
probably something around 25 Euro (no responsability taken).

If you order the record, don't forget to ask for copies of the ANNEXES
("Sammelakten") too, though Sammelakten don't exist for all death
entries at that period. The Sammelakten may contain some details not
found in the death entry itself.

Yours Sincerely, Markus Roehling, Berli markus@roehling.infon,
http://www.markus-roehling.eu


German SIG #Germany Re: Process to apply for a 1900 death certificate for Munich (Upper Bavaria) Germany #germany

markus@...
 

Am 12.12.2014 15:41, schrieb Laurence Harris laurenceharris@btinternet.com:

Please could someone advise which is the correct archive/office
to apply to, together with the postal address, email address, and
website details if known.
Dear Mr Harris,
The town archive is the correct institution:

http://www.muenchen.de/rathaus/Stadtverwaltung/Direktorium/Stadtarchiv.html
e-mail: stadtarchiv@muenchen.de
postal address: Winzererstr. 68, 80797 München

Also, if anyone has any knowledge of the fee that will be charged,
possible payment methods, and typical turn-around time then this
would also be useful information for me.
The Munich archive usually needs several weeks to respond, the fees is
probably something around 25 Euro (no responsability taken).

If you order the record, don't forget to ask for copies of the ANNEXES
("Sammelakten") too, though Sammelakten don't exist for all death
entries at that period. The Sammelakten may contain some details not
found in the death entry itself.

Yours Sincerely, Markus Roehling, Berli markus@roehling.infon,
http://www.markus-roehling.eu


Process to apply for a 1900 death certificate for Munich (Upper Bavaria) Germany #germany

LAURENCE HARRIS
 

I would like to obtain a copy of a death certificate for the death
of a Jewish person that occurred in Munich (Upper Bavaria) Germany
in 1900. I already know, for the deceased, their name, date of death
and in which Jewish cemetery in Munich they are buried.

I have never applied for a German death certificate for this period
before so I would appreciate some guidance as to the best approach.

Please could someone advise which is the correct archive/office
to apply to, together with the postal address, email address, and
website details if known.

Also, if anyone has any knowledge of the fee that will be charged,
possible payment methods, and typical turn-around time then this
would also be useful information for me. Thanks,

Sincerely, Laurence Harris, London, England laurenceharris@btinternet.com


German SIG #Germany Process to apply for a 1900 death certificate for Munich (Upper Bavaria) Germany #germany

LAURENCE HARRIS
 

I would like to obtain a copy of a death certificate for the death
of a Jewish person that occurred in Munich (Upper Bavaria) Germany
in 1900. I already know, for the deceased, their name, date of death
and in which Jewish cemetery in Munich they are buried.

I have never applied for a German death certificate for this period
before so I would appreciate some guidance as to the best approach.

Please could someone advise which is the correct archive/office
to apply to, together with the postal address, email address, and
website details if known.

Also, if anyone has any knowledge of the fee that will be charged,
possible payment methods, and typical turn-around time then this
would also be useful information for me. Thanks,

Sincerely, Laurence Harris, London, England laurenceharris@btinternet.com


Help for tracing records in Sireth, Iasi and Bukarest #romania

Barbara Ras Wechsler
 

Dear All

I am fairly new to research in Romania. This is why I need some help in
finding traces of the following persons:

1. Moses or Marcus (and any name variations) Leow WESCHLER (WECHSLER),
b. 17 August 1844, Sireth, Romania, son of Charles, Karl or any
equivalent name, He was a tailor and immigrated to Alexandria or Cairo,
Egypt before 1872.

2. Bernardo or Bermann and/or Abram Ber WECHSLER, b. 30. April 1854 in
???, son of Hertz Iacob [Iancu] WECHSLER and Amalia [Rifka] BARTEL.
First marriage Nov 30th, 1866 in Iasi to Selima (Irene) VAIZENGRIN
(WEISSENGR=DCN), b. 1845 in Iasi, daughter of Salomon VAIZENGRIN and
Paola WECHSLER; second marriage to Luisa Elisa PARNES, b. May 20th, 1866
in Botosani, Romania, daughter of Baruch PARNES and Golda BANDER or
BRENDER. He may have had a brother called Ioil, b. May 10th, 1852 who
married HInda COFMANN Jun 12th, 1870 in Iasi.

3. Haim (Vita) LITMAN, b. about 1829 in Bukarest, father Beri LITMAN.
First marriage to Brana BARANELl in Cairo, Egypt; second marriage to
Ester WECHSLER in Trieste, Italy.

I would like to know where I can find additional records to those
publisized in JewishGen, especially records for Bukarest. Also if
anybody is researching the families above, I would be happy to hear >from
you.

Thanks
Barbara Ras Wechsler
bwras@bluewin.ch

Researching
WECHSLER >from Jarolaw, Rzeszow, Tarnow (alle Poland) Iasi, Sireth,
Bukarest, Triest (Italy) Cairo and Alexandria (Egypt)
WESCHLER >from Jarolaw, Iasi, Sireth, Bukarest, Triest (italy), Cairo and
Alexandria (Egypt)
RAIBACH or RAIBOCH >from Jarolaw, Jarolaw, Rzeszow, Tarnow (alle Poland)
Triest (italy), Cairo and Alexandria (Egypt)
VAIZENGRIN or WEISSENGR=DCN >from Iasi, Trieste (all Italy)
PARNES >from Iasi, Triest (Italy)
CAMERINI >from Ancona, Senigallia, Trieste (all Italy), Cairo, Alexandria
(Egypt)
LITMAN >from Iasi, Trieste (all Italy)

*Moderator note: please respond privately to Barbara's message unless
you have valuable information to share with the group.
Shabbat Shalom!


Romania SIG #Romania Help for tracing records in Sireth, Iasi and Bukarest #romania

Barbara Ras Wechsler
 

Dear All

I am fairly new to research in Romania. This is why I need some help in
finding traces of the following persons:

1. Moses or Marcus (and any name variations) Leow WESCHLER (WECHSLER),
b. 17 August 1844, Sireth, Romania, son of Charles, Karl or any
equivalent name, He was a tailor and immigrated to Alexandria or Cairo,
Egypt before 1872.

2. Bernardo or Bermann and/or Abram Ber WECHSLER, b. 30. April 1854 in
???, son of Hertz Iacob [Iancu] WECHSLER and Amalia [Rifka] BARTEL.
First marriage Nov 30th, 1866 in Iasi to Selima (Irene) VAIZENGRIN
(WEISSENGR=DCN), b. 1845 in Iasi, daughter of Salomon VAIZENGRIN and
Paola WECHSLER; second marriage to Luisa Elisa PARNES, b. May 20th, 1866
in Botosani, Romania, daughter of Baruch PARNES and Golda BANDER or
BRENDER. He may have had a brother called Ioil, b. May 10th, 1852 who
married HInda COFMANN Jun 12th, 1870 in Iasi.

3. Haim (Vita) LITMAN, b. about 1829 in Bukarest, father Beri LITMAN.
First marriage to Brana BARANELl in Cairo, Egypt; second marriage to
Ester WECHSLER in Trieste, Italy.

I would like to know where I can find additional records to those
publisized in JewishGen, especially records for Bukarest. Also if
anybody is researching the families above, I would be happy to hear >from
you.

Thanks
Barbara Ras Wechsler
bwras@bluewin.ch

Researching
WECHSLER >from Jarolaw, Rzeszow, Tarnow (alle Poland) Iasi, Sireth,
Bukarest, Triest (Italy) Cairo and Alexandria (Egypt)
WESCHLER >from Jarolaw, Iasi, Sireth, Bukarest, Triest (italy), Cairo and
Alexandria (Egypt)
RAIBACH or RAIBOCH >from Jarolaw, Jarolaw, Rzeszow, Tarnow (alle Poland)
Triest (italy), Cairo and Alexandria (Egypt)
VAIZENGRIN or WEISSENGR=DCN >from Iasi, Trieste (all Italy)
PARNES >from Iasi, Triest (Italy)
CAMERINI >from Ancona, Senigallia, Trieste (all Italy), Cairo, Alexandria
(Egypt)
LITMAN >from Iasi, Trieste (all Italy)

*Moderator note: please respond privately to Barbara's message unless
you have valuable information to share with the group.
Shabbat Shalom!


Argentina Jewish newspaper #general

rv Kaplan
 

Can anyone provide an email address for an Argentinian Jewish newspaper or
magazine? Finding it very difficult to source this information on the internet.

thanks

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


JewishGen Education 2015 #romania

Phyllis Kramer
 

We are delighted to offer 'Genners four courses in the first quarter of
2015.

1. Research Your Roots on JewishGen Jan 1-29
2. Beginning Jewish Genealogy in the U.S. Jan 16-Feb 10
3. Complex Genealogical Research in the U.S. March 2-30

These 3 courses focus on your immigrant ancestors and include online
text lessons and our unique FORUM, our personal mentoring program,
where students are encouraged to post one branch, set goals for their
research and work interactively with the instructor to research that
branch.

Consider the beginning course for organization and basic research
skills (census, vital records, manifests) then move on to the Complex
U.S. course (which covers naturalization, military and governmental
records, and local archival research)

The third Course, Research Your Roots begins with an Introduction
to Jewish History, Culture and Naming Patterns, moves into Finding
your Shtetl, explores the JewishGen Researcher and
Country Databases, Jewish Records Indexing (JRI-P), and includes
practical hints on translation, finding a researcher and other
advanced topics. This course creates a bridge between the American
Family data and those left behind in Europe, between records available
on JewishGen and related sites and hiring a researcher. If you are an
experienced researcher, familiar with everything JewishGen has to
offer, and/or have already found your family in European databases,
this course would be too elementary (consider the next Independent
Study class).

4. Basic 1: Search Strategies for Genealogy Jan 2-16
this two week class emphasizes efficient use of the Internet for
genealogy. The class is taught in a forum setting open 24/7 with daily
tasks and assignments
that should take no more than an hour a day. Each lesson includes
illustrative quick search problems using Google. This class is free to
Value Added members of JewishGen who have donated $100 to the General
Fund in the last 12 months.

We strongly encourage you to look at the course details, instructor's
credentials and student requirements (time, fee, prerequisites) on
www.jewishgen.org/education. Course Registration opens two or three weeks
before the course start date. If, after reviewing the education page,
you have some questions, please email
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org.

And thanks for "listening"
Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education,
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
www.JewishGen.org/education


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Argentina Jewish newspaper #general

rv Kaplan
 

Can anyone provide an email address for an Argentinian Jewish newspaper or
magazine? Finding it very difficult to source this information on the internet.

thanks

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


Romania SIG #Romania JewishGen Education 2015 #romania

Phyllis Kramer
 

We are delighted to offer 'Genners four courses in the first quarter of
2015.

1. Research Your Roots on JewishGen Jan 1-29
2. Beginning Jewish Genealogy in the U.S. Jan 16-Feb 10
3. Complex Genealogical Research in the U.S. March 2-30

These 3 courses focus on your immigrant ancestors and include online
text lessons and our unique FORUM, our personal mentoring program,
where students are encouraged to post one branch, set goals for their
research and work interactively with the instructor to research that
branch.

Consider the beginning course for organization and basic research
skills (census, vital records, manifests) then move on to the Complex
U.S. course (which covers naturalization, military and governmental
records, and local archival research)

The third Course, Research Your Roots begins with an Introduction
to Jewish History, Culture and Naming Patterns, moves into Finding
your Shtetl, explores the JewishGen Researcher and
Country Databases, Jewish Records Indexing (JRI-P), and includes
practical hints on translation, finding a researcher and other
advanced topics. This course creates a bridge between the American
Family data and those left behind in Europe, between records available
on JewishGen and related sites and hiring a researcher. If you are an
experienced researcher, familiar with everything JewishGen has to
offer, and/or have already found your family in European databases,
this course would be too elementary (consider the next Independent
Study class).

4. Basic 1: Search Strategies for Genealogy Jan 2-16
this two week class emphasizes efficient use of the Internet for
genealogy. The class is taught in a forum setting open 24/7 with daily
tasks and assignments
that should take no more than an hour a day. Each lesson includes
illustrative quick search problems using Google. This class is free to
Value Added members of JewishGen who have donated $100 to the General
Fund in the last 12 months.

We strongly encourage you to look at the course details, instructor's
credentials and student requirements (time, fee, prerequisites) on
www.jewishgen.org/education. Course Registration opens two or three weeks
before the course start date. If, after reviewing the education page,
you have some questions, please email
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org.

And thanks for "listening"
Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education,
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
www.JewishGen.org/education

106561 - 106580 of 665493