Date   

Toronto Minsker shul #belarus

dovid colman <dybk@...>
 

I was a little astonished at the volume of response regarding the 1930 list
of shul officers; it seems that everybody with family >from Minsk wants the
list.

As it is rather modest, here it is:

President: Jacob Jackson
Vice Pres: Harry Taube
Treasurer: Simon Sieden

Trustees: Lazar Neuman, Selig Zeldin, and David Levinsky

Gabayim: Eliahu Eisenberg and Solomon Friedman

Gabayim - Chevra Kadisha: Jacob Moshe Atlin and Abraham Silverman

Constitution Committee [it appears that this was the year the shul's
constitution was created]: Jacob Jackson (Chairman), Harry Taube (Vice
Chairman), Simon/Simpson Sieden (Secretary), Solomon Friedman, Eliahu
Eisenberg, M. Kozakow, Abraham Silverman, Zelig Zeldin, Judel/Julius Gold,
Lipa Shlutzky, and David Jankovich.

Please note that I went carefully over the names and I have reproduced the
names faithfully - any typos are in the original.

Dovid Colman
Toronto, Canada


Landsmanshaften/Dokshitz #belarus

Constance Rossoff <ConArtRossoff@...>
 

I am pleased to tell you that the first step in the process of placing t=
he
records and membership list of the Dokshitzer Benevolent Society into the=

YIVO archives has been accomplished. After having determined that the
secretary of the society would favorably consider such a transfer, a
letter was sent by the YIVO Accessioning Archivist formally requesting it=

and explaining its research purpose. While the actual transfer of the
records is not likely to occur for several months, I am confident that
these potentially valuable resources will not be lost and will be made
available.

I want to thank all those who expressed interest in this project and
offered to help in private communications. I will keep you posted on
further progress. =


Arthur ROSSOFF
Moriches, New York
conartrossoff@compuserve.com

Researching ROSSOFF and all variants of that surname,also =

SHAPIRO
For the purpose of tracing my paternal grandparents, Aaron ROSSOFF and
Rachel Leah SHAPIRO, their siblings and children who were of Dokshitz,
Belarus and, to my knowledge, did not emigrate to the U.S., as did my
father, Barnett Mose, his brother MAX and sisters, Hannah, Ida and May, a=
ll
now deceased and unable to tell their stories. I am the oldest survivor a=
nd
have noone to ask. =


Belarus SIG #Belarus Toronto Minsker shul #belarus

dovid colman <dybk@...>
 

I was a little astonished at the volume of response regarding the 1930 list
of shul officers; it seems that everybody with family >from Minsk wants the
list.

As it is rather modest, here it is:

President: Jacob Jackson
Vice Pres: Harry Taube
Treasurer: Simon Sieden

Trustees: Lazar Neuman, Selig Zeldin, and David Levinsky

Gabayim: Eliahu Eisenberg and Solomon Friedman

Gabayim - Chevra Kadisha: Jacob Moshe Atlin and Abraham Silverman

Constitution Committee [it appears that this was the year the shul's
constitution was created]: Jacob Jackson (Chairman), Harry Taube (Vice
Chairman), Simon/Simpson Sieden (Secretary), Solomon Friedman, Eliahu
Eisenberg, M. Kozakow, Abraham Silverman, Zelig Zeldin, Judel/Julius Gold,
Lipa Shlutzky, and David Jankovich.

Please note that I went carefully over the names and I have reproduced the
names faithfully - any typos are in the original.

Dovid Colman
Toronto, Canada


Belarus SIG #Belarus Landsmanshaften/Dokshitz #belarus

Constance Rossoff <ConArtRossoff@...>
 

I am pleased to tell you that the first step in the process of placing t=
he
records and membership list of the Dokshitzer Benevolent Society into the=

YIVO archives has been accomplished. After having determined that the
secretary of the society would favorably consider such a transfer, a
letter was sent by the YIVO Accessioning Archivist formally requesting it=

and explaining its research purpose. While the actual transfer of the
records is not likely to occur for several months, I am confident that
these potentially valuable resources will not be lost and will be made
available.

I want to thank all those who expressed interest in this project and
offered to help in private communications. I will keep you posted on
further progress. =


Arthur ROSSOFF
Moriches, New York
conartrossoff@compuserve.com

Researching ROSSOFF and all variants of that surname,also =

SHAPIRO
For the purpose of tracing my paternal grandparents, Aaron ROSSOFF and
Rachel Leah SHAPIRO, their siblings and children who were of Dokshitz,
Belarus and, to my knowledge, did not emigrate to the U.S., as did my
father, Barnett Mose, his brother MAX and sisters, Hannah, Ida and May, a=
ll
now deceased and unable to tell their stories. I am the oldest survivor a=
nd
have noone to ask. =


Re: SEEKING INFORMATION #austria-czech

Bruce Morgenstern <bjmorgenstern@...>
 

Judith,

The following information is >from Where Once We Walked by Gary Mokotoff and
Sallyann Sack:

Pochayev, Ukraine (Pitcheyev, Pitshayev, Pochaev, Poczajow, Potchayev); 82
km SSW of Rovno; 50o01'/25o29'.

Bruce Morgenstern

----- Original Message -----
From: "Judith Silberg" <JUD1TH@compuserve.com>
To: "Lodz Area Research Group" <lodz@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 09, 2000 9:39 AM
Subject: SEEKING INFORMATION



Dear Lodz Researchers,

Is anyone familiar with the town Pitchayev-Wohlyn or Poczajow? I know it
existed in Poland at one time because it is listed in the book >from A
RUINED GARDEN. There is a Yizkor book >from there. It may have later
became a part of the Ukraine.

The family name >from there is ZALTZ (or ZALC or SALTZ).
Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

Judith Saltz Silberg
Encinitas, CA


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Re: SEEKING INFORMATION #lodz #poland

Bruce Morgenstern <bjmorgenstern@...>
 

Judith,

The following information is >from Where Once We Walked by Gary Mokotoff and
Sallyann Sack:

Pochayev, Ukraine (Pitcheyev, Pitshayev, Pochaev, Poczajow, Potchayev); 82
km SSW of Rovno; 50o01'/25o29'.

Bruce Morgenstern

----- Original Message -----
From: "Judith Silberg" <JUD1TH@compuserve.com>
To: "Lodz Area Research Group" <lodz@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 09, 2000 9:39 AM
Subject: SEEKING INFORMATION



Dear Lodz Researchers,

Is anyone familiar with the town Pitchayev-Wohlyn or Poczajow? I know it
existed in Poland at one time because it is listed in the book >from A
RUINED GARDEN. There is a Yizkor book >from there. It may have later
became a part of the Ukraine.

The family name >from there is ZALTZ (or ZALC or SALTZ).
Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

Judith Saltz Silberg
Encinitas, CA


Seeking WILDER in South Africa #general

Trudy Rucker <tjrucker@...>
 

Does anyone have information about WILDER in South Africa? If so, there is
a possibility he is part of this lineage I am tracing. Kiva WILDER had a
brother Benjamin(?) who initially came to the United States but then settled
in South Africa, in Johannesberg(?)

I am trying to find out where my GGF, Kiva ( Karl ) WILDER came from.
He arrived in the United States either in the late 1870's or early 1880's.
He had 5 children by his first wife, name unknown. Jack and Ida were born in
Europe. Bertha (Birdie), Abraham (Abe) and Daniel were born in the United
States, Daniel, the youngest, in 1892.
Any information would be appreciated.

This message corrects misinformation in an earlier inquiry of mine,
and adds new information.

Trudy Rucker


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking WILDER in South Africa #general

Trudy Rucker <tjrucker@...>
 

Does anyone have information about WILDER in South Africa? If so, there is
a possibility he is part of this lineage I am tracing. Kiva WILDER had a
brother Benjamin(?) who initially came to the United States but then settled
in South Africa, in Johannesberg(?)

I am trying to find out where my GGF, Kiva ( Karl ) WILDER came from.
He arrived in the United States either in the late 1870's or early 1880's.
He had 5 children by his first wife, name unknown. Jack and Ida were born in
Europe. Bertha (Birdie), Abraham (Abe) and Daniel were born in the United
States, Daniel, the youngest, in 1892.
Any information would be appreciated.

This message corrects misinformation in an earlier inquiry of mine,
and adds new information.

Trudy Rucker


Origin of given name "Fema" #general

Hilary Henkin <propper@...>
 

Dear group,
All this talk about names has finally prodded me into asking this
question.
I have found a relative who was given the first name of "Fema"
(pronounced "Feema"). She was born in the US in the early part
of the 20th Century, to immigrant (Ukrainian) parents.

She has been told she was named "Fema" because the midwife who
completed the birth registration didn't understand the form, and
started to write "female" where she should have written the given
name.

While the story certainly could be true, are there any other
reasonable possibilities? Is "Fema" a real name in another
language?

Good luck to all of you in your own research!

Shalom
Hilary Henkin
Researching: BERLIN >from Mogilev, HENKIN-GENKIN, KATZ from
Ekatrinaslav, LAPIDUS >from Ekatrinaslav, LAVROTIN-LAVRUTIN,
PESACHINSKY, RINCOVER-HARINCOVER, POLLACK/POLLOCK,
SREBERG-SCHRIEBER >from Harbin, China, SHIMERNITSKY, SOCHINETSKY,
STEINHART and variations >from Russia


Re: Shochet/Mashgiach #general

Paul Bernstein-PE <bernstein.pe@...>
 

Hello,

One of my relatives passed along to me the questions posted about an individual
possibly working as a shochet for Procter & Gamble. As an employee of P & G I
found the question particularly interesting and thought I'd try to find out more
info.

I called Diane Brown in our Corporate Archives office at 513.983.2945 and
described to her this question to see if we might have ever had use for a
shochet. She offered that it may be related to some P & G-produced cooking
publications sponsored by the Crisco brand, which she identified as existing in
the Corporate Archives:

Jewish Recipes - 1940.

Crisco Recipes for the Jewish Housewife - 1933, 1935.
(One was donated to the Museum of Jewish Heritage in 1988).

Crisco Traditional Jewish Cooking - 1989 (too late for the person who died in
1965!).

I don't know if the relative in question had involvement in any of the cook
books produced in the 30's or 40's but you may consider that another educated
guess. Thanks.

Paul E. Bernstein
Chicago, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Origin of given name "Fema" #general

Hilary Henkin <propper@...>
 

Dear group,
All this talk about names has finally prodded me into asking this
question.
I have found a relative who was given the first name of "Fema"
(pronounced "Feema"). She was born in the US in the early part
of the 20th Century, to immigrant (Ukrainian) parents.

She has been told she was named "Fema" because the midwife who
completed the birth registration didn't understand the form, and
started to write "female" where she should have written the given
name.

While the story certainly could be true, are there any other
reasonable possibilities? Is "Fema" a real name in another
language?

Good luck to all of you in your own research!

Shalom
Hilary Henkin
Researching: BERLIN >from Mogilev, HENKIN-GENKIN, KATZ from
Ekatrinaslav, LAPIDUS >from Ekatrinaslav, LAVROTIN-LAVRUTIN,
PESACHINSKY, RINCOVER-HARINCOVER, POLLACK/POLLOCK,
SREBERG-SCHRIEBER >from Harbin, China, SHIMERNITSKY, SOCHINETSKY,
STEINHART and variations >from Russia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Shochet/Mashgiach #general

Paul Bernstein-PE <bernstein.pe@...>
 

Hello,

One of my relatives passed along to me the questions posted about an individual
possibly working as a shochet for Procter & Gamble. As an employee of P & G I
found the question particularly interesting and thought I'd try to find out more
info.

I called Diane Brown in our Corporate Archives office at 513.983.2945 and
described to her this question to see if we might have ever had use for a
shochet. She offered that it may be related to some P & G-produced cooking
publications sponsored by the Crisco brand, which she identified as existing in
the Corporate Archives:

Jewish Recipes - 1940.

Crisco Recipes for the Jewish Housewife - 1933, 1935.
(One was donated to the Museum of Jewish Heritage in 1988).

Crisco Traditional Jewish Cooking - 1989 (too late for the person who died in
1965!).

I don't know if the relative in question had involvement in any of the cook
books produced in the 30's or 40's but you may consider that another educated
guess. Thanks.

Paul E. Bernstein
Chicago, IL


Surname KNISKOV-What do I do from now? #general

Golan <liya1@...>
 

I would like your opinions how do I continue >from here, how can I locate
those names?

Need your help to find my lost paternal family!

Liya Golan

The Mogilev Birth Index for Boys 1864-1894 Database

Searching for Surname KANISHKOV
(D-M code 564570)
Number of hits: 3

Surname Born Index Father Comments
KANISHCHIKOV 1874 25 Sholom-Shmuil

KANISHCHIKOV 1880 301 Sholom-Shmuil

KNYAZIKOV 1872 44 Khaim-Shmerka


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Surname KNISKOV-What do I do from now? #general

Golan <liya1@...>
 

I would like your opinions how do I continue >from here, how can I locate
those names?

Need your help to find my lost paternal family!

Liya Golan

The Mogilev Birth Index for Boys 1864-1894 Database

Searching for Surname KANISHKOV
(D-M code 564570)
Number of hits: 3

Surname Born Index Father Comments
KANISHCHIKOV 1874 25 Sholom-Shmuil

KANISHCHIKOV 1880 301 Sholom-Shmuil

KNYAZIKOV 1872 44 Khaim-Shmerka


GOUSSINOFF--RINGOLD #general

john carr <smike@...>
 

My mother was born Naomi Goussinoff in Regent Road Salford in 1902,
Her Mother was Rebecca Goussinoff whose maiden name was Rebecca Ringold,
her Father was a Russian Immigrant. The Ringolds were a big family in Salford.
I would be so pleased if I could find any thing about either
of these two families.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GOUSSINOFF--RINGOLD #general

john carr <smike@...>
 

My mother was born Naomi Goussinoff in Regent Road Salford in 1902,
Her Mother was Rebecca Goussinoff whose maiden name was Rebecca Ringold,
her Father was a Russian Immigrant. The Ringolds were a big family in Salford.
I would be so pleased if I could find any thing about either
of these two families.


Re: Mosiac Religion = Jews #galicia

Brian Stern <BrianS@...>
 

Can someone out there give us a mini-lesson on how it came to be that Jews
were associated with the word 'mosaic'? I imagine that it is a simple
explanation, but at the moment, I am at a loss. (grin)
Mosaic refers to Moses. I've seen it used in German language records from
Austria-Hungary.
____________________________________________________________________
Brian Stern {8-{)}
BrianS@pbcomputing.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Mosiac Religion = Jews #galicia

Brian Stern <BrianS@...>
 

Can someone out there give us a mini-lesson on how it came to be that Jews
were associated with the word 'mosaic'? I imagine that it is a simple
explanation, but at the moment, I am at a loss. (grin)
Mosaic refers to Moses. I've seen it used in German language records from
Austria-Hungary.
____________________________________________________________________
Brian Stern {8-{)}
BrianS@pbcomputing.com


Re: [eejh] The Oxford Group: Polin [was:[eejh] A book on a controversy] #galicia

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein
 

With the permission of Edis Bevan of the UK, I am reprinting this post from
[eejh] which I think will be of interest to Galitzianers. It describes the
most recent issue of a scholarly journal, "Polin."

Marion H. Bernstein
San Antonio, TX
hlb@texas.net

From: "Edis Bevan" <A.E.B.Bevan@open.ac.uk>
The web page for 'Polin' is:
http://www.littman.co.uk/polin/index.html

Unfortunately the articles are not on-line.
The last volume published was in November 1999 - the official abstract is
reposted below:

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 12
Focusing on Galicia: Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians, 1772-1918

>from 1772 to 1918 the large stretch of eastern Europe that forms the
foothills of the Carpathian Mountains was under Austrian rule and known as
Galicia. Jews were concentrated more densely here than anywhere in Europe
-in large and small towns, in villages, and in estates. Two factors were to
contribute to this region developing a distinctive character in the context
of east European Jewish history: the impact of Austrian rule and exposure
to the German language and culture; and the presence not only of Poles and
Jews but also of Ukrainians. To the east of the River San the Ukrainians
constituted the majority with the Poles as a sizeable minority; to the west
the Poles were the overwhelming majority. In both areas, the triangular
relationship between these groups and the Jews deeply affected Jewish life.

The nature of the Jewish community of Galicia and its relationship with
the Poles, Ukrainians, and other ethnic groups is the core focus of this
volume of Polin.

Israel Bartal and John-Paul Himka give overviews of the history of the
Jewish community and of its relations with the Poles and Ukrainians;
Franz Szabo describes the first impressions of Austrian officials of
ethnic relations in newly annexed Galicia;
Stanislaw Grodziski examines the way the reforms of Maria Theresa and
Joseph II affected the Jews, while
Hanna Kozinska-Witt investigates the views of the sociologist Ludwig
Gumplowicz on the Jewish issue.

Other articles examine the consequences of Galician autonomy after 1867
for the Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians; Jewish large landowners in Galicia;
the views of the Ukrainian writer Ivan Franko on the 'Jewish question';the
Jewish role in the election of 1873; and Jewish emigration >from Galicia to
Vienna.

The next two volumes will be:

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 13
Focusing on the Second World War and its Aftermath in the Polish Lands
Publication date November 2000

and

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 14
Focusing on the Jews in the Borderlands of former Poland-Lithuania
Publication date October 2001


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: [eejh] The Oxford Group: Polin [was:[eejh] A book on a controversy] #galicia

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein
 

With the permission of Edis Bevan of the UK, I am reprinting this post from
[eejh] which I think will be of interest to Galitzianers. It describes the
most recent issue of a scholarly journal, "Polin."

Marion H. Bernstein
San Antonio, TX
hlb@texas.net

From: "Edis Bevan" <A.E.B.Bevan@open.ac.uk>
The web page for 'Polin' is:
http://www.littman.co.uk/polin/index.html

Unfortunately the articles are not on-line.
The last volume published was in November 1999 - the official abstract is
reposted below:

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 12
Focusing on Galicia: Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians, 1772-1918

>from 1772 to 1918 the large stretch of eastern Europe that forms the
foothills of the Carpathian Mountains was under Austrian rule and known as
Galicia. Jews were concentrated more densely here than anywhere in Europe
-in large and small towns, in villages, and in estates. Two factors were to
contribute to this region developing a distinctive character in the context
of east European Jewish history: the impact of Austrian rule and exposure
to the German language and culture; and the presence not only of Poles and
Jews but also of Ukrainians. To the east of the River San the Ukrainians
constituted the majority with the Poles as a sizeable minority; to the west
the Poles were the overwhelming majority. In both areas, the triangular
relationship between these groups and the Jews deeply affected Jewish life.

The nature of the Jewish community of Galicia and its relationship with
the Poles, Ukrainians, and other ethnic groups is the core focus of this
volume of Polin.

Israel Bartal and John-Paul Himka give overviews of the history of the
Jewish community and of its relations with the Poles and Ukrainians;
Franz Szabo describes the first impressions of Austrian officials of
ethnic relations in newly annexed Galicia;
Stanislaw Grodziski examines the way the reforms of Maria Theresa and
Joseph II affected the Jews, while
Hanna Kozinska-Witt investigates the views of the sociologist Ludwig
Gumplowicz on the Jewish issue.

Other articles examine the consequences of Galician autonomy after 1867
for the Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians; Jewish large landowners in Galicia;
the views of the Ukrainian writer Ivan Franko on the 'Jewish question';the
Jewish role in the election of 1873; and Jewish emigration >from Galicia to
Vienna.

The next two volumes will be:

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 13
Focusing on the Second World War and its Aftermath in the Polish Lands
Publication date November 2000

and

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 14
Focusing on the Jews in the Borderlands of former Poland-Lithuania
Publication date October 2001