Date   

Re: REGISTER OF ALL PERSONS SAVED FROM ANTIJEWISH PERSECUTION IN-SLOVAKIa #hungary

Israel Holdengraeber <bpih@...>
 

As long as the content of the volumes isn't final (will they ever be?), it's
useless to purchase.

However it does make sense to transfer them to Data Bases and keep them
updated there. Only this way such things can be kept up-todate
(continuously updated) and perhaps cheaper than printing huge volumes
periodically for distribution.

Then printing volumes can be an additional option for "hard-copy".

Perhaps these volumes (like many other things) are produced and distributed
as a business.

My view is, that given the horrible things the Jewish nation went through, it's
a sin to comercialise this information. It should be FREE for all the Jewish
people (survivors and descendants), available at all times. So there should
not be even a tiny excuse for forgetting.

Of course, one will say, there are expenses to keep it updated, FREE, etc. I
think there are so many good people in the Jewish nation, all over the world.
People who donate generously for many Jewish causes. I am sure some of
them would agree to sustain such a historical national project.

Moreover, such a project should comprise all the regions (not Slovakia only).
I wonder all the time how much resources and energy is invested in/by so
many organizations, Data Bases, lists, printed volumes. Yet there is no one
national accumulated source AND FREE.

It is a pity.

Wishing you all a nice weekend.


Israel Holdengraeber
Hadera - ISRAEL
e-mail: bpih@infolink.net.il
----------------------
Feed the hungry of the world. Visit daily here:
http://www.thehungersite.com/


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: REGISTER OF ALL PERSONS SAVED FROM ANTIJEWISH PERSECUTION IN-SLOVAKIa #hungary

Israel Holdengraeber <bpih@...>
 

As long as the content of the volumes isn't final (will they ever be?), it's
useless to purchase.

However it does make sense to transfer them to Data Bases and keep them
updated there. Only this way such things can be kept up-todate
(continuously updated) and perhaps cheaper than printing huge volumes
periodically for distribution.

Then printing volumes can be an additional option for "hard-copy".

Perhaps these volumes (like many other things) are produced and distributed
as a business.

My view is, that given the horrible things the Jewish nation went through, it's
a sin to comercialise this information. It should be FREE for all the Jewish
people (survivors and descendants), available at all times. So there should
not be even a tiny excuse for forgetting.

Of course, one will say, there are expenses to keep it updated, FREE, etc. I
think there are so many good people in the Jewish nation, all over the world.
People who donate generously for many Jewish causes. I am sure some of
them would agree to sustain such a historical national project.

Moreover, such a project should comprise all the regions (not Slovakia only).
I wonder all the time how much resources and energy is invested in/by so
many organizations, Data Bases, lists, printed volumes. Yet there is no one
national accumulated source AND FREE.

It is a pity.

Wishing you all a nice weekend.


Israel Holdengraeber
Hadera - ISRAEL
e-mail: bpih@infolink.net.il
----------------------
Feed the hungry of the world. Visit daily here:
http://www.thehungersite.com/


Minsk 1911 Homeowners List Now On Line from the ABD #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Dear Belarus SIG Members,

The 1911 Minsk City Homeowners list that appeared in the book Ves' Minsk ili
Sputnik po g. Minsku (The Whole Minsk or Guide to the City of Minsk), 1st
edition, by S. M. Yakhimovich, published in Minsk in 1911 by Electric
Typography of S. A. Nekrasov is available for your research. The List with
5,608 entries has been added to the existing 3,316 entries >from the 1889
Minsk City Homeowners list that appeared in the book Spravochnaya Kniga i
Sputnik po Minskoy Gubernii (Information Book and the Guide to Minsk
Gubernia) issued in Minsk in 1889 and compiled by Izrail Abramovich
Bomshtein. The combined database has the surname, given name, patronymic,
street address, comments, and year. More details about the contents of the
database can be found in the Introduction page.

The 1889 and 1911 combined home owners list is part of the All Belarus
Database. To reach the data and perform a search go to the Belarus SIG
homepage http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/ and click on "All Belarus Database"
at the top of the page.

We all owe a debt of gratitude to Vitaly Charny and his parents, Josif and
Fira Charny, who translated, edited, and entered the data for both the 1889
and 1911 homeowners lists. I would also like to thank Michael Tobias and
Warren Blatt for all their technical support that made it possible for us
to use the data on the JewishGen website.

--
David M. Fox
fox@erols.com
Belarus SIG Co-coordinator
Arnold, MD USA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Minsk 1911 Homeowners List Now On Line from the ABD #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Dear Belarus SIG Members,

The 1911 Minsk City Homeowners list that appeared in the book Ves' Minsk ili
Sputnik po g. Minsku (The Whole Minsk or Guide to the City of Minsk), 1st
edition, by S. M. Yakhimovich, published in Minsk in 1911 by Electric
Typography of S. A. Nekrasov is available for your research. The List with
5,608 entries has been added to the existing 3,316 entries >from the 1889
Minsk City Homeowners list that appeared in the book Spravochnaya Kniga i
Sputnik po Minskoy Gubernii (Information Book and the Guide to Minsk
Gubernia) issued in Minsk in 1889 and compiled by Izrail Abramovich
Bomshtein. The combined database has the surname, given name, patronymic,
street address, comments, and year. More details about the contents of the
database can be found in the Introduction page.

The 1889 and 1911 combined home owners list is part of the All Belarus
Database. To reach the data and perform a search go to the Belarus SIG
homepage http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/ and click on "All Belarus Database"
at the top of the page.

We all owe a debt of gratitude to Vitaly Charny and his parents, Josif and
Fira Charny, who translated, edited, and entered the data for both the 1889
and 1911 homeowners lists. I would also like to thank Michael Tobias and
Warren Blatt for all their technical support that made it possible for us
to use the data on the JewishGen website.

--
David M. Fox
fox@erols.com
Belarus SIG Co-coordinator
Arnold, MD USA


Chaim Fredmans' question #dna

bcg <bcg@...>
 

Hi Chaim

You asked:

Q. Since all Jews most likely have common ancestors at some period, how
can a relationship between cousins whose common ancestor lived 200 years
ago be distinguished >from a common ancestor 500 years ago, who was also
the common ancestor of many other unknown "relatives" ?

A. If two people descend >from a common ancestor (500 years ago) , and
no change has taken place in the Loci within either person or family
branch, then it would not be possible at all to distinguish >from cousins
of 200 years ago vs. further back.

Q. How does the system differentiate between families with very common
names such as Freedman ? If I look in the surname index for Freedman can
I narrow the search down in some way, perhaps geographically ?

A. We do not contemplate a geographic narrowing, especially in light of
the fact that Jews in general have a similar DNA fingerprint.

Also using surnames to narrow a search may be helpful in deciding if all
Rothschild's are related but the idea behind a Surnames Database Library
is that all DNA will be compared for matches to see if two people are
related before a surname was adopted by the family. In the current U of
Arizona/Dr. Hammer research project, he is trying to establish a migratory
track for the Jewish community of Europe, so he is actually looking for
the same 11 markers to show up, let's say, in families >from both Germany
and Latvia.

If established, that would point to a family that had migrated >from one
place to another when no paper trail exists to back the fact up.

Bennet Greenspan, FTDNA



"chance favors the educated mind"


DNA Research #DNA Chaim Fredmans' question #dna

bcg <bcg@...>
 

Hi Chaim

You asked:

Q. Since all Jews most likely have common ancestors at some period, how
can a relationship between cousins whose common ancestor lived 200 years
ago be distinguished >from a common ancestor 500 years ago, who was also
the common ancestor of many other unknown "relatives" ?

A. If two people descend >from a common ancestor (500 years ago) , and
no change has taken place in the Loci within either person or family
branch, then it would not be possible at all to distinguish >from cousins
of 200 years ago vs. further back.

Q. How does the system differentiate between families with very common
names such as Freedman ? If I look in the surname index for Freedman can
I narrow the search down in some way, perhaps geographically ?

A. We do not contemplate a geographic narrowing, especially in light of
the fact that Jews in general have a similar DNA fingerprint.

Also using surnames to narrow a search may be helpful in deciding if all
Rothschild's are related but the idea behind a Surnames Database Library
is that all DNA will be compared for matches to see if two people are
related before a surname was adopted by the family. In the current U of
Arizona/Dr. Hammer research project, he is trying to establish a migratory
track for the Jewish community of Europe, so he is actually looking for
the same 11 markers to show up, let's say, in families >from both Germany
and Latvia.

If established, that would point to a family that had migrated >from one
place to another when no paper trail exists to back the fact up.

Bennet Greenspan, FTDNA



"chance favors the educated mind"


Common ancestors for Jewish families #dna

bcg <bcg@...>
 

Hi Gregor

Q1 I would like to ask if there are already Jewish families/surnames,
that have been genetically researched for a common origin, like this
is the case for the SYKES of Oxford professor Sykes.

To the best of my knowledge there haven't been genetic tests to determine
heredity performed on Jewish families, in mass, like Prof. SYKES of Oxford
has performed. As families come the FTDNA Surnames Library we will be
attempting to do just that, however since ours is a voluntary testing
procedure, rather then a recruitment, it will take a little longer.

Q2 Is it possible with the actual genetic knowledge about the Y-chromosome
to research such supposed common origin?

FTDNA feels that the knowledge exists to determine if two people are
descended >from a 'relatively' common ancestor. Too be considered a
common ancestor two people would need to match perfectly on our 11 Loci
test.

Q3 Does already research work exists, which allows some first answers
to the question of a common ancestor for these or other Jewish families
(besides the Cohanim) with a common surname?

Not at this time. As we build the Database that could become a reality.

Bennett Greenspan Family Tree DNA,


DNA Research #DNA Common ancestors for Jewish families #dna

bcg <bcg@...>
 

Hi Gregor

Q1 I would like to ask if there are already Jewish families/surnames,
that have been genetically researched for a common origin, like this
is the case for the SYKES of Oxford professor Sykes.

To the best of my knowledge there haven't been genetic tests to determine
heredity performed on Jewish families, in mass, like Prof. SYKES of Oxford
has performed. As families come the FTDNA Surnames Library we will be
attempting to do just that, however since ours is a voluntary testing
procedure, rather then a recruitment, it will take a little longer.

Q2 Is it possible with the actual genetic knowledge about the Y-chromosome
to research such supposed common origin?

FTDNA feels that the knowledge exists to determine if two people are
descended >from a 'relatively' common ancestor. Too be considered a
common ancestor two people would need to match perfectly on our 11 Loci
test.

Q3 Does already research work exists, which allows some first answers
to the question of a common ancestor for these or other Jewish families
(besides the Cohanim) with a common surname?

Not at this time. As we build the Database that could become a reality.

Bennett Greenspan Family Tree DNA,


Madison, from Minsk #belarus

Alice6731@...
 

Searching for information on Max Madison who, I was told, came to America in
1880. Madison does not sound like a Jewish name. Can anyone give any ideas
how this name may have originated?

Alice


Belarus SIG #Belarus Madison, from Minsk #belarus

Alice6731@...
 

Searching for information on Max Madison who, I was told, came to America in
1880. Madison does not sound like a Jewish name. Can anyone give any ideas
how this name may have originated?

Alice


What is origin of the name Galicia? #galicia

JPFELS@...
 

I am new to this and have been wondering where the name "Galicia" comes
from.

Is it related to Galicia in Spain?

Thank you
Joan Peters
<jpfels@aol.com>
researching: FELSENHARDT, THALER, GOTTHOFFER


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia What is origin of the name Galicia? #galicia

JPFELS@...
 

I am new to this and have been wondering where the name "Galicia" comes
from.

Is it related to Galicia in Spain?

Thank you
Joan Peters
<jpfels@aol.com>
researching: FELSENHARDT, THALER, GOTTHOFFER


Salt Lake City and Latvia #general

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

Salt Lake City is the venue for the Annual Conference. It would be very
good to have a good turnout of Latvian researchers.. There will be a SIG
meeting on the Sunday with opportunity to Network with others researching
similar shtetlach or names.
Dr Bramie Lenhoff will present an update on the All Latvia Database.
Latvia SIG is hosting a Latvia SIG lunch on the Tuesday at which Mike Getz
will talk about "Moments in Genealogy"
The fact that we have a Latvia SIG is due to Mike and he has extensive
knowledge of Latvia and genealogy. It would be so nice to give him the
support he deserves.
Arlene Beare
Moderator Latvia SIG


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Salt Lake City and Latvia #general

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

Salt Lake City is the venue for the Annual Conference. It would be very
good to have a good turnout of Latvian researchers.. There will be a SIG
meeting on the Sunday with opportunity to Network with others researching
similar shtetlach or names.
Dr Bramie Lenhoff will present an update on the All Latvia Database.
Latvia SIG is hosting a Latvia SIG lunch on the Tuesday at which Mike Getz
will talk about "Moments in Genealogy"
The fact that we have a Latvia SIG is due to Mike and he has extensive
knowledge of Latvia and genealogy. It would be so nice to give him the
support he deserves.
Arlene Beare
Moderator Latvia SIG


* interesting findings #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Two documents, discovered by a researcher in Hungary, indicate new
sources of information and searching. Also, they point to something I
wasn't aware off, namely that Jews living in Slovakia in around 1790
were already using family names. Here is what I discovered:

1) Two Conscriptio Judeorum exist - one for 1791/1792 the other for
1831/1832, which seemingly were not filmed by the Mormons. I have no
clue where the person who sent me the copies found these documents,
but they certainly must exist in the Hungarian archives. Maybe Gyuri
Ujlaki can shed some light on this.

2) I got one page of the 1791/1792 conscription for Liptovsky Mikulas
(Lipto Szent Miklos). All persons listed carry family names already!
Quite surprising, given that Joseph 2nd's decree was passed only a
few years earlier (1786 if I'm correct).

Here are the names found on that single page:

BAUM
BEER
BERGER <- quite likely my gggf
BRANDEL
BRAUCHER
DEMINA
DINER
ESEL
FIDTENDER
FINACIA <- quite likely my ggggf
FRENKEL
FRIDL
GROSSMAN
GROSSMAN
HASZ
HENTZEL
KERCZER
KLEIN
LUX
MUNKESS
OX
PINKUSS
RENKEL
SCHIFF
SEMANDEL
SPITZ
TAUBER
TELYEZ
VEISER
VEISZ
VIXLER
VOLFF

regards
Tom
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary * interesting findings #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Two documents, discovered by a researcher in Hungary, indicate new
sources of information and searching. Also, they point to something I
wasn't aware off, namely that Jews living in Slovakia in around 1790
were already using family names. Here is what I discovered:

1) Two Conscriptio Judeorum exist - one for 1791/1792 the other for
1831/1832, which seemingly were not filmed by the Mormons. I have no
clue where the person who sent me the copies found these documents,
but they certainly must exist in the Hungarian archives. Maybe Gyuri
Ujlaki can shed some light on this.

2) I got one page of the 1791/1792 conscription for Liptovsky Mikulas
(Lipto Szent Miklos). All persons listed carry family names already!
Quite surprising, given that Joseph 2nd's decree was passed only a
few years earlier (1786 if I'm correct).

Here are the names found on that single page:

BAUM
BEER
BERGER <- quite likely my gggf
BRANDEL
BRAUCHER
DEMINA
DINER
ESEL
FIDTENDER
FINACIA <- quite likely my ggggf
FRENKEL
FRIDL
GROSSMAN
GROSSMAN
HASZ
HENTZEL
KERCZER
KLEIN
LUX
MUNKESS
OX
PINKUSS
RENKEL
SCHIFF
SEMANDEL
SPITZ
TAUBER
TELYEZ
VEISER
VEISZ
VIXLER
VOLFF

regards
Tom
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Gene links to diseases within families #dna

Drexler <asleuth@...>
 

I have been trying to track genetic links for my family for a number of
years but until now have run into a blank wall. I have found several
diseases which appear to run in certain branches of the family tree, but
have no way of pinpointing it to one perticular ancestor.
Would this DNA testing help me to link the people with the same surname
with one of these diseases?

To date I have come close but not an exact match for all branches with
that surname (different spellings but all >from the same family).
Would this help to verify that families with the same surname are
members of the same family if they have the same genetic traits for
these diseases?

Anita Drexler
Miami, Florida


DNA Research #DNA Gene links to diseases within families #dna

Drexler <asleuth@...>
 

I have been trying to track genetic links for my family for a number of
years but until now have run into a blank wall. I have found several
diseases which appear to run in certain branches of the family tree, but
have no way of pinpointing it to one perticular ancestor.
Would this DNA testing help me to link the people with the same surname
with one of these diseases?

To date I have come close but not an exact match for all branches with
that surname (different spellings but all >from the same family).
Would this help to verify that families with the same surname are
members of the same family if they have the same genetic traits for
these diseases?

Anita Drexler
Miami, Florida


A most welcome gift! #dna

Elsebeth Paikin
 

The DNA Project is a most welcome gift for "One Name" Researchers!

I have besides my "normal" genealogical research been conducting
a "One Name" research on the name PAIKIN, which appears to be
relatively rare - and consistently spelled the same way >from the
first records in the beginning of the 19th century. I have
information about a number of PAIKIN families and have am please
that I succeeded twice in reuniting two branches of the two
families (they had no knowledge of the existence of the other
branch, but did have some family legends, that gave me the clue
that they were indeed the same family - and it was proved by
documents found!).

However, I have not been so lucky (yet!) with my "own" family,
but have requested research made in Belarus and Latvia (no luck
yet). I have nevertheless several clues that make it more than
likely that "my" family is closely related to two other branches.

Furthermore, as an historian I hope that those who do take the DNA
test will also give permission to Dr. Mike Hammer to use the tests
for his endeavour to map the meandering paths of the Jewish
migration.
Read more about that on
http://www.familytreedna.com/projects.html
That would eventually also prove a great help for all Jewish Genners.

I therefore welcome the DNA Project hoping that it will help me
ubstantiate these links by getting members of the various branches
to take the DNA test. It will be a low cost compared to the great
sums I have already spent on more or less successful research in
the archives in the former Soviet Union, in Europe and in the US.

So: THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR A GREAT INITIATIVE!
AND BEST WISHES FOR POSITIVE RESULTS TO ALL!

P.S.:
Permit me to add, that had it not been for JewishGen, I would
still be lost in the veils of ignorance. Only through the help
of JewishGen and its number of databases, tools, etc., and
contacts with other JewishGenners did I get where I am now.

Best regards

Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark
Coordinator of The Paikin Genealogy Project
http://home.worldonline.dk/~epaikin/paikin.htm
ShtetLink: http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/dagda/dagda.htm
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk
----------------------------------------------


DNA Research #DNA A most welcome gift! #dna

Elsebeth Paikin
 

The DNA Project is a most welcome gift for "One Name" Researchers!

I have besides my "normal" genealogical research been conducting
a "One Name" research on the name PAIKIN, which appears to be
relatively rare - and consistently spelled the same way >from the
first records in the beginning of the 19th century. I have
information about a number of PAIKIN families and have am please
that I succeeded twice in reuniting two branches of the two
families (they had no knowledge of the existence of the other
branch, but did have some family legends, that gave me the clue
that they were indeed the same family - and it was proved by
documents found!).

However, I have not been so lucky (yet!) with my "own" family,
but have requested research made in Belarus and Latvia (no luck
yet). I have nevertheless several clues that make it more than
likely that "my" family is closely related to two other branches.

Furthermore, as an historian I hope that those who do take the DNA
test will also give permission to Dr. Mike Hammer to use the tests
for his endeavour to map the meandering paths of the Jewish
migration.
Read more about that on
http://www.familytreedna.com/projects.html
That would eventually also prove a great help for all Jewish Genners.

I therefore welcome the DNA Project hoping that it will help me
ubstantiate these links by getting members of the various branches
to take the DNA test. It will be a low cost compared to the great
sums I have already spent on more or less successful research in
the archives in the former Soviet Union, in Europe and in the US.

So: THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR A GREAT INITIATIVE!
AND BEST WISHES FOR POSITIVE RESULTS TO ALL!

P.S.:
Permit me to add, that had it not been for JewishGen, I would
still be lost in the veils of ignorance. Only through the help
of JewishGen and its number of databases, tools, etc., and
contacts with other JewishGenners did I get where I am now.

Best regards

Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark
Coordinator of The Paikin Genealogy Project
http://home.worldonline.dk/~epaikin/paikin.htm
ShtetLink: http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/dagda/dagda.htm
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk
----------------------------------------------