Date   

JewishGen Education offers new course Get Ready to Publish Your Research #warsaw #poland

Nancy Holden
 

Get Ready to Publish Your Research May 29 - June 19
Are you ready to publish your family history and wondering how to
get it organized and out to family and friends?

JewishGen is offering a 4 week class in Preparing to Publish Your
Family History Data. This class covers project organization, the
report process, formatting, source and citation skills. It includes
how to create and save media files, graphs and charts. In other
words: Putting it All Together

This class will consider the various ways of packaging your research,
matching your material to your audience and figuring out what to
include >from the research you have accumulated. We will consider the
many kinds of publications >from photo albums to family history books,
the self-publishing venues, and using professional publishers.

Class is in a Forum setting private to JewishGen and open 24/7 to
accommodate all time zones. Students will work on their family history
with the instructor.

Enrollment is by application. Students should have collected enough
data and photographs to start their project.

To apply send a one page document and include these points in your
summary statement:
1. An Introductory Paragraph describing your project. (What will
the project include, who is your audience and what kind of data
you have compiled.)
2. Write a paragraph that begins: "I visualize it being presented
in the following format...."(will it be printed, bound, electronic,
one copy, multiple copies etc.)
3. If you have special needs, missing data, constrictions, obstacles
now is the time to think them through. Write a paragraph that helps
anticipate some of the parameters of your project. For example, I am
waiting for data from....my files are in disarray, I have sources
for some of my data but not all of it, I have large media files that
I want to use (etc.) I am collaborating with...and want to include
that data...
Class size is limited.

Tuition is $150 and is payable after the application process, through
our online secure web site.
For questions and to submit your application, please email the
instructor, by clicking here:
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.jewishgen.org


New JewishGen Success Stories ! #warsaw #poland

Phyllis Kramer
 

We present four new inspiring stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Peter Vanlaw learned that his family was Jewish when he was 51 years
old. Through a connection he makes via JewishGen's Family Finder, he
learns about the family that had been kept a secret >from him all those
years.

Stella Saperstein knew nothing about her American family while she was
growing up in the former Soviet Union. After several unsuccessful
research efforts, she connects with her previously unknown cousin
through JewishGen's Family Finder.

Carol Clingan obtains a copy of Sarah Cohen's obituary that lists two
surviving sons. She knew of one of the sons, but who was Sam Bloom?
She contacts another researcher who listed the Bloom name in
JewishGen's Family Finder. It turns out he has the other piece of the
puzzle!

Robin Koerner updates her story >from January 2015, telling us of the
Maniches family reunion in Montevideo, Uruguay. It was more than 100
years ago when the ancestors of these families had been together in
Krynki, Poland. Now a connection through JewishGen's Family Finder
brings them together.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland JewishGen Education offers new course Get Ready to Publish Your Research #warsaw #poland

Nancy Holden
 

Get Ready to Publish Your Research May 29 - June 19
Are you ready to publish your family history and wondering how to
get it organized and out to family and friends?

JewishGen is offering a 4 week class in Preparing to Publish Your
Family History Data. This class covers project organization, the
report process, formatting, source and citation skills. It includes
how to create and save media files, graphs and charts. In other
words: Putting it All Together

This class will consider the various ways of packaging your research,
matching your material to your audience and figuring out what to
include >from the research you have accumulated. We will consider the
many kinds of publications >from photo albums to family history books,
the self-publishing venues, and using professional publishers.

Class is in a Forum setting private to JewishGen and open 24/7 to
accommodate all time zones. Students will work on their family history
with the instructor.

Enrollment is by application. Students should have collected enough
data and photographs to start their project.

To apply send a one page document and include these points in your
summary statement:
1. An Introductory Paragraph describing your project. (What will
the project include, who is your audience and what kind of data
you have compiled.)
2. Write a paragraph that begins: "I visualize it being presented
in the following format...."(will it be printed, bound, electronic,
one copy, multiple copies etc.)
3. If you have special needs, missing data, constrictions, obstacles
now is the time to think them through. Write a paragraph that helps
anticipate some of the parameters of your project. For example, I am
waiting for data from....my files are in disarray, I have sources
for some of my data but not all of it, I have large media files that
I want to use (etc.) I am collaborating with...and want to include
that data...
Class size is limited.

Tuition is $150 and is payable after the application process, through
our online secure web site.
For questions and to submit your application, please email the
instructor, by clicking here:
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.jewishgen.org


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland New JewishGen Success Stories ! #warsaw #poland

Phyllis Kramer
 

We present four new inspiring stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Peter Vanlaw learned that his family was Jewish when he was 51 years
old. Through a connection he makes via JewishGen's Family Finder, he
learns about the family that had been kept a secret >from him all those
years.

Stella Saperstein knew nothing about her American family while she was
growing up in the former Soviet Union. After several unsuccessful
research efforts, she connects with her previously unknown cousin
through JewishGen's Family Finder.

Carol Clingan obtains a copy of Sarah Cohen's obituary that lists two
surviving sons. She knew of one of the sons, but who was Sam Bloom?
She contacts another researcher who listed the Bloom name in
JewishGen's Family Finder. It turns out he has the other piece of the
puzzle!

Robin Koerner updates her story >from January 2015, telling us of the
Maniches family reunion in Montevideo, Uruguay. It was more than 100
years ago when the ancestors of these families had been together in
Krynki, Poland. Now a connection through JewishGen's Family Finder
brings them together.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


opticians in Budapest - Tropp and Bienenstock #general

rv Kaplan
 

I have just returned >from a few days in Budapest, where a branch of my
Galitzianer family settled in the 1880s and met up with some of their
descendants there.

I have used the Hungarian database on JewishGen.

Can anyone suggest any online sources, such as business directories,
for tracing opticians in Budapest c1880s-1930s, called Tropp or
Bienenstock?

thanks

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen opticians in Budapest - Tropp and Bienenstock #general

rv Kaplan
 

I have just returned >from a few days in Budapest, where a branch of my
Galitzianer family settled in the 1880s and met up with some of their
descendants there.

I have used the Hungarian database on JewishGen.

Can anyone suggest any online sources, such as business directories,
for tracing opticians in Budapest c1880s-1930s, called Tropp or
Bienenstock?

thanks

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


Kutno Death Records/Jewish Cemetery #general

Amit N
 

Hi all,

My grandfather was born and raised in Kutno, and according to him, his
maternal grandparents both died at quite a young age, leaving young
children who were raised by their mother's family. I can only presume
this happened in the early 20th century.

However I couldn't find any death record for that incident. I wonder
now if there was a Jewish cemetery in Kutno, and whether anything of
it survived? Perhaps they were buried there.

If you know anything about that or how can I continue this search, please help.

Best Regards,
Amit Naor
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kutno Death Records/Jewish Cemetery #general

Amit N
 

Hi all,

My grandfather was born and raised in Kutno, and according to him, his
maternal grandparents both died at quite a young age, leaving young
children who were raised by their mother's family. I can only presume
this happened in the early 20th century.

However I couldn't find any death record for that incident. I wonder
now if there was a Jewish cemetery in Kutno, and whether anything of
it survived? Perhaps they were buried there.

If you know anything about that or how can I continue this search, please help.

Best Regards,
Amit Naor
Israel


(US): Social Security Agency: are other records available? #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,

We all know that we can obtain a copy of a deceased person's SS-5
(social security application form) but I wonder if the SSA has any
other documents and are these also accessible?

Let me explain, I am assisting a friend in researching her family but
even her father is a huge stumbling block as nothing is known about
him. (He really covered his tracks.) We have his SS-5 form but we
don't believe the names he provided for his parents (my friend never
knew her grandparents, they supposedly died before she was born.) We
don't believe his year of birth (1927) nor where he was born
(California), nothing is showing up in the usual searches one makes.

Hence my reasoning is, when he applied for his SS-5 (in 1951) what
documents did he have to provide (if any) to prove who he was, and
did the SSA make and keep copies? I'm thinking he may have had to
bring in his birth certificate? If he did, this is obviously
something that he couldn't have faked (well, I hope not).

If anyone has had any success in obtaining any documents >from the SSA
other than retrieving the SS-5 please let me know off-line.

Thanks

Jeremy

--
Jeremy G Frankel
ex-London, England
now Folsom, CA

Searching for:
FRANKEL: Plock, Poland; London, England
GOLDRATH/GOLD: Praszka, Poland; London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania; London, England; NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland; London, England
Pinkus, Poland; London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland; London, England; NY, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US): Social Security Agency: are other records available? #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,

We all know that we can obtain a copy of a deceased person's SS-5
(social security application form) but I wonder if the SSA has any
other documents and are these also accessible?

Let me explain, I am assisting a friend in researching her family but
even her father is a huge stumbling block as nothing is known about
him. (He really covered his tracks.) We have his SS-5 form but we
don't believe the names he provided for his parents (my friend never
knew her grandparents, they supposedly died before she was born.) We
don't believe his year of birth (1927) nor where he was born
(California), nothing is showing up in the usual searches one makes.

Hence my reasoning is, when he applied for his SS-5 (in 1951) what
documents did he have to provide (if any) to prove who he was, and
did the SSA make and keep copies? I'm thinking he may have had to
bring in his birth certificate? If he did, this is obviously
something that he couldn't have faked (well, I hope not).

If anyone has had any success in obtaining any documents >from the SSA
other than retrieving the SS-5 please let me know off-line.

Thanks

Jeremy

--
Jeremy G Frankel
ex-London, England
now Folsom, CA

Searching for:
FRANKEL: Plock, Poland; London, England
GOLDRATH/GOLD: Praszka, Poland; London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania; London, England; NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland; London, England
Pinkus, Poland; London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland; London, England; NY, USA


Trauma on the Eastern Front: European Jews and the First World War #general

Saul Issroff
 

Trauma on the Eastern Front: European Jews and the First World War
Professor David Rechter, University of Oxford,outlines the Jewish
experience of the First World War and argues that it is only by
understanding this experience that we can properly grasp the course of
later Jewish history.
podcast:
www.pearsinstitute.bbk.ac.uk/events/events-calendar/trauma-on-the-eastern-front-european-jews-and-the-first-world-war/

( MOD: http://tinyurl.com/og46ptm )

Saul Issroff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Trauma on the Eastern Front: European Jews and the First World War #general

Saul Issroff
 

Trauma on the Eastern Front: European Jews and the First World War
Professor David Rechter, University of Oxford,outlines the Jewish
experience of the First World War and argues that it is only by
understanding this experience that we can properly grasp the course of
later Jewish history.
podcast:
www.pearsinstitute.bbk.ac.uk/events/events-calendar/trauma-on-the-eastern-front-european-jews-and-the-first-world-war/

( MOD: http://tinyurl.com/og46ptm )

Saul Issroff


Early Australian and New Zealand Jewry #general

Saul Issroff
 

these two sites have a lot of information, life stories etc. of early
Australian and New Zealand Jewry.
Much about the Moses family, Nathan family and Josephs.

http://jewishonlinemuseum.org/neighbours-early-beginnings-australasian-jewry
http://www.jewishnews.net.au/180-years-of-chuppahs/24499

Saul Issroff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Early Australian and New Zealand Jewry #general

Saul Issroff
 

these two sites have a lot of information, life stories etc. of early
Australian and New Zealand Jewry.
Much about the Moses family, Nathan family and Josephs.

http://jewishonlinemuseum.org/neighbours-early-beginnings-australasian-jewry
http://www.jewishnews.net.au/180-years-of-chuppahs/24499

Saul Issroff


Re: finding the town Uszczelane #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

steve posted: I am trying to determine the town that my maternal
grandfather, Aron NADEL came from. Census records in the early 20th
century said that the country he came >from was Austria. In his 1940s
military registration it was called Poland. The closest thing to a
town name I have is >from his ship's manifest, where it appears to be a
town named Uszczelane or Uszczilane....

That's a hard one. Its not easy to find towns >from early manifests as
oftentimes the clerk wrote down what the town sounded like...I started
with the 6500 towns detailed on our community pages, but didnt find the town.

Then i went on JewishGen's gazetteer and queried towns that sound like
Uszczelane, ..now in poland...
i found: Uchylany

then i looked for towns that contain szcz...(very common in poland)
that seemed a better search...
Oszczeklin, Poland 117.6 miles WSW of Warsaw (but i dont think this
is the town because it was in russia, not austria)...now how did i
know that? here's what i did...

After searching on the gazetteer, and finding Oszczeklin, i looked at
the "towns within 10 miles" button on the right, and looked for a town
with the jewishgen logo...because then i could put my mouse on that
logo and see where the town was in 3 periods...before wwi, between the
wars, and after wwii. That way i could determine if it was
in austria before wwi and poland after.

i also found:
Pszczeliny Poland 226.6 miles SSE of Warszawa...which was in galicia,
austria...now in poland

You can take the same approach with the family finder (JGFF) and look
around for towns that sound like or contain a key ingrediant.

Other places i have found the town names: death certificates,
landsmanshaften burial plots, probate, passports, naturalizations,
wwII drafts and social security records.

happy hunting!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
Researching (all Galicia) KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
..SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
..LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
..STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm
education web site: www.jewishgen.org/education


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: finding the town Uszczelane #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

steve posted: I am trying to determine the town that my maternal
grandfather, Aron NADEL came from. Census records in the early 20th
century said that the country he came >from was Austria. In his 1940s
military registration it was called Poland. The closest thing to a
town name I have is >from his ship's manifest, where it appears to be a
town named Uszczelane or Uszczilane....

That's a hard one. Its not easy to find towns >from early manifests as
oftentimes the clerk wrote down what the town sounded like...I started
with the 6500 towns detailed on our community pages, but didnt find the town.

Then i went on JewishGen's gazetteer and queried towns that sound like
Uszczelane, ..now in poland...
i found: Uchylany

then i looked for towns that contain szcz...(very common in poland)
that seemed a better search...
Oszczeklin, Poland 117.6 miles WSW of Warsaw (but i dont think this
is the town because it was in russia, not austria)...now how did i
know that? here's what i did...

After searching on the gazetteer, and finding Oszczeklin, i looked at
the "towns within 10 miles" button on the right, and looked for a town
with the jewishgen logo...because then i could put my mouse on that
logo and see where the town was in 3 periods...before wwi, between the
wars, and after wwii. That way i could determine if it was
in austria before wwi and poland after.

i also found:
Pszczeliny Poland 226.6 miles SSE of Warszawa...which was in galicia,
austria...now in poland

You can take the same approach with the family finder (JGFF) and look
around for towns that sound like or contain a key ingrediant.

Other places i have found the town names: death certificates,
landsmanshaften burial plots, probate, passports, naturalizations,
wwII drafts and social security records.

happy hunting!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
Researching (all Galicia) KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
..SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
..LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
..STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm
education web site: www.jewishgen.org/education


Michael HIRSCHFELD (NY) #general

Miriam Margolyes <yarrawa@...>
 

Dear Genners,

This cousin whom I'm searching for is possibly as below:

JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR)
Name: Michael Hirschfeld
Burial Plot: Section: 13, Row: A, Grave: 6
Burial Place: Huntington Station, New York, United States
Cemetery: Huntington Jewish Center Cemetery
Cemetery Address: 500 Old Country Road, Huntington Station, Suffolk - Long
Island, NY
Long Island Cemetery Burials: 481

If anyone is able to photograph the grave, I'll cover
expenses.

He was born in Prussia about 1852.
His parents were David & Pauline (nee SANDMANN) HIRSCHFELD

Michael had 2 brothers: Louis & Simon.

They are my 1st cousins twice removed.

Many thanks

Miriam Margolyes
Tuscany, Italy


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Michael HIRSCHFELD (NY) #general

Miriam Margolyes <yarrawa@...>
 

Dear Genners,

This cousin whom I'm searching for is possibly as below:

JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR)
Name: Michael Hirschfeld
Burial Plot: Section: 13, Row: A, Grave: 6
Burial Place: Huntington Station, New York, United States
Cemetery: Huntington Jewish Center Cemetery
Cemetery Address: 500 Old Country Road, Huntington Station, Suffolk - Long
Island, NY
Long Island Cemetery Burials: 481

If anyone is able to photograph the grave, I'll cover
expenses.

He was born in Prussia about 1852.
His parents were David & Pauline (nee SANDMANN) HIRSCHFELD

Michael had 2 brothers: Louis & Simon.

They are my 1st cousins twice removed.

Many thanks

Miriam Margolyes
Tuscany, Italy


New JewishGen Success Stories ! #bessarabia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We present four new inspiring stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Peter Vanlaw learned that his family was Jewish when he was 51 years
old. Through a connection he makes via JewishGen's Family Finder, he
learns about the family that had been kept a secret >from him all those
years.

Stella Saperstein knew nothing about her American family while she was
growing up in the former Soviet Union. After several unsuccessful
research efforts, she connects with her previously unknown cousin
through JewishGen's Family Finder.

Carol Clingan obtains a copy of Sarah Cohen's obituary that lists two
surviving sons. She knew of one of the sons, but who was Sam Bloom?
She contacts another researcher who listed the Bloom name in
JewishGen's Family Finder. It turns out he has the other piece of the
puzzle!

Robin Koerner updates her story >from January 2015, telling us of the
Maniches family reunion in Montevideo, Uruguay. It was more than 100
years ago when the ancestors of these families had been together in
Krynki, Poland. Now a connection through JewishGen's Family Finder
brings them together.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia New JewishGen Success Stories ! #bessarabia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We present four new inspiring stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Peter Vanlaw learned that his family was Jewish when he was 51 years
old. Through a connection he makes via JewishGen's Family Finder, he
learns about the family that had been kept a secret >from him all those
years.

Stella Saperstein knew nothing about her American family while she was
growing up in the former Soviet Union. After several unsuccessful
research efforts, she connects with her previously unknown cousin
through JewishGen's Family Finder.

Carol Clingan obtains a copy of Sarah Cohen's obituary that lists two
surviving sons. She knew of one of the sons, but who was Sam Bloom?
She contacts another researcher who listed the Bloom name in
JewishGen's Family Finder. It turns out he has the other piece of the
puzzle!

Robin Koerner updates her story >from January 2015, telling us of the
Maniches family reunion in Montevideo, Uruguay. It was more than 100
years ago when the ancestors of these families had been together in
Krynki, Poland. Now a connection through JewishGen's Family Finder
brings them together.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.

89201 - 89220 of 657939