Date   
JRI-Poland adds more Warszawa Data to the Database #warsaw #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland recently added 11,250 more Warszawa records
to the JRI-Poland database.

Updates were made to the following projects:

1) Additional extracts for the Warszawa LDS Jewish data covering the
1826-1865 time period (Fond 180)

2) Additional extracts for the Warszawa Jewish records >from Fond 200
covering the 1864-1914 time period.

3) Added image links >from the Polish State Archives National Digital
Archives for Fond 200 data that was previously added to the JRI-Poland
database during earlier phases of the project.

With these new additions, the JRI-Poland database now has 155,678 vital
records for the city of Warszawa.

Our Warszawa Database team continues to work hard on adding more extract
data >from Fond 200, adding image links when available for data on the
database, finally completing the extracts >from the LDS files and extracting
the Pre-1826 data for the predominately Jewish districts >from the patronymic
files and adding image links for that data.


Happy Chanukah to all!

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Warszawa Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland

Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland JRI-Poland adds more Warszawa Data to the Database #warsaw #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland recently added 11,250 more Warszawa records
to the JRI-Poland database.

Updates were made to the following projects:

1) Additional extracts for the Warszawa LDS Jewish data covering the
1826-1865 time period (Fond 180)

2) Additional extracts for the Warszawa Jewish records >from Fond 200
covering the 1864-1914 time period.

3) Added image links >from the Polish State Archives National Digital
Archives for Fond 200 data that was previously added to the JRI-Poland
database during earlier phases of the project.

With these new additions, the JRI-Poland database now has 155,678 vital
records for the city of Warszawa.

Our Warszawa Database team continues to work hard on adding more extract
data >from Fond 200, adding image links when available for data on the
database, finally completing the extracts >from the LDS files and extracting
the Pre-1826 data for the predominately Jewish districts >from the patronymic
files and adding image links for that data.


Happy Chanukah to all!

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Warszawa Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland

JGS of Greater Orlando Presents: "Skeletons in Our Closets: Researching a Family Scandal," on Tuesday, January 19, 2016 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando will present:
"Skeletons in Our Closets: Researching a Family Scandal," at the
Roth Jewish Community Center, 851 Maitland Avenue, Maitland, Florida
on Tuesday, January 19, 2016 at 7:00 p.m.

After investigating rumors of an old family scandal that took place
during the "Roaring Twenties" in Chicago, Robin B. Seidenberg
uncovered a sensational story that made newspaper headlines across
the entire nation. She will reveal an intriguing tale of wealth,
romance, betrayal, jealousy, and murder.

Discover the identity of the "Kissing Blond," and learn how Robin
researched historical newspapers to unravel this family mystery.

Using many examples >from her own family, Robin will teach how to
unlock your family's secrets using historical newspapers.
Historical newspapers are a phenomenal resource for uncovering
family information that cannot be located any other way. Unlike
censuses and other official records, they have neither time nor
privacy restrictions.

One of the challenges in genealogy is how to find and report the
facts and give an accurate picture of our ancestors and yet
respect the sensitivities of family members. Robin's presentation
will help you decide:
- whether to disclose all findings- or let "sleeping dogs lie."
- how to decide what to include and what to omit

Robin B. Seidenberg serves as co-president of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Illinois, is a member of the Genealogical
Speakers' Guild, and the Association of Professional Genealogists.
She specializes in using historical newspapers to research family
history. Robin frequently lectures about "family skeletons."

Prior to the program, beginning at 6:30 p.m., there will be time to
network and receive free assistance or mentoring >from a genealogy
expert.

Date: Tuesday, January 19, 2016
Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Location: Roth Jewish Community Center, 851 Maitland Avenue,
Maitland, FL 32751

For more information
contact: Lin Herz
lin2@..., jgsgo.info@..., or call JGSGO Voicemail
407-494-4230

Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Greater Orlando Presents: "Skeletons in Our Closets: Researching a Family Scandal," on Tuesday, January 19, 2016 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando will present:
"Skeletons in Our Closets: Researching a Family Scandal," at the
Roth Jewish Community Center, 851 Maitland Avenue, Maitland, Florida
on Tuesday, January 19, 2016 at 7:00 p.m.

After investigating rumors of an old family scandal that took place
during the "Roaring Twenties" in Chicago, Robin B. Seidenberg
uncovered a sensational story that made newspaper headlines across
the entire nation. She will reveal an intriguing tale of wealth,
romance, betrayal, jealousy, and murder.

Discover the identity of the "Kissing Blond," and learn how Robin
researched historical newspapers to unravel this family mystery.

Using many examples >from her own family, Robin will teach how to
unlock your family's secrets using historical newspapers.
Historical newspapers are a phenomenal resource for uncovering
family information that cannot be located any other way. Unlike
censuses and other official records, they have neither time nor
privacy restrictions.

One of the challenges in genealogy is how to find and report the
facts and give an accurate picture of our ancestors and yet
respect the sensitivities of family members. Robin's presentation
will help you decide:
- whether to disclose all findings- or let "sleeping dogs lie."
- how to decide what to include and what to omit

Robin B. Seidenberg serves as co-president of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Illinois, is a member of the Genealogical
Speakers' Guild, and the Association of Professional Genealogists.
She specializes in using historical newspapers to research family
history. Robin frequently lectures about "family skeletons."

Prior to the program, beginning at 6:30 p.m., there will be time to
network and receive free assistance or mentoring >from a genealogy
expert.

Date: Tuesday, January 19, 2016
Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Location: Roth Jewish Community Center, 851 Maitland Avenue,
Maitland, FL 32751

For more information
contact: Lin Herz
lin2@..., jgsgo.info@..., or call JGSGO Voicemail
407-494-4230

Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz

Upcoming Jewish Genealogy Event at the Center for Jewish History in New York #general

Moriah Amit
 

Family History Today: Events at the Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street (btw. 5th and 6th Aves.) New York, NY 10011
2015 Final Event:
Monday, December 14, 6:30pm
Jewish Populations in Europe, 1750 - 1950: Maps for Your Research
Lecture presented by Sandy Crystall
Free and open to the public. For more information and to reserve
your spot, please visit http://www.cjh.org/event/2744 .

Moriah Amit
New York, NY

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Upcoming Jewish Genealogy Event at the Center for Jewish History in New York #general

Moriah Amit
 

Family History Today: Events at the Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street (btw. 5th and 6th Aves.) New York, NY 10011
2015 Final Event:
Monday, December 14, 6:30pm
Jewish Populations in Europe, 1750 - 1950: Maps for Your Research
Lecture presented by Sandy Crystall
Free and open to the public. For more information and to reserve
your spot, please visit http://www.cjh.org/event/2744 .

Moriah Amit
New York, NY

Re: Jewish shop in Paris #france

Ben Forman
 

Thanks Rick

This is an excellent idea !

I will contact BHPT for assistance.

Ben

On Tue, Dec 8, 2015 at 1:43 PM, Peter Richard Pinard
<pinardpr@...> <frenchsig@...> wrote:
Dear SIG,

Ben Foreman wrote in with a question about the location for a Jewish
clothing store"opposite the Moulin Rouge"some time in the "early 1900s."

Conceivably,"opposite the Moulin Rouge" would most likely mean the
addresses between 67 and 75 Boulevard de Clichy and about half a dozen
buildings on the Place Blanche. Looking on Google Streetview, the
buildings of this area look as though they have been there for at least
100 years. So, presumably it is one of those buildings/addresses.

Starting in 1890, the Parisian telephone directories ("Annuaire officiel
des abonnes au telephone") were published in annual editions that are
alphabetical by name, but also in a version with listings by streets
(rues) and professions.

I own an edition of the latter for 1939, but did not find Furman at any
of the above addresses or under the professions "vetements"or"bonneterie.
"
Of course, the book may be too new to cover the period that Woolf Furman
was in Paris.

Furthermore, unlike today, telephony was a very expensive proposition in
the first half of the 20th century. Only wealthy people and prosperous
businesses could afford a connection. If it was a small shop, it might
not have had a phone.

Nevertheless, it is possible to look at a specific street address and see
who had a telephone precisely in that house. If Ben can narrow the scope
of the time period in question and then get his hands on the relevant
"Annuaires officiel des abonnes au telephone" (professions, rues) then
he could have a chance of determining the address as well.

I know they have many of the books at the Bibliotheque Nationale de
France and at the Bibliotheque Historique des Postes et Telecommunication=
s
(www.bhpt.org).

Bonne chance!

Rick Pinard
Prague, Czech Republic
POLLAK, Paris (21 Rue Colonel Moll); BURG, Cancon, Lot et Garonne;
SONNENSCHEIN, Lot et Garonne

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Watch JewishGen=E2=80=99s video =E2=80=93 click here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DnASSn4rDXh4
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~=
~
For help in using JewishGen services visit the JewishGen Support Center a=
t
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Support.htm
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sign up now for value-added services!
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~=
~~~~~~~~

"Has JewishGen helped you connect with your family? We want to hear
your story! Please email us at info@... today."
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
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To post messages to the FrenchSIG List: <frenchsig@...>

o FrenchSIG: JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/French
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French SIG #France Re: Jewish shop in Paris #france

Ben Forman
 

Thanks Rick

This is an excellent idea !

I will contact BHPT for assistance.

Ben

On Tue, Dec 8, 2015 at 1:43 PM, Peter Richard Pinard
<pinardpr@...> <frenchsig@...> wrote:
Dear SIG,

Ben Foreman wrote in with a question about the location for a Jewish
clothing store"opposite the Moulin Rouge"some time in the "early 1900s."

Conceivably,"opposite the Moulin Rouge" would most likely mean the
addresses between 67 and 75 Boulevard de Clichy and about half a dozen
buildings on the Place Blanche. Looking on Google Streetview, the
buildings of this area look as though they have been there for at least
100 years. So, presumably it is one of those buildings/addresses.

Starting in 1890, the Parisian telephone directories ("Annuaire officiel
des abonnes au telephone") were published in annual editions that are
alphabetical by name, but also in a version with listings by streets
(rues) and professions.

I own an edition of the latter for 1939, but did not find Furman at any
of the above addresses or under the professions "vetements"or"bonneterie.
"
Of course, the book may be too new to cover the period that Woolf Furman
was in Paris.

Furthermore, unlike today, telephony was a very expensive proposition in
the first half of the 20th century. Only wealthy people and prosperous
businesses could afford a connection. If it was a small shop, it might
not have had a phone.

Nevertheless, it is possible to look at a specific street address and see
who had a telephone precisely in that house. If Ben can narrow the scope
of the time period in question and then get his hands on the relevant
"Annuaires officiel des abonnes au telephone" (professions, rues) then
he could have a chance of determining the address as well.

I know they have many of the books at the Bibliotheque Nationale de
France and at the Bibliotheque Historique des Postes et Telecommunication=
s
(www.bhpt.org).

Bonne chance!

Rick Pinard
Prague, Czech Republic
POLLAK, Paris (21 Rue Colonel Moll); BURG, Cancon, Lot et Garonne;
SONNENSCHEIN, Lot et Garonne

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Watch JewishGen=E2=80=99s video =E2=80=93 click here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DnASSn4rDXh4
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~=
~
For help in using JewishGen services visit the JewishGen Support Center a=
t
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Support.htm
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sign up now for value-added services!
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~=
~~~~~~~~

"Has JewishGen helped you connect with your family? We want to hear
your story! Please email us at info@... today."
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
--
To post messages to the FrenchSIG List: <frenchsig@...>

o FrenchSIG: JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/French
o Search the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF)
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/
o Search the Family Tree of the Jewish People (FTJP)
http://www.jewishgen.org/gedcom/
o Search previous archived messages at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop
o This list is supported by JewishGen.
Become a contributor at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/
o This message may contain pointers to outside resources.
No endorsement is implied by their presence here.
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r

Seek WEIL / WILE and KAHN - Birkenfeld & Gonnesweiler to Kentucky, USA circa 1850 #usa

mygins@...
 

Hello Fellow Researchers,

I am researching the families of my great great- grandparents, John
WEIL (WILE) and Fanny KAHN, both >from Germany who immigrated to the
United States in the 1840's-1850's.
Specifically, I am interested in discovering their parents and the
broader relationship between the WEIL (WILE) family and the KAHN family.

from U.S. census records I have been able to determine that John WEIL
(age 18) was living in Hopkins, Kentucky in 1850 with Isaac WEIL or WILE
( age 26), presumably his older brother.

On 14 Aug. 1856, John married Fanny KAHN in Sumner, Tennessee.
The month before, on 15 July, 1856, Caroline WILE, (b. 1832 in
*** Hoppstadten, Birkenfeld, ***) married Joseph KAHN, (b. 1817
in *** Gonnesweiler, *** Germany), in Bowling Green Kentucky.

These two WEIL/KAHN families, and the family of S.L. (Solomon or
Samuel) KAHN (1860 census, Bowling Green, KY) continued to live next
door to each other for decades, even after moving >from Kentucky to
Evansville, Indiana, (1870 census) The close relationship between these
three families may lead me to the parents of Fanny KAHN and John WEIL.
I have not been able to find the parents of John WEIL or the parents of
Fanny KAHN in Germany.

I have no firm evidence of the relationship between the two WILE/KAHN
families (e.g. is John WEIL related to Caroline WILE, or is Fanny KAHN
related to Joseph KAHN?) I also do not know their relationship to the
family of S.L. Kahn. I am in possession of a family tree (of unknown
origin) that has Fanny KAHN, my great great-grandmother, as the sister
of Flora KAHN, one of the daughters of S.L. KAHN, but I have no
evidence to substantiate that entry.

Some of what I know is: Fanny KAHN, parents unknown, was b. 17 March
1836 in ***Oldenburg, Germany, *** immigrated to U.S. in 1848, married
John WEIL, 14 Aug. 1856 in Sumner, TN, died October, 1902,
in Huntsville, Alabama.

John WEIL (or WILE), born 25 March, 1831, Oldenburg, died 9 May
1906. Fanny and John lived for many years in Bowling Green, Kentucky.

Flora KAHN, (youngest child of S.L. (Saloman/Samuel?) KAHN and
Adeline BORG), b. 3 Jul 1853 in Bowling Green, KY, married Daniel
SCHIFFMAN ca. 1880, died 7 Dec., 1922, in Huntsville, Alabama. Flora's
parents and their first three sons were born in *Oldenburg: Joseph L.
ca. 1839, Isaac ca. 1843, Moses ca. 1845. Like Flora, their next son,
Leopold, b. ca 1851, was born in Kentucky. (1860 Census)( (*NOTE: 1870
Census specifies place of German births as Hesse-Darmstadt /
Hessen-Darmstadt).

I have an 1850 immigration record >from the book: [BOOK CITE]

MOERSDORF, ROBERT. Die Auswanderung aus dem Birkenfelder Land, p. 126

for a Salomon KAHN and Frau BORG with their
FIVE children, but in the 1860 U.S. Census only three of their five
children listed were born in Germany. Leopold and Flora were born in
Ky Who were the other two children who immigrated with Salomon and
Adeline? I can't find any ship manifest to determine that.

The only evidence I have of when my G Ggrandmother, Fanny KAHN WEIL
arrived is the 1900 census, 50 years after the fact. It says she
immigrated in 1848, but could she have arrived in 1850 with Salomon
KAHN? I cannot find any other immigration or passenger information for
her or anyone she traveled with. Could she be the oldest daughter of
S.L. KAHN and Adeline BORG, who doesn't show up with them in the 1860
U.S. census because she was already married to John WEIL?

John and Fanny eventually had 13 children: Emma, Charles, Carrie, Rena,
Edward, Lillie, Delia, Harry, Mollye, Nettie, Rona, Samuel Lee and
Mortimer Lee. *** Harry WEIL was my great grandfather. ***

Joseph KAHN and Caroline Weil KAHN eventually had 9 children, and five
of them share names with John and Fanny's family: Fanny, Edward,
Harry, Lee and Rhona.

Note: These families also married into the Rothschild family in the
U.S. during the 1850's.

My apology for the length of this message but I thought maybe
it would help in finding the next generation back on my family tree.
Thank you for your patience in wading through it.

Marilyn Ginsburg, Toronto Canada mygins@...
=

Early American SIG #USA Seek WEIL / WILE and KAHN - Birkenfeld & Gonnesweiler to Kentucky, USA circa 1850 #usa

mygins@...
 

Hello Fellow Researchers,

I am researching the families of my great great- grandparents, John
WEIL (WILE) and Fanny KAHN, both >from Germany who immigrated to the
United States in the 1840's-1850's.
Specifically, I am interested in discovering their parents and the
broader relationship between the WEIL (WILE) family and the KAHN family.

from U.S. census records I have been able to determine that John WEIL
(age 18) was living in Hopkins, Kentucky in 1850 with Isaac WEIL or WILE
( age 26), presumably his older brother.

On 14 Aug. 1856, John married Fanny KAHN in Sumner, Tennessee.
The month before, on 15 July, 1856, Caroline WILE, (b. 1832 in
*** Hoppstadten, Birkenfeld, ***) married Joseph KAHN, (b. 1817
in *** Gonnesweiler, *** Germany), in Bowling Green Kentucky.

These two WEIL/KAHN families, and the family of S.L. (Solomon or
Samuel) KAHN (1860 census, Bowling Green, KY) continued to live next
door to each other for decades, even after moving >from Kentucky to
Evansville, Indiana, (1870 census) The close relationship between these
three families may lead me to the parents of Fanny KAHN and John WEIL.
I have not been able to find the parents of John WEIL or the parents of
Fanny KAHN in Germany.

I have no firm evidence of the relationship between the two WILE/KAHN
families (e.g. is John WEIL related to Caroline WILE, or is Fanny KAHN
related to Joseph KAHN?) I also do not know their relationship to the
family of S.L. Kahn. I am in possession of a family tree (of unknown
origin) that has Fanny KAHN, my great great-grandmother, as the sister
of Flora KAHN, one of the daughters of S.L. KAHN, but I have no
evidence to substantiate that entry.

Some of what I know is: Fanny KAHN, parents unknown, was b. 17 March
1836 in ***Oldenburg, Germany, *** immigrated to U.S. in 1848, married
John WEIL, 14 Aug. 1856 in Sumner, TN, died October, 1902,
in Huntsville, Alabama.

John WEIL (or WILE), born 25 March, 1831, Oldenburg, died 9 May
1906. Fanny and John lived for many years in Bowling Green, Kentucky.

Flora KAHN, (youngest child of S.L. (Saloman/Samuel?) KAHN and
Adeline BORG), b. 3 Jul 1853 in Bowling Green, KY, married Daniel
SCHIFFMAN ca. 1880, died 7 Dec., 1922, in Huntsville, Alabama. Flora's
parents and their first three sons were born in *Oldenburg: Joseph L.
ca. 1839, Isaac ca. 1843, Moses ca. 1845. Like Flora, their next son,
Leopold, b. ca 1851, was born in Kentucky. (1860 Census)( (*NOTE: 1870
Census specifies place of German births as Hesse-Darmstadt /
Hessen-Darmstadt).

I have an 1850 immigration record >from the book: [BOOK CITE]

MOERSDORF, ROBERT. Die Auswanderung aus dem Birkenfelder Land, p. 126

for a Salomon KAHN and Frau BORG with their
FIVE children, but in the 1860 U.S. Census only three of their five
children listed were born in Germany. Leopold and Flora were born in
Ky Who were the other two children who immigrated with Salomon and
Adeline? I can't find any ship manifest to determine that.

The only evidence I have of when my G Ggrandmother, Fanny KAHN WEIL
arrived is the 1900 census, 50 years after the fact. It says she
immigrated in 1848, but could she have arrived in 1850 with Salomon
KAHN? I cannot find any other immigration or passenger information for
her or anyone she traveled with. Could she be the oldest daughter of
S.L. KAHN and Adeline BORG, who doesn't show up with them in the 1860
U.S. census because she was already married to John WEIL?

John and Fanny eventually had 13 children: Emma, Charles, Carrie, Rena,
Edward, Lillie, Delia, Harry, Mollye, Nettie, Rona, Samuel Lee and
Mortimer Lee. *** Harry WEIL was my great grandfather. ***

Joseph KAHN and Caroline Weil KAHN eventually had 9 children, and five
of them share names with John and Fanny's family: Fanny, Edward,
Harry, Lee and Rhona.

Note: These families also married into the Rothschild family in the
U.S. during the 1850's.

My apology for the length of this message but I thought maybe
it would help in finding the next generation back on my family tree.
Thank you for your patience in wading through it.

Marilyn Ginsburg, Toronto Canada mygins@...
=

Re: Abbreviations #germany

Barbara Mannlein
 

It would help us to help you if we knew in what context these
abbreviations were used. [MODERATOR NOTE: Yes, always]

CV usually refers to Curriculum Vitae (resume). Don't know if
it was used in Europe at that time period.

Barbara Mannlein, Tucson, AZ

German SIG #Germany Re: Abbreviations #germany

Barbara Mannlein
 

It would help us to help you if we knew in what context these
abbreviations were used. [MODERATOR NOTE: Yes, always]

CV usually refers to Curriculum Vitae (resume). Don't know if
it was used in Europe at that time period.

Barbara Mannlein, Tucson, AZ

Re: Abbreviations [Germany 1920-30s] #germany

Roger Lustig
 

CV: Centralverein der Juden in Deutschland--the politically
conservative, nationalistic, anti-Zionist national association of Jews
and Jewish communities.

RjF: Reichsverband juedischer Frontsoldaten--the Jewish Combat Veterans
Association, formed after WW I to counter slanders that claimed that
Jews had avoided service and profiteered.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 12/9/2015 Miriam Harel 3mharel@... wrote:
Does anyone know what the following abbreviations during the 1930s stand for?
1) C. V. 2)R.j.F.s

German SIG #Germany Re: Abbreviations [Germany 1920-30s] #germany

Roger Lustig
 

CV: Centralverein der Juden in Deutschland--the politically
conservative, nationalistic, anti-Zionist national association of Jews
and Jewish communities.

RjF: Reichsverband juedischer Frontsoldaten--the Jewish Combat Veterans
Association, formed after WW I to counter slanders that claimed that
Jews had avoided service and profiteered.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 12/9/2015 Miriam Harel 3mharel@... wrote:
Does anyone know what the following abbreviations during the 1930s stand for?
1) C. V. 2)R.j.F.s

More About Retirement of Family Tree Maker #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Dear JewishGen Discussion Group Subscribers:

I am writing again about the surprising announcement by Ancestry regarding
their intention to retire Family Tree Maker.

First, do not panic!

While Ancestry is not going to sell the product past December 31, 2015 they
will continue to support the product for current users -those who purchased
the product by December 31, 2015 -through at least December 31, 2016-more
than a year away. Even after the December 31, 2016 date you may still use
your Family Tree Maker, you just won't get any support >from Ancestry if you
need it. That gives all of us time to make reasoned decisions on what we
want to do.
1. Place our trees on a website-such as Ancestry or another genealogy
website-there are many
2. Review the different type of genealogy products that are available for
desktop computers for those of us who plan to continue to use a desk top
operation.

FTM is but one of a myriad of desktop genealogy programs. Below are listed
but a few- it is not a comprehensive list and I am not endorsing or
recommending any in particular. These are in alpha order and those which are
for MACs state that.I don't know if Legacy supports MACs. This is not an
invitation to start a string on which is your favorite desktop software but
only to show that there are other genealogy softwares that you can start to
look at during the one year we have to make our individual decisions on what
to use to replace Family Tree Maker.

Dorotree http://www.dorotree.com/index.html
(does not support MACs, available in 5 languages)
Heredis for MAC http://www.heredis.com/en/heredis-2015-for-mac/
Legacy Family Tree 8.0 http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/ (has
international versions)
MacFamily Tree http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/8018/macfamilytree
Reunion Genealogy Software for Mac's (Version 11)
http://www.leisterpro.com/
RootsMagic 7.0 http://rootsmagic.com/

The Ancestry blog is where to express your feelings not JewishGen. In my
initial posting I gave a link to read their announcement which is also their
blog:
http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2015/12/08/ancestry-to-retire-family-tree-maker-software/
[or http://tinyurl.com/ztq3fzo --Mod.]

On 10 December Ancestry posted another response to the thousands of comments
on their blog by users. One of the most important things said in the new
blog entry is that Ancestry is exploring possible relationships with other
desktop software solutions that would make it possible for their products to
integrate with Ancestry. Other of your concerns are also addressed and I
encourage you to read this at: http://tinyurl.com/z4ezkp2
Original url:
http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2015/12/09/more-information-on-family-tree-maker-desktop-software/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ancestry+%28Ancestry.com+blog%29

I have no interest in any of the genealogy softwares mentioned above. It is
a personal decision for everyone as to what software is best for them. I
like you, will use the year to make those decisions as to what to do. The
JewishGen Discussion list is not the place to discuss this unexpected turn
of events nor is it the venue to discuss your favorite genealogy software.
The most important thing to remember is not to panic!

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR NOTE: Extended discussion of applications of computers in
genealogy is beyond the scope of this group. This message is posted for
informational purposes only. Please do not reply to the group.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More About Retirement of Family Tree Maker #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Dear JewishGen Discussion Group Subscribers:

I am writing again about the surprising announcement by Ancestry regarding
their intention to retire Family Tree Maker.

First, do not panic!

While Ancestry is not going to sell the product past December 31, 2015 they
will continue to support the product for current users -those who purchased
the product by December 31, 2015 -through at least December 31, 2016-more
than a year away. Even after the December 31, 2016 date you may still use
your Family Tree Maker, you just won't get any support >from Ancestry if you
need it. That gives all of us time to make reasoned decisions on what we
want to do.
1. Place our trees on a website-such as Ancestry or another genealogy
website-there are many
2. Review the different type of genealogy products that are available for
desktop computers for those of us who plan to continue to use a desk top
operation.

FTM is but one of a myriad of desktop genealogy programs. Below are listed
but a few- it is not a comprehensive list and I am not endorsing or
recommending any in particular. These are in alpha order and those which are
for MACs state that.I don't know if Legacy supports MACs. This is not an
invitation to start a string on which is your favorite desktop software but
only to show that there are other genealogy softwares that you can start to
look at during the one year we have to make our individual decisions on what
to use to replace Family Tree Maker.

Dorotree http://www.dorotree.com/index.html
(does not support MACs, available in 5 languages)
Heredis for MAC http://www.heredis.com/en/heredis-2015-for-mac/
Legacy Family Tree 8.0 http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/ (has
international versions)
MacFamily Tree http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/8018/macfamilytree
Reunion Genealogy Software for Mac's (Version 11)
http://www.leisterpro.com/
RootsMagic 7.0 http://rootsmagic.com/

The Ancestry blog is where to express your feelings not JewishGen. In my
initial posting I gave a link to read their announcement which is also their
blog:
http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2015/12/08/ancestry-to-retire-family-tree-maker-software/
[or http://tinyurl.com/ztq3fzo --Mod.]

On 10 December Ancestry posted another response to the thousands of comments
on their blog by users. One of the most important things said in the new
blog entry is that Ancestry is exploring possible relationships with other
desktop software solutions that would make it possible for their products to
integrate with Ancestry. Other of your concerns are also addressed and I
encourage you to read this at: http://tinyurl.com/z4ezkp2
Original url:
http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2015/12/09/more-information-on-family-tree-maker-desktop-software/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ancestry+%28Ancestry.com+blog%29

I have no interest in any of the genealogy softwares mentioned above. It is
a personal decision for everyone as to what software is best for them. I
like you, will use the year to make those decisions as to what to do. The
JewishGen Discussion list is not the place to discuss this unexpected turn
of events nor is it the venue to discuss your favorite genealogy software.
The most important thing to remember is not to panic!

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR NOTE: Extended discussion of applications of computers in
genealogy is beyond the scope of this group. This message is posted for
informational purposes only. Please do not reply to the group.

Odessa, Ukraine on site research advice, please #general

mike yesnes
 

If you are going to Odessa/Vinnytsia/Kiev in Ukraine in the near
future and are familiar in how to look for vital records such as
birth/marriage records for Hebrew/Russian person{s},I would appreciate
in hearing >from you.Thank you.

Sincerely,

Mike Yesnes

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Odessa, Ukraine on site research advice, please #general

mike yesnes
 

If you are going to Odessa/Vinnytsia/Kiev in Ukraine in the near
future and are familiar in how to look for vital records such as
birth/marriage records for Hebrew/Russian person{s},I would appreciate
in hearing >from you.Thank you.

Sincerely,

Mike Yesnes

Re: Polish record translation template? #general

Paul A. Auerbach
 

While not as comprehensive as what David is envisioning, here are a few
online resources I've used to do at least rudimentary translations of
Polish records:

- FamilySearch's "Poland Genealogical Word List":
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Poland_Genealogical_Word_List

- JewishGen's Polish-English occupations translations for the 19th
century < http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/PolishOccs.htm > and the 20th
century < http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/PolishBusDirOccs.htm >.

- Sample pages posted by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois
from Judith Frazin's "Translation Guide to 19th Century Polish Language
Civil Registration Documents": http://jgsi.org/Polish_translation_guide

While Ms. Frazin's book looks like an excellent resource, I have no
financial interest in it and am not promoting it.

Paul Auerbach
Sharon, MA

On 12/9/2015, David Dubin wrote:
Since the website contains millions of Polish records all in the same
Napoleonic format, it would be great if there was a place to see a
word-by-word translation into English, indicating the words used in
the fixed format and variable fields for names, dates, places, etc.
A separate template would be needed for births, marriages and deaths
(maybe divorces, maybe separate sets for pre- and post-1826).
Even better would be a translation with drop-down menus for things
like (Polish or Russian) months and numbers, so that anyone could
conveniently compare the template with the record being translated.
Does this already exist on the web, or could someone please volunteer?

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Polish record translation template? #general

Paul A. Auerbach
 

While not as comprehensive as what David is envisioning, here are a few
online resources I've used to do at least rudimentary translations of
Polish records:

- FamilySearch's "Poland Genealogical Word List":
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Poland_Genealogical_Word_List

- JewishGen's Polish-English occupations translations for the 19th
century < http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/PolishOccs.htm > and the 20th
century < http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/PolishBusDirOccs.htm >.

- Sample pages posted by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois
from Judith Frazin's "Translation Guide to 19th Century Polish Language
Civil Registration Documents": http://jgsi.org/Polish_translation_guide

While Ms. Frazin's book looks like an excellent resource, I have no
financial interest in it and am not promoting it.

Paul Auerbach
Sharon, MA

On 12/9/2015, David Dubin wrote:
Since the website contains millions of Polish records all in the same
Napoleonic format, it would be great if there was a place to see a
word-by-word translation into English, indicating the words used in
the fixed format and variable fields for names, dates, places, etc.
A separate template would be needed for births, marriages and deaths
(maybe divorces, maybe separate sets for pre- and post-1826).
Even better would be a translation with drop-down menus for things
like (Polish or Russian) months and numbers, so that anyone could
conveniently compare the template with the record being translated.
Does this already exist on the web, or could someone please volunteer?