Date   

Yizkor Book Project, January 2015 #hungary

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day was commemorated,
marking 70 years since Auschwitz was liberated of by the Allies. As we grow
further and further away >from the events of the Holocaust, so does our need
grow to save every scrap of memory of the communities and the people that
were taken >from us forever. The Yizkor Book Project mission of disseminating
information on the lost communities freely available has continued in the
past month involving the translation of the original Yiddish and Hebrew
books into English, but not only... You will certainly notice below that
some of the additions and updates this past month are in Hebrew and Polish.
On one hand, Yiddish sections of a number of books have been translated into
Hebrew, making this material accessible to those whose mother tongue is
Hebrew and are less comfortable with English and on the other hand,
translations have been prepared in Polish for the people of Poland who
quite often have little information on the events that took place in their
own country during World War Two and are frequently thirsty for such
information.

Other than that, it was a milestone month for the Yizkor Books in Print
Project with no less than three books becoming available during January.
Congratulations to the volunteers behind this remarkable achievement! The
books are:

- Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and Vicinity
- Dubossary Memorial Book
- The Book of Klobucko; In Memory of a Martyred Community

As time progresses, we are seeing more and more correspondence >from people
interested in obtaining hard copies of the Yizkor Book translations. Whilst
the translations continue to be freely available online in the Yizkor Book
Project, there is a growing interest in seeing the translations in a
concrete, "touchable" format on people's bookshelves. The only thing here is
that in order to reach the publishing stage, we obviously need to complete
the translation of the books beforehand. This generally requires quite a
deal of financial report and, as always, if you feel strongly about seeing
the books translated and are able to assist in any way, your donations would
be very much appreciated and perhaps, in the end, would mean you seeing the
book you supported sitting proudly on your bookshelf at home.

If you wish to learn more about the Yizkor Book in Print Project or how you
can support one of the Yizkor Book Translation projects, please see the
links at the end of this message.

Lastly, I would like to point out a new page which has been added to the YB
Project called Yizkor Book Insights at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybinsights.html . The first of the articles
which appear here have been kindly donated by Shalom Bronstein and Dr. Ida
Selavan Schwarcz and I'm sure you'll find their insights into Yizkor books
particularly enlightening. Hopefully, more of these type of articles will be
added with time.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Eisiskes, Lithuania (Ejszyszki, its History and Destruction)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Eisiskes/Eisiskes.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Memorial Book of Krzemieniec)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets4/kremenetsh.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Yizkor book of Luboml)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lyuboml1/Lyubomlh.html [Hebrew]

- Sosnove, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ludvipol1/ludvipolh.html [Hebrew]

Added 10 entries:

- Bogdan Voda, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar185.html

- Birsana, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar177.html

- Nanesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194.html

- Oncesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar193.html

- Poienile Izei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar192b.html

- Salistea de Sus, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar178.html

- Slatina, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194b.html

- Sieu, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar183.html

- Strimatra, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar181.html

- Valen, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar195.html

We have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Czenstochov; a new supplement to the book
"Czenstochover Yidn")
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa/Czestochowa.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Krosno, Poland (Krosno by the Wislok River)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krosno/Krosno.html

- Lithuania (Lite) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Nowy Zmigrod, Poland (Halbow near Nowy Zmigrod)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_zmigrod1/nowy_zmigrod1.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ryki, Poland (A Memorial to the Community of Ryki, Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ryki/rykp000.html [Polish]

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Skarzysko-Kamienna, Poland (The Yischor book in memoriam of the Jewish
community of Skarzysko and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Skarzysko/Skarzysko.html

- Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/pinkas_slovakia.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wlodawa, Poland (Yizkor book in memory of Vlodava and region)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wlodawa/wlodowa.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager

Moderator: H-SIGrs will find the additions to the Maramaros Yizkor book as well
as additions to Satoraljauhely and Slovakia books of particular interest. Please
check them out!


ViewMate translation request -- Old German script #hungary

carolevogel51@...
 

Hi All,

I have posted on Viewmate a short property transfer document >from 1792
written in old German script. I am trying to learn whether the new
owner of a property was related to the previous owners. This is part
of my ongoing project to document the families that lived in the
Jewish community of Mattersdorf, Hungary (now Mattersburg, Austria)
from the 1600s to the Holocaust.
I would like a direct translation. If you can help, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37919

Thanks for your help!

Carole G. Vogel
Branchville, New Jersey, USA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Yizkor Book Project, January 2015 #hungary

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day was commemorated,
marking 70 years since Auschwitz was liberated of by the Allies. As we grow
further and further away >from the events of the Holocaust, so does our need
grow to save every scrap of memory of the communities and the people that
were taken >from us forever. The Yizkor Book Project mission of disseminating
information on the lost communities freely available has continued in the
past month involving the translation of the original Yiddish and Hebrew
books into English, but not only... You will certainly notice below that
some of the additions and updates this past month are in Hebrew and Polish.
On one hand, Yiddish sections of a number of books have been translated into
Hebrew, making this material accessible to those whose mother tongue is
Hebrew and are less comfortable with English and on the other hand,
translations have been prepared in Polish for the people of Poland who
quite often have little information on the events that took place in their
own country during World War Two and are frequently thirsty for such
information.

Other than that, it was a milestone month for the Yizkor Books in Print
Project with no less than three books becoming available during January.
Congratulations to the volunteers behind this remarkable achievement! The
books are:

- Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and Vicinity
- Dubossary Memorial Book
- The Book of Klobucko; In Memory of a Martyred Community

As time progresses, we are seeing more and more correspondence >from people
interested in obtaining hard copies of the Yizkor Book translations. Whilst
the translations continue to be freely available online in the Yizkor Book
Project, there is a growing interest in seeing the translations in a
concrete, "touchable" format on people's bookshelves. The only thing here is
that in order to reach the publishing stage, we obviously need to complete
the translation of the books beforehand. This generally requires quite a
deal of financial report and, as always, if you feel strongly about seeing
the books translated and are able to assist in any way, your donations would
be very much appreciated and perhaps, in the end, would mean you seeing the
book you supported sitting proudly on your bookshelf at home.

If you wish to learn more about the Yizkor Book in Print Project or how you
can support one of the Yizkor Book Translation projects, please see the
links at the end of this message.

Lastly, I would like to point out a new page which has been added to the YB
Project called Yizkor Book Insights at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybinsights.html . The first of the articles
which appear here have been kindly donated by Shalom Bronstein and Dr. Ida
Selavan Schwarcz and I'm sure you'll find their insights into Yizkor books
particularly enlightening. Hopefully, more of these type of articles will be
added with time.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Eisiskes, Lithuania (Ejszyszki, its History and Destruction)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Eisiskes/Eisiskes.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Memorial Book of Krzemieniec)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets4/kremenetsh.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Yizkor book of Luboml)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lyuboml1/Lyubomlh.html [Hebrew]

- Sosnove, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ludvipol1/ludvipolh.html [Hebrew]

Added 10 entries:

- Bogdan Voda, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar185.html

- Birsana, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar177.html

- Nanesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194.html

- Oncesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar193.html

- Poienile Izei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar192b.html

- Salistea de Sus, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar178.html

- Slatina, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194b.html

- Sieu, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar183.html

- Strimatra, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar181.html

- Valen, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar195.html

We have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Czenstochov; a new supplement to the book
"Czenstochover Yidn")
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa/Czestochowa.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Krosno, Poland (Krosno by the Wislok River)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krosno/Krosno.html

- Lithuania (Lite) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Nowy Zmigrod, Poland (Halbow near Nowy Zmigrod)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_zmigrod1/nowy_zmigrod1.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ryki, Poland (A Memorial to the Community of Ryki, Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ryki/rykp000.html [Polish]

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Skarzysko-Kamienna, Poland (The Yischor book in memoriam of the Jewish
community of Skarzysko and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Skarzysko/Skarzysko.html

- Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/pinkas_slovakia.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wlodawa, Poland (Yizkor book in memory of Vlodava and region)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wlodawa/wlodowa.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager

Moderator: H-SIGrs will find the additions to the Maramaros Yizkor book as well
as additions to Satoraljauhely and Slovakia books of particular interest. Please
check them out!


Hungary SIG #Hungary ViewMate translation request -- Old German script #hungary

carolevogel51@...
 

Hi All,

I have posted on Viewmate a short property transfer document >from 1792
written in old German script. I am trying to learn whether the new
owner of a property was related to the previous owners. This is part
of my ongoing project to document the families that lived in the
Jewish community of Mattersdorf, Hungary (now Mattersburg, Austria)
from the 1600s to the Holocaust.
I would like a direct translation. If you can help, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37919

Thanks for your help!

Carole G. Vogel
Branchville, New Jersey, USA


Knihynicze (Knyahynychi) Cadastral Map 1876 #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has added a complete single-color cadastral map of the
town of Knihynicze (Knyahynychi, Kniehynicze, Kniahynychi) >from 1876
to the Cadastral Map Room. This formerly Galician town is today in
Ukraine.

This working copy was made >from an earlier lithograph, rather
savagely quartered for carrying in the field, and then marked by hand
for a new edition to follow; the manuscript updates include a wealth of
property numbers and many landowner names, making this a uniquely
valuable record of the Austrian Empire's tax record process.

The direct link is here:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/knihynicze-knyahynychi-1876/

Situated at the edge of the large town reservoir, the center of
Knihynicze shows a large church, several numbered Jewish community
buildings (revealed in the associated landowner records), Jewish and
Catholic cemeteries, and many features for managing the water inlets
to and outlets >from the reservoir. For this composite image, Jay Osborn
has left the rough-cut edges of map sheets unblended.

The entire map room can be searched here:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org

For photos and close-ups documenting many more maps, consult
Gesher Galicia's Facebook page here:
https://www.facebook.com/GesherGalicia?ref=br_tf

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Knihynicze (Knyahynychi) Cadastral Map 1876 #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has added a complete single-color cadastral map of the
town of Knihynicze (Knyahynychi, Kniehynicze, Kniahynychi) >from 1876
to the Cadastral Map Room. This formerly Galician town is today in
Ukraine.

This working copy was made >from an earlier lithograph, rather
savagely quartered for carrying in the field, and then marked by hand
for a new edition to follow; the manuscript updates include a wealth of
property numbers and many landowner names, making this a uniquely
valuable record of the Austrian Empire's tax record process.

The direct link is here:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/knihynicze-knyahynychi-1876/

Situated at the edge of the large town reservoir, the center of
Knihynicze shows a large church, several numbered Jewish community
buildings (revealed in the associated landowner records), Jewish and
Catholic cemeteries, and many features for managing the water inlets
to and outlets >from the reservoir. For this composite image, Jay Osborn
has left the rough-cut edges of map sheets unblended.

The entire map room can be searched here:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org

For photos and close-ups documenting many more maps, consult
Gesher Galicia's Facebook page here:
https://www.facebook.com/GesherGalicia?ref=br_tf

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com


Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando presents: "Shared Success Stories" on Tuesday, September 3, 2015 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

Please join the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando at its
February 3 meeting. Our topic is "Shared Success Stories". Some of our
members will describe some of their biggest challenges in researching
family history and how they overcame these obstacles. The discussion
is sure to provide you with some valuable ideas to help you in your
genealogy research.

Our meetings feature speakers on a variety of genealogy topics. Many
of our presenters are known nationally and globally for their expertise.
You also have the opportunity to meet and make friends with other family
researchers, which makes your efforts more successful and rewarding.

The meeting is >from 7:00 - 9:00 P.M. at the Roth Jewish Community Center,
851 N. Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751, on the Southwest corner of
Maitland Avenue and Maitland Boulevard. The meeting is in the Senior
Lounge of the building.

Admission and parking for the February 3, 2015 meeting is free. Come
early (6:30) to chat with our members, or to learn about more about
Jewish genealogy and our organization.

For more information "like" us at www.facebook.com/jgsgreaterorlando ,
call us at 407-494-4230, or email one of the contacts below.

Contact Information:
Tom Hirsch
JGSGO VP Programs & Publicity
jgsgo.programs@gmail.com

Lin Herz
JGSGO Publicity Chairperson
jgsgo.info@gmail.com or 407-494-4230

Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida


Inaugural Meeting of the Twin Cities Jewish Genealogical Society #general

WALTER ELIAS
 

The Twin Cities Jewish Genealogical Society is pleased and proud to announce
our inaugural program, taking place on Sunday February 8 at 3:15 PM at the
St. Paul JCC, 1375 St. Paul Ave, St. Paul, Minnesota.

Our program follows a 2:00 artist talk by our member, Susan Weinberg,
"Capturing the Stories," part of the Jewish Identity and Legacy Project.

In our 3:15 meeting we will begin to shape this Society to meet the needs of
the Minneapolis/St. Paul Jewish Genealogy community.

Everyone is welcome to both programs!

Walter Elias, TCJGS President
wselias@msn.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando presents: "Shared Success Stories" on Tuesday, September 3, 2015 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

Please join the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando at its
February 3 meeting. Our topic is "Shared Success Stories". Some of our
members will describe some of their biggest challenges in researching
family history and how they overcame these obstacles. The discussion
is sure to provide you with some valuable ideas to help you in your
genealogy research.

Our meetings feature speakers on a variety of genealogy topics. Many
of our presenters are known nationally and globally for their expertise.
You also have the opportunity to meet and make friends with other family
researchers, which makes your efforts more successful and rewarding.

The meeting is >from 7:00 - 9:00 P.M. at the Roth Jewish Community Center,
851 N. Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751, on the Southwest corner of
Maitland Avenue and Maitland Boulevard. The meeting is in the Senior
Lounge of the building.

Admission and parking for the February 3, 2015 meeting is free. Come
early (6:30) to chat with our members, or to learn about more about
Jewish genealogy and our organization.

For more information "like" us at www.facebook.com/jgsgreaterorlando ,
call us at 407-494-4230, or email one of the contacts below.

Contact Information:
Tom Hirsch
JGSGO VP Programs & Publicity
jgsgo.programs@gmail.com

Lin Herz
JGSGO Publicity Chairperson
jgsgo.info@gmail.com or 407-494-4230

Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Inaugural Meeting of the Twin Cities Jewish Genealogical Society #general

WALTER ELIAS
 

The Twin Cities Jewish Genealogical Society is pleased and proud to announce
our inaugural program, taking place on Sunday February 8 at 3:15 PM at the
St. Paul JCC, 1375 St. Paul Ave, St. Paul, Minnesota.

Our program follows a 2:00 artist talk by our member, Susan Weinberg,
"Capturing the Stories," part of the Jewish Identity and Legacy Project.

In our 3:15 meeting we will begin to shape this Society to meet the needs of
the Minneapolis/St. Paul Jewish Genealogy community.

Everyone is welcome to both programs!

Walter Elias, TCJGS President
wselias@msn.com


Re: Glossary of Terms & Abbreviations for ITS Records #austria-czech

Fritz Neubauer
 

From: Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 12:49:27 -0800
If you are working with ITS (International Tracing Service in Bad
Arolsen) documents, or other German-language records, you'll find this
free English "Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations Found in the Archive
of the International Tracing Service" invaluable:

https://secure.ushmm.org/individual-research//Glossary.pdf

The 346-page work-in-progress is published by the Holocaust Survivors
and Victims Resource Center at the USHMM and is regularly updated. It
begins with a guide to Sutterlin script (Sutterlinschrift: the
historical form of German handwriting)
Dear Pamela,
dear all,

I keep seeing the reference to the Suetterlin handwriting style as "*the*
historical form of German handwriting ...", which is not so correct
(unless you do not make a distinction between German and German-speaking!):
First of all, "Suetterlin" has an umlaut, then is would only be "historical"
if history started at 1915, when Ludwig Suetterlin published his reduced
version of Gothic script handwriting in Prussia. But it was only adopted in
North German Prussia in contrast with the rest of German-speaking
administrations such as all the territory of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy
that stretched all the way to Galicia to the East or (sadly) Bosnia-
Herzegowina to the South. All over there the hand-writing was still called
"Kurrent" and not affected by these Prussian ideas of doing away with the
way Gothic script was hand-written. And, by the way, even Suetterlin was
never banned (another myth!), it was just no longer taught in schools after
1941, when Hitler stopped its use, when he suddenly claimed to have
discovered its Jewish origin ...

With best regards

Fritz Neubauer, residing in previous Prussian territory in North Germany


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Glossary of Terms & Abbreviations for ITS Records #general

Fritz Neubauer
 

From: Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 12:49:27 -0800
If you are working with ITS (International Tracing Service in Bad
Arolsen) documents, or other German-language records, you'll find this
free English "Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations Found in the Archive
of the International Tracing Service" invaluable:

https://secure.ushmm.org/individual-research//Glossary.pdf

The 346-page work-in-progress is published by the Holocaust Survivors
and Victims Resource Center at the USHMM and is regularly updated. It
begins with a guide to Sutterlin script (Sutterlinschrift: the
historical form of German handwriting)
Dear Pamela,
dear all,

I keep seeing the reference to the Suetterlin handwriting style as "*the*
historical form of German handwriting ...", which is not so correct
(unless you do not make a distinction between German and German-speaking!):
First of all, "Suetterlin" has an umlaut, then is would only be "historical"
if history started at 1915, when Ludwig Suetterlin published his reduced
version of Gothic script handwriting in Prussia. But it was only adopted in
North German Prussia in contrast with the rest of German-speaking
administrations such as all the territory of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy
that stretched all the way to Galicia to the East or (sadly) Bosnia-
Herzegowina to the South. All over there the hand-writing was still called
"Kurrent" and not affected by these Prussian ideas of doing away with the
way Gothic script was hand-written. And, by the way, even Suetterlin was
never banned (another myth!), it was just no longer taught in schools after
1941, when Hitler stopped its use, when he suddenly claimed to have
discovered its Jewish origin ...

With best regards

Fritz Neubauer, residing in previous Prussian territory in North Germany


KRIEGER from Ramigola/Remagala #lithuania

mkaplan27
 

Shalom Litvaks-

My maternal grandmother, known to me as Bertha KRIEGER, came to the United
States early in the last century. Her husband, Charles SARAPIN says in his
Petition that Bertha was >from Ramigola. Ramigola is in Kovno gubernia,
Ponevezh district. Ponewish and Krakinow are nearby towns.

While I knew her as Bertha, her tombstone has a Yiddish inscription which,
when translated, gives her name as Ester Brocha, daughter of Yaakov.

She resided since arriving in the States in northern New Jersey, Passaic and
Hackensack.

She probably had a brother, Harry, and maybe a second brother, Morris, and
just possibly a sister, Rose.

I hit this brick wall several years ago, and have not been able to make any
progress since then.

Can anyone out there offer some help?

-Michael Kaplan

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania KRIEGER from Ramigola/Remagala #lithuania

mkaplan27
 

Shalom Litvaks-

My maternal grandmother, known to me as Bertha KRIEGER, came to the United
States early in the last century. Her husband, Charles SARAPIN says in his
Petition that Bertha was >from Ramigola. Ramigola is in Kovno gubernia,
Ponevezh district. Ponewish and Krakinow are nearby towns.

While I knew her as Bertha, her tombstone has a Yiddish inscription which,
when translated, gives her name as Ester Brocha, daughter of Yaakov.

She resided since arriving in the States in northern New Jersey, Passaic and
Hackensack.

She probably had a brother, Harry, and maybe a second brother, Morris, and
just possibly a sister, Rose.

I hit this brick wall several years ago, and have not been able to make any
progress since then.

Can anyone out there offer some help?

-Michael Kaplan

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list


ViewMate interpretation request - Chisinau address on passenger manifest #bessarabia

Jay Lechtman <jay.lechtman@...>
 

I've posted the Chisinau address of my great grandparents on a
passenger manifest >from November 1912. I can read everything except
the name of the street -- and I'm looking for two things:

1. An interpretation of the street name
2. A source for a historical (pre-WW1) street map of Kishinev/Chisinau

It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37918
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much for any assistance you can provide!

Jay Lechtman
Vienna, Virginia, USA
Researching LECHTMAN in Snitivka, Ukraine and Chisinau, Moldova and
SLEPKOW in Chisinau
MODERATOR NOTE - Please reply privately to sender or via Viewmate


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia ViewMate interpretation request - Chisinau address on passenger manifest #bessarabia

Jay Lechtman <jay.lechtman@...>
 

I've posted the Chisinau address of my great grandparents on a
passenger manifest >from November 1912. I can read everything except
the name of the street -- and I'm looking for two things:

1. An interpretation of the street name
2. A source for a historical (pre-WW1) street map of Kishinev/Chisinau

It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37918
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much for any assistance you can provide!

Jay Lechtman
Vienna, Virginia, USA
Researching LECHTMAN in Snitivka, Ukraine and Chisinau, Moldova and
SLEPKOW in Chisinau
MODERATOR NOTE - Please reply privately to sender or via Viewmate


Pick and Mahler (and Grab?) families #austria-czech

rfc974@...
 

Hi folks:

I know there are a number of people on the list who have looked at the
Mahler family. Having just bumped into the family in my genealogical
research, I thought I'd solicit some help.

Barbara (Mahler) PIck was the composer's aunt. She married Wilhelm
Pick and they lived for a period of time in Jihlava, before moving to
Vienna.

Their son, Karl Pick (b. 17 September 1876 in Jihlava), was an
engineer and married Ludmila Lederer in 1907 in Prague, where the
couple initially lived and had a daughter, Johanna (b. 1908).

And then I lose track of them until either 1938 or 1942. In 1938, a
Karl Pick dies, in his 71st year in Vienna (Neue Freie Presse obituary
that lists him as a husband, father, grandfather and brother). Then on
12 May 1942, Ludmila, apparently not accompanied by any family, is
deported >from Prague to Theresienstadt.

Hints that may or may not relate to the family -- a Rudolf Pick, son
of Karl, is born in Vienna in 1911. I haven't been able to link or
exclude him. Similarly, Johanna Pick marries Ernst Grab in Vienna in
1935 -- again, I don't know if there's a fit or not.

Any insights into this branch of the Pick/Mahler family welcomed!
Craig

--
Craig Partridge
(non-work account -- for work issues send to craig@aland.bbn.com)


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Pick and Mahler (and Grab?) families #austria-czech

rfc974@...
 

Hi folks:

I know there are a number of people on the list who have looked at the
Mahler family. Having just bumped into the family in my genealogical
research, I thought I'd solicit some help.

Barbara (Mahler) PIck was the composer's aunt. She married Wilhelm
Pick and they lived for a period of time in Jihlava, before moving to
Vienna.

Their son, Karl Pick (b. 17 September 1876 in Jihlava), was an
engineer and married Ludmila Lederer in 1907 in Prague, where the
couple initially lived and had a daughter, Johanna (b. 1908).

And then I lose track of them until either 1938 or 1942. In 1938, a
Karl Pick dies, in his 71st year in Vienna (Neue Freie Presse obituary
that lists him as a husband, father, grandfather and brother). Then on
12 May 1942, Ludmila, apparently not accompanied by any family, is
deported >from Prague to Theresienstadt.

Hints that may or may not relate to the family -- a Rudolf Pick, son
of Karl, is born in Vienna in 1911. I haven't been able to link or
exclude him. Similarly, Johanna Pick marries Ernst Grab in Vienna in
1935 -- again, I don't know if there's a fit or not.

Any insights into this branch of the Pick/Mahler family welcomed!
Craig

--
Craig Partridge
(non-work account -- for work issues send to craig@aland.bbn.com)


Yizkor Book Project, January 2015 #austria-czech

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day was commemorated,
marking 70 years since Auschwitz was liberated of by the Allies. As we grow
further and further away >from the events of the Holocaust, so does our need
grow to save every scrap of memory of the communities and the people that
were taken >from us forever. The Yizkor Book Project mission of disseminating
information on the lost communities freely available has continued in the
past month involving the translation of the original Yiddish and Hebrew
books into English, but not only... You will certainly notice below that
some of the additions and updates this past month are in Hebrew and Polish.
On one hand, Yiddish sections of a number of books have been translated into
Hebrew, making this material accessible to those whose mother tongue is
Hebrew and are less comfortable with English and on the other hand,
translations have been prepared in Polish for the people of Poland who
quite often have little information on the events that took place in their
own country during World War Two and are frequently thirsty for such
information.

Other than that, it was a milestone month for the Yizkor Books in Print
Project with no less than three books becoming available during January.
Congratulations to the volunteers behind this remarkable achievement! The
books are:

- Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and Vicinity
- Dubossary Memorial Book
- The Book of Klobucko; In Memory of a Martyred Community

As time progresses, we are seeing more and more correspondence >from people
interested in obtaining hard copies of the Yizkor Book translations. Whilst
the translations continue to be freely available online in the Yizkor Book
Project, there is a growing interest in seeing the translations in a
concrete, "touchable" format on people's bookshelves. The only thing here is
that in order to reach the publishing stage, we obviously need to complete
the translation of the books beforehand. This generally requires quite a
deal of financial report and, as always, if you feel strongly about seeing
the books translated and are able to assist in any way, your donations would
be very much appreciated and perhaps, in the end, would mean you seeing the
book you supported sitting proudly on your bookshelf at home.

If you wish to learn more about the Yizkor Book in Print Project or how you
can support one of the Yizkor Book Translation projects, please see the
links at the end of this message.

Lastly, I would like to point out a new page which has been added to the YB
Project called Yizkor Book Insights at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybinsights.html . The first of the articles
which appear here have been kindly donated by Shalom Bronstein and Dr. Ida
Selavan Schwarcz and I'm sure you'll find their insights into Yizkor books
particularly enlightening. Hopefully, more of these type of articles will be
added with time.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Eisiskes, Lithuania (Ejszyszki, its History and Destruction)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Eisiskes/Eisiskes.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Memorial Book of Krzemieniec)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets4/kremenetsh.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Yizkor book of Luboml)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lyuboml1/Lyubomlh.html [Hebrew]

- Sosnove, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ludvipol1/ludvipolh.html [Hebrew]

Added 10 entries:

- Bogdan Voda, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar185.html

- Birsana, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar177.html

- Nanesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194.html

- Oncesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar193.html

- Poienile Izei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar192b.html

- Salistea de Sus, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar178.html

- Slatina, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194b.html

- Sieu, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar183.html

- Strimatra, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar181.html

- Valen, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar195.html

We have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Czenstochov; a new supplement to the book
"Czenstochover Yidn")
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa/Czestochowa.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Krosno, Poland (Krosno by the Wislok River)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krosno/Krosno.html

- Lithuania (Lite) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Nowy Zmigrod, Poland (Halbow near Nowy Zmigrod)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_zmigrod1/nowy_zmigrod1.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ryki, Poland (A Memorial to the Community of Ryki, Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ryki/rykp000.html [Polish]

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Skarzysko-Kamienna, Poland (The Yischor book in memoriam of the Jewish
community of Skarzysko and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Skarzysko/Skarzysko.html

- Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/pinkas_slovakia.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wlodawa, Poland (Yizkor book in memory of Vlodava and region)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wlodawa/wlodowa.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Heda Kovaly's Under a Cruel Star now published in Mainland China #austria-czech

Helen Epstein
 

Incrediable news: Our translation of Kovaly's memoir has just come out
in Mainland China >from one of its large mainstream presses and we have
been giving copies away to out Chinese immigrant neighbors here in
Massachusetts. They are drawn to the history of a country that went
through brutal totalitarianism like their own. Of course I can't tell
if the text is uncut or not. Brave new world indeed!

--
www.helenepstein.com
www.plunkettlakepress.com

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