Date   

Multiple families at one address #lithuania

Dorothy Leivers <dorfleiv@...>
 

I suggest you redo the search using the All Lithuania Database where
you will find a little more information
http://www.litvaksig.org/index.php/component/litvaksearch/?view=ald
or become a qualified contributor to the Panevezys District Research
Group and obtain access to the excel spreadsheets this data came from.
A contribution of $100 US provides access for a 5 year period and the
files are downloadable to your computer.

Donations can be made at http://www.litvaksig.org/contribute

Multifamily occupancy was not rare. Households could and did
include multi generations and relatives. You have found clues
to the wider family for your research.

Happy hunting,

Dorothy Leivers


From: Matt Tucker <mtuckr@gmail.com>:
Wed, 29 Jul 2015 11:23:54 -0400

I am researching my
family's records >from Pasvalys and Pumpian
Lithuania and am wondering if anyone
has come across census records
where there are many families in one address.
Sometimes they are
listed with multiple last names or hyphenated last names.
Does anyone
know if this is because many families were trying to settle a
new
community? Were there communal farms?


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Multiple families at one address #lithuania

Dorothy Leivers <dorfleiv@...>
 

I suggest you redo the search using the All Lithuania Database where
you will find a little more information
http://www.litvaksig.org/index.php/component/litvaksearch/?view=ald
or become a qualified contributor to the Panevezys District Research
Group and obtain access to the excel spreadsheets this data came from.
A contribution of $100 US provides access for a 5 year period and the
files are downloadable to your computer.

Donations can be made at http://www.litvaksig.org/contribute

Multifamily occupancy was not rare. Households could and did
include multi generations and relatives. You have found clues
to the wider family for your research.

Happy hunting,

Dorothy Leivers


From: Matt Tucker <mtuckr@gmail.com>:
Wed, 29 Jul 2015 11:23:54 -0400

I am researching my
family's records >from Pasvalys and Pumpian
Lithuania and am wondering if anyone
has come across census records
where there are many families in one address.
Sometimes they are
listed with multiple last names or hyphenated last names.
Does anyone
know if this is because many families were trying to settle a
new
community? Were there communal farms?


More about those military "draft board" records containing previously unavailable Jewish birth records #poland

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

Thank you to everyone who wrote to me with nice comments about the
partial Jewish birth records discovered within the military "draft
board" records. Thank you especially to Tomasz Jankowski, who wrote to
me that "The original files were microfilmed at the State Archives of
the Ivano-Frankivsk Region >from the fonds of regional authority
(starostwo powiatowe)."

Tomasz is correct; FamilySearch (the LDS Church) apparently
microfilmed those records on site at the Ivano-Frankivsk archives, not
at the Lviv archives as I had previously written. The Lviv Archives
do hold many military records, but almost all of theirs are >from the
Austrian (Galician) era, not Polish period. FamilySearch lists them
this way:

"Miltary [sic] records, 1865-1930"
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1713234

As usual, this FamilySearch microfilm set's title is misleading; those
records are nearly all >from the Austrian era, which was up basically
only through 1918, except for one item at the end of this record set
that gives medical test results >from 1920-1930 for military personnel
born in 1883.

I personally haven't looked at those Austrian military records, but
they appear to be alphabetical by surname and then grouped by year,
which doesn't sound so bad to search through. If anyone has experience
with that record set, perhaps they could comment if the data is as
helpful as the later Polish records whose examples I posted the other
day.

So, here's some more good news: I found even more of those excellent
Polish draft board records preserved and filmed by FamilySearch. It
is sadly not easy or intuitive to find these records in the
FamilySearch catalog if you do a search by location, but if you leave
the location field blank, then do a combination of keyword searching
and subsequent filtering of the results based on Polish language, it
yields a much bigger list of records.

The main takeaway is that there is at least one more large record set
of "draft board" files available, besides the Bohorodczany powiat and
Stanislawow powiat records mentioned in my previous message to the
listserve. And that would be the Sniatyn powiat records for 1920-1939
-- again, this is a fortuitous record set to be preserved, since many
of the smaller towns in the Sniatyn area had few or no 19th century
Jewish vital records that survived. Or didn't until now, I guess.
Czernowitz [Chernivtsy] researchers might want to look at this record
set, too, since that area borders the Sniatyn area.

So, to sum up, the three largest collections of "draft board" records
each cover multiple towns in the former Stanislawow Voivodeship, and
each have many records available for many years:

#1: "Miltary [sic] records, 1884-1910"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Bohorodczany
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the
Bohorodchany area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447115
NOTE: All the example images linked in my previous message to the
listserve came >from this record set. I am pretty sure that these
records do cover all towns in the powiat, even the very small towns.

#2a: "Miltary [sic] records, 1883-1939"
and
#2b: "Military records, 1903-1938"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Stanislawow
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the
Ivano-Frankivsk area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1382964
and
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383712
NOTE: It is unclear why these two collections of records are given
separate catalog entries; they should probably be combined as they
cover the same area and complementary years.

#3: "Miltary [sic] records, 1920-1939"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Sniatyn
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the Sniatyn
area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447114
NOTE: This record set is very poorly named; according to the record
descriptions, these files actually cover men born >from 1890 up through
1921, but with several years missing.

I also found these two new smaller collections:

#4: "Miltary [sic] records, 1928-1938" [actually recruits born in 1890 and 1896]
It is unclear whether this is just for the town of Kolomyya,
Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine or whether it refers to multiple towns
within the former Kolomyja [Kolomea] powiat
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383009

#5: "Military records, 1938" [actually recruits born in 1917]
Jablonow -- now Yabluniv, Kolomyya region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447111

The following towns were all in Stanislawow powiat in Interwar Poland,
and all have single record sets in the FamilySearch catalog labeled
simply "Military records, 1924", which >from the record descriptions
were all for recruits born in 1903:

- Knihinin -- absorbed into the city of Stanislawow, now
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383698

- Pawelcze [Pavelche] -- now Pavlivka, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383699

- Perlowce -- now Perlivtsi, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383009

- Podbereze -- now Poberezhzhya, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383703

- Podluze -- now Pidluzhzhya, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383705

- Pukasowce -- now Pukasivtsi, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383707

- Radcza -- now Radcha, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383708

- Rybno -- now Rybne, Ivano-Frankivs'ka oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383709

- Sielec [Selets] -- now Silets, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383710

- Sobotow [Subotow] -- now Subotiv, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383713

- Uhrynow Dolny -- now Uhryniv, Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383715

So, lots of records available!

To sum up: if you have late 19th century or early 20th century
ancestry >from the southern part of what was once the Stanislawow
region, but your family comes >from a town where the conventional
wisdom is that "the records didn't survive", you might want to take a
look at these military records to see if they could be a useful
substitute.

Good luck!


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California


JRI Poland #Poland More about those military "draft board" records containing previously unavailable Jewish birth records #poland

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

Thank you to everyone who wrote to me with nice comments about the
partial Jewish birth records discovered within the military "draft
board" records. Thank you especially to Tomasz Jankowski, who wrote to
me that "The original files were microfilmed at the State Archives of
the Ivano-Frankivsk Region >from the fonds of regional authority
(starostwo powiatowe)."

Tomasz is correct; FamilySearch (the LDS Church) apparently
microfilmed those records on site at the Ivano-Frankivsk archives, not
at the Lviv archives as I had previously written. The Lviv Archives
do hold many military records, but almost all of theirs are >from the
Austrian (Galician) era, not Polish period. FamilySearch lists them
this way:

"Miltary [sic] records, 1865-1930"
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1713234

As usual, this FamilySearch microfilm set's title is misleading; those
records are nearly all >from the Austrian era, which was up basically
only through 1918, except for one item at the end of this record set
that gives medical test results >from 1920-1930 for military personnel
born in 1883.

I personally haven't looked at those Austrian military records, but
they appear to be alphabetical by surname and then grouped by year,
which doesn't sound so bad to search through. If anyone has experience
with that record set, perhaps they could comment if the data is as
helpful as the later Polish records whose examples I posted the other
day.

So, here's some more good news: I found even more of those excellent
Polish draft board records preserved and filmed by FamilySearch. It
is sadly not easy or intuitive to find these records in the
FamilySearch catalog if you do a search by location, but if you leave
the location field blank, then do a combination of keyword searching
and subsequent filtering of the results based on Polish language, it
yields a much bigger list of records.

The main takeaway is that there is at least one more large record set
of "draft board" files available, besides the Bohorodczany powiat and
Stanislawow powiat records mentioned in my previous message to the
listserve. And that would be the Sniatyn powiat records for 1920-1939
-- again, this is a fortuitous record set to be preserved, since many
of the smaller towns in the Sniatyn area had few or no 19th century
Jewish vital records that survived. Or didn't until now, I guess.
Czernowitz [Chernivtsy] researchers might want to look at this record
set, too, since that area borders the Sniatyn area.

So, to sum up, the three largest collections of "draft board" records
each cover multiple towns in the former Stanislawow Voivodeship, and
each have many records available for many years:

#1: "Miltary [sic] records, 1884-1910"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Bohorodczany
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the
Bohorodchany area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447115
NOTE: All the example images linked in my previous message to the
listserve came >from this record set. I am pretty sure that these
records do cover all towns in the powiat, even the very small towns.

#2a: "Miltary [sic] records, 1883-1939"
and
#2b: "Military records, 1903-1938"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Stanislawow
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the
Ivano-Frankivsk area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1382964
and
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383712
NOTE: It is unclear why these two collections of records are given
separate catalog entries; they should probably be combined as they
cover the same area and complementary years.

#3: "Miltary [sic] records, 1920-1939"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Sniatyn
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the Sniatyn
area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447114
NOTE: This record set is very poorly named; according to the record
descriptions, these files actually cover men born >from 1890 up through
1921, but with several years missing.

I also found these two new smaller collections:

#4: "Miltary [sic] records, 1928-1938" [actually recruits born in 1890 and 1896]
It is unclear whether this is just for the town of Kolomyya,
Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine or whether it refers to multiple towns
within the former Kolomyja [Kolomea] powiat
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383009

#5: "Military records, 1938" [actually recruits born in 1917]
Jablonow -- now Yabluniv, Kolomyya region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447111

The following towns were all in Stanislawow powiat in Interwar Poland,
and all have single record sets in the FamilySearch catalog labeled
simply "Military records, 1924", which >from the record descriptions
were all for recruits born in 1903:

- Knihinin -- absorbed into the city of Stanislawow, now
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383698

- Pawelcze [Pavelche] -- now Pavlivka, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383699

- Perlowce -- now Perlivtsi, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383009

- Podbereze -- now Poberezhzhya, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383703

- Podluze -- now Pidluzhzhya, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383705

- Pukasowce -- now Pukasivtsi, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383707

- Radcza -- now Radcha, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383708

- Rybno -- now Rybne, Ivano-Frankivs'ka oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383709

- Sielec [Selets] -- now Silets, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383710

- Sobotow [Subotow] -- now Subotiv, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383713

- Uhrynow Dolny -- now Uhryniv, Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383715

So, lots of records available!

To sum up: if you have late 19th century or early 20th century
ancestry >from the southern part of what was once the Stanislawow
region, but your family comes >from a town where the conventional
wisdom is that "the records didn't survive", you might want to take a
look at these military records to see if they could be a useful
substitute.

Good luck!


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California


Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland #general

sjhoi@...
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland will be held
Wednesday, August 5 starting at 7:30 P.M. in the Miller Board Room at
Menorah Park, 27100 Cedar Rd., Beachwood.

The featured speaker will be Jerry Pockar, a volunteer for Hospice of the
Western Reserve, who meets with patients who are often in the last stages of
life and want to document their life stories. His best subjects are often
ordinary people like the late Molly Kravitz who at the age of 96 gained
national media attention as the oldest of 10 women to participate in a group
bat mitzvah at Menorah Park.

The program is free and open to the public. Board members will be available
at 7:00 P.M. to respond to questions and research issues.

For further information contact Stewart Hoicowitz at 440-473-5364.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland #general

sjhoi@...
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland will be held
Wednesday, August 5 starting at 7:30 P.M. in the Miller Board Room at
Menorah Park, 27100 Cedar Rd., Beachwood.

The featured speaker will be Jerry Pockar, a volunteer for Hospice of the
Western Reserve, who meets with patients who are often in the last stages of
life and want to document their life stories. His best subjects are often
ordinary people like the late Molly Kravitz who at the age of 96 gained
national media attention as the oldest of 10 women to participate in a group
bat mitzvah at Menorah Park.

The program is free and open to the public. Board members will be available
at 7:00 P.M. to respond to questions and research issues.

For further information contact Stewart Hoicowitz at 440-473-5364.


More about those military "draft board" records containing previously unavailable Jewish birth records #general

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

Thank you to everyone who wrote to me with nice comments about the
partial Jewish birth records discovered within the military "draft
board" records. Thank you especially to Tomasz Jankowski, who wrote to
me that "The original files were microfilmed at the State Archives of
the Ivano-Frankivsk Region >from the fonds of regional authority
(starostwo powiatowe)."

Tomasz is correct; FamilySearch (the LDS Church) apparently
microfilmed those records on site at the Ivano-Frankivsk archives, not
at the Lviv archives as I had previously written. The Lviv Archives
do hold many military records, but almost all of theirs are >from the
Austrian (Galician) era, not Polish period. FamilySearch lists them
this way:

"Miltary [sic] records, 1865-1930"
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1713234

As usual, this FamilySearch microfilm set's title is misleading; those
records are nearly all >from the Austrian era, which was up basically
only through 1918, except for one item at the end of this record set
that gives medical test results >from 1920-1930 for military personnel
born in 1883.

I personally haven't looked at those Austrian military records, but
they appear to be alphabetical by surname and then grouped by year,
which doesn't sound so bad to search through. If anyone has experience
with that record set, perhaps they could comment if the data is as
helpful as the later Polish records whose examples I posted the other
day.

So, here's some more good news: I found even more of those excellent
Polish draft board records preserved and filmed by FamilySearch. It
is sadly not easy or intuitive to find these records in the
FamilySearch catalog if you do a search by location, but if you leave
the location field blank, then do a combination of keyword searching
and subsequent filtering of the results based on Polish language, it
yields a much bigger list of records.

The main takeaway is that there is at least one more large record set
of "draft board" files available, besides the Bohorodczany powiat and
Stanislawow powiat records mentioned in my previous message to the
listserve. And that would be the Sniatyn powiat records for 1920-1939
-- again, this is a fortuitous record set to be preserved, since many
of the smaller towns in the Sniatyn area had few or no 19th century
Jewish vital records that survived. Or didn't until now, I guess.
Czernowitz [Chernivtsy] researchers might want to look at this record
set, too, since that area borders the Sniatyn area.

So, to sum up, the three largest collections of "draft board" records
each cover multiple towns in the former Stanislawow Voivodeship, and
each have many records available for many years:

#1: "Miltary [sic] records, 1884-1910"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Bohorodczany
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the
Bohorodchany area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447115
NOTE: All the example images linked in my previous message to the
listserve came >from this record set. I am pretty sure that these
records do cover all towns in the powiat, even the very small towns.

#2a: "Miltary [sic] records, 1883-1939"
and
#2b: "Military records, 1903-1938"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Stanislawow
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the
Ivano-Frankivsk area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1382964
and
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383712
NOTE: It is unclear why these two collections of records are given
separate catalog entries; they should probably be combined as they
cover the same area and complementary years.

#3: "Miltary [sic] records, 1920-1939"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Sniatyn
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the Sniatyn
area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447114
NOTE: This record set is very poorly named; according to the record
descriptions, these files actually cover men born >from 1890 up through
1921, but with several years missing.

I also found these two new smaller collections:

#4: "Miltary [sic] records, 1928-1938" [actually recruits born in 1890 and 1896]
It is unclear whether this is just for the town of Kolomyya,
Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine or whether it refers to multiple towns
within the former Kolomyja [Kolomea] powiat
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383009

#5: "Military records, 1938" [actually recruits born in 1917]
Jablonow -- now Yabluniv, Kolomyya region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447111

The following towns were all in Stanislawow powiat in Interwar Poland,
and all have single record sets in the FamilySearch catalog labeled
simply "Military records, 1924", which >from the record descriptions
were all for recruits born in 1903:

- Knihinin -- absorbed into the city of Stanislawow, now
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383698

- Pawelcze [Pavelche] -- now Pavlivka, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383699

- Perlowce -- now Perlivtsi, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383009

- Podbereze -- now Poberezhzhya, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383703

- Podluze -- now Pidluzhzhya, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383705

- Pukasowce -- now Pukasivtsi, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383707

- Radcza -- now Radcha, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383708

- Rybno -- now Rybne, Ivano-Frankivs'ka oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383709

- Sielec [Selets] -- now Silets, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383710

- Sobotow [Subotow] -- now Subotiv, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383713

- Uhrynow Dolny -- now Uhryniv, Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383715

So, lots of records available!

To sum up: if you have late 19th century or early 20th century
ancestry >from the southern part of what was once the Stanislawow
region, but your family comes >from a town where the conventional
wisdom is that "the records didn't survive", you might want to take a
look at these military records to see if they could be a useful
substitute.

Good luck!

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More about those military "draft board" records containing previously unavailable Jewish birth records #general

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

Thank you to everyone who wrote to me with nice comments about the
partial Jewish birth records discovered within the military "draft
board" records. Thank you especially to Tomasz Jankowski, who wrote to
me that "The original files were microfilmed at the State Archives of
the Ivano-Frankivsk Region >from the fonds of regional authority
(starostwo powiatowe)."

Tomasz is correct; FamilySearch (the LDS Church) apparently
microfilmed those records on site at the Ivano-Frankivsk archives, not
at the Lviv archives as I had previously written. The Lviv Archives
do hold many military records, but almost all of theirs are >from the
Austrian (Galician) era, not Polish period. FamilySearch lists them
this way:

"Miltary [sic] records, 1865-1930"
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1713234

As usual, this FamilySearch microfilm set's title is misleading; those
records are nearly all >from the Austrian era, which was up basically
only through 1918, except for one item at the end of this record set
that gives medical test results >from 1920-1930 for military personnel
born in 1883.

I personally haven't looked at those Austrian military records, but
they appear to be alphabetical by surname and then grouped by year,
which doesn't sound so bad to search through. If anyone has experience
with that record set, perhaps they could comment if the data is as
helpful as the later Polish records whose examples I posted the other
day.

So, here's some more good news: I found even more of those excellent
Polish draft board records preserved and filmed by FamilySearch. It
is sadly not easy or intuitive to find these records in the
FamilySearch catalog if you do a search by location, but if you leave
the location field blank, then do a combination of keyword searching
and subsequent filtering of the results based on Polish language, it
yields a much bigger list of records.

The main takeaway is that there is at least one more large record set
of "draft board" files available, besides the Bohorodczany powiat and
Stanislawow powiat records mentioned in my previous message to the
listserve. And that would be the Sniatyn powiat records for 1920-1939
-- again, this is a fortuitous record set to be preserved, since many
of the smaller towns in the Sniatyn area had few or no 19th century
Jewish vital records that survived. Or didn't until now, I guess.
Czernowitz [Chernivtsy] researchers might want to look at this record
set, too, since that area borders the Sniatyn area.

So, to sum up, the three largest collections of "draft board" records
each cover multiple towns in the former Stanislawow Voivodeship, and
each have many records available for many years:

#1: "Miltary [sic] records, 1884-1910"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Bohorodczany
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the
Bohorodchany area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447115
NOTE: All the example images linked in my previous message to the
listserve came >from this record set. I am pretty sure that these
records do cover all towns in the powiat, even the very small towns.

#2a: "Miltary [sic] records, 1883-1939"
and
#2b: "Military records, 1903-1938"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Stanislawow
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the
Ivano-Frankivsk area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1382964
and
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383712
NOTE: It is unclear why these two collections of records are given
separate catalog entries; they should probably be combined as they
cover the same area and complementary years.

#3: "Miltary [sic] records, 1920-1939"
Covers multiple towns (perhaps all towns?) in the former Sniatyn
powiat, Stanislawow Voivodeship, Interwar Poland -- now the Sniatyn
area, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447114
NOTE: This record set is very poorly named; according to the record
descriptions, these files actually cover men born >from 1890 up through
1921, but with several years missing.

I also found these two new smaller collections:

#4: "Miltary [sic] records, 1928-1938" [actually recruits born in 1890 and 1896]
It is unclear whether this is just for the town of Kolomyya,
Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine or whether it refers to multiple towns
within the former Kolomyja [Kolomea] powiat
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383009

#5: "Military records, 1938" [actually recruits born in 1917]
Jablonow -- now Yabluniv, Kolomyya region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1447111

The following towns were all in Stanislawow powiat in Interwar Poland,
and all have single record sets in the FamilySearch catalog labeled
simply "Military records, 1924", which >from the record descriptions
were all for recruits born in 1903:

- Knihinin -- absorbed into the city of Stanislawow, now
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383698

- Pawelcze [Pavelche] -- now Pavlivka, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383699

- Perlowce -- now Perlivtsi, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383009

- Podbereze -- now Poberezhzhya, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383703

- Podluze -- now Pidluzhzhya, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383705

- Pukasowce -- now Pukasivtsi, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383707

- Radcza -- now Radcha, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383708

- Rybno -- now Rybne, Ivano-Frankivs'ka oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383709

- Sielec [Selets] -- now Silets, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383710

- Sobotow [Subotow] -- now Subotiv, Halych region, Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383713

- Uhrynow Dolny -- now Uhryniv, Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/1383715

So, lots of records available!

To sum up: if you have late 19th century or early 20th century
ancestry >from the southern part of what was once the Stanislawow
region, but your family comes >from a town where the conventional
wisdom is that "the records didn't survive", you might want to take a
look at these military records to see if they could be a useful
substitute.

Good luck!

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California


Two More Cemeteries - Otaki (Ataki) and Faleshty. #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Last couple of days I got some initial money to start Otaki (Ataki) Jewish
Cemetery photographing. I know for sure that there are many of our members
interested in that town. I hope that you could contribute to the
Bessarabia-Moldova Cemetery project. Please also email me when you make
your contributions.

The second one is Faleshty Jewish Cemetery. In fact there are TWO
cemeteries in Faleshty: Old and New. I also remember a number of our
members interested in Faleshty. Please consider donating and we could plan
of photographing these cemeteries in 2015-2016.

I also encourage you to donate $100 for a particular cemetery to
Bessasrabia-Moldova Cemetery Project. In this case you will receive the
whole Excel table with records before they will appear at JewishGen. Also
if you find your relative(s), I will send you ALL photos we have for that
grave. In some cases we have 2-3 photos.

In order to start working on a new cemetery we need to collect about 30% of
cost. If you are interested in some other Bessarabia-Moldova cemetery,
please email me.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Two More Cemeteries - Otaki (Ataki) and Faleshty. #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Last couple of days I got some initial money to start Otaki (Ataki) Jewish
Cemetery photographing. I know for sure that there are many of our members
interested in that town. I hope that you could contribute to the
Bessarabia-Moldova Cemetery project. Please also email me when you make
your contributions.

The second one is Faleshty Jewish Cemetery. In fact there are TWO
cemeteries in Faleshty: Old and New. I also remember a number of our
members interested in Faleshty. Please consider donating and we could plan
of photographing these cemeteries in 2015-2016.

I also encourage you to donate $100 for a particular cemetery to
Bessasrabia-Moldova Cemetery Project. In this case you will receive the
whole Excel table with records before they will appear at JewishGen. Also
if you find your relative(s), I will send you ALL photos we have for that
grave. In some cases we have 2-3 photos.

In order to start working on a new cemetery we need to collect about 30% of
cost. If you are interested in some other Bessarabia-Moldova cemetery,
please email me.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Book announcement #france

Israel P
 

I am pleased to announce that my book "ENDOGAMY: One Family, One People" is now
available for preorder, with a release date of 16 August. The book deals with genetic
genealogy and analysis of DNA test results with special emphasis on endogamous
populations, those who - like European Jews - have been marrying within the tribe for
hundreds of years.

Endogamy is a special challenge for genetic genealogy and this the first book on the subject.
See the foreword and mission statement at www.endogamy-one-family.com.

"ENDOGAMY: One Family, One People" is also personal in the sense that my own
families, particularly the Pikholz families of east Galicia, are the basis for my work with DNA
and this is largely their story.

I shall be speaking at several venues in the United States in the second half of August,
and they are listed on the website together with other information.

I'd be pleased if you would pass this on to anyone who you think might be interested.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


French SIG #France Book announcement #france

Israel P
 

I am pleased to announce that my book "ENDOGAMY: One Family, One People" is now
available for preorder, with a release date of 16 August. The book deals with genetic
genealogy and analysis of DNA test results with special emphasis on endogamous
populations, those who - like European Jews - have been marrying within the tribe for
hundreds of years.

Endogamy is a special challenge for genetic genealogy and this the first book on the subject.
See the foreword and mission statement at www.endogamy-one-family.com.

"ENDOGAMY: One Family, One People" is also personal in the sense that my own
families, particularly the Pikholz families of east Galicia, are the basis for my work with DNA
and this is largely their story.

I shall be speaking at several venues in the United States in the second half of August,
and they are listed on the website together with other information.

I'd be pleased if you would pass this on to anyone who you think might be interested.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


Jewish ancestry in Albania #general

ridvan baxha <rbaxha@...>
 

I am an inhabitant of gjirokaster in the south albania. Just recently i was
watching a documentary regarding my city when i heard that a great part
of my city's population some 500 hundred years ago was of Jewish origin.
The speaker of this documentary was supporting this assumption by also
looking at the city's architecture, similar to Jewish style like today's
Jerusalem. All the residents of my city didn't hand over to the nazi's
not a single jew during the second world war.

I was also told that a resident of my city surnamed bakalli went over to israel
some years ago and thru dna test they found out that he had a jewish ancestry.

I was wandering how i could undergo the same dna test if that is at all possible
in order to determine my family roots and to tell my children so. Where,
how,when can i and my family have this test and who is able to interpret
the results of the test. I have heard some stories >from my father's side
telling me probably our jewish ancestry. Unfortunately our city records
are very poor to prove this fact. So dna would be a a good proof for me
and my kids 3 sons. If anyone knows anything about jewish albanians
please let me know. Just recently very near to my city was found a
hebrew singogue and this tells me a lot.

thank you in advance ritvan ferdi baxha

MODERATOR NOTE: Information on DNA testing may be found at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/DNA/genbygen.html

There is a special discussion group for DNA matters, which you are encouraged
to join, since DNA is normally off-topic for the main Discussion Group.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish ancestry in Albania #general

ridvan baxha <rbaxha@...>
 

I am an inhabitant of gjirokaster in the south albania. Just recently i was
watching a documentary regarding my city when i heard that a great part
of my city's population some 500 hundred years ago was of Jewish origin.
The speaker of this documentary was supporting this assumption by also
looking at the city's architecture, similar to Jewish style like today's
Jerusalem. All the residents of my city didn't hand over to the nazi's
not a single jew during the second world war.

I was also told that a resident of my city surnamed bakalli went over to israel
some years ago and thru dna test they found out that he had a jewish ancestry.

I was wandering how i could undergo the same dna test if that is at all possible
in order to determine my family roots and to tell my children so. Where,
how,when can i and my family have this test and who is able to interpret
the results of the test. I have heard some stories >from my father's side
telling me probably our jewish ancestry. Unfortunately our city records
are very poor to prove this fact. So dna would be a a good proof for me
and my kids 3 sons. If anyone knows anything about jewish albanians
please let me know. Just recently very near to my city was found a
hebrew singogue and this tells me a lot.

thank you in advance ritvan ferdi baxha

MODERATOR NOTE: Information on DNA testing may be found at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/DNA/genbygen.html

There is a special discussion group for DNA matters, which you are encouraged
to join, since DNA is normally off-topic for the main Discussion Group.


(Germany) Munich City Council Upholds Ban on Stolpersteine #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Munich's City Council has upheld its ban on Stolpersteine >from being placed
outside Holocaust victims homes. The Council first rejected this in 2004.
The decline to change their policy was due to opponents-including some
Jewish leaders-- on the grounds that they allow victim's names to be
trampled on again. Jewish concentration camp survivors and victims' families
said they will start legal proceedings against the Stolpersteine ban.
Stolpersteine are brass plaques embedded in the pavement of former homes of
Holocaust victims. About 54,000 have been laid in 1,200 different towns and
cities in Europe including 500 German cities.

Instead, on July 29th the Munich City Council approved permission for
plaques on building facades, if the building owners give approval and atop
posts on public grounds. A central memorial listing all the victims' names
is planned.

To read more about this see: http://tinyurl.com/o37ddcp

Original url:

http://www.i24news.tv/en/news/international/europe/80182-150729-munich-opts-
for-controversial-holocaust-memorial-compromise

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Germany) Munich City Council Upholds Ban on Stolpersteine #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Munich's City Council has upheld its ban on Stolpersteine >from being placed
outside Holocaust victims homes. The Council first rejected this in 2004.
The decline to change their policy was due to opponents-including some
Jewish leaders-- on the grounds that they allow victim's names to be
trampled on again. Jewish concentration camp survivors and victims' families
said they will start legal proceedings against the Stolpersteine ban.
Stolpersteine are brass plaques embedded in the pavement of former homes of
Holocaust victims. About 54,000 have been laid in 1,200 different towns and
cities in Europe including 500 German cities.

Instead, on July 29th the Munich City Council approved permission for
plaques on building facades, if the building owners give approval and atop
posts on public grounds. A central memorial listing all the victims' names
is planned.

To read more about this see: http://tinyurl.com/o37ddcp

Original url:

http://www.i24news.tv/en/news/international/europe/80182-150729-munich-opts-
for-controversial-holocaust-memorial-compromise

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


ViewMate translation request - Russian (reposted) #general

Micah Salb
 

Friends:

I have posted a marriage document in Russian for which I need a translation.
(I previously made this request but erroneously said the document was in
Polish.) This document relates to the marriage between Liba FLOREK and Nu=
ssen GRUSZKA.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=3D41492

I know that this is a little bit lengthy, but I would really like to get a
complete translation of this, both because I am very curious and because this
ties to a mystery we are trying to solve.

I would appreciate if you would respond via the form provided in the
ViewMate application or, if you have questions or comments, please email me at
msalb@lsslawyers.com

Thank you so much.

Micah Salb
Washington, DC


JewishGen Offers Class: Independent Study Aug 1-Aug 30 2015 #ciechanow #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study August 1-30.

If you have a project you would love to work on with individualized
instruction...JewishGen Education offers a wide range of problem
solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/
Education that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.
Course Description: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $150
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian (reposted) #general

Micah Salb
 

Friends:

I have posted a marriage document in Russian for which I need a translation.
(I previously made this request but erroneously said the document was in
Polish.) This document relates to the marriage between Liba FLOREK and Nu=
ssen GRUSZKA.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=3D41492

I know that this is a little bit lengthy, but I would really like to get a
complete translation of this, both because I am very curious and because this
ties to a mystery we are trying to solve.

I would appreciate if you would respond via the form provided in the
ViewMate application or, if you have questions or comments, please email me at
msalb@lsslawyers.com

Thank you so much.

Micah Salb
Washington, DC


#Ciechanow #Poland JewishGen Offers Class: Independent Study Aug 1-Aug 30 2015 #ciechanow #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study August 1-30.

If you have a project you would love to work on with individualized
instruction...JewishGen Education offers a wide range of problem
solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/
Education that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.
Course Description: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $150
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com

83101 - 83120 of 654932