Date   

Name of Hosenrott #ukraine

mygins@...
 

Hello fellow seekers,

My husband's grandmother, Esther ALBERT, was born in England in
March, 1887.  Her birth certificate, >from the district of
Whitechapel, lists her mother as Rachel ALBERT, formerly HOSENROTT. 
Subsequent U.S. census records indicate that she was >from Russia,
although my husband's mother thought she was >from Poland.  I have
not been able to find the name HOSENROTT anywhere.  Rachel spoke
Yiddish so it was likely the registrar could not understand her well. 
Can anyone come up with a possible alternative spelling to the name
HOSENROTT? 

Thanks very much, 

Marilyn GINSBURG,
Toronto

Moderator's note: Altho this post is not specific to the Ukraine, it
may ring a bell with one or more of our expert researchers.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Name of Hosenrott #ukraine

mygins@...
 

Hello fellow seekers,

My husband's grandmother, Esther ALBERT, was born in England in
March, 1887.  Her birth certificate, >from the district of
Whitechapel, lists her mother as Rachel ALBERT, formerly HOSENROTT. 
Subsequent U.S. census records indicate that she was >from Russia,
although my husband's mother thought she was >from Poland.  I have
not been able to find the name HOSENROTT anywhere.  Rachel spoke
Yiddish so it was likely the registrar could not understand her well. 
Can anyone come up with a possible alternative spelling to the name
HOSENROTT? 

Thanks very much, 

Marilyn GINSBURG,
Toronto

Moderator's note: Altho this post is not specific to the Ukraine, it
may ring a bell with one or more of our expert researchers.


JGSLA "Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a Lost World in a 1938 Film" with Glenn Kurtz - Tuesday, Sept. 8th in Los Angeles #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to
our next program:

Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 7:30PM

American Jewish University - Sperber Library
15600 Mulholland Dr. Los Angeles 90077

"Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a Lost World in a
1938 Family Film" - with author Glenn Kurtz

How did three minutes of film shot in 1938 reunite
Holocaust survivors?

In the summer of 1938, David KURTZ, an American businessman on a
six-week European vacation with his wife and friends, made a home
movie that captured three minutes of life in his birthplace, the
Polish town of Nasielsk.

In 2009, his grandson, Glenn Kurtz stumbled across these old family
films in a closet in his parents' house in Florida, and was
especially taken by this one, shot more than 70 years earlier on
that vacation in Europe. The footage is a series of panoramic views
and seemingly unrelated scenes. It shows dozens of adults,
schoolchildren, the town synagogue, building facades, the interior
of a home, and what appears to be a restaurant. Residents respond
enthusiastically to the presence of the Americans and their camera,
vying to be part of the picture.

As Glenn Kurtz relates: "I realized it was 1938 and there are all of
these beautiful images of children and adults in this town, one year
before World War II begins. They're so happy to be filmed, they're so
excited to see these Americans coming to visit the town ... not knowing
what was coming."

Kurtz set out to restore the film and find the people in it. Three
Minutes in Poland traces his four-year journey to identify those in
these haunting images: a search that took him across the United States,
to Canada, England, Poland and Israel, to archives, film preservation
laboratories, and an abandoned Luftwaffe airfield.

Ultimately, he encountered seven living survivors >from this lost town,
including an eighty-six-year-old man who appears in the film as a
thirteen-year-old boy. The book - and the story behind it - is a
detective story, genealogical quest and memorial to the vanished
Jewish community of Nasielsk.

Glenn Kurtz is the author of "Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a
Lost World in a 1938 Family Film," which was selected as a "Best
Book of 2014" by The New Yorker, The Boston Globe, and National Public
Radio. The Wall Street Journal praised it as "captivating",and The
Los Angeles Times described Three Minutes in Poland as "breathtaking".

Glenn's first book, Practicing: A Musician's Return to Music was
hailed by the New York Times asa "thoughtful and fluid meditation"
and by Newsday as "the book of a lifetime."

Book sale and signing after the presentation. JGSLA members free.
Guests $5.00. More details and an excerpt >from the film at:
http://www.jgsla.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair
JGSLA
pweisberger@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA "Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a Lost World in a 1938 Film" with Glenn Kurtz - Tuesday, Sept. 8th in Los Angeles #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to
our next program:

Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 7:30PM

American Jewish University - Sperber Library
15600 Mulholland Dr. Los Angeles 90077

"Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a Lost World in a
1938 Family Film" - with author Glenn Kurtz

How did three minutes of film shot in 1938 reunite
Holocaust survivors?

In the summer of 1938, David KURTZ, an American businessman on a
six-week European vacation with his wife and friends, made a home
movie that captured three minutes of life in his birthplace, the
Polish town of Nasielsk.

In 2009, his grandson, Glenn Kurtz stumbled across these old family
films in a closet in his parents' house in Florida, and was
especially taken by this one, shot more than 70 years earlier on
that vacation in Europe. The footage is a series of panoramic views
and seemingly unrelated scenes. It shows dozens of adults,
schoolchildren, the town synagogue, building facades, the interior
of a home, and what appears to be a restaurant. Residents respond
enthusiastically to the presence of the Americans and their camera,
vying to be part of the picture.

As Glenn Kurtz relates: "I realized it was 1938 and there are all of
these beautiful images of children and adults in this town, one year
before World War II begins. They're so happy to be filmed, they're so
excited to see these Americans coming to visit the town ... not knowing
what was coming."

Kurtz set out to restore the film and find the people in it. Three
Minutes in Poland traces his four-year journey to identify those in
these haunting images: a search that took him across the United States,
to Canada, England, Poland and Israel, to archives, film preservation
laboratories, and an abandoned Luftwaffe airfield.

Ultimately, he encountered seven living survivors >from this lost town,
including an eighty-six-year-old man who appears in the film as a
thirteen-year-old boy. The book - and the story behind it - is a
detective story, genealogical quest and memorial to the vanished
Jewish community of Nasielsk.

Glenn Kurtz is the author of "Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a
Lost World in a 1938 Family Film," which was selected as a "Best
Book of 2014" by The New Yorker, The Boston Globe, and National Public
Radio. The Wall Street Journal praised it as "captivating",and The
Los Angeles Times described Three Minutes in Poland as "breathtaking".

Glenn's first book, Practicing: A Musician's Return to Music was
hailed by the New York Times asa "thoughtful and fluid meditation"
and by Newsday as "the book of a lifetime."

Book sale and signing after the presentation. JGSLA members free.
Guests $5.00. More details and an excerpt >from the film at:
http://www.jgsla.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair
JGSLA
pweisberger@gmail.com


ViewMate translation request for KATC WAGNER, Lublin-Zamosc area #poland

Tamar Amit <ta.genealogy@...>
 

Dear siggers,

I would appreciate a transcription to English for the following
documents uploaded to Viewmate.

The families I'm specifically interested in are FRANKEL, WAGNER from
the Lublin-Zamosc area.

I'd appreciate any assistance with exact dates, names of parents,
spouses including maiden names, occupations, ages, where they came
from, if they were still alive at the time, other relatives etc.

They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

Marriage registration of FRAYND Ryfka Mincia & WAKSMAN Jos (one of the
mothers a WAGNER?), Hrubieszow 1853 (Polish)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41820

Birth registration of KATC Chaim-Srul, Zolkiewka 1889 (Cyrillic)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41900

Death registration of WAGNER Lejbus, Jozefow Nad Wisla 1852 (Polish)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41901

Death registration of WAGNER Hinda, Jozefow Nad Wisla 1867 (Polish)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41902

Death registration of WAGNER Chaim, Jozefow Nad Wisla 1849 (Polish)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41903

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,

Tamar Amit
ISRAEL
Researching: (FRENK)IEL, GEWIRCMAN, WAGNER, RAJSBAUM, BRONFENBRENER,
SZPILER,RACHMAN/ROJCHMAN all >from the Lublin-Zamosc area


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate translation request for KATC WAGNER, Lublin-Zamosc area #poland

Tamar Amit <ta.genealogy@...>
 

Dear siggers,

I would appreciate a transcription to English for the following
documents uploaded to Viewmate.

The families I'm specifically interested in are FRANKEL, WAGNER from
the Lublin-Zamosc area.

I'd appreciate any assistance with exact dates, names of parents,
spouses including maiden names, occupations, ages, where they came
from, if they were still alive at the time, other relatives etc.

They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

Marriage registration of FRAYND Ryfka Mincia & WAKSMAN Jos (one of the
mothers a WAGNER?), Hrubieszow 1853 (Polish)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41820

Birth registration of KATC Chaim-Srul, Zolkiewka 1889 (Cyrillic)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41900

Death registration of WAGNER Lejbus, Jozefow Nad Wisla 1852 (Polish)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41901

Death registration of WAGNER Hinda, Jozefow Nad Wisla 1867 (Polish)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41902

Death registration of WAGNER Chaim, Jozefow Nad Wisla 1849 (Polish)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41903

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,

Tamar Amit
ISRAEL
Researching: (FRENK)IEL, GEWIRCMAN, WAGNER, RAJSBAUM, BRONFENBRENER,
SZPILER,RACHMAN/ROJCHMAN all >from the Lublin-Zamosc area


JGSLA "Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a Lost World in a 1938 Film" with Glenn Kurtz - Tuesday, Sept. 8th in Los Angeles #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to our
next program:

Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 7:30PM

American Jewish University- Sperber Library
15600 Mulholland Dr. Los Angeles 90077

"Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a Lost World in a 1938 Family Film"
with author Glenn Kurtz

How did three minutes of film shot in 1938 reunite Holocaust survivors?

In the summer of 1938, David Kurtz, an American businessman on a
six-week European vacation with his wife and friends, made a home
movie that captured three minutes of life in his birthplace, the
Polish town of Nasielsk.

In 2009, his grandson, Glenn Kurtz stumbled across these old family
films in a closet in his parents' house in Florida, and was
especially taken by this one, shot more than 70 years earlier on
that vacation in Europe. The footage is a series of panoramic views
and seemingly unrelated scenes. It shows dozens of adults,
schoolchildren, the town synagogue, building facades, the interior of
a home, and what appears to be a restaurant.

Residents respond enthusiastically to the presence of the Americans
and their camera, vying to be part of the picture. As Glenn Kurtz
relates: "I realized it was 1938 and there are all of these beautiful
images of children and adults in this town, one year before World War
II begins. They"re so happy to be filmed, they're so excited to see
these Americans coming to visit the town..not knowing what was coming."

Kurtz set out to restore the film and find the people in it. Three
Minutes in Poland traces his four-year journey to identify those in
these haunting images: a search that took him across the United States,
to Canada, England, Poland and Israel, to archives, film preservation
laboratories, and an abandoned Luftwaffe airfield. Ultimately, he
encountered seven living survivors >from this lost town, including an
eighty-six-year-old man who appears in the film as a thirteen-year-old
boy. The book -- and the story behind it -- is a detective story,
genealogical quest and memorial to the vanished Jewish community of
Nasielsk.

Glenn Kurtz is the author of "Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a
Lost World in a 1938 Family Film," which was selected as a "Best
Book of 2014" by The New Yorker, The Boston Globe, and National Public
Radio. The Wall Street Journal praised it as "captivating," and The
Los Angeles Times described Three Minutes in Poland as "breathtakin."
Glenn's first book, Practicing: A Musician's Return to Music, was
hailed by the New York Times as "a thoughtful and fluid meditation,"
and by Newsday as "the book of a lifetime."

Book sale and signing after the presentation. JGSLA members free.
Guests $5.00. More details and an excerpt >from the film at:
http://www.jgsla.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair
JGSLA
pweisberger@gmail.com


JRI Poland #Poland JGSLA "Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a Lost World in a 1938 Film" with Glenn Kurtz - Tuesday, Sept. 8th in Los Angeles #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to our
next program:

Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 7:30PM

American Jewish University- Sperber Library
15600 Mulholland Dr. Los Angeles 90077

"Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a Lost World in a 1938 Family Film"
with author Glenn Kurtz

How did three minutes of film shot in 1938 reunite Holocaust survivors?

In the summer of 1938, David Kurtz, an American businessman on a
six-week European vacation with his wife and friends, made a home
movie that captured three minutes of life in his birthplace, the
Polish town of Nasielsk.

In 2009, his grandson, Glenn Kurtz stumbled across these old family
films in a closet in his parents' house in Florida, and was
especially taken by this one, shot more than 70 years earlier on
that vacation in Europe. The footage is a series of panoramic views
and seemingly unrelated scenes. It shows dozens of adults,
schoolchildren, the town synagogue, building facades, the interior of
a home, and what appears to be a restaurant.

Residents respond enthusiastically to the presence of the Americans
and their camera, vying to be part of the picture. As Glenn Kurtz
relates: "I realized it was 1938 and there are all of these beautiful
images of children and adults in this town, one year before World War
II begins. They"re so happy to be filmed, they're so excited to see
these Americans coming to visit the town..not knowing what was coming."

Kurtz set out to restore the film and find the people in it. Three
Minutes in Poland traces his four-year journey to identify those in
these haunting images: a search that took him across the United States,
to Canada, England, Poland and Israel, to archives, film preservation
laboratories, and an abandoned Luftwaffe airfield. Ultimately, he
encountered seven living survivors >from this lost town, including an
eighty-six-year-old man who appears in the film as a thirteen-year-old
boy. The book -- and the story behind it -- is a detective story,
genealogical quest and memorial to the vanished Jewish community of
Nasielsk.

Glenn Kurtz is the author of "Three Minutes in Poland: Discovering a
Lost World in a 1938 Family Film," which was selected as a "Best
Book of 2014" by The New Yorker, The Boston Globe, and National Public
Radio. The Wall Street Journal praised it as "captivating," and The
Los Angeles Times described Three Minutes in Poland as "breathtakin."
Glenn's first book, Practicing: A Musician's Return to Music, was
hailed by the New York Times as "a thoughtful and fluid meditation,"
and by Newsday as "the book of a lifetime."

Book sale and signing after the presentation. JGSLA members free.
Guests $5.00. More details and an excerpt >from the film at:
http://www.jgsla.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair
JGSLA
pweisberger@gmail.com


Military Archive / Info on Jews Who fell in WWI or the Balkan Wars #romania

Orit Lavi
 

Dear Friends

I am trying to find information on a Jewish soldier in the Romanian
army (Sergeant Major),
who fell in WWI or in the Balkan wars. I am interested in the family
status of this person.

Would you please let me know to which archive to apply.

Many thanks and a very happy new year!

Orit Lavi
Tsukey Yam, Israel


Romania SIG #Romania Military Archive / Info on Jews Who fell in WWI or the Balkan Wars #romania

Orit Lavi
 

Dear Friends

I am trying to find information on a Jewish soldier in the Romanian
army (Sergeant Major),
who fell in WWI or in the Balkan wars. I am interested in the family
status of this person.

Would you please let me know to which archive to apply.

Many thanks and a very happy new year!

Orit Lavi
Tsukey Yam, Israel


Seeking Sarah BOWMAN death certificate (NY) #general

The Becker's Email
 

Dear Genners,

My husband's ggm Sarah BOWMAN [originally BAUMAN] is buried in
Rochester, NY in Britton Road Cemetery. Her tombstone gives her
DOD as 4 April 1918.

I sent a request for the death certificate, along w/ a photo of the
tombstone, to the Monroe County Vital Records office. They were not
able to find a record of her death. I then hired a local researcher
who checked the NY State Archives microfiche for 1917-1919 for BOWMAN
or BAUMAN and couldn't find her.

I should note that many years ago I contacted the NY State
Archives for the death certificate before I knew the DOD, only an
approximate range. They sent me a death certificate for another Sarah
Bowman who died in 1919 who lived in another county and who was married.
The researcher I hired found this death certificate too. My husband's
ggm was a widow.

People have suggested that she might not have died in Rochester.
It doesn't seem reasonable that there would be a tombstone in Rochester
if she didn't die there and wasn't buried there. The NY State Archives
should have her if she died elsewhere in NY. [I did check italiangen
for the NYC area.]

She had three children >from her marriage and two older stepdaughters
from her husband's first marriage.
Her children:
Moses/Morris BOWMAN lived in Tyler Co. West Virginia [1910] and
Pittsburgh, Allegheny, PA [1920].
Leah LEVINE lived first in Manhattan then the Bronx [1910 and later].
Rose BLOOM lived in Rochester. (Rose was the youngest.) Rose
married Louis BLOOM in 1905.

Her stepdaughters:
Bessie SANDERS lived in Brooklyn [1910 and later.]
Ida GARFINKLE lived in Bradford, PA initially and then appears in
Brooklyn [1910]. (Ida is hard to trace.) She eventually moved to
Baltimore to a dtr.

I have done searches through both Ancestry and familysearch to see
if I could find Sarah elsewhere but no luck. I even tried just
filling in the DOD and no name and death in the US and no luck.

Sarah immigrated in 1905 and I've found her in the Rochester City
directories for some years, the last being 1913. I've also found
someone I believe is she on the 1910 census for Rochester but
nowhere on the 1915 census. According to my mother-in-law (b. 1915),
Sarah's gdtr, Sarah was very religious and didn't always live w/
her daughter Rose and family; yet my mother-in-law wrote that
Sarah came to Rochester and lived w/ daughter Rose BLOOM and
family until her death when my mother-in-law was about 2 years old.
Given how young my mother-in-law was, it's possible that her
information is wrong but the tombstone seems to verify her information.

At this point, I don't know what do do next. Any suggestions would be
greatly appreciated.

Johanna Becker
Newport, RI
USA

MODERATOR: Contact and/or family information directly to Johanna,
please. Suggestions for research resources and tools - which may be
of more general interest - may be shared with the Group.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Sarah BOWMAN death certificate (NY) #general

The Becker's Email
 

Dear Genners,

My husband's ggm Sarah BOWMAN [originally BAUMAN] is buried in
Rochester, NY in Britton Road Cemetery. Her tombstone gives her
DOD as 4 April 1918.

I sent a request for the death certificate, along w/ a photo of the
tombstone, to the Monroe County Vital Records office. They were not
able to find a record of her death. I then hired a local researcher
who checked the NY State Archives microfiche for 1917-1919 for BOWMAN
or BAUMAN and couldn't find her.

I should note that many years ago I contacted the NY State
Archives for the death certificate before I knew the DOD, only an
approximate range. They sent me a death certificate for another Sarah
Bowman who died in 1919 who lived in another county and who was married.
The researcher I hired found this death certificate too. My husband's
ggm was a widow.

People have suggested that she might not have died in Rochester.
It doesn't seem reasonable that there would be a tombstone in Rochester
if she didn't die there and wasn't buried there. The NY State Archives
should have her if she died elsewhere in NY. [I did check italiangen
for the NYC area.]

She had three children >from her marriage and two older stepdaughters
from her husband's first marriage.
Her children:
Moses/Morris BOWMAN lived in Tyler Co. West Virginia [1910] and
Pittsburgh, Allegheny, PA [1920].
Leah LEVINE lived first in Manhattan then the Bronx [1910 and later].
Rose BLOOM lived in Rochester. (Rose was the youngest.) Rose
married Louis BLOOM in 1905.

Her stepdaughters:
Bessie SANDERS lived in Brooklyn [1910 and later.]
Ida GARFINKLE lived in Bradford, PA initially and then appears in
Brooklyn [1910]. (Ida is hard to trace.) She eventually moved to
Baltimore to a dtr.

I have done searches through both Ancestry and familysearch to see
if I could find Sarah elsewhere but no luck. I even tried just
filling in the DOD and no name and death in the US and no luck.

Sarah immigrated in 1905 and I've found her in the Rochester City
directories for some years, the last being 1913. I've also found
someone I believe is she on the 1910 census for Rochester but
nowhere on the 1915 census. According to my mother-in-law (b. 1915),
Sarah's gdtr, Sarah was very religious and didn't always live w/
her daughter Rose and family; yet my mother-in-law wrote that
Sarah came to Rochester and lived w/ daughter Rose BLOOM and
family until her death when my mother-in-law was about 2 years old.
Given how young my mother-in-law was, it's possible that her
information is wrong but the tombstone seems to verify her information.

At this point, I don't know what do do next. Any suggestions would be
greatly appreciated.

Johanna Becker
Newport, RI
USA

MODERATOR: Contact and/or family information directly to Johanna,
please. Suggestions for research resources and tools - which may be
of more general interest - may be shared with the Group.


On-Line Class on Jewish Family History Research #general

Nancy Levin
 

Dear JewishGenners -

Some of you may remember me as Nancy Levin Arbeiter and >from the Jewish
Genealogy Beginner's Workshops that I gave at nine of the past IAJGS
annual conferences.

I am now scheduled to give a multi-session on-line class on Jewish
Family History research through the Virtual Institute for Genealogical
Research. It will be held on-line on four Thursday nights in October
and registration is now open.

For those who are interested in learning more about the class and how to
register, please see the following Internet page:

http://vigrgenealogy.com/2015/08/27/levin-open/

Wishing you all a Sweet and Happy New Year.

Thank you!

Nancy

Nancy C. Levin, CG (formerly Nancy Levin Arbeiter)
Natick, Massachusetts
NCLevin1@gmail.com

MODERATOR: This is the permitted one-time mention of a
commercial product or service which we think might be of
interest to Jewish genealogical researchers.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen On-Line Class on Jewish Family History Research #general

Nancy Levin
 

Dear JewishGenners -

Some of you may remember me as Nancy Levin Arbeiter and >from the Jewish
Genealogy Beginner's Workshops that I gave at nine of the past IAJGS
annual conferences.

I am now scheduled to give a multi-session on-line class on Jewish
Family History research through the Virtual Institute for Genealogical
Research. It will be held on-line on four Thursday nights in October
and registration is now open.

For those who are interested in learning more about the class and how to
register, please see the following Internet page:

http://vigrgenealogy.com/2015/08/27/levin-open/

Wishing you all a Sweet and Happy New Year.

Thank you!

Nancy

Nancy C. Levin, CG (formerly Nancy Levin Arbeiter)
Natick, Massachusetts
NCLevin1@gmail.com

MODERATOR: This is the permitted one-time mention of a
commercial product or service which we think might be of
interest to Jewish genealogical researchers.


Re: One family member sent to Canada, 1937 #general

Eva Lawrence
 

I know of a family who sent their 18-year-old eldest daughter to a boarding
school in England in 1938, where she later became a teaching assistant,
while her parents and younger brothers continued in their old home.

By 1937 the culture had changed and many European young women were
independent-minded and perfectly capable of holding down responsible jobs,
having had to do so in WWI, when their fathers and brothers were in the
army. In 1937 there would have been no question that a girl could also earn
money for her parent's passage, if that was indeed the reason for her
going.

There could have been other reasons, too. Perhaps at that stage
the family was not ready even to consider emigration, she may herself
have felt an urge to seek new horizons. In 1937 one could still feel that
antisemitism was just a phase and would abate.

Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: One family member sent to Canada, 1937 #general

Eva Lawrence
 

I know of a family who sent their 18-year-old eldest daughter to a boarding
school in England in 1938, where she later became a teaching assistant,
while her parents and younger brothers continued in their old home.

By 1937 the culture had changed and many European young women were
independent-minded and perfectly capable of holding down responsible jobs,
having had to do so in WWI, when their fathers and brothers were in the
army. In 1937 there would have been no question that a girl could also earn
money for her parent's passage, if that was indeed the reason for her
going.

There could have been other reasons, too. Perhaps at that stage
the family was not ready even to consider emigration, she may herself
have felt an urge to seek new horizons. In 1937 one could still feel that
antisemitism was just a phase and would abate.

Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Re: One family member sent to Canada, 1937 #general

Elisabeth Wellington
 

I have no idea if this will be of any help to you or not, but it looks
like Halifax has a page for archives and I saw on the left side a
reference to genealogy. http://novascotia.ca/archives/

Maybe try that and see if you can get access to any of those
documents. You may have to reach out to them via email and explain
what you are looking for.

I had a situation last week where I found the grave of a family member
who died in Canada (still not sure how he got there) but I wanted to
know what he died from. I found the county information >from where he
died and contacted them and they not only transcribed the information
into an email for me, but they gave me copies of the microfilm
explaining what he died from. they were very helpful!

Elisabeth Wellington
Cedar Rapids, Iowa

On Sun, Aug 30, 2015 at 9:27 PM, Barbara Lynn Weintraub blwgen@q.com
<jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

I recently found the family of one of my grandmother's sisters.
Cerla Marja KAC, born 1896, who married Herszek MANDEL. They had 4
children in the years 1913 to 1924. It appears there was a break in
childbearing for World War I. ... I found an outgoing manifest
from Liverpool to Halifax, Canada with the correct name and age
of their oldest child, a daughter named Hinda. It is dated 1937,
so she would have been 24 years old. ...

I've had difficulties doing research in neighboring Canada (!)
and could use some help. I imagine she would either look up
relatives or seek out a synagogue for assistance. ...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: One family member sent to Canada, 1937 #general

Elisabeth Wellington
 

I have no idea if this will be of any help to you or not, but it looks
like Halifax has a page for archives and I saw on the left side a
reference to genealogy. http://novascotia.ca/archives/

Maybe try that and see if you can get access to any of those
documents. You may have to reach out to them via email and explain
what you are looking for.

I had a situation last week where I found the grave of a family member
who died in Canada (still not sure how he got there) but I wanted to
know what he died from. I found the county information >from where he
died and contacted them and they not only transcribed the information
into an email for me, but they gave me copies of the microfilm
explaining what he died from. they were very helpful!

Elisabeth Wellington
Cedar Rapids, Iowa

On Sun, Aug 30, 2015 at 9:27 PM, Barbara Lynn Weintraub blwgen@q.com
<jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

I recently found the family of one of my grandmother's sisters.
Cerla Marja KAC, born 1896, who married Herszek MANDEL. They had 4
children in the years 1913 to 1924. It appears there was a break in
childbearing for World War I. ... I found an outgoing manifest
from Liverpool to Halifax, Canada with the correct name and age
of their oldest child, a daughter named Hinda. It is dated 1937,
so she would have been 24 years old. ...

I've had difficulties doing research in neighboring Canada (!)
and could use some help. I imagine she would either look up
relatives or seek out a synagogue for assistance. ...


Re: Naming of child when mother dies in childbirth #general

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

In Bischofsheim (now part of Mainz, Germany) my great-grandmother died in
1875 giving birth to a baby girl who was given the same name as her
mother. In this case the baby survived.

Arline Sachs
Lorton, VA

researching Mainz and Frankfurt areas


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming of child when mother dies in childbirth #general

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

In Bischofsheim (now part of Mainz, Germany) my great-grandmother died in
1875 giving birth to a baby girl who was given the same name as her
mother. In this case the baby survived.

Arline Sachs
Lorton, VA

researching Mainz and Frankfurt areas

87321 - 87340 of 660677