Date   

Re: Mosiac Religion = Jews #galicia

Brian Stern <BrianS@...>
 

Can someone out there give us a mini-lesson on how it came to be that Jews
were associated with the word 'mosaic'? I imagine that it is a simple
explanation, but at the moment, I am at a loss. (grin)
Mosaic refers to Moses. I've seen it used in German language records from
Austria-Hungary.
____________________________________________________________________
Brian Stern {8-{)}
BrianS@pbcomputing.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Mosiac Religion = Jews #galicia

Brian Stern <BrianS@...>
 

Can someone out there give us a mini-lesson on how it came to be that Jews
were associated with the word 'mosaic'? I imagine that it is a simple
explanation, but at the moment, I am at a loss. (grin)
Mosaic refers to Moses. I've seen it used in German language records from
Austria-Hungary.
____________________________________________________________________
Brian Stern {8-{)}
BrianS@pbcomputing.com


Re: [eejh] The Oxford Group: Polin [was:[eejh] A book on a controversy] #galicia

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein
 

With the permission of Edis Bevan of the UK, I am reprinting this post from
[eejh] which I think will be of interest to Galitzianers. It describes the
most recent issue of a scholarly journal, "Polin."

Marion H. Bernstein
San Antonio, TX
hlb@texas.net

From: "Edis Bevan" <A.E.B.Bevan@open.ac.uk>
The web page for 'Polin' is:
http://www.littman.co.uk/polin/index.html

Unfortunately the articles are not on-line.
The last volume published was in November 1999 - the official abstract is
reposted below:

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 12
Focusing on Galicia: Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians, 1772-1918

>from 1772 to 1918 the large stretch of eastern Europe that forms the
foothills of the Carpathian Mountains was under Austrian rule and known as
Galicia. Jews were concentrated more densely here than anywhere in Europe
-in large and small towns, in villages, and in estates. Two factors were to
contribute to this region developing a distinctive character in the context
of east European Jewish history: the impact of Austrian rule and exposure
to the German language and culture; and the presence not only of Poles and
Jews but also of Ukrainians. To the east of the River San the Ukrainians
constituted the majority with the Poles as a sizeable minority; to the west
the Poles were the overwhelming majority. In both areas, the triangular
relationship between these groups and the Jews deeply affected Jewish life.

The nature of the Jewish community of Galicia and its relationship with
the Poles, Ukrainians, and other ethnic groups is the core focus of this
volume of Polin.

Israel Bartal and John-Paul Himka give overviews of the history of the
Jewish community and of its relations with the Poles and Ukrainians;
Franz Szabo describes the first impressions of Austrian officials of
ethnic relations in newly annexed Galicia;
Stanislaw Grodziski examines the way the reforms of Maria Theresa and
Joseph II affected the Jews, while
Hanna Kozinska-Witt investigates the views of the sociologist Ludwig
Gumplowicz on the Jewish issue.

Other articles examine the consequences of Galician autonomy after 1867
for the Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians; Jewish large landowners in Galicia;
the views of the Ukrainian writer Ivan Franko on the 'Jewish question';the
Jewish role in the election of 1873; and Jewish emigration >from Galicia to
Vienna.

The next two volumes will be:

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 13
Focusing on the Second World War and its Aftermath in the Polish Lands
Publication date November 2000

and

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 14
Focusing on the Jews in the Borderlands of former Poland-Lithuania
Publication date October 2001


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: [eejh] The Oxford Group: Polin [was:[eejh] A book on a controversy] #galicia

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein
 

With the permission of Edis Bevan of the UK, I am reprinting this post from
[eejh] which I think will be of interest to Galitzianers. It describes the
most recent issue of a scholarly journal, "Polin."

Marion H. Bernstein
San Antonio, TX
hlb@texas.net

From: "Edis Bevan" <A.E.B.Bevan@open.ac.uk>
The web page for 'Polin' is:
http://www.littman.co.uk/polin/index.html

Unfortunately the articles are not on-line.
The last volume published was in November 1999 - the official abstract is
reposted below:

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 12
Focusing on Galicia: Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians, 1772-1918

>from 1772 to 1918 the large stretch of eastern Europe that forms the
foothills of the Carpathian Mountains was under Austrian rule and known as
Galicia. Jews were concentrated more densely here than anywhere in Europe
-in large and small towns, in villages, and in estates. Two factors were to
contribute to this region developing a distinctive character in the context
of east European Jewish history: the impact of Austrian rule and exposure
to the German language and culture; and the presence not only of Poles and
Jews but also of Ukrainians. To the east of the River San the Ukrainians
constituted the majority with the Poles as a sizeable minority; to the west
the Poles were the overwhelming majority. In both areas, the triangular
relationship between these groups and the Jews deeply affected Jewish life.

The nature of the Jewish community of Galicia and its relationship with
the Poles, Ukrainians, and other ethnic groups is the core focus of this
volume of Polin.

Israel Bartal and John-Paul Himka give overviews of the history of the
Jewish community and of its relations with the Poles and Ukrainians;
Franz Szabo describes the first impressions of Austrian officials of
ethnic relations in newly annexed Galicia;
Stanislaw Grodziski examines the way the reforms of Maria Theresa and
Joseph II affected the Jews, while
Hanna Kozinska-Witt investigates the views of the sociologist Ludwig
Gumplowicz on the Jewish issue.

Other articles examine the consequences of Galician autonomy after 1867
for the Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians; Jewish large landowners in Galicia;
the views of the Ukrainian writer Ivan Franko on the 'Jewish question';the
Jewish role in the election of 1873; and Jewish emigration >from Galicia to
Vienna.

The next two volumes will be:

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 13
Focusing on the Second World War and its Aftermath in the Polish Lands
Publication date November 2000

and

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 14
Focusing on the Jews in the Borderlands of former Poland-Lithuania
Publication date October 2001


Mosiac Religion = Jews #galicia

Debbie Raff <seraff@...>
 

Can someone out there give us a mini-lesson on how it came to be that Jews
were associated with the word 'mosaic'? I imagine that it is a simple
explanation, but at the moment, I am at a loss. (grin)

Debbie Raff
California
<seraff@sprintmail.com>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Mosiac Religion = Jews #galicia

Debbie Raff <seraff@...>
 

Can someone out there give us a mini-lesson on how it came to be that Jews
were associated with the word 'mosaic'? I imagine that it is a simple
explanation, but at the moment, I am at a loss. (grin)

Debbie Raff
California
<seraff@sprintmail.com>


Re: Cheikel,Chaikin #general

Ury Link <uryl@...>
 

Udi Cain wrote:
CHEIKEL / CHAIK'L is the Yiddish version for CHAIM (the Hebrew name
that means: life).

Chaia has only one letter "Yud", Chaikin is written originally (I have
documents of original Chaikins) with two letters "Yud".

The original Chaikins are descendants of Admo"r (teacher Rabbi and leader)
CHAIM CHAIK'L who was born in Karlin around 1730, became an one of the
first Hassidic Admo"rs, and died in Amdur in 1787.>>

Cheikel seems to be a diminuitive of Chaya.
It can be that the Chaikin of Udi Cain (Chaikin) are descendants of the
Admo"r Chaim Chaik'l and why not, but the most families names that ended
with the suffix --Kin are metronymic names (Derived >from woman's name). The
first bearer of this family name is cold after his mother : Chaikin mean the
son of Chaia (kin = in German (Yiddish) Kind and this mean a child).I want
to bring some samples on family names that ended on Kin.

Chava = Chavkin. Chana = Chankin. Chaia = Chaikin. Rivka = Rivkin.

Sara = Sirkin or Surkin. Sheine (Yafa) = Sheinkin. Mira or Miriam = Mirkin.

Devora = Dvorkin. Malka = Malkin. Tamar = Tomarkin. Rachel(Rashel) = Rashkin.

Rosa = Raskin. Liba = Libkin or Lipkin.

We have also patronymic name: Dov = Dubkin but this name can also be a
matronymic name that derived >from Tova .

The most of the name's above are used in Russia ,I don't have the book of
Alexander Beider about Jewish surnames in Russia in my home ,perhaps one of
our members have it in home and can checked it for us if this name are
typical for Jewish >from Russia.

Best regards

Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Cheikel,Chaikin #general

Ury Link <uryl@...>
 

Udi Cain wrote:
CHEIKEL / CHAIK'L is the Yiddish version for CHAIM (the Hebrew name
that means: life).

Chaia has only one letter "Yud", Chaikin is written originally (I have
documents of original Chaikins) with two letters "Yud".

The original Chaikins are descendants of Admo"r (teacher Rabbi and leader)
CHAIM CHAIK'L who was born in Karlin around 1730, became an one of the
first Hassidic Admo"rs, and died in Amdur in 1787.>>

Cheikel seems to be a diminuitive of Chaya.
It can be that the Chaikin of Udi Cain (Chaikin) are descendants of the
Admo"r Chaim Chaik'l and why not, but the most families names that ended
with the suffix --Kin are metronymic names (Derived >from woman's name). The
first bearer of this family name is cold after his mother : Chaikin mean the
son of Chaia (kin = in German (Yiddish) Kind and this mean a child).I want
to bring some samples on family names that ended on Kin.

Chava = Chavkin. Chana = Chankin. Chaia = Chaikin. Rivka = Rivkin.

Sara = Sirkin or Surkin. Sheine (Yafa) = Sheinkin. Mira or Miriam = Mirkin.

Devora = Dvorkin. Malka = Malkin. Tamar = Tomarkin. Rachel(Rashel) = Rashkin.

Rosa = Raskin. Liba = Libkin or Lipkin.

We have also patronymic name: Dov = Dubkin but this name can also be a
matronymic name that derived >from Tova .

The most of the name's above are used in Russia ,I don't have the book of
Alexander Beider about Jewish surnames in Russia in my home ,perhaps one of
our members have it in home and can checked it for us if this name are
typical for Jewish >from Russia.

Best regards

Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


Re: Yiddish-English first names -- Emma #general

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

The English name Emma was adopted by women who immigrated to the US
from Lithuania during the 19th century, who had the following Yiddish
and/or Hebrew names in the "old country:"

Ella, Elka
Chana, Ana, Hanka, Henya, Hisya, Chasya
Nechame, Chama, Necha
Tema

I have omitted a number of additional names in each case which are
basically different pronunciations of these names.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish-English first names -- Emma #general

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

The English name Emma was adopted by women who immigrated to the US
from Lithuania during the 19th century, who had the following Yiddish
and/or Hebrew names in the "old country:"

Ella, Elka
Chana, Ana, Hanka, Henya, Hisya, Chasya
Nechame, Chama, Necha
Tema

I have omitted a number of additional names in each case which are
basically different pronunciations of these names.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Jacob Fred COHEN Birth Certificate #general

,
 

I have just received the birth certificate of Jacob Fred Cohen B. 5/15/05.
Parents names Meyer & Sophie (Hershkowitz) Cohen. Father >from Russia, mother
from Roumania. Ages 25. Address 118 Eldridge St. Since this is not the party I
was looking for, I will be glad to send the certificate to you if it's a
member of your family. Please contact privately. Carol Blumenthal Cohen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jacob Fred COHEN Birth Certificate #general

,
 

I have just received the birth certificate of Jacob Fred Cohen B. 5/15/05.
Parents names Meyer & Sophie (Hershkowitz) Cohen. Father >from Russia, mother
from Roumania. Ages 25. Address 118 Eldridge St. Since this is not the party I
was looking for, I will be glad to send the certificate to you if it's a
member of your family. Please contact privately. Carol Blumenthal Cohen


Re: jewishgen digest: March 08, 2000 #general

RosieHA9@...
 

In a message dated 09/03/00 05:56:40 GMT Standard Time,
Subject: Wellington Bldg.
From: ZeraKodesh@aol.com
Hello
I wonder if any one heard of the Wellington Building in the East
End of London. On my brother birth certificate it says he was born at that
address. Was it a maternity hospital or something of that sort. He lived
at 42 Commercial Road at that time. He was born in about 1910.
Thank you for any help you can give.
Esther Feinstein Sackheim
ZeraKodesh@aol.com

from Maurice Hoffman, London
Try The London Metropolitan Archives
ask.lma@ms.corpoflondon.gov.uk
This is a good place to ask in the first instance about locations in London
since they have a good set of street atlases and detailed maps.
can I suggest that the email address is added to a suitable Jewgen file
also Tower Hamlets Local History Library and Archives, 277 Bancroft Road,
London, E1 4DQ 020 8980 4366 fax 020 8983 4510.
This covers all the East End of London where the bulk of the Jewish community
lived through the 19th century and into the 20th. The staff are very helpful.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: jewishgen digest: March 08, 2000 #general

RosieHA9@...
 

In a message dated 09/03/00 05:56:40 GMT Standard Time,
Subject: Wellington Bldg.
From: ZeraKodesh@aol.com
Hello
I wonder if any one heard of the Wellington Building in the East
End of London. On my brother birth certificate it says he was born at that
address. Was it a maternity hospital or something of that sort. He lived
at 42 Commercial Road at that time. He was born in about 1910.
Thank you for any help you can give.
Esther Feinstein Sackheim
ZeraKodesh@aol.com

from Maurice Hoffman, London
Try The London Metropolitan Archives
ask.lma@ms.corpoflondon.gov.uk
This is a good place to ask in the first instance about locations in London
since they have a good set of street atlases and detailed maps.
can I suggest that the email address is added to a suitable Jewgen file
also Tower Hamlets Local History Library and Archives, 277 Bancroft Road,
London, E1 4DQ 020 8980 4366 fax 020 8983 4510.
This covers all the East End of London where the bulk of the Jewish community
lived through the 19th century and into the 20th. The staff are very helpful.


Change of London phone numbers #general

RosieHA9@...
 

from Maurice Hoffman, London
London phone numbers change on 20th April

0171 xxx xxxx becomes 020 7xxx xxxx
0181 xxx xxxx becomes 020 8xxx xxxx


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Change of London phone numbers #general

RosieHA9@...
 

from Maurice Hoffman, London
London phone numbers change on 20th April

0171 xxx xxxx becomes 020 7xxx xxxx
0181 xxx xxxx becomes 020 8xxx xxxx


MICHAELSON, SHAIR, FILENBOGEN #general

Appy2331@...
 

I recently had some very old family letters translated >from Yiddish and
Russian script. They date >from 1896 to 1899, and are postmarked >from
Alexandrovsk, Yekaterinoslav Oblast. I've discovered the current name is
Zaparozhe, in Dnepropetrovsk in the Ukraine. The letters state a number of
family surnames: MICHAELSON, SHAIR and FILENBOGEN. Some other names may or
may not be surnames, but I will add them as well: VILISHEVSKY and
SHTAVITSKIA. Some of the MICHAELSON and SHAIR families immigrated to the
U.S. in the 1880-90s.
I would like to hear >from anyone who knows of these families and/or the town
they came from.

Barbara Appleby,
Hartsdale, NY
appy2331@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MICHAELSON, SHAIR, FILENBOGEN #general

Appy2331@...
 

I recently had some very old family letters translated >from Yiddish and
Russian script. They date >from 1896 to 1899, and are postmarked >from
Alexandrovsk, Yekaterinoslav Oblast. I've discovered the current name is
Zaparozhe, in Dnepropetrovsk in the Ukraine. The letters state a number of
family surnames: MICHAELSON, SHAIR and FILENBOGEN. Some other names may or
may not be surnames, but I will add them as well: VILISHEVSKY and
SHTAVITSKIA. Some of the MICHAELSON and SHAIR families immigrated to the
U.S. in the 1880-90s.
I would like to hear >from anyone who knows of these families and/or the town
they came from.

Barbara Appleby,
Hartsdale, NY
appy2331@aol.com


Ehrenwert - surname or description? #general

Estelle Wolfers <Ewolfers@...>
 

Dear All,

I have recently been given details of a marriage in Staedtel, near Breslau,
in 1851, of Zacharias Mendelsohn to Cecilie Tockuss. The bridegroom's
parents are described as Rabbi Mendel Zacharias (who performed the marriage
ceremony) and Gittel Ehrenwert. Initially I took Ehrenwert to be a surname,
but it seems to be an adjective meaning honest or honourable. Does anyone
know if it *would* have been a surname, or would it have been an honorific
title, because she was the Rabbi's wife?

Best wishes, Estelle Wolfers
researching WOLFERS, VAN MINDEN Rotterdam; LOPES SALZEDO Amsterdam; VIGEVANO
Amsterdam and Schiedam; SABEL, Vidzy in Belarus; SWIDLER, 'Russia'; HECHT,
Tarnowitz (Tarnowskie Gory) Silesia and Breslau; STEIN Konigsberg;
MENDELSOHN, GOLDSTEIN Silesia.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ehrenwert - surname or description? #general

Estelle Wolfers <Ewolfers@...>
 

Dear All,

I have recently been given details of a marriage in Staedtel, near Breslau,
in 1851, of Zacharias Mendelsohn to Cecilie Tockuss. The bridegroom's
parents are described as Rabbi Mendel Zacharias (who performed the marriage
ceremony) and Gittel Ehrenwert. Initially I took Ehrenwert to be a surname,
but it seems to be an adjective meaning honest or honourable. Does anyone
know if it *would* have been a surname, or would it have been an honorific
title, because she was the Rabbi's wife?

Best wishes, Estelle Wolfers
researching WOLFERS, VAN MINDEN Rotterdam; LOPES SALZEDO Amsterdam; VIGEVANO
Amsterdam and Schiedam; SABEL, Vidzy in Belarus; SWIDLER, 'Russia'; HECHT,
Tarnowitz (Tarnowskie Gory) Silesia and Breslau; STEIN Konigsberg;
MENDELSOHN, GOLDSTEIN Silesia.