Date   

Michael Steinlauf's upcoming book #yiddish

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

People who attended the 19'th annual seminar last summer in NYC may
remember a presenter named Michael STEINLAUF (Gratz College) who talked
about the Jewish civilization of Eastern Ashkenaz. He is fluent in
Yiddish and Polish (in addition to English, of course) and is working on
a book about Yiddish theater and Jewish popular culture in prewar Poland.


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Michael Steinlauf's upcoming book #yiddish

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

People who attended the 19'th annual seminar last summer in NYC may
remember a presenter named Michael STEINLAUF (Gratz College) who talked
about the Jewish civilization of Eastern Ashkenaz. He is fluent in
Yiddish and Polish (in addition to English, of course) and is working on
a book about Yiddish theater and Jewish popular culture in prewar Poland.


tombstone errors #belarus

Judith Kunofsky <kunofsky@...>
 

Friends:

I'm a few weeks behind in reading Belarus messages, so I apologize if this
has been posted already.

Re the discussion of mistakes on tombstones: If an elderly spouse is the one
who orders the tombstone, mistakes may be more than minor.

My grandfather's name was Khayim. My late uncle's tombstone says his father
was "Tsvi Khayim." The tombstone was ordered by his wife, who was older than
my uncle (but of course still alive). I called to ask her why she had
written "Tsvi Khayim" and she said she didn't know.

One might think a spouse has more accurate information than a child, but age
may confound that.

Judy Kunofsky
Berkeley, California
kunofsky@...


Belarus SIG #Belarus tombstone errors #belarus

Judith Kunofsky <kunofsky@...>
 

Friends:

I'm a few weeks behind in reading Belarus messages, so I apologize if this
has been posted already.

Re the discussion of mistakes on tombstones: If an elderly spouse is the one
who orders the tombstone, mistakes may be more than minor.

My grandfather's name was Khayim. My late uncle's tombstone says his father
was "Tsvi Khayim." The tombstone was ordered by his wife, who was older than
my uncle (but of course still alive). I called to ask her why she had
written "Tsvi Khayim" and she said she didn't know.

One might think a spouse has more accurate information than a child, but age
may confound that.

Judy Kunofsky
Berkeley, California
kunofsky@...


Re: Mary Antin #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

At 17:30 21-03-00 -0800, Faye Chaikin Pearl wrote to Elsebeth Paikin:

Thank you for your article on "The Promised Land" by Mary Antin.
My father comes >from Polotsk.

Do you know if the name Mary Antin was anglicized?
--------------------------------------------------
I reply both privately and to the Belarus Discussion Group, as I
think there might be others who could be interested:

Yes, the names were anglicized, and on
page 149 Mary Antin describes how:

"....
With our despised immigrant clothing we shed also our
impossible Hebrew names. A committee of friends, several
years ahead of us in American experience, put their head
together and concocted American names for us all.
Those of our real names that had no pleasing American
equivalents they ruthlessly discarded, content if they
retained the initials.
My mother, possessing a name that was not easily translatable,
was pubished with the undignified nickname of Annie.
Fetchke, Joseph, and Deborah issued as Frieda, Joseph and Dora,
respectively.
As for poor me, I was simply cheated. The name they gave me
was hardly new. My Hebrew name being Maryashe in full, Mashke
for short, Russianized into Marya (Mar-ya), my friends said that
it would hold good in English as Mary; which was very disappointing,
as I longed to possess a strange-sounding American name like the
others.
I am forgetting the consolation i had, in this matter of names,
from the use of my surname, which i have had no occasion to mention
until now. I found on my arrival that my father was "Mr. Antin" on
the slightest provocation, and not, as in Polotzk, on state occasions
alone. And so I was "Mary Antin," and I felt very important to answer
to such a dignified title. It was just like America that even plain
people should wear their surnames on week days.
...."

However, I sincerely recommend that you read the book. It gives such a
wonderfully vivid picture of life in Polotsk. For copyright reasons I
could not - and cannot - quote more than a few lines.

Best regards
--
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark,
e-mail: elsebeth@...
--


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Mary Antin #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

At 17:30 21-03-00 -0800, Faye Chaikin Pearl wrote to Elsebeth Paikin:

Thank you for your article on "The Promised Land" by Mary Antin.
My father comes >from Polotsk.

Do you know if the name Mary Antin was anglicized?
--------------------------------------------------
I reply both privately and to the Belarus Discussion Group, as I
think there might be others who could be interested:

Yes, the names were anglicized, and on
page 149 Mary Antin describes how:

"....
With our despised immigrant clothing we shed also our
impossible Hebrew names. A committee of friends, several
years ahead of us in American experience, put their head
together and concocted American names for us all.
Those of our real names that had no pleasing American
equivalents they ruthlessly discarded, content if they
retained the initials.
My mother, possessing a name that was not easily translatable,
was pubished with the undignified nickname of Annie.
Fetchke, Joseph, and Deborah issued as Frieda, Joseph and Dora,
respectively.
As for poor me, I was simply cheated. The name they gave me
was hardly new. My Hebrew name being Maryashe in full, Mashke
for short, Russianized into Marya (Mar-ya), my friends said that
it would hold good in English as Mary; which was very disappointing,
as I longed to possess a strange-sounding American name like the
others.
I am forgetting the consolation i had, in this matter of names,
from the use of my surname, which i have had no occasion to mention
until now. I found on my arrival that my father was "Mr. Antin" on
the slightest provocation, and not, as in Polotzk, on state occasions
alone. And so I was "Mary Antin," and I felt very important to answer
to such a dignified title. It was just like America that even plain
people should wear their surnames on week days.
...."

However, I sincerely recommend that you read the book. It gives such a
wonderfully vivid picture of life in Polotsk. For copyright reasons I
could not - and cannot - quote more than a few lines.

Best regards
--
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark,
e-mail: elsebeth@...
--


Re: New Lodz web site: "From Dawn to Dusk" #lodz #poland

Steven Shapiro <SteveSequoia@...>
 

Thanks, I think it is a useful site and very well done, however, it does
give the impression that the Poles didn't participate in the destruction of
the Jewish community...wrong they were active participates.

Steven Shapiro

Resurching

----- Original Message -----
From: <Seflaum@...>
To: Lodz Area Research Group <lodz@...>
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2000 4:50 PM
Subject: New Lodz web site: ">from Dawn to Dusk"


Dear Fellow Lodz Area Researchers,

I am very pleased to inform you about a brand new web site on Jewish Lodz,
">from Dawn to Dusk." What is unique about this web site is that it was
created by 10 16-year-old students in the XIII Liceum Ogolnoksztalcace (
"13th High School" ) in Lodz, Poland, as a project for their math-computer
science class. Their dedicated teacher is Wojciech Kolasinski.

This is a very high quality web site, in terms of appearance, content and
structure; students and teacher are to be highly commended for their hard
work and dedication to this project. I was very moved by this site and the
care and respect these students obviously have for the Jews who once made
up
such a large of their city. I encourage each and every one of you to visit
and explore this site -- I believe you will be very impressed by what you
see.

You will especially be interested in these highlights: photos of
synagogues,
photos of pre-war street scenes in Lodz, a downloadable map of the Lodz
ghetto, a still photo >from the documentary "Photographer" (including an
audio
excerpt >from the film by survivor Arnold Mostowicz, one of the narrators).
There are interesting narratives about the history of the Jews in Poland
and
in Lodz, the Lodz ghetto, Chelmno and more.

I won't tell you what absolutely moved me the most on the last page of the
site...you will see it for yourself.

Visit ">from Dawn to Dusk" at:
http://cyberfair.gsn.org/thirteen/narrate.html
from the home page, click on "Cyber Fair 2000 Entry (this site)" to enter
the
project in frames format.

Wojciech Kolasinski and his students may be contacted by email at:
13lo@...
I'm sure they would appreciate our comments about their project.

Best Wishes,
Shirley Flaum


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Re: New Lodz web site: "From Dawn to Dusk" #lodz #poland

Steven Shapiro <SteveSequoia@...>
 

Thanks, I think it is a useful site and very well done, however, it does
give the impression that the Poles didn't participate in the destruction of
the Jewish community...wrong they were active participates.

Steven Shapiro

Resurching

----- Original Message -----
From: <Seflaum@...>
To: Lodz Area Research Group <lodz@...>
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2000 4:50 PM
Subject: New Lodz web site: ">from Dawn to Dusk"


Dear Fellow Lodz Area Researchers,

I am very pleased to inform you about a brand new web site on Jewish Lodz,
">from Dawn to Dusk." What is unique about this web site is that it was
created by 10 16-year-old students in the XIII Liceum Ogolnoksztalcace (
"13th High School" ) in Lodz, Poland, as a project for their math-computer
science class. Their dedicated teacher is Wojciech Kolasinski.

This is a very high quality web site, in terms of appearance, content and
structure; students and teacher are to be highly commended for their hard
work and dedication to this project. I was very moved by this site and the
care and respect these students obviously have for the Jews who once made
up
such a large of their city. I encourage each and every one of you to visit
and explore this site -- I believe you will be very impressed by what you
see.

You will especially be interested in these highlights: photos of
synagogues,
photos of pre-war street scenes in Lodz, a downloadable map of the Lodz
ghetto, a still photo >from the documentary "Photographer" (including an
audio
excerpt >from the film by survivor Arnold Mostowicz, one of the narrators).
There are interesting narratives about the history of the Jews in Poland
and
in Lodz, the Lodz ghetto, Chelmno and more.

I won't tell you what absolutely moved me the most on the last page of the
site...you will see it for yourself.

Visit ">from Dawn to Dusk" at:
http://cyberfair.gsn.org/thirteen/narrate.html
from the home page, click on "Cyber Fair 2000 Entry (this site)" to enter
the
project in frames format.

Wojciech Kolasinski and his students may be contacted by email at:
13lo@...
I'm sure they would appreciate our comments about their project.

Best Wishes,
Shirley Flaum


New Lodz web site #lodz #poland

Hildy Sanders <hksanders@...>
 

If you are unable to reach this site >from the link in the March 21 digest, as I
was, try
http://www.13lo.infocentrum.com/competition/intro.html.

It's a very well-done and interesting site, especially if your Lodz family was in
the textile business.

Hildy Sanders
hksanders@...


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland New Lodz web site #lodz #poland

Hildy Sanders <hksanders@...>
 

If you are unable to reach this site >from the link in the March 21 digest, as I
was, try
http://www.13lo.infocentrum.com/competition/intro.html.

It's a very well-done and interesting site, especially if your Lodz family was in
the textile business.

Hildy Sanders
hksanders@...


Census 2000 and Ethnic Ancestry #galicia

Judy and Gary Floam <gfloam@...>
 

For those of you who did not get the long form for the census, it has two
questions about family background (for each person in the household):

Q. 6 is "What is this person's race?" Choices are: White, Black/African
Am./Negro, American Indian/Alaska Native (print name of tribe), Asian
Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Other Asian (print
race), native Hawaiian, Guamanian/Chamorro, Samoan, Other Pacific Islander
(print race), and Some other race (print race).

Q. 10 is "What is this person's ancestry or ethnic origin?" ("For
example: Italian, Jamaican, Afrian Am., Cambodian, Cape Verdean, Norwegian,
Dominican, French Canadian, Haitian, Korean, Lebanese, Polish, Nigerian,
Mexican, Taiwanese, Ukranian, and so on."}

You can see >from the above that "Jewish" or "Jewish-Ashkenazic" would be the
most reasonable response for a Galizianer to put on Question 10, but it's
not clear that the Census Bureau would accept that. Maybe they need to be
lobbied by some "official" organization?

Judy Floam
Baltimore, MD


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Census 2000 and Ethnic Ancestry #galicia

Judy and Gary Floam <gfloam@...>
 

For those of you who did not get the long form for the census, it has two
questions about family background (for each person in the household):

Q. 6 is "What is this person's race?" Choices are: White, Black/African
Am./Negro, American Indian/Alaska Native (print name of tribe), Asian
Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Other Asian (print
race), native Hawaiian, Guamanian/Chamorro, Samoan, Other Pacific Islander
(print race), and Some other race (print race).

Q. 10 is "What is this person's ancestry or ethnic origin?" ("For
example: Italian, Jamaican, Afrian Am., Cambodian, Cape Verdean, Norwegian,
Dominican, French Canadian, Haitian, Korean, Lebanese, Polish, Nigerian,
Mexican, Taiwanese, Ukranian, and so on."}

You can see >from the above that "Jewish" or "Jewish-Ashkenazic" would be the
most reasonable response for a Galizianer to put on Question 10, but it's
not clear that the Census Bureau would accept that. Maybe they need to be
lobbied by some "official" organization?

Judy Floam
Baltimore, MD


Katowice, Poland #general

Ada Holtzman <ada01@...>
 

Shalom,

I have the name and address of the chairman of the Jewish Council in
Katowice, Poland. He has records of all the burials in the Jewish
Katowice cemetery.
I shall give the details to anyone who requests it >from me.

Ada Holtzman
Web Site: http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/4017/


1900 migration #general

SteveHWLTD@...
 

My family[s] came >from Lemberg, Dwinsk, and Vitesbk and arrived in the US
between 1900 and 1910. Most came through Liverpool to Philadelphia with a
few entering New York. I am looking for books/articles that describe the
migration they might have made first to England then on to the US. If this
is not an appropriate question for this forum, please direct me to a more
appropriate site. Thank you, Steve Schecter


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Katowice, Poland #general

Ada Holtzman <ada01@...>
 

Shalom,

I have the name and address of the chairman of the Jewish Council in
Katowice, Poland. He has records of all the burials in the Jewish
Katowice cemetery.
I shall give the details to anyone who requests it >from me.

Ada Holtzman
Web Site: http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/4017/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1900 migration #general

SteveHWLTD@...
 

My family[s] came >from Lemberg, Dwinsk, and Vitesbk and arrived in the US
between 1900 and 1910. Most came through Liverpool to Philadelphia with a
few entering New York. I am looking for books/articles that describe the
migration they might have made first to England then on to the US. If this
is not an appropriate question for this forum, please direct me to a more
appropriate site. Thank you, Steve Schecter


Re: Searching: MINTZER from Strelisker, Poland #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Rose Boxer wrote about the town named Strelisker.

This appears to be a common mistake made by our Genners [JewishGen
researchers] when a town is identified with the "er" at the end.

"Er" at the end is usually associated with Jewish "landsmanshaftn",
associations of people who have common ancestry in particular shtetl,
for example: Stryyer, Lodzer, Varshaver, and so on. It make me Boryslaver.

You will identify the shtetl name in this case by simply deleting 'er'.
[Strelisker is really Strelisk. See below.]

Town Strelisk (Polish: Strzeliska Nowe), is now known as Novyye Strelishcha,
Ukraine. Located 50 km SE of Lviv in what used to be known as Bobrka
county. 828 Jewish souls were residents of this shtetl in the interwar
period (WOWW data). O. MUNZER (u umlaut) was registered as town bricklayer
in 1929 Poland Business directory.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
a.sharon@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Searching: MINTZER from Strelisker, Poland #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Rose Boxer wrote about the town named Strelisker.

This appears to be a common mistake made by our Genners [JewishGen
researchers] when a town is identified with the "er" at the end.

"Er" at the end is usually associated with Jewish "landsmanshaftn",
associations of people who have common ancestry in particular shtetl,
for example: Stryyer, Lodzer, Varshaver, and so on. It make me Boryslaver.

You will identify the shtetl name in this case by simply deleting 'er'.
[Strelisker is really Strelisk. See below.]

Town Strelisk (Polish: Strzeliska Nowe), is now known as Novyye Strelishcha,
Ukraine. Located 50 km SE of Lviv in what used to be known as Bobrka
county. 828 Jewish souls were residents of this shtetl in the interwar
period (WOWW data). O. MUNZER (u umlaut) was registered as town bricklayer
in 1929 Poland Business directory.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
a.sharon@...


Re: Majdan #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Phil Zuckerbrod asked about Majdan:

There are several places in Poland and in Ukraine that are known as Majdan
(Maydan). This is includes few Maydan in Galicia. Name means 'open space'
sometimes "open yard: within the farmstead, all depending with what kind of
Ukrainians you are discussing the name.

Since you are searching within Galicia, small Majdan that I have done basic
research on is located in Carpathian mountains, only one road goes in,
nothing is coming out. Village is located west of Kropiwnik (Stary and Nowy,
Schodnica and Rybnik) on the stream Rybnik contributory to close by river
Stryy. There are couple of Majdans in Lviv area - check with WOWW and
ShtetlSeeker, and several Majdans in central region of Poland including
infamous concentration camp Majdanek.

This small mountan Majdan that I have done some basic research- WOWW does
not mentioned town an its Jewish population, had several Jewish businessmen:
MAJDAN, county Drohobycz, Lwow Province, Poland
1929 POLAND BUSINESS DIRECTORY
Location: 49o09' 23o17', Alternative names: Maydan, Maidan (meaning: Open
space or courtyard)
County court: Podbuz, regional court: Sambor
Jewish population:???? Total population: 710 (1921)
28 km distance to the nearest railway station Boryslaw-Tustanowice

Proprietor Name Business or Occupation Category

Ames, S General store
Izdebski, M Shoemaker
Libieg & Co. Landowner
Majer, M Liquor store
Majer, S General store
Muller, W Sawmill
Piechowicz, J General store
Reinholtz, Z Tailor
Waldman, H Mercer
Waldman, P Flour mill
Waldman, R Food store
Wiesengrun, W General store
Wingrun, S Food store
Wozna, A General store
Wozny, J Blacksmith



Alexander Sharon
<a.sharon@...>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Majdan #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Phil Zuckerbrod asked about Majdan:

There are several places in Poland and in Ukraine that are known as Majdan
(Maydan). This is includes few Maydan in Galicia. Name means 'open space'
sometimes "open yard: within the farmstead, all depending with what kind of
Ukrainians you are discussing the name.

Since you are searching within Galicia, small Majdan that I have done basic
research on is located in Carpathian mountains, only one road goes in,
nothing is coming out. Village is located west of Kropiwnik (Stary and Nowy,
Schodnica and Rybnik) on the stream Rybnik contributory to close by river
Stryy. There are couple of Majdans in Lviv area - check with WOWW and
ShtetlSeeker, and several Majdans in central region of Poland including
infamous concentration camp Majdanek.

This small mountan Majdan that I have done some basic research- WOWW does
not mentioned town an its Jewish population, had several Jewish businessmen:
MAJDAN, county Drohobycz, Lwow Province, Poland
1929 POLAND BUSINESS DIRECTORY
Location: 49o09' 23o17', Alternative names: Maydan, Maidan (meaning: Open
space or courtyard)
County court: Podbuz, regional court: Sambor
Jewish population:???? Total population: 710 (1921)
28 km distance to the nearest railway station Boryslaw-Tustanowice

Proprietor Name Business or Occupation Category

Ames, S General store
Izdebski, M Shoemaker
Libieg & Co. Landowner
Majer, M Liquor store
Majer, S General store
Muller, W Sawmill
Piechowicz, J General store
Reinholtz, Z Tailor
Waldman, H Mercer
Waldman, P Flour mill
Waldman, R Food store
Wiesengrun, W General store
Wingrun, S Food store
Wozna, A General store
Wozny, J Blacksmith



Alexander Sharon
<a.sharon@...>